August 29, 2016 eClips Weekend Edition

State Library eClips

* Which state sends the most college students to Oregon?
* 8 takeaways from ‘Draining Oregon’: The big water giveaway
* Ellen Rosenblum takes a stand against free speech — Opinion
* Ocean will close to salmon fishing off the mouth of the Columbia River
* The wait will be worth it for the right environment agency head — Opinion
* I want equitable education for every child, so I’m voting no on Measure 97 — Guest Opinion
* By protecting forage fish, Oregon can help boost ocean health — Guest Opinion
* ITT Tech is ‘risky’ and can’t enroll new students on financial aid, feds say
* Judge quashes Ryan Bundy’s subpoena of Gov. Kate Brown
* Field burning problems aren’t over in Marion County
* More planning than kit building this week
* Crews gain ground on forest fire burning west of Junction City
* Be prepared totally for 2017 solar eclipse — Guest Opinion
* Framework approved for Oregon’s retirement plan
* Harbor businesses to challenge Terminal 1 homeless shelter
* Marijuana tourism comes to Bend
* Eagle Crest evacuations lifted with fire tamed
* With foster care shortage, teen held in juvenile detention in Deschutes County
* Bend Parkway driven more like a freeway
* Music teacher hiring hits a low note
* Hunting, fishing licenses on sale again in Washington
* Progress made on Willow Fire and Lower Valley Fire
* COIC wants authority to propose taxes
* Redmond horse tests positive for West Nile
* Trout return to North Twin Lake
* Editorial: Gov. Brown exposes weaknesses in public records law — Opinion
* Editorial: When a pot winner needs to remain hidden — Opinion
* Column: Texting, speeding, and cheap gas are killing more of us — Guest Opinion
* Federal Rules Clear Path For New Oregon Retirement Plans
* Oregon Says 5,000 Taxpayers Are Owed $1 Million
* Cannabis Business Groups Sponsor Event To Help Clear Convictions
* Crews Mopping Up High Pass Fire In Lane County
* Friends of Family Farmers wants shift in ODA direction
* FAA authorizes Pendleton UAS Range to fly higher
* State recognizes Morrow-Grant OHV Park
* Op-ed: B2H transmission line moves forward — Guest Opinion
* Other views: Columbia River talks need to get going — Guest Opinion
* As fire nears containment; more campgrounds open
* Possible ODFW license hack reveals how tax fraud can occur
* Anglers push for renewing Holy Water fishery by stocking larger trout
* Alleged hacker claims he may sell game licensees’ information
* Cleveland Ridge fire burning down to its final embers
* Since You Asked: Rumble strips will be back on Interstate 5
* Guest Opinion: Tribal casino should not be allowed in Medford — Guest Opinion
* Guest Opinion: Our children are sleeping in state offices — Guest Opinion
* Protest filed over dam removal vote
* Ocean salmon season closes from Cape Falcon to Leadbetter Point
* Small quake hits near Baker City
* More West Nile found
* Fire crews save historic lookout
* Rail Fire expands to the south
* Our View: Immigration reform will require courage — Opinion
* Union County, USFS enter agreement
* Charter district has potential for lasting impact in region
* New Elgin ag classroom, shop should be finished in October
* West Nile makes it to Union County
* ODOT will fund 3 projects
* MY VOICE: Canyonlands need protection — Guest Opinion
* OUR VIEW: Hey, lets be safe out there — Opinion
* State mailed extra ballots
* Roseburg Public School completes lead testing
* Lower Nehalem Watershed Council invites community to join annual BBQ, tour McDonald Slough Reconnection project
* Wallowa County ready for new state mental health requirements
* Crews battling new wildfire near Halfway
* Quick response keeps Alder Slope fire to a minimum
* Wallowa Lake State Park campground replacing bathrooms
* Drive Oregon to open EV showroom in prominent downtown spot — Blog
* Unintended Consequence of Measure 97 Could Send $100 Million A Year to Transportation
* Hacker claims breach of Oregon hunting and fishing database
* Test all blood for Zika? FDA runs into criticism in Seattle
* Medicaid Bill Coming Due, with Few Answers Outside Big Tax Measure
* Doctors Raise Concerns For Small Practices In Medicares New Payment System
* Report For State Insurance Commissioners Offers Options To Improve Drug Access
* OHSU President and Moda CEO Having Friendly Discussions
* Is Centene Corp. on the Move In Oregon?
* Oregon’s Ambulatory Surgery Centers Reveal Large Cost Variations

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WHICH STATE SENDS THE MOST COLLEGE STUDENTS TO OREGON? (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/08/are_oregonians_fleeing_the_sta.html#incart_river_index

More than twice as many freshman came to Oregon for a public college education compared to the number of those who left the state for school in 2014, according to a New York Times analysis.

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8 TAKEAWAYS FROM ‘DRAINING OREGON’: THE BIG WATER GIVEAWAY (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2016/08/draining_oregon_series_summary.html#incart_river_index

Something seemed amiss in Harney County last summer, long before it became the scene of January’s armed standoff at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

After years of liberally granting access to underground water across the high desert of southeastern Oregon, the state abruptly told irrigators it would accept no new applications to pump wells.

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ELLEN ROSENBLUM TAKES A STAND AGAINST FREE SPEECH — OPINION (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/08/ellen_rosenblums_takes_a_stand.html#incart_river_index

As legal briefs go, there’s not much surprising in the arguments offered by Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum’s office. The filing backs Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian’s finding that a Christian-owned bakery violated Oregon’s anti-discrimination statute when it refused to make a wedding cake for a lesbian couple.

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OCEAN WILL CLOSE TO SALMON FISHING OFF THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/sports/oregonian/bill_monroe/index.ssf/2016/08/ocean_will_close_to_salmon_fis.html#incart_river_index

All ocean salmon fishing off the mouth of the Columbia River will close Saturday evening.

The closure area is between Cape Falcon, near Manzanita, and Leadbetter Point, Wash.

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THE WAIT WILL BE WORTH IT FOR THE RIGHT ENVIRONMENT AGENCY HEAD — OPINION (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/08/the_wait_will_be_worth_it_for.html

Jobs come and go. But not the top spot at Oregon’s Department of Environmental Quality, without a permanent leader for months and with little prospect of having one soon. Despite the civic emergency this year of toxics in Portland’s air and the demands ahead of a complex Superfund cleanup of Portland Harbor, however, the delay can be used wisely.

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I WANT EQUITABLE EDUCATION FOR EVERY CHILD, SO I’M VOTING NO ON MEASURE 97 — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/08/i_want_equitable_education_for.html

Every Oregon child deserves access to an equitable public education.

We have persistently low graduation rates, major student achievement disparities and real holes in our cradle-to-career continuum.

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BY PROTECTING FORAGE FISH, OREGON CAN HELP BOOST OCEAN HEALTH — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/08/by_protecting_forage_fish_oreg.html

It’s not every day that representatives of commercial fishing, sport fishing, and conservation organizations can find common ground. Yet when it comes to maintaining a cornerstone of a healthy Pacific Ocean, the three of us are in full agreement.

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ITT TECH IS ‘RISKY’ AND CAN’T ENROLL NEW STUDENTS ON FINANCIAL AID, FEDS SAY (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/08/feds_crack_down_on_itt_tech_sa.html

Federal education leaders on Thursday banned ITT Tech, a for-profit chain with branches in 38 states, from enrolling new students who rely on federal financial aid to attend the college.

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JUDGE QUASHES RYAN BUNDY’S SUBPOENA OF GOV. KATE BROWN (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/oregon-standoff/2016/08/judge_quashes_ryan_bundys_subp.html

A federal judge has granted Oregon Gov. Kate Brown’s motion to quash a subpoena issued by Ryan Bundy that demanded her presence as a witness for next month’s Oregon standoff trial.

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FIELD BURNING PROBLEMS AREN’T OVER IN MARION COUNTY (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2016/08/26/field-burning-problems-arent-over-marion-county/88002380/

At least six times in the past four years, thick smoke from field burning has covered roads in communities east of Salem, while required flaggers and signs were absent.

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MORE PLANNING THAN KIT BUILDING THIS WEEK (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/local/earthquake/2016/08/27/more-planning-than-kit-building-week/89370584/

This week’s kit additions build on supplies already included in the kit.

Disaster preparedness folks at the American Red Cross Cascades Region recommend adding another large can of fruit, packed in its own juice if possible, one can of meat or chicken, such as Spam or Underwood chicken spread or tuna in cans or pouches, along with another large can of vegetables.

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CREWS GAIN GROUND ON FOREST FIRE BURNING WEST OF JUNCTION CITY (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/34739194-75/crews-gain-ground-on-forest-fire-burning-west-of-junction-city.html.csp

Thanks to favorable weather conditions, the High Pass 12.5 Fire, a forest fire burning in rugged terrain 10 miles west of Junction City, was 35 percent contained Saturday night and active fire behavior was deemed over, according to Oregon Department of Forestry spokeswoman Ashley Lertora.

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BE PREPARED TOTALLY FOR 2017 SOLAR ECLIPSE — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/opinion/34724862-78/be-prepared–totally–for-2017-solar-eclipse.html.csp

In less than a year, a long-awaited total solar eclipse, perhaps the most beautiful sight in nature, will make landfall in Oregon, crossing 14 states in all before leaving in South Carolina. While the entire country will see some portion of the sun covered by the moon, the path of totality, where the sun is completely covered, will be only 60 to 70 miles wide. Here in Oregon, totality will last from a few seconds at the edge of the path to two minutes, nine seconds on the centerline at the Idaho border.

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FRAMEWORK APPROVED FOR OREGON’S RETIREMENT PLAN (Portland Tribune) http://pamplinmedia.com/but/239-news/319920-199127-framework-approved-for-oregons-retirement-plan

-Employer feedback helps design key elements of landmark retirement savings plan-

A simple IRA retirement plan is what Fotis Lanaras, owner of Portland-based Hercules Construction, offers his three employees.

Only one guy adds money to his retirement on top of what we give, the others dont, Lanaras said. It is easy, very inexpensive, but we have to contribute to all even if they dont themselves.

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HARBOR BUSINESSES TO CHALLENGE TERMINAL 1 HOMELESS SHELTER (Portland Tribune) http://portlandtribune.com/pt/9-news/320400-200071-harbor-businesses-to-challenge-terminal-1-homeless-shelter

A group of businesses in the Portland Harbor plans to challenge the City Councils decision to open a homeless shelter at Terminal 1 before the state Land Use Board of Appeals.

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MARIJUANA TOURISM COMES TO BEND (Bend Bulletin)

http://www.bendbulletin.com/business/4607037-151/marijuana-tourism-comes-to-bend?referrer=carousel9

-Dispensary tour could be icing on the cake-

Look for an open-sided, six-seat, electric touring car making its way along Bend streets starting in September.

It will mark the advent of marijuana tourism, the next phase in a town already a destination for skiers, beer drinkers and bicyclists.

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EAGLE CREST EVACUATIONS LIFTED WITH FIRE TAMED (Bend Bulletin)

http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4615088-151/some-eagle-crest-evacuations-ordered-because-of-brush?referrer=carousel10

Crews were mopping up a brush fire Saturday night in the Deschutes River Canyon that caused evacuations and closed Cline Falls State Park.

Residents of 67 condominiums and 10 single-family homes in the Eagle Crest Resort near the park west of Redmond were evacuated Saturday afternoon, and were allowed to return Saturday night, according to a news release from the Deschutes County Sheriffs Office and Redmond Fire and Rescue.

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WITH FOSTER CARE SHORTAGE, TEEN HELD IN JUVENILE DETENTION IN DESCHUTES COUNTY (Bend Bulletin)

http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4610335-151/with-foster-care-shortage-teen-held-in-juvenile?referrer=carousel11

-State is also putting up children in hotel rooms and state offices-

Oregon’s shortage of families willing to accept children who are in need of homes has led to a troubling reality: Not only is the state putting children in hotel rooms and state offices because homes are scarce, juvenile detention is an option, too.

In at least one case in Deschutes County, a teenage boy was held in juvenile detention for nearly a month after the state couldnt find an alternative place to house him.

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BEND PARKWAY DRIVEN MORE LIKE A FREEWAY (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4611996-151/bend-parkway-driven-more-like-a-freeway

-Why its speed limit is 45 mph, which often goes ignored-

The speed limit on the Bend Parkway is 45 mph but is almost universally ignored.

Peter Murphy, spokesman for the Oregon Department of Transportation in Bend, recalled a fellow motorist who rolled down his window and shouted at him while passing.

Nobody drives 45 on the parkway.

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MUSIC TEACHER HIRING HITS A LOW NOTE (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4612839-151/music-teacher-hiring-hits-a-low-note

-Orchestra teachers are hard to come by. Just ask Bend-

Heaven help the middle school principal trying to fill an orchestra teacher position.

Stephanie Bennett at Cascade Middle School in Bend spent all summer trying to find a suitable candidate after her schools full-time orchestra teacher, who also taught at Pacific Crest Middle School and Summit High School, resigned and moved out of state.

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HUNTING, FISHING LICENSES ON SALE AGAIN IN WASHINGTON (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4615128-151/hunting-fishing-licenses-on-sale-again-in-washington#

Hunting and fishing licenses are on sale again in Washington state, after someone hacked or attempted to hack into an outside vendors system, exposing several million records containing the personal information of hunters and anglers throughout the Northwest.

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PROGRESS MADE ON WILLOW FIRE AND LOWER VALLEY FIRE (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4614743-151/progress-made-on-willow-fire-and-lower-valley

Firefighters are continuing to make progress on two wildfires burning in Central Oregon.

The Willow Fire, 8 miles northwest of Madras, has burned 150 acres and is 30 percent contained, according to a news release from the Central Oregon Fire Info group.

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COIC WANTS AUTHORITY TO PROPOSE TAXES (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4612542-151/coic-wants-authority-to-propose-taxes

-Money would go to improving regional transit system-

To improve its service, the operator of a regional transit system is asking for authority to propose tax levies to voters.

Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council operates Cascades East Transit, in addition to providing economic development, alternative education, employment and job training.

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REDMOND HORSE TESTS POSITIVE FOR WEST NILE (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4612584-151/redmond-horse-tests-positive-for-west-nile

-Positive serves as warning that local mosquitoes are infected-

A Redmond horse has tested positive for West Nile Virus, the first reported animal case in Deschutes County this year. The virus is spread to animals and humans by mosquitoes, and infected birds, livestock and pets often serve as sentinel warnings.

The affected horse is a 14-year-old mare with no history of West Nile vaccination.

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TROUT RETURN TO NORTH TWIN LAKE (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4612837-151/trout-return-to-north-twin-lake

-State restocks after killing off catfish-

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife put a few thousand rainbow trout into North Twin Lake on Friday after poisoning the lake last fall to kill off brown bullhead catfish.

ODFWs first truckload deposited about 2,500 fish and the second load brought more than 1,000. The fish range from about a half-pound to 2 pounds and from about 10 inches to more than 16 inches.

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EDITORIAL: GOV. BROWN EXPOSES WEAKNESSES IN PUBLIC RECORDS LAW — OPINION (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/4612309-151/editorial-gov-brown-exposes-weaknesses-in-public-records

Nobody should know better the weaknesses in Oregon’s public records law than Gov. Kate Brown.

Those weaknesses just helped her office win a public records case with the software company Oracle.

The state of Oregon and Oracle are battling over whos to blame for Cover Oregons failure. Oracle wants access to emails by former Gov. John Kitzhaber as part of that case.

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EDITORIAL: WHEN A POT WINNER NEEDS TO REMAIN HIDDEN — OPINION (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/4612314-151/editorial-when-a-pot-winner-needs-to-remain

Oregon is first in all sorts of things, from being the first to legalize doctor-assisted suicide to being first in fungus. Something called armillaria solidipes covers 2,384 acres in the Malheur National Forest, according to Scientific American.

Now we have another first: The Oregon State Fair, which runs to Sept. 5 in Salem, is the first of its kind to have cannabis on display.

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COLUMN: TEXTING, SPEEDING, AND CHEAP GAS ARE KILLING MORE OF US — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/4612576-151/column-texting-speeding-and-cheap-gas-are-killing

I had a friend in college who saw the good in most things despite evidence to the contrary. She believed passionately that the federal government had imposed a 55 mph speed limit in the 1970s to save lives. She lost the bet  and maybe a little faith in government?  when she learned that it had been done to save gas.

So here we are in 2016, and the National Safety Council has issued a report this week saying that traffic fatalities have risen dramatically for the second consecutive year  an estimated 9 percent more over just the first six months this year. It seems almost quaint these days to think the government would do anything to change that, unless theres another oil embargo.

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FEDERAL RULES CLEAR PATH FOR NEW OREGON RETIREMENT PLANS (Oregon Public Broadcasting) http://www.opb.org/news/article/oregon-retirement-plans-federal-rules/

A new state-sponsored retirement plan for private-sector workers in Oregon has cleared a key federal hurdle.

The U.S. Department of Labor finalized rules Thursday that allow Oregons plan to debut next July.

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OREGON SAYS 5,000 TAXPAYERS ARE OWED $1 MILLION (Oregon Public Broadcasting) http://www.opb.org/news/article/oregon-taxpayers-owed-money/

Earlier this summer, the state of Oregon notified more than 7,000 taxpayers that they had a combined $1.5 million to claim.

A couple of thousand people did claim about $500,000. But Bob Estabrook with the Oregon Department of Revenue says theres still plenty of unclaimed money.

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CANNABIS BUSINESS GROUPS SPONSOR EVENT TO HELP CLEAR CONVICTIONS (Oregon Public Broadcasting) http://www.opb.org/news/article/clear-marijuana-conviction-oregon-cannabis-business/

Dozens of people signed up for a free clinic in Portland Saturday that offered to help clear marijuana convictions from their records.

Oregon law allows some people whove been convicted of drug crimes to have their criminal records sealed and set aside, if at least three years have gone by since the conviction.

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CREWS MOPPING UP HIGH PASS FIRE IN LANE COUNTY (Jefferson Public Radio)

http://ijpr.org/post/crews-mopping-high-pass-fire-lane-county#stream/0

The crews have made tremendous progress in mopping up this fire. They have spent the last several days working to extinguish all smokes around the rim of the fire. In most places crews have a 200 feet zone and are working towards 400 feet.

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FRIENDS OF FAMILY FARMERS WANTS SHIFT IN ODA DIRECTION (Capital Press) http://www.capitalpress.com/Oregon/20160826/friends-of-family-farmers-wants-shift-in-oda-direction

Don’t count Friends of Family Farmers among the groups praising the legacy of Katy Coba, the departing director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

In a prepared statement, the Salem-based advocacy group said Coba has overseen a growing shift towards promoting large, corporate, factory-scale farming operations in Oregon even as the state has been losing small and mid-sized family farms in large numbers.

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FAA AUTHORIZES PENDLETON UAS RANGE TO FLY HIGHER (East Oregonian) http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/local-news/20160826/faa-authorizes-pendleton-uas-range-to-fly-higher

The Federal Aviation Administration just gave the Pendleton Unmanned Aerial Systems Range its competitive advantage back.

The range announced Thursday that the FAA has granted Pendleton authorization to fly large drones as high as 9,999 feet, day or night, as long as they remain in visual line of sight of the operator.

The authorization covers all 14,000 square miles of the range and applies to both small drones and UAS weighing more than 55 pounds.

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STATE RECOGNIZES MORROW-GRANT OHV PARK (East Oregonian) http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/local-news/20160826/state-recognizes-morrow-grant-ohv-park

Oregon State Parks celebrated the 30th anniversary of its all-terrain vehicle program by honoring some of the most successful projects for four-wheelers across the state.

Program officials gathered Thursday at the Morrow-Grant OHV Park south of Heppner, where they presented a plaque to Morrow County Parks and spent the afternoon riding the trails.

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OP-ED: B2H TRANSMISSION LINE MOVES FORWARD — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian) http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/editorials/20160826/op-ed-b2h-transmission-line-moves-forward

The Boardman to Hemingway Transmission Line Project is moving forward to meet the energy needs of the Pacific Northwest region. Since 2002, Idaho Power has regularly analyzed the need for this regional transmission connection. Analysis shows the need for the project is still strong and the project will benefit the entire area by allowing more electricity to move throughout the Pacific Northwest.

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OTHER VIEWS: COLUMBIA RIVER TALKS NEED TO GET GOING — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian) http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/editorials/20160826/other-views-columbia-river-talks-need-to-get-going

Our Northwest congressional delegation has pleaded with federal State Department officials since 2014 to set up a process so the U.S. and Canada can renegotiate the Columbia River Treaty.

And time and again the request seems to go nowhere. We hope the lawmakers latest appeal finally will lead to some action.

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AS FIRE NEARS CONTAINMENT; MORE CAMPGROUNDS OPEN (Argus Observer) http://www.argusobserver.com/news/as-fire-nears-containment-more-campgrounds-open/article_0dde4ed6-6ae7-11e6-8088-5b5a4b79622f.html

The Cherry Road Fire is nearly out.

Some resources which have been used on the fire have been released, as containment of the blaze has reached 85 percent.

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POSSIBLE ODFW LICENSE HACK REVEALS HOW TAX FRAUD CAN OCCUR (Medford Mail Tribune)

http://www.mailtribune.com/article/20160826/NEWS/160829722

Computer breaches like the one feared this week inside a vendor selling hunting and fishing licenses for Oregon and other states typically target Social Security numbers to file bogus income-tax returns that stiff the government and give victims headaches, federal agents say.

About two-thirds of all identity theft cases these days are fraudulent tax returns usually sniffed out by Internal Revenue Service computer filters. But innocent citizens are often surprised to learn that crooks need just your name and Social Security number to file fake returns, the IRS says.

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ANGLERS PUSH FOR RENEWING HOLY WATER FISHERY BY STOCKING LARGER TROUT (Medford Mail Tribune) http://www.mailtribune.com/news/20160828/anglers-push-for-renewing-holy-water-fishery-by-stocking-larger-trout

Anglers say stocking larger trout below Lost Creek Dam will bring back the…

Peter Ware looks back longingly to the late 1980s for the kind of fishing days that earned this short stretch of the Rogue River below Lost Creek dam the name “Holy Water.”

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ALLEGED HACKER CLAIMS HE MAY SELL GAME LICENSEES’ INFORMATION (Medford Mail Tribune)

http://www.mailtribune.com/article/20160827/NEWS/160829698

A computer hacker calling himself “Mr. High” claims he stole and may sell names and other personal identification from nearly 1.2 million people who bought Oregon hunting and fishing licenses through a private vendor.

While Mr. High did not acquire Social Security numbers of Oregon license holders, he claims to have names, birth dates, Social Security numbers and other personal information from nearly 800,000 similar licensees in Idaho. Federal officials say that puts them at risk of future identity theft and tax fraud if the information fell into cyber-thieves’ hands.

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CLEVELAND RIDGE FIRE BURNING DOWN TO ITS FINAL EMBERS (Medford Mail Tribune)

http://www.mailtribune.com/article/20160827/NEWS/160829701

Firefighters say the Cleveland Ridge fire that ignited Monday north of Shady Cove is now down to a limited number of hot spots and firefighter resources are being shifted elsewhere.

According to a press release from the Oregon Department of Forestry, today’s objective is “to put out all hot spots within 300 feet of the fire line, and go farther when it is warranted.”

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SINCE YOU ASKED: RUMBLE STRIPS WILL BE BACK ON INTERSTATE 5 (Medford Mail Tribune)

http://www.mailtribune.com/news/20160829/since-you-asked-rumble-strips-will-be-back-on-interstate-5

Q: Why did the highway department fill in the safety rumble strips to the right of I-5? They were a blessing for drowsy drivers.

A: And drowsy drivers will continue to be blessed, eventually, Jerry.

According to Gary Leaming, a spokesman for the Oregon Department of Transportation, the rumble strips along the outside edges of the freeway traffic lanes will be back.

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GUEST OPINION: TRIBAL CASINO SHOULD NOT BE ALLOWED IN MEDFORD — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune) http://www.mailtribune.com/opinion/20160828/guest-opinion-tribal-casino-should-not-be-allowed-in-medford

Its a simple question: Should the Coquille Tribe be allowed to build and operate a Class II casino In Medford? The answer is just as simple: no.

If you’re reading this, you probably already share that opinion, but your wishes and the wishes of the vast majority of the people in the Rogue Valley are in imminent danger of being ignored.

Why shouldn’t the casino be allowed?

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GUEST OPINION: OUR CHILDREN ARE SLEEPING IN STATE OFFICES — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune) http://www.mailtribune.com/opinion/20160828/guest-opinion-our-children-are-sleeping-in-state-offices

Tonight, children in Oregon’s foster care system will sleep on cots in state offices. Others will sleep in motels, supervised by caseworkers. For some, this has been the situation for weeks.

The lack of foster homes and therapeutic placements for traumatized children has reached a crisis level and Oregon’s most vulnerable children are paying an exorbitant price. No parent would support this arrangement for his or her own children and we, as juvenile court judges, are calling on state and local governments to immediately address this crisis and for more Oregonians to become foster parents.

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PROTEST FILED OVER DAM REMOVAL VOTE (Herald and News) http://www.heraldandnews.com/news/local_news/protest-filed-over-dam-removal-vote/article_8ea8b65f-ac41-5a8f-9469-58c6b5abfebe.html

A protest over the wording of an advisory ballot issue regarding removal of four dams on the Klamath River has been filed by a group of Basin farmers.

The Klamath County Commissioners last week voted 2 to 1 to place the advisory issue before voters on the Nov. 8 ballot. It asks voters simply if the dams should be kept or removed. The vote does not have the force of law, and is simply advisory.

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OCEAN SALMON SEASON CLOSES FROM CAPE FALCON TO LEADBETTER POINT (Daily Astorian) http://www.dailyastorian.com/Free/20160826/ocean-salmon-season-closes-from-cape-falcon-to-leadbetter-point

Recreational salmon fishing ends at 11:59 p.m. Saturday in the ocean from Cape Falcon to Leadbetter Point, Wash., under an in-season rule change approved today by NOAA Fisheries after consulting with Oregon and Washington fishery managers.

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SMALL QUAKE HITS NEAR BAKER CITY (Baker City Herald) http://www.bakercityherald.com/news/4612388-151/small-quake-hits-near-baker-city

While earthquakes aren’t common in the Baker Valley, they do happen here.

That was proven Thursday morning as a temblor that registered 2.8 on the Richter scale occurred about six miles north of Baker City according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

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MORE WEST NILE FOUND (Baker City Herald) http://www.bakercityherald.com/news/4607192-151/more-west-nile-found

Last week, the Baker Valley Vector Control District detected four pools of mosquitoes that contained West Nile Virus.

Three of the positive samples were found in Keating Valley, about 15 miles east of Baker City, on Aug. 16.

An additional contaminated pool was collected on the northeast end of Baker City on Aug. 17.

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FIRE CREWS SAVE HISTORIC LOOKOUT (Baker City Herald) http://www.bakercityherald.com/news/4602178-151/fire-crews-save-historic-lookout

Crews fighting the Rail Fire saved the historical Table Rock Lookout from wind driven spot fires that had reached Table Rock where the lookout is located on Sunday.

Were proud to share the good news that fire crews were able to save that historical structure, Fire Information Officer Stephen Baker said.

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RAIL FIRE EXPANDS TO THE SOUTH (Blue Mountain Eagle) http://www.bluemountaineagle.com/Local_News/20160825/rail-fire-expands-to-the-south

The Rail fire near Unity continues to expand to the south while patrols and mop-up operations continue on the northern edge of the blaze. The fire is now 32,840 acres and 47 percent contained, according to a Thursday update from the management team.

Aerial supports intends to drop ping-pong ball sized ignition devices to back burn areas in the fires path. The plastic spherical devices being used are filled with combustible chemicals that ignite when dropped.

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OUR VIEW: IMMIGRATION REFORM WILL REQUIRE COURAGE — OPINION (Blue Mountain Eagle) http://www.bluemountaineagle.com/be/editorials/20160823/our-view-immigration-reform-will-require-courage

There are 12 million stories about those who have illegally immigrated to the U.S. They range from heart-wrenching to opportunistic. Each is different in many ways, and the same in one: Each person broke federal law in getting here.

That’s why the discussion of illegal immigration is so divisive. While many Americans see the people behind the statistics, many counter with, What part of illegal dont you understand?

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UNION COUNTY, USFS ENTER AGREEMENT (LaGrande Observer)

http://www.lagrandeobserver.com/news/local/4612640-151/union-county-usfs-enter-agreement?referrer=carousel4

-Forest Service to lease new rappel building at airport-

The 13,000-square-foot building for the Forest Service rapellers at the La Grande/Union County Airport is planned to be complete by the next fire season, according to Union County Public Works Director Doug Wright.

The rappel team is working out of what we call the old cache building, Wright said. Theyre doing their training, they dispatch out of it and hold their equipment there.

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CHARTER DISTRICT HAS POTENTIAL FOR LASTING IMPACT IN REGION (LaGrande Observer)

http://www.lagrandeobserver.com/outdoors/4612160-151/charter-district-has-potential-for-lasting-impact-in?referrer=carousel8

-Mission would help conserve wild country of Wallowa Mountains-

Americas public lands draw millions of visitors each year from around the world, but many of these places are in desperate need of maintenance. The wild country of the Wallowa Mountains has inspired some of its users to help conserve its vast recreational resources.

For the last couple of years, Donna Mattson of the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest said  she has been working with the Wallowa Mountains Office in Joseph to create a charter district.

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NEW ELGIN AG CLASSROOM, SHOP SHOULD BE FINISHED IN OCTOBER (LaGrande Observer) http://www.lagrandeobserver.com/news/4612748-151/new-elgin-ag-classroom-shop-should-be-finished

The sense of anticipation is growing at Elgin High School.

The construction of a major addition to EHS’s agricultural sciences facility is about six weeks from being completed.

This is a really exciting thing to see, said Daniel Bolen, Elgin High Schools agriculture sciences teacher.

The additions will be composed of a new agricultural sciences classroom and a  major expansion of its manufacturing shop.

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WEST NILE MAKES IT TO UNION COUNTY (LaGrande Observer) http://www.lagrandeobserver.com/news/4607627-151/west-nile-makes-it-to-union-county

-Mosquito-based virus found in a sample taken from the Imbler area-

A mosquito pool sample collected by the Union County Vector Control has tested positive for the West Nile virus, according to a press release Tuesday.

The Center for Human Development Public Health was notified about the sample, which was collected in the Imbler area.

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ODOT WILL FUND 3 PROJECTS (LaGrande Observer) http://www.lagrandeobserver.com/news/4602525-151/odot-will-fund-3-projects

-County receives nearly $2.5 million to fund projects-

Union County received nearly $2.5 million from the Oregon Department of Transportation to fund three projects, according to a release from ODOT.

Nearly $50 million was awarded to 39 multi-modal projects across the state, through the ConnectOregon program.

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MY VOICE: CANYONLANDS NEED PROTECTION — GUEST OPINION (LaGrande Observer) http://www.lagrandeobserver.com/opinion/4612270-151/my-voice-canyonlands-need-protection

I first visited the Owyhee Canyonlands in 1979. Since moving to Bend I had been hearing rumors about a place called Leslie Gulch in Eastern Oregon near the Idaho border. Among other things, I heard it was home to several plants that are found nowhere else in the world. I wanted to see them and explore the dramatic canyons said to be there.

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OUR VIEW: HEY, LETS BE SAFE OUT THERE — OPINION (LaGrande Observer) http://www.lagrandeobserver.com/opinion/4612272-151/our-view-hey-lets-be-safe-out-there

Here are some figures to contemplate  19,100 and $205 billion.

The first figure is the number of Americans that died on American roads between January and June. The other number is the total cost produced by automobile accidents.

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STATE MAILED EXTRA BALLOTS (LaGrande Observer)

http://www.lagrandeobserver.com/news/4612649-151/state-mailed-extra-ballots?referrer=carousel3

-Added cost of extra ballots  partly the result of doing vote by mail  falls to counties-

Oregon printed and sent nearly 100,000 extra ballots during the May primary, more than in any of the recent presidential or midterm elections, state data show.

Of the states nearly 2.3 million registered voters, 96,036 either needed duplicate ballots because they changed parties near the deadline or received one when a county clerk sent an extra ballot by mistake, as happened in one Eastern Oregon county.

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ROSEBURG PUBLIC SCHOOL COMPLETES LEAD TESTING (Douglas County News-Review) http://www.nrtoday.com/news/roseburg-public-school-completes-lead-testing/article_b77ff1ac-d25d-5fda-8d72-3aff95213796.html

In time for the 2016-17 school year that begins in early September, Roseburg Public Schools announced Thursday that it has completed all lead testing for district-wide water fixtures and test results have been recorded.

We feel good about the results and weve had good conversations with public health, said Roseburg Public Schools Superintendent Gerry Washburn.

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LOWER NEHALEM WATERSHED COUNCIL INVITES COMMUNITY TO JOIN ANNUAL BBQ, TOUR MCDONALD SLOUGH RECONNECTION PROJECT (Tillamook County Pioneer) http://www.tillamookcountypioneer.net/lower-nehalem-watershed-council-invites-community-to-join-annual-bbq-tour-mcdonald-slough-reconnection-project/

The Lower Nehalem Watershed Council invites council members, partners, friends, and the public to celebrate their accomplishments and the completion of the McDonald Slough Reconnection project at the groups annual BBQ.

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WALLOWA COUNTY READY FOR NEW STATE MENTAL HEALTH REQUIREMENTS (Wallowa.com) http://www.wallowa.com/local_news/20160828/wallowa-county-ready-for-new-state-mental-health-requirements

A performance plan to address needs of the severely or persistently mentally ill in Oregon has been finalized.

The plan was announced by the Oregon Health Authority in late July and was instituted after lengthy discussions between OHA and the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.

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CREWS BATTLING NEW WILDFIRE NEAR HALFWAY (Wallowa.com) http://www.wallowa.com/local_news/20160828/crews-battling-new-wildfire-near-halfway

Wallowa-Whitman Forest officials on Sunday issued a press release regarding a new wildfire.

The Indian Creek Crossing Fire was reported by Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch Center shortly after 2 p.m. Saturday and is located 15 miles North of Halfway, along the Imnaha River, near Indian Crossing Campground. The fire is currently 85 acres in size and containment is at zero percent. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

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QUICK RESPONSE KEEPS ALDER SLOPE FIRE TO A MINIMUM (Wallowa.com) http://www.wallowa.com/local_news/20160824/quick-response-keeps-alder-slope-fire-to-a-minimum

A quick response from Enterprise Fire Department, Oregon Department of Forestry and passers-by kept a potentially dangerous Alder Slope blaze to a half-acre Wednesday afternoon.

The fire occurred inside a rail fence enclosure about a half-mile up Spring Creek Road.

Fire crews with hoses, chainsaws and shovels worked furiously to contain the blaze as a Sled Springs Rappel chopper circled overhead monitoring the situation.

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WALLOWA LAKE STATE PARK CAMPGROUND REPLACING BATHROOMS (Wallowa.com) http://www.wallowa.com/local_news/20160823/wallowa-lake-stat-park-campground-replacing-bathrooms

As the adage says: When you gotta go, you gotta go, But dont try that at sections B and C at Wallowa Lake State Park campgrounds.

The state just demolished the bathrooms in those sections of the park for replacement. Park Manager Nancy McLeod said current and prospective campers shouldnt worry as campground sections A, D and E still have functioning bathrooms that also have showers and laundry facilities.

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DRIVE OREGON TO OPEN EV SHOWROOM IN PROMINENT DOWNTOWN SPOT — BLOG (Oregon Business Journal) http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/sbo/2016/08/drive-oregon-to-open-ev-showroom-in-prominent.html

Oregon has received a booster shot that should help its longstanding efforts to turn the state into a hub for electric vehicle suppliers and parts manufacturers.

Drive Oregon, the group charged with boosting the industry’s prospects within the Northwest, has collected a $1 million U.S. Department of Energy grant to promote early EV adoption. Among other strategies, the money will be used to help Drive Oregon establish a downtown Portland EV showroom.

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UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCE OF MEASURE 97 COULD SEND $100 MILLION A YEAR TO TRANSPORTATION (Willamette Week) http://www.wweek.com/news/2016/08/26/unintended-consequence-of-measure-97-could-send-100-million-a-year-to-transportation/

-Proposed new tax conflicts with Oregon constitutional requirements that vehicle-related taxes be dedicated to roads.-

The text of Measure 97, the proposed $3 billion corporate tax increase on the November ballot, says that new revenue raised “shall be used,” for education, health care and services for senior citizens.

In legalese, “shall” means must.

But now the Legislature’s leading tax expert says this earmarking of new revenue may not be allowed.

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HACKER CLAIMS BREACH OF OREGON HUNTING AND FISHING DATABASE (KGW)

http://www.kgw.com/news/local/hacker-claims-breach-of-oregon-hunting-and-fishing-database/309486865

Oregon officials say they don’t think personal information has been compromised by a hacking operation that impacted hunting and fishing license databases in four states.

Online sales of licenses have been suspended in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Kentucky following claims from an individual that they obtained information such as Social Security numbers, phone numbers and drivers license information.

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TEST ALL BLOOD FOR ZIKA? FDA RUNS INTO CRITICISM IN SEATTLE (KUOW) http://kuow.org/post/test-all-blood-zika-fda-runs-criticism-seattle

Testing blood donations for the Zika virus doesnt make sense for places like Seattle.

Thats what Dr. James AuBuchon, president and chief executive of Bloodworks Northwest, told KUOWs Kim Malcolm.

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MEDICAID BILL COMING DUE, WITH FEW ANSWERS OUTSIDE BIG TAX MEASURE (The Lund Report) https://www.thelundreport.org/content/medicaid-bill-coming-due-few-answers-outside-big-tax-measure

The Oregon Health Authority has so far dodged questions about how the state plans to cover its $328 million share of the Medicaid expansion, as the cost of providing healthcare for the poor comes due next year. The state agency promises a budget in September based on current revenues, while Democratic politicians pray for a big windfall come election day from Measure 97, the corporate tax initiative.

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DOCTORS RAISE CONCERNS FOR SMALL PRACTICES IN MEDICARES NEW PAYMENT SYSTEM (The Lund Report) https://www.thelundreport.org/content/doctors-raise-concerns-small-practices-medicare%E2%80%99s-new-payment-system

Dr. Lee Gross is worried. He has practiced family medicine in North Port, Florida, near Sarasota, for 14 years. But he and two partners are the last small, independent practice in the town of 62,000. Everyone else has moved away, joined larger groups, or become salaried employees of hospitals or health companies.

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REPORT FOR STATE INSURANCE COMMISSIONERS OFFERS OPTIONS TO IMPROVE DRUG ACCESS (The Lund Report) https://www.thelundreport.org/content/report-state-insurance-commissioners-offers-options-improve-drug-access

As prescription drug costs continue to rise, ensuring that consumers have access to the drugs they need is a growing concern. Insurers blame the drug companies for high prices while drug companies blame insurers for restrictive plans. Consumers are stuck in the middle picking up a higher tab. Now a new study highlights strategies for states to help consumers in this tug of war.

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OHSU PRESIDENT AND MODA CEO HAVING FRIENDLY DISCUSSIONS (The Lund Report) https://www.thelundreport.org/content/ohsu-president-and-moda-ceo-having-friendly-discussions

-In emails obtained by The Lund Report, the two leaders mention talking to their collective board membership, but spokespeople from OHSU and Moda insist nothing is imminent.-

Could OHSU and Moda be moving toward an equity arrangement? In emails obtained by The Lund Report under the Freedom of Information Act, Dr. Joe Robertson, president of OHSU, and Robert Gootee, CEO of Moda Health, could be headed in that direction.

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IS CENTENE CORP. ON THE MOVE IN OREGON? (The Lund Report) https://www.thelundreport.org/content/centene-corp-move-oregon

Since purchasing Trillium Community Health Plan, a coordinated care organization in Eugene, theres been speculation Centene is trying to spread its wings throughout Oregon.

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OREGON’S AMBULATORY SURGERY CENTERS REVEAL LARGE COST VARIATIONS (The Lund Report)

-Please contact the State Library for access to this premium story from the Lund Report via email, library.help@state.or.us or phone, 503-378-8800

Geographic regions may be responsible for some of these variations, according to Chris Skagen, JD MELP, executive director of the Oregon Ambulatory Surgery Center Association.

The cost of common outpatient surgeries performed at ambulatory surgery centers in Oregon vary dramatically  in some cases a range of three to six times higher than the lowest cost for the procedure.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 29, 2016 eClips Weekend Edition

August 29, 2016 eClips

* Year out from eclipse, local hotels maxed out
* Former State Hospital employee seeks $900k in lawsuit
* Oregon State Fair hosts marijuana exhibit
* Changes at Snake River dams helping Idaho sockeye salmon
* ‘I was so broken’: 14 years in foster care
* Fourteen Years in Foster Care
* Widow of slain Malheur occupier Robert ‘LaVoy’ Finicum plans to sue
* Traffic deaths rising — Opinion
* Prineville has a deer problem
* What a doubled bottle deposit could mean for Oregon
* Editoria: Blumenauer is wrong about the Owyhee — Opinion
* Puget Sound Has New Climate Refugees. They’re Pelicans.
* New PPS Superintendent, Foster Care Failures
* Destination Huntington
* Since You Asked: Rumble strips will be back on Interstate 5
* Reedsport boatbuilders get big state grant
* Editorial: Gov. Brown’s moment of candor on 97 — Opinion
* Wallowa County ready for new state mental health requirements
* 3 reasons why new FAA drone rules could help Oregon soar
* Marijuana continues to grow a year after legalization
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YEAR OUT FROM ECLIPSE, LOCAL HOTELS MAXED OUT (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2016/08/28/year-out-eclipse-local-hotels-maxed-out/88567622/

The moon passes between the Earth and the Sun. Darkness replaces the daylight.

Tick-tock. Tick-tock.

The shadow travels through Oregon. At 3,400 miles per hour, in about 12 minutes the shadow has sped from the Oregon Coast to the Oregon-Idaho border.

Salem is the largest metro area and the first state capitol in the path of a total solar eclipse, occurring roughly one year from now: August 21, 2017.

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FORMER STATE HOSPITAL EMPLOYEE SEEKS $900K IN LAWSUIT (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/politics/state-workers/2016/08/28/former-state-hospital-employee-seeks-900k-lawsuit/89511756/

A lawsuit filed last week by a former Oregon State Hospital employee Larry Pressnall accuses the hospital, its superintendent and two state agencies of wage theft, retaliation and discrimination.

Pressnall’s suit follows a series of large monetary awards to former state employees turned whistle-blowers. Millions have been paid to former state agency heads fired for reporting mismanagement, and similar suits against the state are now playing out in court.

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OREGON STATE FAIR HOSTS MARIJUANA EXHIBIT (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/videos/news/local/oregon/2016/08/28/89522958/

The Oregon State Fair hosted a marijuana exhibit after plants were chosen at an earlier growing competition.

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CHANGES AT SNAKE RIVER DAMS HELPING IDAHO SOCKEYE SALMON (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/tech/science/environment/2016/08/29/changes-snake-river-dams-helping-idaho-sockeye-salmon/89530742/

Structural changes at two Snake River dams in Washington state are helping more endangered sockeye salmon make the trip upstream to central Idaho this year, federal officials say.

The permanent system at Lower Granite Dam and a temporary system at Little Goose Dam pull up cold, deep water for fish ladders to combat high temperatures that discourage fish from completing their journey. The success of the new systems could lead to similar changes at other dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers.

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‘I WAS SO BROKEN’: 14 YEARS IN FOSTER CARE (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/special-reports/2016/08/26/fostercare/88738120/

-The story of one tormented path through Oregon’s child welfare system-

As a single mom, Mia Storm’s life revolves around her daughter, Lily, 3. Storm does everything she can to give Lily a stable life filled with love  something she missed out on as a child.

Storm, 32, is a product of Oregon’s foster care system, which she said left her unemployed, in debt and dependent on welfare as an adult. Though she maintains the semblance of a normal life for Lily, Storm struggles to make ends meet.

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FOURTEEN YEARS IN FOSTER CARE (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/videos/news/2016/08/28/89515760/

Mia Storm spent 14 years in foster care. Now 32 years old, and mother to a 3-year-old daughter, she is working to rebuild her life and provide a stable, loving home for her child.

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WIDOW OF SLAIN MALHEUR OCCUPIER ROBERT ‘LAVOY’ FINICUM PLANS TO SUE (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/34742224-75/widow-of-slain-malheur-occupier-robert-lavoy-finicum-plans-to-sue.html.csp

Oregon police and two FBI agents could face a lawsuit from the widow of an Arizona rancher who took part in the Malheur Wildlife Refuge occupation and was killed in a confrontation with authorities.

California-based attorney Brian Claypool told The Oregonian/OregonLive that the lawsuit on behalf of Jeanette Finicum and the family has not been filed but that they are pursuing it “with 100 percent certainty.”

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TRAFFIC DEATHS RISING — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/opinion/34728991-78/traffic-deaths-rising.html.csp

Could you read this editorial just as easily while talking on the phone or taking a selfie or changing your clothes?

Not likely. But millions of Americans seem cool with the idea of doing such things while driving a two-ton mass of steel at 55 mph on roads on which similar vehicles are going the opposite way at similar speeds.

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PRINEVILLE HAS A DEER PROBLEM (Bend Bulletin)

http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4612814-151/prineville-has-a-deer-problem?referrer=carousel1

-City declines to fine those who feed deer-

If youre walking down Ochoco Avenue in Prineville and notice streamers and balloons in anyones yard, its not an invitation to a party  especially if youre a deer.

The deer population inside Prinevilles city limits has some irritated residents trying out colorful techniques for scaring the animals out of their neighborhoods, especially now that the City Council this week decided not to pursue fining people who feed the deer.

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WHAT A DOUBLED BOTTLE DEPOSIT COULD MEAN FOR OREGON (Bend Bulletin)

http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4610276-151/what-doubled-redemption-values-could-mean-next-year?referrer=carousel4

-Increased return rates expected, and deposits could sometimes match beverage prices-

When Oregon doubles its redemption value on bottles and cans in April, the deposit customers pay on some items will rival the price of the item itself.

Under state law, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission had to check whether redemption rates for the past two years fell under 80 percent. The OLCC found the statewide redemption rate was 68.26 percent in 2014 and 64.45 percent in 2015, triggering the increase in redemption value from 5 to 10 cents beginning next April 1.

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EDITORIA: BLUMENAUER IS WRONG ABOUT THE OWYHEE — OPINION (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/4609844-151/editoria-blumenauer-is-wrong-about-the-owyhee

U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer announced recently that hes asked the Obama administration to create a national monument in the Owyhee River Canyon area of Malheur County. One might ask why a Portland Democrat would do something no other member of Oregons congressional delegation has seen fit to do.

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PUGET SOUND HAS NEW CLIMATE REFUGEES. THEY’RE PELICANS. (Oregon Public Broadcasting) http://www.opb.org/news/article/puget-sound-has-new-climate-refugees-theyre-pelicans/

American white pelicans are conspicuous birds. With their long orange bills and their nine-foot wingspan, they stand out, even at a distance.

Sue Ehler easily spots a squadron of them through her binoculars from over a mile away, coming in for a landing on Puget Sound’s Padilla Bay.

“They’ve got that pure white. It just shines like a bright light out there. More than the other white birds,” Ehler says.

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NEW PPS SUPERINTENDENT, FOSTER CARE FAILURES (Oregon Public Broadcasting) http://www.opb.org/radio/programs/thinkoutloud/segment/new-pps-superintendent-foster-care-failures/

A new report shows rates of child abuse in Oregon’s foster care system are rising. We hear the story of one woman who is coming to terms with her own time in foster care, and we check in with a young woman who just recently aged out of the system.

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DESTINATION HUNTINGTON (Argus Observer)

http://www.argusobserver.com/news/destination-huntington/article_cd329cc4-6ce5-11e6-bb69-3f88587d4969.html

-Dwindling area becomes boom town-

Huntington is bustling with activity. Life in the small town had slowed over the years. It was bypassed by the freeway and the trains that still go through town but rarely stop, and the population eventually declined.

But that has changed with laws that now allow use of medical and recreational marijuana.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: RUMBLE STRIPS WILL BE BACK ON INTERSTATE 5 (Medford Mail Tribune)

http://www.mailtribune.com/article/20160829/NEWS/160829723

Why did the highway department fill in the safety rumble strips to the right of I-5? They were a blessing for drowsy drivers.

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REEDSPORT BOATBUILDERS GET BIG STATE GRANT (Medford Mail Tribune)

http://www.mailtribune.com/article/20160829/NEWS/160829728

A company that builds commercial fishing boats in Reedsport netted a $3.4 million grant from the state this month, positioning itself to expand its workforce by 50 percent in the coming years.

Fred Wahl Marine Construction, currently the biggest private employer in the coastal city, won the grant through the Oregon Department of Transportation and its ConnectOregon program. Its award was the second highest monetary award after an $8.3 million grant given to Union Pacific for railroad improvements.

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EDITORIAL: GOV. BROWN’S MOMENT OF CANDOR ON 97 — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald) http://democratherald.com/news/opinion/editorial/editorial-gov-brown-s-moment-of-candor-on/article_69783ac0-a53c-527b-8790-9d8eb0788f18.html

Gov. Kate Brown has had a somewhat tortured relationship with Measure 97, the proposal on the November ballot for a corporate sales tax.

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WALLOWA COUNTY READY FOR NEW STATE MENTAL HEALTH REQUIREMENTS (Wallowa.com) http://www.wallowa.com/local_news/20160828/wallowa-county-ready-for-new-state-mental-health-requirements

A performance plan to address needs of the severely or persistently mentally ill in Oregon has been finalized.

The plan was announced by the Oregon Health Authority in late July and was instituted after lengthy discussions between OHA and the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.

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3 REASONS WHY NEW FAA DRONE RULES COULD HELP OREGON SOAR (Oregon Business Journal) http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/techflash/2016/08/3-reasons-why-new-faa-drone-rules-could-help.html

While some questions still remain about the new Federal Aviation Administration rules on commercial drone flights, Oregon operators have long been ready for the edicts to take effect.

That’s because Oregon emerged as an early hub candidate as the unmanned aerial system began taking shape.

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MARIJUANA CONTINUES TO GROW A YEAR AFTER LEGALIZATION (The Daily Emerald) https://www.dailyemerald.com/2016/08/29/marijuana-continues-to-grow-a-year-after-legalization/

The recreational marijuana industry is “doing phenomenal” in Eugene, Oregon.

That’s what Courtney Delaplain, the manager of a local dispensary named Casper’s, said of Eugene’s newest industry.

A recent report published by the Department of Revenue shows that Oregon state-licensed dispensaries sold $42.2 million worth of recreational marijuana in June and July combined. This comes after selling $59.6 million worth from January to May.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 29, 2016 eClips

August 26, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* New report on Oregon’s foster care system charts solutions, failures
* Fish/Wildlife officials: No Oregon data breach, but online site now closed ‘until further notice’
* Fine after weed killer sprayed on timber workers? $53,000
* School advocates release primer on Oregon education funding
* Oregon’s top commodities
* Portland State grew under Wim Wiewel where does it go from here?
* State needs to loosen physical-education requirements on schools — Opinion
* Draining Oregon: What can we do about over-pumping?
* False reports, photos, can be tracked on the Internet
* Oregon shuts down online fishing and hunting license sales
* Hatchery chinook rule at Buoy 10 suspended for Labor Day weekend
* Oregon’s pioneering in cancer drug research needs protection — Guest Opinion
* Transportation Department hobbled by credibility and cultural problems — Guest Opinion
* Oregonians have $1 million in unclaimed tax checks
* Report: Foster care in Oregon is getting worse
* Oregon hunting and fishing license information hacked
* Report: Oregon schools extremely behind in funding
* Fire consumes 70 acres of timberland northwest of Eugene
* Review: DHS could do more to prevent foster care abuses
* Washington County sets vehicle fee in motion
* PPS tries cure for school nurse shortage
* Oregon education officials mandate healthy schools plans
* Framework approved for Oregon’s retirement plan
* Bend residents clash over neighborhood marijuana grow
* Hundreds show up to give feedback on proposed UGB
* Rising Deschutes swamps neighborhood
* Car camping raises enforcement questions in Bend
* Editorial: Let the state bureaucrats know if CCO’s deliver — Opinion
* Janet Stevens column: No quick solutions to Bends affordable housing problem — Opinion
* Editorial: Trigger warning, this editorial is not a safe space — Opinion
* Coastal Labor Shortage
* Testing Public Records Law
* Pharmacy Board Bans Designer Drugs In Oregon
* DHS Report: Agency Needs To Address Abuse, Shortage Of Quality Homes
* Gov. Kate Brown: Consumers Would Pay Part Of Corporate Tax Increase Cost
* Cyber Hack Shuts Down Hunting, Fishing License Sales In 3 Northwest States
* Christmas tree production down as market stabilizes
* Washington fire sparks suit over federal firefighting powers
* When neighbors go to court
* Strong dollar challenging U.S. agricultural industry — Opinion
* Archery season to begin amid fire concerns
* Our view: Tip and kicks — Opinion
* Safety measures
* Revenue loss leaves agency unable to pay off project
* Crews encircle Cleveland Ridge fire near Shady Cove
* Bowhunters hit woods with extreme fire danger, private land closures
* Climate change taking toll on American pika’s Western lands
* Since You Asked: Traffic stripe paint touched up regularly
* More digging expected to yield lead pipes in Medford
* No crisis, but Affordable Care Act could be better — Guest Opinion
* Babies, moms both thrive though breastfeeding — Guest Opinion
* Mental health agency on better track, officials believe
* Warrenton confronts costly cracks in water, sewer pipes
* Jetty A gets armored up as repairs at the mouth of the Columbia quicken
* School leaders worry about cost of lead testing
* Column: Commercial fishers are endangered — Guest Opinion
* Editorial: Physical education should be a part of everyone’s day — Opinion
* OSBA: No unauthorized drones at schools
* Editorial: We each have a role in keeping fire at bay — Opinion
* Crews encircle Cleveland Ridge fire
* Withers fire comes eerily close to torching Paisley
* Deadline is Oct. 12 to submit photos for 2017-2018 Blue Book
* Douglas County unemployment continued to rise in July
* Entrepreneurship in Oregon rises, but drops in Portland– Blog
* SEC Censures 71 Governments for Lack of Fiscal Transparency
* Medical Marijuana, Physical Therapy, Acupuncture Reduce Opioid Dependence

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NEW REPORT ON OREGON’S FOSTER CARE SYSTEM CHARTS SOLUTIONS, FAILURES (Portland Oregonian)

A new report commissioned in the wake of Oregon’s latest foster care scandal identifies fairly obvious remedies for the state’s troubled foster care system.

But the findings also highlight the Department of Human Services’ failure over the years to adopt solutions to recurring problems identified by previous reviews.

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FISH/WILDLIFE OFFICIALS: NO OREGON DATA BREACH, BUT ONLINE SITE NOW CLOSED ‘UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE’ (Portland Oregonian)

The message a hacker left Tuesday morning on the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website set off the alarm bells the intruder doubtlessly anticipated.

In brief remarks left on the agency’s “contact us” page, a hacker claimed the sort of intrusion — stealing Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers, cell phone numbers — that has caused nightmares for companies and governments around the country.

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FINE AFTER WEED KILLER SPRAYED ON TIMBER WORKERS? $53,000 (Portland Oregonian)

A helicopter spray company whose pilot doused timber workers in weed killers and then ignored a state order to stop spraying will be fined $53,552.

The state Department of Agriculture on Thursday finalized its penalty against Banks-based Applebee Aviation, levying a $10,000 fine against its owner, Michael Applebee, and a $43,552 fine against the company.

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SCHOOL ADVOCATES RELEASE PRIMER ON OREGON EDUCATION FUNDING (Portland Oregonian)

To show the need for a huge corporate tax increase in the November ballot, which they both support, the state’s teachers union and its largest parent lobbying group on Thursday unveiled a primer on Oregon school finances and staffing levels.

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OREGON’S TOP COMMODITIES (Portland Oregonian)

In 2015, Oregon was home to 34,600 farms on 16,400,000 acres, according to the Department of Agriculture. Oregon as a whole is about 63 million acres.  Oregon was the nation’s No. 1 producer of blackberries, boysenberries, hazelnuts, black raspberries, various seeds including orchardgrass and ryegrass, peppermint and Christmas trees in 2015.

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PORTLAND STATE GREW UNDER WIM WIEWEL WHERE DOES IT GO FROM HERE? (Portland Oregonian)

When Wim Wiewel arrived on the South Park Blocks in 2008, Portland State was Oregon’s largest public university.

But the sleepy commuter school that moved into Portland’s urban core just over 60 years ago didn’t feel like it.

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STATE NEEDS TO LOOSEN PHYSICAL-EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ON SCHOOLS — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

There are a couple different takeaways from a recent report that less than 10 percent of K-8 schools in Oregon are meeting state requirements for physical education  despite having nine years to do so.

One is that school districts simply dropped the ball.

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DRAINING OREGON: WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT OVER-PUMPING? (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon is granting farmers rights to more groundwater for irrigation than the state can sustain, The Oregonian/OregonLive found in its in-depth series, “Draining Oregon.”

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FALSE REPORTS, PHOTOS, CAN BE TRACKED ON THE INTERNET (Portland Oregonian)

Don’t cry wolf in the age of the Internet.

…Or cougar.

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division recently investigated the report of a cougar hanging out in the yard and porch of an unidentified north Eugene house.

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OREGON SHUTS DOWN ONLINE FISHING AND HUNTING LICENSE SALES (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon closed its online license sales late Thursday to allow state investigators more time to check on the system’s security after a breach Tuesday.

While officials of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said earlier in the day the system was secure the department reopened its online sales Tuesday afternoon, Oregon’s chief information officer decided late in the day to close it anyway and make a more thorough inspection.

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HATCHERY CHINOOK RULE AT BUOY 10 SUSPENDED FOR LABOR DAY WEEKEND (Portland Oregonian)

Anglers at Buoy 10 will be allowed to keep wild chinook for the entire Labor Day weekend.

The hatchery-only chinook rule on Sundays and Mondays was suspended for Sept. 4 and 5 Thursday in a conference telephone call after biologists said fewer-than-expected chinook salmon had been caught between the mouth of the Columbia River and Tongue Point.

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OREGON’S PIONEERING IN CANCER DRUG RESEARCH NEEDS PROTECTION — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

As a biotech leader in Oregon, I appreciate hearing positive stories of how patients such as Janet Thompson of Portland didn’t meekly accept her doctor’s diagnosis of advanced lung cancer, as reported by Lynne Terry of The Oregonian/OregonLive “Breakthrough lung cancer drug helps clinical trial patient at Providence,” March 6. Thompson fought back, undergoing radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery. But nothing worked.

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TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT HOBBLED BY CREDIBILITY AND CULTURAL PROBLEMS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Let me add fuel to the considerable fire generated by op-eds by Catherine Mater “Transportation Department’s credibility problem is really the governor’s problem”; Aug. 14 and David Bragdon “ODOT’s blurry mission drives chronic failures”; Aug. 17. Mater and Bragdon were both critical of the long-standing cultural and competency problems of the Oregon Department of Transportation, the agency that Congressman Peter DeFazio recently described in an article in the Eugene Register Guard as a “turgid dysfunctional bureaucracy.”

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OREGONIANS HAVE $1 MILLION IN UNCLAIMED TAX CHECKS (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Revenue has put 5,000 Oregonians on notice: claim $1 million dollars in expired tax refund checks before the end of October.

“We try to give folks as much time as we can but the deadline is coming up,” said Rob Estabrook, media spokesperson for the department.

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REPORT: FOSTER CARE IN OREGON IS GETTING WORSE (Salem Statesman Journal)

A blistering, 69-page report released by consultants auditing the Oregon Department of Human Services concluded that the state’s foster care system is getting worse.

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OREGON HUNTING AND FISHING LICENSE INFORMATION HACKED (Salem Statesman Journal)

Security specialists are investigating whether the breach of an online system used to process hunting and fishing licenses in Oregon resulted in the loss of personal information.

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REPORT: OREGON SCHOOLS EXTREMELY BEHIND IN FUNDING (Salem Statesman Journal)

A student in Salem, Oregon would have a very different educational experience than one in Salem, Massachusetts.

Aside from a notable change in weather, the student in Massachusetts would receive thousands of dollars more per year in funding, is more likely to graduate in four years, and would have a smaller student-teacher ratio and average class size than in Oregon.

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FIRE CONSUMES 70 ACRES OF TIMBERLAND NORTHWEST OF EUGENE (Eugene Register-Guard)

Firefighters on Friday were expected to spend a second day battling a forest fire west of Junction City that had consumed 70 acres after starting early Thursday.

The fire is burning timberland in the foothills of the Coast Range about 5 miles north of unincorporated Cheshire off High Pass Road.

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REVIEW: DHS COULD DO MORE TO PREVENT FOSTER CARE ABUSES (Portland Tribune)

The Oregon Department of Human Services might be able to prevent the abuse of children in Oregon’s foster care system by placing their charges more appropriately and better coordinating its response to allegations of abuse, according to draft of an outside assessment of the agency, released Thursday.

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WASHINGTON COUNTY SETS VEHICLE FEE IN MOTION (Portland Tribune)

-But board will await state legislative session before imposing it.-

Washington County commissioners have set in motion a plan to impose a vehicle registration fee to raise money for local road work.

But the proposed $30 annual fee, equal to an amount that voters rejected in 2014, would be delayed until after the Oregon Legislature ends its next regular session in mid-2017.

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PPS TRIES CURE FOR SCHOOL NURSE SHORTAGE (Portland Tribune)

-Health assistants deployed to share duties with RNs-

This year, when your kid goes to see the school nurse, they might not be seeing a nurse at all.

Portland Public Schools is significantly expanding a pilot program that will add school health assistants to the Franklin, Jefferson and Roosevelt clusters. The effort began last year in the Madison cluster as a way to address the abysmal nurse-to-student ratios in the district.

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OREGON EDUCATION OFFICIALS MANDATE HEALTHY SCHOOLS PLANS (Portland Tribune)

-School districts have until October to create draft guidelines for water, radon testing and pest management-

Local school districts have until Oct. 1 to submit draft versions of a health and safety inspection plan to the Orgeon Department of Education. The plans are to include guidelines for regular sample testing of school water, exposure to lead in paint and radon gas, and pest management practices.

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FRAMEWORK APPROVED FOR OREGON’S RETIREMENT PLAN (Portland Tribune)

-Employer feedback helps design key elements of landmark retirement savings plan- A simple IRA retirement plan is what Fotis Lanaras, owner of Portland-based Hercules Construction, offers his three employees.

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BEND RESIDENTS CLASH OVER NEIGHBORHOOD MARIJUANA GROW (Bend Bulletin)

-Figuring out whats legal and what isn’t can be confusing for residents and law enforcement alike-

Bend resident Art Johnson and his wife wanted to retire in Bend. But so far, retirement hasnt been quite as relaxing as they planned, Johnson said.

After Johnson moved into his home in east Bend, the house next door was sold to new neighbors who started using the property to grow medical marijuana. A warehouse next door constantly smells like marijuana and most of the windows are blacked out.

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HUNDREDS SHOW UP TO GIVE FEEDBACK ON PROPOSED UGB (Bend Bulletin)

-Plan sets guidelines for Bends urban growth-

After listening to dozens of Bend residents give feedback on the citys plan to expand its urban growth boundary, Bend city councilors are working toward approving the plan.

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RISING DESCHUTES SWAMPS NEIGHBORHOOD (Bend Bulletin)

-Water going to farmers downstream creates flooding in south Deschutes County-

Waterfront neighborhoods and water-dependent livelihoods are at an impasse this summer as a rising Deschutes River floods riverside properties and attracts thousands of mosquitoes to residential areas on its way to providing farmers crops with water downstream.

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CAR CAMPING RAISES ENFORCEMENT QUESTIONS IN BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-While neighbors feel unsafe, court rulings make it tricky to enforce-

How to deal with people who sleep in cars throughout Bends neighborhoods has become a thorny enforcement problem for city officials.

Last week, the issue became a topic of debate at the Bend City Council meeting, and its something that has been brought up at various meetings since April. The most recent discussion was spurred when the city received an email from a Bend resident wondering what to do about a man sleeping in a van in her neighborhood.

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EDITORIAL: LET THE STATE BUREAUCRATS KNOW IF CCO’S DELIVER — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s coordinated care organizations, CCO’s, were created in 2011 as part of the states move to reform health care. The state aimed to deliver the states Medicaid patients, most of whom would receive physical, dental and mental health services through the CCO’s, better care than they’d had in the past.

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JANET STEVENS COLUMN: NO QUICK SOLUTIONS TO BEND’S AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROBLEM — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Only one city in Oregon has built more affordable housing than Bend in the last 10 years, and its more than seven times larger than Bend. That said, both Bend and Portland continue to have some of the least affordable housing in Oregon.

Jim Long, the city’s affordable housing manager, knows that Bends shortage wont end anytime soon. Meanwhile, the city continues to work to improve the situation, and with good reason.

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EDITORIAL: TRIGGER WARNING, THIS EDITORIAL IS NOT A SAFE SPACE — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

When so many college campuses have allowed political correctness to grow like a weed, a letter to incoming freshman at the University of Chicago is bluntly refreshing.

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COASTAL LABOR SHORTAGE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Small business owner and Oregon state representative David Gomberg joins us to talk about the shortage of labor for coastal businesses all over the state, what some of the factors are and about how he thinks lawmakers should be approaching the issues involved.

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TESTING PUBLIC RECORDS LAW (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Two University of Oregon students recently conducted an experiment to see how well Oregon’s public records request law works. Their conclusion: not that well.

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PHARMACY BOARD BANS DESIGNER DRUGS IN OREGON (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Think of heroin as a molecule. Then imagine adding a few extra atoms.

It still has the same physical effect, but technically, its no longer heroin and therefore its legal.

Marc Watt, the executive director of the Oregon Board of Pharmacy, said that’s whats happening with synthetic opioids and synthetic fentanyl.

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DHS REPORT: AGENCY NEEDS TO ADDRESS ABUSE, SHORTAGE OF QUALITY HOMES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon’s foster care system is being pushed to its limits and failing to put in place remedies for ongoing problems. That’s the upshot of a consultants draft report released Thursday by the Oregon Department of Human Services.

The report is the result of a call for an independent investigation last fall by Oregon Gov. Kate Brown. It followed a series of news reports of child abuse and financial wrongdoings at Portland area foster care providers.

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GOV. KATE BROWN: CONSUMERS WOULD PAY PART OF CORPORATE TAX INCREASE COST (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Gov. Kate Brown conceded Thursday that Oregon consumers would have to bear some of the costs of the proposed $3 billion corporate tax increase on the November ballot.

In her first extensive interview on Measure 97 since endorsing it early this month, Brown defended the measure as the only viable option for sustaining needed investments in schools, health care and other services.

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CYBER HACK SHUTS DOWN HUNTING, FISHING LICENSE SALES IN 3 NORTHWEST STATES (Northwest Public Radio)

Online fishing and hunting license sales have now been suspended in Washington, Oregon and Idaho following a hacking incident. A Washington state official says some 7 million records across the three states were compromised, but the information was not terribly sensitive.

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CHRISTMAS TREE PRODUCTION DOWN AS MARKET STABILIZES (Capital Press)

Oregon’s 2015 Christmas tree sales were down 26 percent from 2010, but an industry representative said supply and demand appear to be balancing out and he expects 2016 to be a good year.

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WASHINGTON FIRE SPARKS SUIT OVER FEDERAL FIREFIGHTING POWERS (Capital Press)

A federal lawsuit stemming from a 65,000-acre fire in Central Washington last summer challenges the U.S. Forest Services authority to suspend environmental laws and take emergency actions during a wildfire.

A Eugene-based environmental group, Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics, alleges that the agency broke the law by not analyzing the environmental effects of building a 50-mile long, 30-foot wide community protection line.

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WHEN NEIGHBORS GO TO COURT (Capital Press)

An Albany, Ore., farmer has won a legal challenge against his straw compressing facility launched by his neighbors and now wants the plaintiffs to cover his legal bills.

The neighbors, happy to shell out money to put him out of business, didn’t count on losing and having to pony up for his defense. Pay back, they say, is a  disappointment.

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STRONG DOLLAR CHALLENGING U.S. AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY — OPINION (Capital Press)

Agriculture is a risky business. From the time our ancestors first began cultivating crops, farmers have faced the possibility of losing their harvests to extreme weather events.

Whether its a hailstorm that destroys a grain or fruit crop, a flood that washes out a newly planted cornfield or a drought that turns grazing lands into a barren desert, uncooperative weather can upend the best-laid plans.

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ARCHERY SEASON TO BEGIN AMID FIRE CONCERNS (East Oregonian)

Archery season for deer and elk begins Saturday in Eastern Oregon, and officials are reminding bow hunters to beware of fire danger when heading out into the woods.

The Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch Center reports there have been 110 fires so far this year, 57 of which were human-caused. Human-caused fires have also burned the vast majority of acres in the area, totaling 29,642.

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OUR VIEW: TIP AND KICKS — OPINION (East Oregonian)

A tip of the hat to Katy Coba, the Pendleton-born, longtime director of the Department of Agriculture who this week was named the chief operating officer for the state of Oregon.

Its a big promotion for Coba, who has gone from wheat fields to executive suites.

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SAFETY MEASURES (Argus Observer)

-We do not mess around with concussions-

Sports teams from across the area have been practicing for the past few weeks in preparation for the beginning of the sports season.

As teams practice every day, there comes the question of student athlete safety, especially related to concussions.

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REVENUE LOSS LEAVES AGENCY UNABLE TO PAY OFF PROJECT (Argus Observer)

-Owyhee Project official projects $5.5 million debt-

Besides having to stretch tight water supplies, three years of drought have left the Joint Board of the Owyhee Project unable to make final payment of the tunnel hydro project at the deadline next spring.

Because of the low water, the plant  built aside the main outlet for irrigation water from Owyhee Reservoir  has produced little or no power. That power is needed to provide revenue to pay on the loan from the Oregon Department of Energy.

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CREWS ENCIRCLE CLEVELAND RIDGE FIRE NEAR SHADY COVE (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Evacuation level reduced as fire is now 100 percent lined-

Crews on the Cleveland Ridge fire north of Shady Cove have revised their estimate on the blaze’s size following a walk around the perimeter overnight.

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BOWHUNTERS HIT WOODS WITH EXTREME FIRE DANGER, PRIVATE LAND CLOSURES (Medford Mail Tribune)

Deer-hunting season opens Saturday for bowhunters, and tinder-dry forests have triggered extreme fire-season conditions in Southern Oregon’s public forests as well as closures on large swaths of industrial forests.

While Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service lands remain accessible to hunters, extreme fire-danger restrictions mean no driving off improved roads and no smoking outside of vehicles, as well as the standard no open fires of any kind.

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CLIMATE CHANGE TAKING TOLL ON AMERICAN PIKA’S WESTERN LANDS (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Climate change taking toll on Western lands-

Populations of a rabbit-like animal known as the American pika are vanishing in many mountainous areas of the West as climate change alters its habitat, according to findings released Thursday by the U.S. Geological Survey.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: TRAFFIC STRIPE PAINT TOUCHED UP REGULARLY (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: Driving around town, I see a lot of places where the road paint is chipped or hard to see. How often does that get repainted?

A: According to the Oregon Department of Transportation website at www.tripcheck.com, “lane-striping paint is … a short-lived product.”

Newer thermoplastic products are on the market that have a lifespan of about 3 to 4 years. If that doesn’t sound like a long time, keep in mind the paint is pummeled by rain, sun, snow, de-icing chemicals and sand, plus car and truck tires, as well as studs, chains and snowplows.

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MORE DIGGING EXPECTED TO YIELD LEAD PIPES IN MEDFORD (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Medford Water Commission will be digging up streets near 264 water meters through the end of the year to see whether there are any lead pipes underground.

So far, 47 have been inspected and 13 were found to have lead connectors known as pigtails, Larry Rains, manager of the Water Commission, told the City Council Thursday.

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NO CRISIS, BUT AFFORDABLE CARE ACT COULD BE BETTER — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

Over the final few months of the election, The Post will ask policy experts to weigh in on the critical questions our presidential candidates should be addressing  but often arent. This weeks question: Are the Affordable Care Acts insurance exchanges sustainable?

Aetna’s withdrawal from Affordable Care Act markets has sparked the latest round of dire predictions about the laws survival.

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BABIES, MOMS BOTH THRIVE THOUGH BREASTFEEDING — GUEST OPINION (The World)

Pregnancy and the delivery of a baby come accompanied by many new challenges and decisions. One being, how am I going to feed my baby? Most mothers want to breastfeed and in Oregon it is quite obvious with a breastfeeding initiation rate of over 90 percent. However, breastfeeding is often decreased or discontinued altogether in the weeks following birth due to a variety of barriers women face.

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MENTAL HEALTH AGENCY ON BETTER TRACK, OFFICIALS BELIEVE (Daily Astorian)

The chief executive for regional mental health care on Wednesday praised the Clatsop County manager and the interim director at Clatsop Behavioral Healthcare for stepping forward to really save a local program from the brink.

Kevin Campbell, who leads Greater Oregon Behavioral Healthcare Inc., which ovesees mental health services in Clatsop and several other counties, believes Clatsop Behavioral Healthcare is beginning to turn a corner.

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WARRENTON CONFRONTS COSTLY CRACKS IN WATER, SEWER PIPES (Daily Astorian)

Cracks and unsealed joints in Warrenton’s old water and sewer lines are quietly costing the city a lot of money, though it is unclear just how much.

This is a problem that’s accumulated over time, Public Works Director Jim Dunn said. Its not something that just happened overnight.

Depending on the season, a decent volume of the water piped from the water treatment plant to faucets, showers, toilets and other outlets leaks out along the way.

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JETTY A GETS ARMORED UP AS REPAIRS AT THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA QUICKEN (Daily Astorian)

Crash Bang Boom On a recent afternoon, the construction site at Jetty A, near U.S. Coast Guard Station Cape Disappointment, was something straight out of a child’s imagination. On a barge tethered to the tip of the jetty, a crane was swinging rocks as big as cars ashore. The giant claw of an oversized excavator hefted most of the massive boulders into oversized dump trucks and plunged some of the rock directly into the weather-worn chinks in the jetty’s aging armor.

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SCHOOL LEADERS WORRY ABOUT COST OF LEAD TESTING (Daily Astorian)

As the deadline nears for school districts to turn in plans to test for lead and radon, local administrators understand the need but worry about the costs.

The state Board of Education this month voted to require school districts to test for lead and radon. The vote came after scandals in Portland Public Schools over contaminated drinking water ballooned into a statewide issue. School districts have to turn in preliminary plans to test for lead and radon into the state by October, with final plans due by January.

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COLUMN: COMMERCIAL FISHERS ARE ENDANGERED — GUEST OPINION (Daily Astorian)

It seems a bit odd that some of our neighbors should have to reintroduce themselves. But many new residents in our community dont seem to know who they are. They are your fishermen. The vast majority of citizens are not recreational or commercial fishermen.

We live on one of the worlds great rivers  once known as the worlds greatest salmon stream. Astoria also was once known as the salmon-canning capital of the world.

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EDITORIAL: PHYSICAL EDUCATION SHOULD BE A PART OF EVERYONE’S DAY — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

There is a branding problem for physical education. Perhaps it should be renamed Learning to have fun for life, or Play for healthy bodies and minds.

Whatever we call it, some form of PE should be a significant part of everyone’s day  children and grownups alike. For decades, professional educators recognized this and built physical activity into the school day. They recognized that bodies and minds aren’t separate. Growing young people particularly need the physical and mental stimulus of fresh air and rushing muscles. Lifetime health and physical coordination must be ingrained early on.

Our nation has meandered far from this ideal. Oregon is as bad or even worse than most.

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OSBA: NO UNAUTHORIZED DRONES AT SCHOOLS (Albany Democrat Herald)

Add this to the list of things banned without prior permission on the grounds of Oregon’s public schools: flying a drone.

The Oregon School Boards Association in June put together a “conditionally required” policy for school districts on the use of unmanned aircraft systems, which includes the prohibition.

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EDITORIAL: WE EACH HAVE A ROLE IN KEEPING FIRE AT BAY — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

We’ve spent a lot of time in recent editorials talking about the challenges facing the federal, state and local agencies that battle wildfires, and how their task gets harder each year as fire seasons burn hotter.

Obviously, those challenges aren’t going away. But our actions, whether we’re recreating in the woods or building our dream home among the trees, have a direct impact on firefighters.

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CREWS ENCIRCLE CLEVELAND RIDGE FIRE (Ashland Daily Tidings)

-Evacuation level reduced as fire is now 100 percent lined-

Crews on the Cleveland Ridge fire north of Shady Cove have revised their estimate on the blaze’s size following a walk around the perimeter overnight Thursday.

Oregon Department of Forestry crews estimate the fire is now about 530 acres, down more than 100 acres from Wednesday’s 635.

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WITHERS FIRE COMES EERILY CLOSE TO TORCHING PAISLEY (Lake County Examiner)

A quickly expanding fire appeared poised to consume parts of Paisley by Thursday, Aug. 18 if not for the quick and coordinated response of firefighters to establish fire lines just outside the community’s limits.

The Withers Fire was one of four starts in quick succession along Hwy 31 on Wednesday, Aug. 17, starting near Summer Lake Hot Springs and quickly expanding to 3,422 acres by the following day.

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DEADLINE IS OCT. 12 TO SUBMIT PHOTOS FOR 2017-2018 BLUE BOOK (Hood River News)

It seems like a perfect fit for the Gorge  as a place full of photographers and outdoor recreationists.

Friday was World Photo Day, and the Oregon Secretary of State encourages Oregonians to submit their photo entries for the cover of the 2017-2108 Oregon Blue Book. Photographers are encouraged to use the 2017-2018 Blue Book theme of outdoor recreation as inspiration.

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DOUGLAS COUNTY UNEMPLOYMENT CONTINUED TO RISE IN JULY (Douglas County News-Review)

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Douglas County rose from 6.4 percent in June to 6.8 percent in July, which is still a whole percentage point below the 7.8 percent recorded in July 2015. Meanwhile, the statewide seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 5.2 percent and the national rate was 4.9 percent in July.

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN OREGON RISES, BUT DROPS IN PORTLAND— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

The latest Kauffman Foundation report on startup activity nationwide suggests that, in terms of spawning entrepreneurs, the state of Oregon fared better than the city of Portland.

It was one of the top smaller states for startup activity compared to last year. However, entrepreneurship in 2016 seems to be slipping in the Portland metro, according to the report.

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SEC CENSURES 71 GOVERNMENTS FOR LACK OF FISCAL TRANSPARENCY (Governing)

More than 70 state and local governments have been censured for failing to disclose certain financial information about bonds they sold to investors, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced Wednesday.

The SEC reached settlements with 71 governments across 45 states as part of a voluntary self-reporting program called the Municipalities Continuing Disclosure Cooperation Initiative MCDC. Only five states — Arizona, Florida, Nevada, Oregon and Rhode Island — had no governments or government entities censured.

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CALIFORNIA AIMS RETIREMENT PLAN AT THOSE WHOSE JOBS OFFER NONE (New York Times)

California is preparing to create a mandatory state-run retirement plan for an estimated six million workers at companies that do not now offer any retirement benefits.

The move could make California the first state to require companies to take part in such a system. Colorado was considering the idea but decided against it in May, and New Jersey and Washington have opted instead for programs with very limited state involvement. But Connecticut, Oregon, Maryland and Illinois are moving forward with their own state-run retirement programs and are looking to California as an example.

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CLOUD COMPUTING BRINGS SPRAWLING CENTERS, BUT FEW JOBS, TO SMALL TOWNS (New York Times)

A giant Microsoft facility just outside this very small town hides behind a quarter-mile berm and a guard house, across the highway from the rubble of a demolished prison.

Behind the berm, six unmarked hangars each hold tens of thousands of computer servers. Microsoft has cleared enough scrub trees and vines for at least 15 of these buildings, and six more are already under construction.

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MEDICAL MARIJUANA, PHYSICAL THERAPY, ACUPUNCTURE REDUCE OPIOID DEPENDENCE (The Lund Report)

A panel discussion at the National University of Natural Medicine NUNM sponsored by Oregon Health Forum considered the cultural swings for treating pain in the past 20 years to the current opioid epidemic and the fear of prescribing opioids.

More Oregonians die of drug overdoses than in car crashes, even though the number of adults living with chronic pain has held steady for the past 20 years.

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August 25, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips
* Gov. Brown names Katy Coba as state’s new chief operating officer
* Oregon lawyers: Sweet Cakes by Melissa $135,000 damage award was justified
* Oregon wins big early round against Oracle in Cover Oregon dispute
* Pair of Oregon wildfires, together burning more than 100 square miles, among several in the state
* 31 foods you didn’t know were grown in Oregon
* Eastern Oregon campgrounds reopen after wildfires force closure
* In defense of Canada’s softwood lumber trading — Guest Opinion
* Gov. Brown appoints Oregon DAS director
* Washington to kill entire wolf pack
* Report: Oregon schools extremely behind in funding
* Oregon’s health care transparency “grade” improves; think tank says it’s too soon
* Brown, Pierce endorse Measure 98 for education efforts
* Burned out — Opinion
* Federal investment in solar blocks path forward — Guest Opinion
* Potholes in ODOT’s quality control
* My View: It’s time for PPS voucher system — Guest Opinion
* Bend area ranks 13 for home-price increase
* Help with the heat in summer, not just winter
* Wildlife rehabilitation center closes in Bend
* Bend lawmaker wins small-business award
* Unemployment rate rises in Central Oregon
* Editorial: Don’t reply to failed leadership with a tax — Opinion
* Column: Restore power to property owners — Opinion
* Earl Blumenauer To Obama: Designate Owyhee National Monument
* Bend Wildlife Rehab Center Closes During ODFW Investigation
* BLM Postpones Wild Horse Roundup Due To Fire
* ODA’s Katy Coba named Oregon COO
* ODFW: Calf found in pond had been attacked by wolves
* Ag groups say Coba’s experience, style will be hard to replace
* Farmers seek legal fees from GMO ban supporters
* Katy Coba picked as Oregons next chief operating officer
* MIP marijuana referrals up sharply in Linn County
* Editorial: State firefighters face similar issues as the feds — Opinion
* Oregon health insurers show new signs of life– Blog
* Oregon’s Tightening Labor Market– Blog
* Gov. Kate Brown Names New Director of Oregon Department of Administrative Services
* Tourism is Here to Stay
* Warnings of rate hikes as Oregon becomes 1st state to kill coal
* Oregon Stands Out In 20 Years Since National Welfare Reform
* Oregon Hospitals Receive $6.3 Million from Medicare Billing Disputes

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GOV. BROWN NAMES KATY COBA AS STATE’S NEW CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown has appointed Katy Coba, who currently directs the Oregon Department of Agriculture, to serve as the state’s chief operating officer and as director of the Department of Administrative Services.

Coba’s appointment is effective Oct. 1, pending confirmation by the Oregon Senate in September.
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OREGON LAWYERS: SWEET CAKES BY MELISSA $135,000 DAMAGE AWARD WAS JUSTIFIED (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian was justified in forcing the Christian owners of a Gresham bakery to pay $135,000 to a lesbian couple they turned away, state lawyers argued in a brief filed this week.
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OREGON WINS BIG EARLY ROUND AGAINST ORACLE IN COVER OREGON DISPUTE (Portland Oregonian)

In a big win for Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, a Marion County judge on Wednesday indicated she was prepared to throw out Oracle’s claims that the state violated the state’s public records law when it withheld or delayed release of certain Cover Oregon-related emails from the software company.
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PAIR OF OREGON WILDFIRES, TOGETHER BURNING MORE THAN 100 SQUARE MILES, AMONG SEVERAL IN THE STATE (Portland Oregonian)

Two eastern Oregon wildfires, together burning more than 100 square miles, are among several blazes requiring the attention of firefighters throughout the state.

The Cherry Road and Rail fires, at almost 55 and 51 square miles apiece, are by far the largest active blazes in Oregon.
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31 FOODS YOU DIDN’T KNOW WERE GROWN IN OREGON (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s many climates and soils lend the state to growing a wide array of fruits, vegetables and herbs that you might not imagine.
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EASTERN OREGON CAMPGROUNDS REOPEN AFTER WILDFIRES FORCE CLOSURE (Portland Oregonian)

Eastern Oregon campgrounds that were forced to close by a wildfire will reopen on Wednesday, Bureau of Land Management officials said in a news release.

The Cherry Road Fire threatened the Lake Owyhee State Park,, which includes the McCormack and Indian Creek campgrounds, when it grew to nearly 50,000 acres earlier this week.
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IN DEFENSE OF CANADA’S SOFTWOOD LUMBER TRADING — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon and Canada share a long and proud history of saw-milling. In both countries the recovery of the housing sector over the past five years has brought new life to many forest-reliant communities. And yet communities continue to struggle in both Oregon and Canada to keep mills open when local timber supplies are tight.
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GOV. BROWN APPOINTS OREGON DAS DIRECTOR (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown on Wednesday appointed Katy Coba as state chief operating officer and director of the Department of Administrative Services.

In her new job, Coba will be Brown’s manager of state agencies and sit atop what is a low-profile yet critical agency.
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WASHINGTON TO KILL ENTIRE WOLF PACK (Salem Statesman Journal)

State wildlife biologists are moving forward with a plan to kill all 11 members of a wolf pack in northeast Washington.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife said the Profanity Peak wolf pack have killed or injured six cattle and likely five others based on staff investigations.
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REPORT: OREGON SCHOOLS EXTREMELY BEHIND IN FUNDING (Salem Statesman Journal)

A student in Salem, Oregon would have a very different educational experience than one in Salem, Massachusetts.

Aside from a notable change in weather, the student in Massachusetts would receive thousands of dollars more per year in funding, is more likely to graduate in four years, and would have a smaller student-teacher ratio and average class size than in Oregon.
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OREGON’S HEALTH CARE TRANSPARENCY “GRADE” IMPROVES; THINK TANK SAYS IT’S TOO SOON (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon’s health care transparency rating jumped from a consistent “F” to a “B” this year on a national scorecard after new legislation required Oregon hospitals to report average costs for in-patient and out-patient procedures.
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BROWN, PIERCE ENDORSE MEASURE 98 FOR EDUCATION EFFORTS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Kate Brown, Bud Pierce and the Independent Party of Oregon have all officially endorsed Measure 98.

They’re joined by former governor Ted Kulongoski and many other individuals and organizations.
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BURNED OUT — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Its little wonder that an audit by the secretary of states office found that the Oregon Department of Forestry is reeling. In the seven years before 2013, the agency spent an average of $9.7 million per year to fight large fires. During the next three years, annual costs averaged $92.7 million. No department can absorb a 10-fold increase in its biggest expense without feeling some strain and at the Department of Forestry, the strain is showing in ways the Legislature must address.
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FEDERAL INVESTMENT IN SOLAR BLOCKS PATH FORWARD — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Between 2010 and 2015, the Obama administration gave $195 billion of your tax dollars to private solar companies. To put such an enormous figure in perspective, all 450,000 miles of electric lines in the United States cost $111 billion.

And what did future Americans get in return? Energy from solar increased from 0.02 percent to 0.7 percent. In short, Americans paid twice what it would cost to rewire their entire house and got a cell phone battery that only works in daytime. And it was all done without a single public hearing

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POTHOLES IN ODOT’S QUALITY CONTROL (Portland Tribune)

Potholes and ruts cost the average Oregonian driver hundreds of dollars in vehicle repairs every year.

But as Oregon Department of Transportation Director Matt Garrett prepares to ask lawmakers for hundreds of millions of dollars in increased taxes and fees on Oregonians to fund new roads and bridge upgrades, documents show that his department has for more than a decade resisted basic quality improvements intended to stop construction fraud, combat premature potholes and make roads last longer.
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MY VIEW: IT’S TIME FOR PPS VOUCHER SYSTEM — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Portland school Superintendent Carole Smith abruptly resigned in July, after nine years on the job. She was planning to retire next June, but the release of an independent investigation into the districts inept handling of contaminated drinking water caused her to speed up her departure.
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BEND AREA RANKS 13 FOR HOME-PRICE INCREASE (Bend Bulletin)

In the 12 months ending June 30, Bend-area home prices increased nearly 11 percent, ranking the area 13th nationally, according to quarterly federal housing data released Wednesday.

The Portland metro area ranked third in the nation, with a 13.45 percent increase from the second quarter of 2015 to the second quarter of this year, according to a report from the Federal Housing Finance Agency.

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HELP WITH THE HEAT IN SUMMER, NOT JUST WINTER (Bend Bulletin)

-Energy assistance program now includes electric bills during summer-

NeighborImpacts Home Energy Assistance Program expanded into new territory this summer: helping families keep their homes cool in the heat in addition to keeping them warm in the winter.
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WILDLIFE REHABILITATION CENTER CLOSES IN BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-Some animals released, some transferred, some euthanized-

The High Desert Wildlife center in Bend has shut down after its resident veterinarian gave up his permit for wildlife rehabilitation.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife took most of the animals receiving care there last week.

Dr. Jeff Cooney, co-founder of the center, gave up his wildlife rehabilitation permit associated with the center earlier this month.
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BEND LAWMAKER WINS SMALL-BUSINESS AWARD (Bend Bulletin)

State Sen. Tim Knopp, R-Bend, received an award from the National Federation of Independent Business, a trade association for small businesses, on Tuesday.

The award, called the Guardian of Small Business award, is given around once per year to an Oregon lawmaker who shows exemplary support for small businesses, according to Anthony Smith, Oregon state director for the federation.
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UNEMPLOYMENT RATE RISES IN CENTRAL OREGON (Bend Bulletin)

The unemployment rate last month increased slightly across Central Oregon for the second consecutive month, according to a report released Tuesday by the Oregon Employment Department.

Regional Economist Damon Runberg said the uptick was driven primarily by growth in the labor force, due to college graduates and new arrivals to the region.

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EDITORIAL: DON’T REPLY TO FAILED LEADERSHIP WITH A TAX — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s citizens initiative review process is a poor use of public resources and campaign time and there’s no evidence that it has any impact on voters.

Can you guess who wrote that? It was a representative of the nonprofit advocacy organization Our Oregon in 2012.

But this year, when the same citizens panel process narrowly endorsed Our Oregons corporate tax on the November ballot, a spokeswoman for Our Oregon and Measure 97 was happy to highlight the results.
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COLUMN: RESTORE POWER TO PROPERTY OWNERS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

State laws limit what can be done with property that’s been tagged as historic.

The original property owners may request having the designation removed. Until earlier this month, so, too, could those who bought a historic property after the state designation was in place. Now, an opinion by the Oregon Supreme Court says that option is no longer available.

The Legislature should change the law to again give succeeding property owners the ability to have state historic designations removed.

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EARL BLUMENAUER TO OBAMA: DESIGNATE OWYHEE NATIONAL MONUMENT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Rep. Earl Blumenauer D-Ore. has officially asked President Obama to designate a remote area in southeastern Oregon as a national monument.

Blumenauer is the only member of Oregon’s Congressional delegation to openly ask Obama to create an Owyhee National Monument.
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BEND WILDLIFE REHAB CENTER CLOSES DURING ODFW INVESTIGATION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A wildlife rehabilitation facility in Central Oregon is under investigation by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

The High Desert Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center voluntarily gave up its permit to care for wildlife after a visit from ODFW officials earlier this month.
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BLM POSTPONES WILD HORSE ROUNDUP DUE TO FIRE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A wild horse roundup in eastern Oregon has been postponed because of the Cherry Road Fire.

The plan was for the Bureau of Land Management to collect about 100 feral horses from the overpopulated herd that lives on BLM lands. But now the Cherry Road fire has burned through about 20 percent of the herd management area. BLM spokesman Larry Moore said that means even less for the wild horses to eat.
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ODA’S KATY COBA NAMED OREGON COO (Capital Press)

Katy Coba, the director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture, has been appointed the states chief operating officer and director of the Department of Administrative Services, the states overarching administrative agency, Oregon Gov. Kate Browns office announced Wednesday.

Cobas appointment is effective Oct. 1 but requires confirmation by the Oregon Senate in September, according to a news release from the Governors Office.

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ODFW: CALF FOUND IN POND HAD BEEN ATTACKED BY WOLVES (Capital Press)

A 450-pound calf that died in Umatilla County was attacked by wolves, according to Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

The incident happened in the Meacham Creek area on private land, according to ODFW. A ranch employee found a calf partially under water in a pond on a forested pasture on Aug. 20. The employee tried to save it, but the calf died on the bank, according to a report.

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AG GROUPS SAY COBA’S EXPERIENCE, STYLE WILL BE HARD TO REPLACE (Capital Press)

Oregon farm organizations are still absorbing news of longtime Oregon Department of Agriculture Director Katy Cobas appointment as the states chief operating officer and director of the Department of Administrative Services.

Word spread quickly through Oregon’s agricultural groups Wednesday morning. Coba used her 11:30 ag budget conference call with producer organizations to tell them first-hand.

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FARMERS SEEK LEGAL FEES FROM GMO BAN SUPPORTERS (Capital Press)

A judge here is considering whether parties that unsuccessfully defended a legal challenge to Josephine Countys GMO ban should pay the plaintiff farmers attorney fees.

In May, farmers Robert and Shelley Ann White convinced a judge the county’s GMO ban, approved by voters in 2014, was pre-empted by a state law passed the prior year.

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KATY COBA PICKED AS OREGON’S NEXT CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER (East Oregonian)

Growing up on a Pendleton wheat ranch, its no surprise Katy Coba says shes passionate about agriculture.

Coba, who has become the longest-serving director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture, remembers helping her grandmother cook lunch and dinners for the work crews during summer harvest. Later, she became the first woman on the ranch to drive an 18-wheeler, delivering loads of grain to an export terminal along the Columbia River.

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MIP MARIJUANA REFERRALS UP SHARPLY IN LINN COUNTY (Albany Democrat Herald)

The number of juveniles in Linn County referred to the Linn County Juvenile Department for marijuana-related offenses during the first six months of the year is nearly double that of the same time period a year ago, department director Torri Lynn told the Board of Commissioners Tuesday.

Oregonians legalized recreational marijuana in 2014, effective July 2015.
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EDITORIAL: STATE FIREFIGHTERS FACE SIMILAR ISSUES AS THE FEDS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Stop us if you’ve heard this before: Increasingly severe wildfire seasons have sapped the resources of the government agencies charged with fighting those fires. Officials are forced to reassign money and personnel that had been earmarked for other programs into firefighting efforts. As each fire season seemingly burns hotter and wilder, the agencies charged with firefighting are stretched to the breaking point.
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OREGON HEALTH INSURERS SHOW NEW SIGNS OF LIFE— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon health insurers could be turning the corner, as three of the largest plans were able to narrow their losses or even turn a profit in the first half of the year, according to their financial statements.

The most dramatic example is that of Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest, which had net income of $40.9 million, or $25 million on just its underwriting and not including net investment gains, according to its filing with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners.
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OREGON’S TIGHTENING LABOR MARKET— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

We know Oregon’s economy is booming today. Job growth is outpacing the typical state by a considerable margin. These gains are strong enough to make up the recessionary losses and keep pace with population growth. As labor becomes scarce in a tight market, wages rise. Businesses must compete more on price to attract and retain the best talent. One positive result of these dynamics is the growing labor force and increasing participation rate as more Oregonians look for work.
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GOV. KATE BROWN NAMES NEW DIRECTOR OF OREGON DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES (Willamette Week)

Longtime Department of Agriculture director takes over key state agency.

Gov. Kate Brown today filled an opening atop a key state agency, naming Katy Coba director of the Oregon Department of Administrative Services.
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TOURISM IS HERE TO STAY (Bend Source Weekly)

-But how to make it pay its way?-

Last Thursday, Aug. 18, the City Club of Central Oregon held a forum titled “Tourism or Tourisn’t: Is the Juice of a Tourist Economy Worth the Squeeze?” Some of the area’s most influential citizens gathered to discuss the “branding, promotion, and impact of tourism” on the local economy. Panelists included a regional economist from the State of Oregon, the City of Bend’s Economic Development Director, and the President and CEO of VisitBend.
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WARNINGS OF RATE HIKES AS OREGON BECOMES 1ST STATE TO KILL COAL (Fox News)

The massive coal-fired plant in Boardman, Ore., is just four years away from being shut down for good at that point, Oregon coal production will be no more, after the state became the first in the nation to completely ban coal power.
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OREGON STANDS OUT IN 20 YEARS SINCE NATIONAL WELFARE REFORM (National Public Radio)

Monday marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark welfare reform bill, which overhauled how the government hands out cash assistance to poor people. Oregon is considered one of the most successful states at implementing the reforms.
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OREGON HOSPITALS RECEIVE $6.3 MILLION FROM MEDICARE BILLING DISPUTES (The Lund Report)

-All told, 22 Oregon hospitals received payments, with Providence hospitals receiving the largest amount, $2 million.-

Oregon hospitals benefitted from the recent announcement by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services which paid out nearly $1.5 billion to more than a third of U.S. hospitals to resolve longstanding Medicare billing disputes. All told, 22 hospitals in Oregon received slightly more than $6.3 million from claims dating back to 2013.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 25, 2016 OSL eClips

August 24, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Wildfire north of Medford prompts ‘be set’ evacuation notice
* Portland area emergency dispatch centers launch Text to 911 services
* Get free admission to national and Washington state parks this week
* Oregon students’ ACT scores best in recent history
* Little progress in search for new Oregon environmental regulator
* Audit finds Oregon Department of Forestry struggling after years of large wildfire seasons
* Future wildfire and forest productivity depend on active management — Guest Opinion
* Oregon and Washington link requires reimagining – and discussion by candidates — Guest Opinion
* Bow hunting begins Saturday across tinder-dry Oregon
* Measure 96 gives veterans support they’ve earned — Guest Opinion
* Next Portland bridge won’t allow cars, either
* Most millennials want to buy a home, but can’t afford one
* Records-release deadlines proposed
* City hopes conference will help find a fix for Columbia levee
* Newberg, like other PERs employers, awaits word on hikes
* Audit: More fires stretch ODF resources
* Crater Lake waiving fees for four days
* With pending investigation, BMC physician stops practicing
* Traffic fatalities surge, with marked rise in Oregon
* Whats safe to say about climate change? — Opinion
* Welfare reform, the bipartisan success story — Guest Opinion
* Earl Blumenauer To Obama: Designate Owyhee National Monument
* EPA Pushes Oregon To Toughen Lead Paint Contracting Rules
* People Of Color In The Cannabis Industry & Eugene’s Racist History
* USDA projects 38,000-ton hazelnut crop
* Hood River basins water reservations renewed
* Immigration a longstanding political problem, experts say
* Organic seed supply lags demand as industry grows
* Audit shows wildfires straining ODF staff, programs
* Morrow County mosquitoes test positive for West Nile
* Fire outside of Hat Rock burns 80 acres
* Cleveland Ridge fire hits 600-acre mark
* Improving mental, physical health care at once — Opinion
* Wheat harvest links Oregon farmers to flour mills of Asia
* New blue lines mark tsunami safe zones
* Costly fir disease threatens a leg of our coastal economy — Opinion
* Transportation panel plans Albany hearing — Opinion
* Senator Johnson looks for solution to PERS funding crisis — Guest Opinion
* City Inspectors Demand a Cannabis Shop Close. The Owner Refuses.
* Oregon Hospitals Receive $6.3 Million from Medicare Billing Disputes
* Traffic deaths up nearly 20 percent since 2014, government says

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WILDFIRE NORTH OF MEDFORD PROMPTS ‘BE SET’ EVACUATION NOTICE (Portland Oregonian)

A wildfire 25 miles north of Medford has prompted a “be set” evacuation notice for an area containing more than 40 structures, officials said.

The Cleveland Ridge fire, reported Monday about 5 miles north of Shady Cove, had scorched more than 570 acres as of Tuesday night. Homes along two roads and a rural highway are under a Level 2 evacuation notice, which means occupants should be set to leave at any time.
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PORTLAND AREA EMERGENCY DISPATCH CENTERS LAUNCH TEXT TO 911 SERVICES (Portland Oregonian)

Donna Nicklin was on one side of the door, but her attacker was on the other. The deaf woman had locked herself in a bathroom after she’d been beaten and choked by a relative, but she couldn’t get to her teletypewriter, the special device she needed to call 911.

So she waited.
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GET FREE ADMISSION TO NATIONAL AND WASHINGTON STATE PARKS THIS WEEK (Portland Oregonian)

This Thursday marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, and the celebration comes with a little bit of freedom.

For four days this week from Thursday, Aug. 25 to Sunday, Aug. 28 all entrance fees will be waived at the 124 national parks that normally charge them.
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OREGON STUDENTS’ ACT SCORES BEST IN RECENT HISTORY (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s class of 2016 was the best-prepared for college in recent history, according to results for the 14,000-plus students who took the ACT college entrance exam.
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LITTLE PROGRESS IN SEARCH FOR NEW OREGON ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATOR (Portland Oregonian)

Six months after Oregon’s top environmental regulator resigned during the Portland air pollution crisis, the state appears no closer to finding another top leader for the Department of Environmental Quality.
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AUDIT FINDS OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY STRUGGLING AFTER YEARS OF LARGE WILDFIRE SEASONS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s Department of Forestry has been stretched too thin both in its budget and staffing over the past three severe fire seasons, according to an audit released Tuesday by the Secretary of State’s Office.
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FUTURE WILDFIRE AND FOREST PRODUCTIVITY DEPEND ON ACTIVE MANAGEMENT — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

There’s a common thread to the heartbreaking stories in The Oregonian’s investigative account of the Canyon Complex fire “Burned”; Aug. 14. Our system of federal forest management is broken, beginning with the government’s failure to proactively thin and harvest the overcrowded and combustible forests where the conflagration ignited and spread to nearby communities

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OREGON AND WASHINGTON LINK REQUIRES REIMAGINING — AND DISCUSSION BY CANDIDATES — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Multimodal transportation arteries connecting the two largest cities on the largest river in the West already suffer congestive “heart failure.” Recently, scientists increased earthquake risk projections and likelihood that the 1917 Interstate and 1908 BNSF Bridges could collapse, blocking road, rail and ship commerce. Such an arterial “heart attack” would cripple the economy, divide Oregon and Washington, strand residents and leave thousands jobless.
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BOW HUNTING BEGINS SATURDAY ACROSS TINDER-DRY OREGON (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon bow hunters begin their seasons Saturday under heavy fire restrictions that still leave most public land open and new rules from the state.
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MEASURE 96 GIVES VETERANS SUPPORT THEY’VE EARNED — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregonians have an unprecedented opportunity to assist our veterans who struggle to return. They are our brothers, sisters, fathers, and mothers who seek to reintegrate into our nation, our state and our communities. Measure 96 on the November ballot represents the most consequential investment in veterans outreach and services in Oregon history.
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NEXT PORTLAND BRIDGE WON’T ALLOW CARS, EITHER (Portland Tribune)

For the second time in a row, a new Portland bridge wont carry any private motor vehicles.

The Flanders Cross over I-405 is designed for pedestrians and bicyclists. The Oregon Transportation Commission announced the state will contribute $2.9 million to the project on Sunday. The Portland Bureau of Transportation will provide the remaining $3 million. The money will come from transportation system development charges that are collected from new developments around the city and which can only be used to expand the capacity of Portland’s transportation system.
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MOST MILLENNIALS WANT TO BUY A HOME, BUT CAN’T AFFORD ONE (Portland Tribune)

Portlands housing shortage is especially hard on younger would-be homebuyers. The shortage of homes for sale is continuing to drive prices up, making it even more difficult for those just starting out in life to afford them, according to a recent national survey.
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RECORDS-RELEASE DEADLINES PROPOSED (Portland Tribune)

State Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum hopes that when it comes to improving government transparency, less is more in Oregon.

Rosenblum will hold the last of four hearings on her public records reform effort Thursday, Aug. 18, two weeks after she unveiled efforts to clean up a law she once described as a car wreck.
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CITY HOPES CONFERENCE WILL HELP FIND A FIX FOR COLUMBIA LEVEE (Portland Tribune)

A week after floodwaters battered Baton Rouge, Louisiana, the nations leading flood-control experts converge on Portland this week for a four-day convention.

Local leaders of the Levee Ready Columbia project, who lobbied to bring the national conference here, will use the spotlight to pitch for federal funds to upgrade the 45 miles of levees that shield Portland, Troutdale, Gresham, Fairview and Sauvie Island from potentially catastrophic Columbia River floods.
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NEWBERG, LIKE OTHER PERS EMPLOYERS, AWAITS WORD ON HIKES (Portland Tribune)

– City set aside $180,000 during previous budgeting process to partially offset the as-yet-unknown amount of increase –

Although it remains to be seen what the actual employer rates paid by the city of Newberg for the Public Employees Retirement System PERS during the 2017-2019 biennium will be, early estimates suggest the blow will not be a staggering one.
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AUDIT: MORE FIRES STRETCH ODF RESOURCES (Bend Bulletin)

-Fires severity, frequency strain state staff and other programs-

The time, effort and money the Oregon Department of Forestry spends fighting wildfires has harmed its other programs and strained its workers, according to a new state audit.
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CRATER LAKE WAIVING FEES FOR FOUR DAYS (Bend Bulletin)

-National Park Services 100th anniversary celebration-

Crater Lake National Park will waive its entrance fees from Thursday through Sunday and offer a host of activities Thursday to mark the National Park Services 100th anniversary.

Entrance fees, commercial tour fees and transportation entrance fees will all be included in the waiver, according to a release from the National Park Service. Reservation, camping, tours and concession fees will still be charged.

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WITH PENDING INVESTIGATION, BMC PHYSICIAN STOPS PRACTICING (Bend Bulletin)

Dr. Craig Laws, a family physician with Bend Memorial Clinic, has agreed to voluntarily withdraw from the practice of medicine and have his license made inactive pending the completion of an investigation by the Oregon Medical Board.
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TRAFFIC FATALITIES SURGE, WITH MARKED RISE IN OREGON (Bend Bulletin)

Traffic fatalities were up 9 percent in the first six months of this year compared with the same period last year, continuing a surge in deaths that began two years ago as the economy improved and travel picked up, according to preliminary estimates released Tuesday by the National Safety Council.
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WHATS SAFE TO SAY ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE? — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

We would appreciate it if Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum would tell us what we are supposed to say about climate change.

Her office has signed on to an agreement with 16 other attorneys general to potentially conduct investigations, including examining representations made by companies to investors, consumers and the public regarding fossil fuels, renewable energy and climate change.

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 WELFARE REFORM, THE BIPARTISAN SUCCESS STORY — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Welfare reform may be the last great bipartisan success story. It was enacted in 1996 by a Republican Congress led by Newt Gingrich and by Democratic President Bill Clinton in response to decades of public frustration with the U.S. system of aid to the poor. At the time, the law had liberal enemies, some of whom resigned from Clintons administration in protest of his signing it.
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EARL BLUMENAUER TO OBAMA: DESIGNATE OWYHEE NATIONAL MONUMENT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Rep. Earl Blumenauer D-Ore. has officially asked President Obama to designate a remote area in southeastern Oregon as a national monument _________________________________________

EPA PUSHES OREGON TO TOUGHEN LEAD PAINT CONTRACTING RULES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Regulators in Salem, gardeners in Portland, lab technicians in Washington theyve all been studying toxic lead this summer. Health regulators want to add one more group to that list: building contractors.

As many as 50 percent of all poisoning cases result from some kind of renovation activities in homes, said Perry Cabot, lead specialist in Multnomah Countys Public Health Department. That is the next big thing thats been really tackled, but not fully and not successfully yet around the country.
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PEOPLE OF COLOR IN THE CANNABIS INDUSTRY & EUGENE’S RACIST HISTORY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

We talk to Jesce Horton, founder and chairman of the Minority Cannabis Business Association, about getting more people of color involved in business opportunities in the pot industry, after experiencing disproportionate arrest and imprisonment rates from the war on drugs.

University of Washington professor Quintard Taylor tells us about the racist pasts of Matthew Deady and Frederick Dunn, two important characters in the University of Oregons history who have buildings named after them. The university is considering renaming the buildings.
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USDA PROJECTS 38,000-TON HAZELNUT CROP (Capital Press)

Oregon farmers are projected to reap 38,000 tons of hazelnuts this year, which would be a substantial improvement over 2015 but less than some had expected.

The USDAs National Agricultural Statistics Service has forecast the crop will be 22.5 percent larger in 2016, based on statistical surveys conducted earlier this summer.

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HOOD RIVER BASINS WATER RESERVATIONS RENEWED (Capital Press)

Nearly 83,000 acre-feet of water reservations in Oregons Hood River basin have been renewed by state regulators, opening the way for new water rights development.

The Oregon Water Resources Commission voted in favor of extending water reservations in the region for another 20 years during its Aug. 18 meeting in Hermiston.
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IMMIGRATION A LONGSTANDING POLITICAL PROBLEM, EXPERTS SAY (Capital Press)

For more than a decade, lawmakers have been pointing at their counterparts to take the blame for what just about everyone agrees is a broken immigration system.

Republicans say President Barack Obamas immigration enforcement policies encourage more people to sneak into the country. Democrats blame Republicans for blocking legislation that would allow people already here to gain legal status and create a path for future, legal immigration.

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ORGANIC SEED SUPPLY LAGS DEMAND AS INDUSTRY GROWS (Capital Press)

The state of the U.S. organic seed industry has improved over the past five years and more organic farmers are using organic seed.

But major seed supply gaps remain and most organic farmers still use conventional seed, according to the State of Organic Seed 2016 report.

The 111-page report was recently released by the Organic Seed Alliance, which surveyed 1,364 organic farmers in 47 states in 2014.

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AUDIT SHOWS WILDFIRES STRAINING ODF STAFF, PROGRAMS (East Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Forestry is straining both its staff and its budget to withstand more grueling wildfire seasons, according to a state audit released Tuesday.

Last year, fires burned roughly 55,000 acres in the ODF Northeast Oregon District alone nearly twice as much as any other year since 1960. Yet the audit, prepared by the Secretary of States Office, revealed the agency as a whole is still fighting blazes with the same number of full-time employees as 20 years ago.
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MORROW COUNTY MOSQUITOES TEST POSITIVE FOR WEST NILE (East Oregonian)

Three pools of mosquitoes recently tested positive for West Nile virus from one site near Boardman, according to the North Morrow Vector Control District.

A total of five samples have tested positive for the virus so far this summer, said District Manager Greg Barron. Two others were collected near Irrigon. Overall, Barron said he feels good about the season so far, considering they had 13 positive samples at this time last year.

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FIRE OUTSIDE OF HAT ROCK BURNS 80 ACRES (East Oregonian)

A fire just outside of Hat Rock State Park burned about 80 acres over the weekend.

Umatilla Fire Chief Steve Potts said that cause was still undetermined and was being investigated by the Bureau of Land Management. No structures were threatened.

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CLEVELAND RIDGE FIRE HITS 600-ACRE MARK (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Fire lines hold on three flanks overnight-

The wildfire burning about five miles north of Shady Cove pumped the brakes overnight, only seeing new growth of about 25 acres.

Oregon Department of Forestry officials said the Cleveland Ridge fire, which is burning on a mix of private and Bureau of Land Management lands, had grown to about 600 acres by Wednesday morning. On Tuesday evening, ODF crews estimated the fire, which they now believe to be human-caused, was 575 acres.
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IMPROVING MENTAL, PHYSICAL HEALTH CARE AT ONCE — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

The addition of behavioral health specialists to local doctor’s offices is part of a national trend. It’s also part of the legacy of Sen. Alan Bates, who championed the concept of treating the whole patient.

A story in Tuesday’s Mail Tribune profiled Dr. Jared Cox, a behavioral healthy consultant at Southern Oregon Pediatrics. When one of the clinic’s pediatricians sees a patient who may need mental health care in addition to medical treatment, they can refer the patient directly to Cox

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WHEAT HARVEST LINKS OREGON FARMERS TO FLOUR MILLS OF ASIA (Herald and News)

It’s a limited pallet this time of year in the Columbia Plateau counties. Blue sky above brown fallow, with combines of John Deere green or Case IH red moving in slow, shrinking circuits around golden wheat fields.

It’s an empty landscape, most ways you look. Few buildings and no traffic. And in that emptiness, you can lose track of the broader world. The wheat kernels tumbling into the hopper on Chuck Greenfield’s combine are the reminder of the connection.

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NEW BLUE LINES MARK TSUNAMI SAFE ZONES (Daily Astorian)

Follow me are two words Jene Pearce-Mushen encourages residents to tell people in the event of a major Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. But to help lead others to safety, one needs to first understand where to go when the ground starts to shake.
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COSTLY FIR DISEASE THREATENS A LEG OF OUR COASTAL ECONOMY — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

New forestry research is an invaluable reminder that our changing climate has local consequences that demand action, even if everyone isnt yet convinced human action is to blame.

A time-progression map of the Oregon Coast Range is the most immediately eye-catching aspect of a study by Oregon State University, the Oregon Department of Forestry and Weyerhaeuser Corp.
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TRANSPORTATION PANEL PLANS ALBANY HEARING — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

If you’ve been tracking the progress of the Oregon Legislature’s Joint Interim Committee on Transportation Preservation and Modernization and, yes, that’s the full name, you know that the committee has been meeting throughout the state, trying to get a better feel for Oregon’s numerous transportation needs.
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SENATOR JOHNSON LOOKS FOR SOLUTION TO PERS FUNDING CRISIS — GUEST OPINION (St. Helens Chronicle)

Two members of the Oregon Senate are attempting to find an alternative to the looming crisis in public retirement funding. Democrat Senator Betsy Johnson from Scappoose and Republican Senator Tim Knopp, of Bend are creating a bipartisan work group to study and make recommendations to address the Public Employee Retirement System, or PERS, funding crisis.
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CITY INSPECTORS DEMAND A CANNABIS SHOP CLOSE. THE OWNER REFUSES. (Willamette Week)

The dispute is the latest accusation that City Hall wraps marijuana businesses in red tape.

Chris Schaaf says he has no choice: If he wants to sell cannabis, he has to defy Portland City Hall.

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OREGON HOSPITALS RECEIVE $6.3 MILLION FROM MEDICARE BILLING DISPUTES (The Lund Report)

– All told, 22 Oregon hospitals received payments, with Providence hospitals receiving the largest amount, $2 million. –

Oregon hospitals benefited from the recent announcement by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services which paid out nearly $1.5 billion to more than a third of U.S. hospitals to resolve longstanding Medicare billing disputes. All told, 22 hospitals in Oregon received slightly more than $6.3 million from claims dating back to 2013.
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TRAFFIC DEATHS UP NEARLY 20 PERCENT SINCE 2014, GOVERNMENT SAYS (PBS)

Traffic fatalities were up 9 percent in the first six months of this year compared to the same period last year, continuing a surge in deaths that began two years ago as the economy improved and travel picked up, according to preliminary estimates released Tuesday by the National Safety Council.

Ed Note: Oregon with second highest increase.
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Posted in Oregon Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Oregon Department of Education, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife, Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon Department of State Lands, Oregon Department of Transportation, Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Liquor Control Commission, Oregon Office of Emergency Management, Oregon Parks & Recreation Department, Oregon Public Employees Retirement System, Oregon Secretary of State, Oregon State Police, State or Oregon Employment Department | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on August 24, 2016 OSL eClips

August 23, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips
* Oregon collects $25.5 million in marijuana taxes since start of the year
* Who really would pay if Measure 97 passes? — Guest Opinion
* New wildfire threatens eastern Oregon state park
* Citizen panel votes to endorse $3 billion corporate tax measure
* Study: Oregon one of worst states for community college
* Recreational marijuana dispensaries sell $40 million worth of pot products in June, July
* UO faces higher costs, but shortfall is misnomer — Guest Opinion
* Citizens panel endorses corporate sales tax measure
* Most millennials want to buy a home, but can’t afford one
* My View: Enact tenants’ bill of rights — Guest Opinion
* My View: State is getting anti-business reputation — Guest Opinion
* Citizens panel endorses corporate sales tax measure
* State review panel narrowly backs M97
* Pot generates $25.5 million in taxes so far
* 14 fires in the region deemed arson
* Bend is trying to figure out how to deal tourists but is isnt the only one
* Editorial: Bend stuck with difficult UGB choice — Opinion
* Oregon Lawmakers Unveil New Way To Dispose Of Unwanted Drugs
* 20 Years Since Welfare’s Overhaul, Results Are Mixed
* China may exempt some U.S. farm exports from Zika rules
* Oregon State Fair offers new attractions
* Western Governors plan workshops on forest management
* As states first speed-enforcement cameras go up, Eastern Oregon exempt for now
* Tribes set to harvest largest fishery of year
* Life boat available to those treading murky Medicare waters
* Fire near Owyhee Reservoir grows to about 50,000 acres
* Big dreams
* Crews battle to contain fast-growing blaze
* Grants Pass Growers Market won’t accept Oregon Trail Card
* Dam removal document misses deadline, plan still on track
* School lead and copper testing complete
* Work the key to welfare reform — Guest Opinion
* Together, we can build a stronger Oregon Coast economy — Opinion
* Fred Wahl Marine gets $3.4 million in state funds
* Local projects funded by state
* Editorial: Citizen reviewers ponder Measure 97 — Opinion
* A fond farewell
* You Can Now Collect Patches From Oregon’s 53 State Parks
* Oregon collects $25.5M in taxes on recreational marijuana in first 7 months of 2016

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OREGON COLLECTS $25.5 MILLION IN MARIJUANA TAXES SINCE START OF THE YEAR (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon medical marijuana dispensaries have sold an estimated $102 million in recreational cannabis since January, when the state imposed a 25 percent sales tax on pot.

The state has collected about $25.5 million in marijuana taxes in the first six months of the year and is on track to meet state economists’ projections.
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WHO REALLY WOULD PAY IF MEASURE 97 PASSES? — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Where will the $3 billion or so that Measure 97 collects each year come from? The Legislative Revenue Office estimates that about two thirds of the total will be paid by us, Oregon’s consumers, that most of the rest would be shifted to the Internal Revenue Service, with the remainder borne by corporate shareholders about $200 million a year, which is enough to explain a lot of opposition and their employees about $100 million. I think that’s probably about right.
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NEW WILDFIRE THREATENS EASTERN OREGON STATE PARK (Portland Oregonian)

A wildfire that started Sunday afternoon is threatening a state park in eastern Oregon, officials said Monday morning.

The Cherry Road Fire, which was reported near Vale at 1 p.m. Sunday, is burning an estimated 31,210 acres.
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CITIZEN PANEL VOTES TO ENDORSE $3 BILLION CORPORATE TAX MEASURE (Portland Oregonian)

Supporters of a $3 billion corporate tax measure on the November ballot notched another win on Sunday, when a slim majority of a panel overseen by the Citizens’ Initiative Review Commission decided to endorse the measure.
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STUDY: OREGON ONE OF WORST STATES FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon ranked second to last for community college systems in a recent study by finance company WalletHub.

The personal-finance website conducted an analysis of 2016s Best & Worst Community Colleges and identified the states with the best and worst community college systems.
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RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARIES SELL $40 MILLION WORTH OF POT PRODUCTS IN JUNE, JULY (Eugene Register-Guard)

An expanded recreational marijuana menu including weed-laced foods and candies appears to have sharply boosted pot sales in Oregon.

State-licensed dispensaries sold $42.4 million worth of recreational marijuana in June and July alone, after having sold $59.6 million worth from January through May, based on tax amounts released Monday by the Oregon Department of Revenue.
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UO FACES HIGHER COSTS, BUT SHORTFALL IS MISNOMER — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Diane Dietz’s Aug. 14 story, UO turns to higher tuition to keep up with labor costs, was a welcome overview of the University of Oregon’s challenges as it focuses on delivering a world-class education to our students in the context of limited state support. The story demonstrated some of the complexities of the UOs budgeting process and the many variables that affect our operating budget of more than $800 million per year.
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CITIZENS PANEL ENDORSES CORPORATE SALES TAX MEASURE (Portland Tribune)

A citizens panel that reviews Oregon ballot initiatives for the voters pamphlet has endorsed a controversial corporate sales tax measure on the November ballot.

Measure 97 would levy a 2.5 percent tax on certain corporations Oregon sales exceeding $25 million.

The Citizens Initiative Review Commission heard from both sides of the measure before voting 11-to-9 on Sunday, Aug. 21, to endorse the measure. Its key findings will be published in the state voters guide.
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MOST MILLENNIALS WANT TO BUY A HOME, BUT CAN’T AFFORD ONE (Portland Tribune)

Portland’s housing shortage is especially hard on younger would-be homebuyers. The shortage of homes for sale is continuing to drive prices up, making it even more difficult for those just starting out in life to afford them, according to a recent national survey.
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MY VIEW: ENACT TENANTS’ BILL OF RIGHTS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

When it comes to solving Portland’s housing crisis, developers and local politicians prefer to keep the conversation focused on supply and demand. For many Portland decision-makers, building new units is the beginning, middle and end of the conversation.

After years of hearing this mantra, we should ask: If all we need to do is build more units, why does Portland’s housing and eviction crisis continue to spiral out of control? City and state policymakers should reject their myopic adherence to supply-only policy, and enact a basic set of tenant protections immediately.

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MY VIEW: STATE IS GETTING ANTI-BUSINESS REPUTATION — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

I often have said my head is a Republican and my heart is a Democrat because, despite my party registration, I end up supporting Democratic candidates for office based on their commitment and passion for this state.

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CITIZENS PANEL ENDORSES CORPORATE SALES TAX MEASURE (Portland Tribune)

A citizens panel that reviews Oregon ballot initiatives for the voters pamphlet has endorsed a controversial corporate sales tax measure on the November ballot.

Measure 97 would levy a 2.5 percent tax on certain corporations Oregon sales exceeding $25 million.
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STATE REVIEW PANEL NARROWLY BACKS M97 (Bend Bulletin)

-Citizens Initiative Review Commission supports $3B tax increase-

Supporters of a proposed tax on big businesses in Oregon that would bring in around $3 billion annually got another backing over the weekend when a slim majority of a panel that reviewed Ballot Measure 97 said it supports the measure.

Eleven of 20 members on the Citizens Initiative Review Commission, a group that intends to reflect the voting public of Oregon, decided after hearing from both sides of the measure that they support raising the tax on businesses with over $25 million in annual sales.

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POT GENERATES $25.5 MILLION IN TAXES SO FAR (Bend Bulletin)

-Tax collected in Oregon jumps about 71 percent in 2 months-

The Oregon Department of Revenue collected $25.5 million in tax from the sales of recreational marijuana this year as of July 31, the department announced Monday.

That represents $102 million in total sales thus far this year. The state collects a 25 percent tax on sales of recreational marijuana. That figure drops to 17 percent in 2017, although local governments may impose their own tax of up to 3 percent.

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14 FIRES IN THE REGION DEEMED ARSON (Bend Bulletin)

-Federal, state agencies seek help from public, urge caution-

At least 14 fires over the past three weeks in Central Oregon were intentionally set, according to state and federal officials.

Investigators are still trying to determine whether the suspected arson fires are the work of the same person or persons. Except for a cluster of small fires near Sisters last week and a large fire in Paisley, officials would not confirm which recent blazes are suspected arson fires.

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BEND IS TRYING TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO DEAL TOURISTS BUT IS ISNT THE ONLY ONE (Bend Bulletin)

-Some local residents see it as a growing problem with no easy solutions-

Traffic. Empty beer cans scattered throughout parks. Crowded trailhead parking lots.

These are just a few complaints often voiced in tourist communities, and Bend is no exception. From neighborhoods that feel like they’re overrun with vacation rentals to parking shortages downtown, Bend is facing a number of challenges directly related to its allure as a popular getaway.
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EDITORIAL: BEND STUCK WITH DIFFICULT UGB CHOICE — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The state gives Bend a terrible choice on expanding the urban growth boundary: Bend could stick with increasing scarcity of land or change Bends character and be allowed to grow a little.

Thursdays joint meeting of the city of Bend and the Deschutes County Commission is just one of many steps along to road to having the expanded UGB approved by the state Land Conservation and Development Commission. If LCDC approves the plan, the county will have to amend its own zoning ordinances to reflect the changes; this hearing sets that in motion.
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OREGON LAWMAKERS UNVEIL NEW WAY TO DISPOSE OF UNWANTED DRUGS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon lawmakers announced a new initiative Monday to make it easier to dispose of unused prescriptions.
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20 YEARS SINCE WELFARE’S OVERHAUL, RESULTS ARE MIXED (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Twenty years ago, welfare as Americans knew it ended.

President Bill Clinton signed a welfare overhaul bill that limited benefits and encouraged poor people to find jobs.

Ed Note: Section about Oregon.
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CHINA MAY EXEMPT SOME U.S. FARM EXPORTS FROM ZIKA RULES (Capital Press)

U.S. farm exports from regions unaffected by the Zika virus may eventually be excluded from Chinas new rules requiring mosquito treatments for incoming goods.

For now, however, agricultural exporters have to treat outgoing shipping containers with pesticides to kill mosquitoes, which spread the birth defect-causing virus.

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OREGON STATE FAIR OFFERS NEW ATTRACTIONS (Capital Press)

The 151st Oregon State Fair will feature new attractions, including an FFA greenhouse, a motorsports competition and a new carnival.

The fair runs from Aug. 26 through Sept. 5.

Fair spokesman Dan Cox said fair management this year is focusing on increasing attendance and drawing new audiences to the fair.
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WESTERN GOVERNORS PLAN WORKSHOPS ON FOREST MANAGEMENT (Capital Press)

The Western Governors Association plans five workshops to discuss forest and rangeland management practices and develop a compromise that could include more logging while also preserving forest and rangeland for tourism and recreation.
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AS STATE’S FIRST SPEED-ENFORCEMENT CAMERAS GO UP, EASTERN OREGON EXEMPT FOR NOW (East Oregonian)

Drivers in Portland will have a hard time getting away with speeding now that the city has put up the states first fixed speed enforcement cameras.

The cameras, which were installed on the Beaverton-Hillsboro Highway earlier this month by the Portland Bureau of Transportation, send photographs of every speeding car to the police, who can then mail tickets to the offenders without ever pulling them over.
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TRIBES SET TO HARVEST LARGEST FISHERY OF YEAR (East Oregonian)

The largest tribal fishery of the year is underway on the Columbia River.

Anglers from the Umatilla, Nez Perce, Warm Springs and Yakama tribes have started harvesting fall salmon, with an estimated 778,000 chinook expected to migrate past Bonneville Dam. Another 200,000 coho, 149,000 summer steelhead and 19,700 natural-origin Snake River chinook are predicted upriver.
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LIFE BOAT AVAILABLE TO THOSE TREADING MURKY MEDICARE WATERS (East Oregonian)

Medicare is such a complicated issue the state of Oregon has put out an 87-page guide to Medicare insurance plans.

The federal government, through grants from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides free help in navigating Medicares sometimes murky waters.
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FIRE NEAR OWYHEE RESERVOIR GROWS TO ABOUT 50,000 ACRES (Argus Observer)

A fire burning between Owyhee Reservoir and Homedale exploded overnight, reaching 50,000 acres and was burning along the eastside of the reservoir.

The Cherry Road Fire, burning brush and grass, was estimated to be 10 percent contained, according to information provided by Larry Moore, Vale District Bureau of Land Management spokesman.
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BIG DREAMS (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Butte Falls School District launches ambitious effort to turn old fish hatchery into a destination learning center-

Fish raceways used to raise millions of young salmon and steelhead for nearly a century could be used to grow shiitake mushrooms, wasabi and perhaps even shrimp, all cultivated by kids and sold for profit.
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CREWS BATTLE TO CONTAIN FAST-GROWING BLAZE (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Fire has burned an estimated 180 acres-

Fire crews battled wind, heat and dry weather Monday evening in a struggle to contain the fast-growing Cleveland Ridge fire north of Shady Cove.

Beginning around 4 p.m., the blaze swelled rapidly from about 10 acres to 180 acres by 8 p.m. Oregon Department of Forestry Southwest District spokesperson Melissa Cano said the rate of growth started to slow by around 9 p.m. after an afternoon of surging growth resulted in the ODF calling for support.

“This is the biggest fire in the district for 2016 fire season,” Cano said.

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GRANTS PASS GROWERS MARKET WON’T ACCEPT OREGON TRAIL CARD (Medford Mail Tribune)

If you want to use an Oregon Trail Card to pick up produce at a growers’ market, more than 100 accept them in Oregon.

Another 51 markets participate in Double Up Food Bucks, a program that gives low-income people twice the buying power with their food stamp money this summer.

But at the Grants Pass Growers Market, don’t try to use your Oregon Trail Card. After a five-year run of accepting them, the Oregon Trail Card is no longer accepted at the market.

Manager Bob Schaller said the market quit accommodating the cards in December because of concerns over personal liability and fraud.
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DAM REMOVAL DOCUMENT MISSES DEADLINE, PLAN STILL ON TRACK (Herald and News)

A plan to remove four Klamath River dams to improve water quality and habitat for fish and river communities will likely be submitted to the federal government in September, according to plan proponents.

The plan was originally set to be submitted to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FERC by the end of July, but has been delayed in order to address other steps needed to progress it forward.

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SCHOOL LEAD AND COPPER TESTING COMPLETE (Herald and News)

Throughout the summer, the Klamath county and city schools districts tested schools and facilities water for lead and copper and found that both districts have safe levels of the elements.

After the discovery of high lead levels in several Portland Public Schools drinking water, school districts across the state began testing their water, something not required by law.

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WORK THE KEY TO WELFARE REFORM — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

Its been 20 years now since the 1996 welfare reform, a rare bipartisan triumph, was signed into law. Critics predicted gloom and doom, but it soon proved to be a success. Why?

Simply put, it was because of the laws work requirements. But how those work requirements, well, worked is less well understood and that leaves us poorly prepared to maintain and build on that reform to help more Americans achieve self-sufficiency.

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TOGETHER, WE CAN BUILD A STRONGER OREGON COAST ECONOMY — OPINION (The World)

If opportunity were edible, the Oregon Coast would be capable of feeding many mouths. Up and down the coast from Brookings to Astoria, and particularly in Senate District 5 the area I represent, stretching from Tillamook to Coos Bay no one can dispute the stunning natural beauty and healthy living opportunities available to those who choose to make their homes here.

Ed. Note: Guest editorial written by Sen. Arnie Roblan _________________________________________

FRED WAHL MARINE GETS $3.4 MILLION IN STATE FUNDS (The World)

Fred Wahl Marine Construction will get a long-awaited $3.4 million ConnectOregon grant for its $8.75 million Bolon Island expansion.

The Oregon Transportation Commission approved the funding at its Aug. 19 meeting in Klamath Falls, according to Region 3 planning manager Mike Baker.
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LOCAL PROJECTS FUNDED BY STATE (Daily Astorian)

The state Transportation Committee on Friday approved $1.54 million to help the Port of Astoria repair storm damage throughout the central waterfront, and $665,000 for Life Flight Network to build a new hangar at the Astoria Regional Airport.
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EDITORIAL: CITIZEN REVIEWERS PONDER MEASURE 97 — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The members of the Citizens’ Initiative Review panel that was examining Measure 97, the proposal for a corporate gross receipts tax, wrapped up their work on Sunday afternoon and left Monmouth, where they had gathered for four days of work.

They left behind a straightforward summary of the measure’s pros and cons.

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A FOND FAREWELL (Ashland Daily Tidings)

-Bates’ devotion to health care, patients highlighted in memorial service-

Leaders from near and far and across the political aisle were among hundreds who paid their respects to State Senator Dr. Alan Bates at a memorial service Saturday.

Nearly 400 people filled the Rogue River Room at Southern Oregon University, among them Republican Rep. Greg Walden and former Gov. John Kitzhaber, who spoke at the service.
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YOU CAN NOW COLLECT PATCHES FROM OREGON’S 53 STATE PARKS (Willamette Week)

The first ten released include Silver Falls, Ft. Stevens and Smith Rock.

For collectors who fall somewhere between state quarter numismatists and amateur Pokemon trainers, there is now a hipper, more socially responsible, and more Oregon-centric item to collect.
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OREGON COLLECTS $25.5M IN TAXES ON RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA IN FIRST 7 MONTHS OF 2016 (KATU)

Tax receipts from recreational marijuana sales have packed more green into Oregon’s coffers than initially anticipated.

Through July 31, the Department of Revenue had processed $25.5 million in marijuana tax payments in calendar year 2016 – an average of $3.64 million per month.
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Posted in Oregon Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon Department of Revenue, Oregon Department of State Lands, Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission, Oregon Housing & Community Services, Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission, Oregon Liquor Control Commission, Oregon Parks & Recreation Department, Oregon Transportation Commission, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on August 23, 2016 OSL eClips

August 22, 2016 eClips Weekend Edition

State Library eClips

* 2 men will be billed $37 million for 2015 Stouts Creek fire, forestry officials say
* Three-dozen employers expected at Beaverton job-fair for laid off tech workers
* Arson suspected in 3,500-acre Withers Fire burning in southern Oregon
* Experts weigh in on Oregon’s ‘castle law,’ copycat effect after spate of home intruder shootings
* Shellfish infected by bacteria that kills humans as ocean temperatures rise
* Sex abuse, poor supervision alleged at Oregon foster program
* Don’t eat produce from any Portland school garden, officials warn
* Which Oregon university has the most loan debt?
* Hunters and anglers can feed vultures as well as their families
* Burned: Lawmakers call for change within U.S. Forest Service
* Health advisory issued for Ross Island Lagoon
* Who really would pay if Measure 97 passes? — Guest Opinion
* Forest fuels pileup, not firefighter failure, made Canyon Creek fire a tragedy — Guest Opinion
* Who asks Gov. Brown for a veto? Lobbyists, advisers, citizens
* Include tools in this week’s Think Big kit
* State declines action in dirt case
* Oregon to receive half million for disabilities education
* Repair work on 4 bridges along Highway 126 in Springfield begins Sunday
* Schools seek delay in Oregon’s P.E. requirement
* St. Helens awarded grant to fund transportation improvement plan
* Radon levels require additional tests at Lake Grove Elementary School
* Putting Oregon’s records law to the test
* Oregon, county spar over $1.4 billion timber lawsuit
* Bend’s outdoors paradise comes with some peril
* Transportation projects awarded state money
* State plans to net chub from East, Paulina lakes
* Fire on Pine Mountain 60 percent contained
* Editorial: Legislators should look at gas tax formula — Opinion
* Column: Death by medical error: Adding context to scary headlines — Guest Opinion
* Column: Is Obamacare on the brink? — Guest Opinion
* Crooked River legislation results in massive declines in fish populations — Guest Opinion
* Editorial: COCC should give data to Bend police — Opinion
* Fungal Disease Grows Among Douglas Fir Trees On Oregon Coast
* Ryan Bundy Wants Oregon Governor To Testify For His Trial
* Portlanders Warned Against Eating Produce From School Gardens
* Underfunded wildlife enforcement in the Pacific Northwest fails to keep up with poachers
* Pot plants at Oregon State Fair a first
* Umatilla prisons first pow wow digs into the roots
* Marine patrol works to protect boats from McNary Dam, vice versa
* Irrigation district responds to lawsuit
* Walden: Combating mental illness and drug addiction — Guest Opinion
* PERS pay
* TVCC is now tobacco-free and that’s good news — Opinion
* Our View: Public records task force falls short — Opinion
* Guest Opinion: Safe, affordable transportation options for all — Guest Opinion
* ‘Doc’ to all
* Airport awarded $2.8M for hangar
* Dam removal document misses deadline, plan still on track
* Withers Fire holds at 56 percent containment
* Highway group hears economic update
* Airport awarded $2.8M for hangar
* Advisory vote not likely to change anybody’s beliefs about dam removal — Opinion
* Research: Childhood hunger can lead to adult violence — Guest Opinion
* Scottsburg Bridge replacement may need to wait
* CASA program offers an opportunity to serve children
* Thrill-ride accidents spark new demands for regulation
* New businesses can anchor on the REEF
* Editorial: Enforcement will quell beach driving complaints — Opinion
* Think Too Much: Citizens take a deep dive into measures — Opinion
* Editorial: A solution to Zika funding woes — Opinion
* Turning back the clock
* Solar eclipse countdown begins
* Fire officials urging caution to prevent fires
* Motor Voter law pays off
* Another voice: The greenest corner in the richest nation on earth — Guest Opinion
* Mosquito-borne disease devastates rabbit herd in Roberts Creek
* Public records report names Roseburg’s Sen. Kruse
* Interactive Map Puts Portland Crime in Perspective – Hint: Its Safe Out There
* Oregon Is in the Midst of an Explosion of Female Political Power
* What’s the Deal with Portland’s Rising Rents?
* Portland’s Cheapest Apartments Are Seeing the Fastest Rent Spikes
* The complications of ID for nonbinary people and how it could change soon

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2 MEN WILL BE BILLED $37 MILLION FOR 2015 STOUTS CREEK FIRE, FORESTRY OFFICIALS SAY (Portland Oregonian)

Last summer, the Stouts Creek fire burned for more than a month, scorching more than 26,000 acres. Now the men blamed for starting it are expected to reimburse the government the estimated $37 million it cost to put it out.

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THREE-DOZEN EMPLOYERS EXPECTED AT BEAVERTON JOB-FAIR FOR LAID OFF TECH WORKERS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s laid-off tech workers have another chance to meet with prospective employers this week at an August 24 job fair in Beaverton.

State-backed employment agency WorkSource Oregon and the Intel Eliminati an association of former Intel employees  have organized the event, the second of its kind since Intel’s layoffs began in April.

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ARSON SUSPECTED IN 3,500-ACRE WITHERS FIRE BURNING IN SOUTHERN OREGON (Portland Oregonian)

The Withers Fire, which has burned almost 3,500 acres in southern Oregon, was started intentionally, officials announced Sunday, as containment numbers grew to 65 percent despite high temperatures and Red Flag warnings for the area.

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EXPERTS WEIGH IN ON OREGON’S ‘CASTLE LAW,’ COPYCAT EFFECT AFTER SPATE OF HOME INTRUDER SHOOTINGS (Portland Oregonian)

Tara-Alexis Ford fired one bullet at the stranger in her daughter’s bedroom.

Ford, 33, had come back to her Powellhurst-Gilbert home with her two children, 5 and 10, early June 26 to find a man had broken in.

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SHELLFISH INFECTED BY BACTERIA THAT KILLS HUMANS AS OCEAN TEMPERATURES RISE (Portland Oregonian)

Norovirus is the least of your worries. A sometimes-fatal bacteria is infecting more shellfish, even as those species are moving northward to escape warmer ocean waters.

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SEX ABUSE, POOR SUPERVISION ALLEGED AT OREGON FOSTER PROGRAM (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Human Services is investigating accusations that workers at a residential program for boys and young men in Eastern Oregon provided poor supervision and failed to report alleged sex abuse by a female staffer.

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DON’T EAT PRODUCE FROM ANY PORTLAND SCHOOL GARDEN, OFFICIALS WARN (Portland Oregonian)

Portland Public Schools warned employees and families Friday not to eat produce from any school garden, citing guidance from the Oregon Health Authority.

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WHICH OREGON UNIVERSITY HAS THE MOST LOAN DEBT? (Portland Oregonian)

Chances are, if you went to school at Linfield College or Portland State University, you have more debt than, say, someone who went to Reed College.

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HUNTERS AND ANGLERS CAN FEED VULTURES AS WELL AS THEIR FAMILIES (Portland Oregonian)

Hunters and anglers are no strangers to nature’s ultimate scavenger, but their neighbors may wonder.

…Why do vultures show up at the Monroes’ house on Thursdays?

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BURNED: LAWMAKERS CALL FOR CHANGE WITHIN U.S. FOREST SERVICE (Portland Oregonian)

A bipartisan group of local, state and federal lawmakers in Oregon is renewing calls for a basic overhaul of the U.S. Forest Service.

Their comments came this week in the wake of an investigation by The Oregonian/OregonLive that revealed how years of failed Forest Service policy and flawed budgets helped fuel the catastrophic Canyon Creek fire in August 2015.

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HEALTH ADVISORY ISSUED FOR ROSS ISLAND LAGOON (Portland Oregonian)

Heath officials are asking people to stay out of the Ross Island Lagoon after finding a blue-green algae bloom in the water.

The Oregon Health Authority issued a health advisory Friday for both the lagoon and the mouth of the lagoon.

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WHO REALLY WOULD PAY IF MEASURE 97 PASSES? — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Where will the $3 billion or so that Measure 97 collects each year come from? The Legislative Revenue Office estimates that about two thirds of the total will be paid by us, Oregon’s consumers, that most of the rest would be shifted to the Internal Revenue Service, with the remainder borne by corporate shareholders about $200 million a year, which is enough to explain a lot of opposition and their employees about $100 million. I think that’s probably about right.

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FOREST FUELS PILEUP, NOT FIREFIGHTER FAILURE, MADE CANYON CREEK FIRE A TRAGEDY — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

A recent Oregonian/OregonLive article “Burned,” Aug. 14 concludes mismanagement by the U.S. Forest Service resulted in the destruction of 43 homes during the 2015 Canyon Creek Complex fire. As scientists with decades of experience in fire ecology and wildland fire management, we believe this reporting is deeply flawed.

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WHO ASKS GOV. BROWN FOR A VETO? LOBBYISTS, ADVISERS, CITIZENS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown didn’t veto a single bill from the legislative session earlier this year, but it wasn’t for lack of trying.

Brown faced pressure to veto at least four bills passed in 2016, according to emails between staff in the Governor’s Office released to the Statesman Journal via public records request.

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INCLUDE TOOLS IN THIS WEEK’S THINK BIG KIT (Salem Statesman Journal)

In week No. 9, the Statesman Journal and the American Red Cross recommend adding tools to your disaster-preparedness kit. These are tools most residents already have in their garages and basements, but in the event of an earthquake, such as a rupture of the Cascadia Subduction Zone, it’s highly likely items in these areas will shift and move.

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STATE DECLINES ACTION IN DIRT CASE (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Government Ethics Commission wont investigate any further the complaint made by Silver Falls School Board member Todd White against former Chairman Tim Roth for receiving loads of fill dirt from the turf project at the football field this summer.

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OREGON TO RECEIVE HALF MILLION FOR DISABILITIES EDUCATION (Salem Statesman Journal)

The U.S. Department of Education is awarding $7 million in grants to seven states to recruit and train teachers, principals and other personnel to provide quality education for children with disabilities, including Oregon.

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REPAIR WORK ON 4 BRIDGES ALONG HIGHWAY 126 IN SPRINGFIELD BEGINS SUNDAY (Eugene Register-Guard)

The Oregon Department of Transportation is having to repair four bridges on Highway 126 in Springfield at a cost of $1.1 million after a protective coating on them failed, ODOT said.

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SCHOOLS SEEK DELAY IN OREGON’S P.E. REQUIREMENT (Portland Tribune)

With less than 10 percent of Oregon’s K-8 schools providing the minimum number of weekly physical education minutes mandated by the Legislature nine years ago, districts want lawmakers to extend the fall 2017 compliance deadline.

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ST. HELENS AWARDED GRANT TO FUND TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PLAN (Portland Tribune)

The city of St. Helens will likely receive a $175,000 grant to create a detailed transportation plan to improve access from Highway 30 to the citys waterfront property along the Columbia River.

St. Helens was one of 15 cities in Oregon to receive grants ranging from $75,000 to $200,000 from the Transportation and Growth Management Program grant, which is supported by the Department of Land Conservation and Development and the Oregon Department of Transportation, according a press release sent out Wednesday, Aug. 17.

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RADON LEVELS REQUIRE ADDITIONAL TESTS AT LAKE GROVE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (Portland Tribune)

The Lake Oswego School District has found radon levels at Lake Grove Elementary School that will require follow-up testing.

To ready itself for new state requirements, the district conducted radon testing at six locations at Lake Grove in June, according to Nancy Duin, the district’s director of communications. Results from one of those locations  Classroom 3  showed the level of radon at 4.3 picocuries per liter pCi/L, which is slightly above the level at which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommends a follow-up test.

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PUTTING OREGON’S RECORDS LAW TO THE TEST (Portland Tribune)

Two weeks ago, the states top lawyer revealed how she wants to fix what she calls a car wreck  Oregon’s troubled public records law.

That’s how Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum described the law when she visited our investigative reporting class last spring at the University of Oregon.

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OREGON, COUNTY SPAR OVER $1.4 BILLION TIMBER LAWSUIT (Portland Tribune)

Linn County shouldn’t be allowed to represent other counties in a lawsuit seeking $1.4 billion from Oregon over its forest management practices, according to the states attorneys.

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BEND’S OUTDOORS PARADISE COMES WITH SOME PERIL (Bend Bulletin)

-Tourists can find themselves in trouble on the river or on trails-

It was a hot and sunny August day in 2012 when Sharie Smith, 50, and Angelia Chase, 48, decided to go rafting on the Deschutes River while visiting from Portland.

But their trip turned deadly when they entered a treacherous stretch of rapids in an inflatable rubber raft. Authorities found Chase clinging to the riverbank, where she was rescued by Bend Fire. But Smith drowned; her body was found in the Deschutes River below Lava Island Falls.

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TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS AWARDED STATE MONEY (Bend Bulletin) h

-Work to take place at Bend, Redmond, Prineville airports-

Five transportation projects in Central Oregon are in line to share $4.8 million in state funding, including money that would help pay for a new transit station in Redmond and a dedicated heliport at Bend Airport.

The state’s ConnectOregon program distributes grants to nonhighway infrastructure projects, including airports, rail, trails and ports using lottery-backed bonds. The Oregon Transportation Commission on Friday approved funding for 39 projects across the state totaling $49.5 million.

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STATE PLANS TO NET CHUB FROM EAST, PAULINA LAKES (Bend Bulletin)

-Work could start next summer-

An effort to remove tui chub and blue chub from East and Paulina lakes could start next summer, but it would involve using nets rather than the poison used in other water bodies that also kills other fish.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has previously used a poison, rotenone, to kill the chub in other lakes. But that chemical would not be effective in East and Paulina lakes partly because of the lakes size, depth and springs where chub could escape, according to the department.

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FIRE ON PINE MOUNTAIN 60 PERCENT CONTAINED (Bend Bulletin)

A wildfire burning on the southeast side of Pine Mountain, east of Bend, is now 60 percent contained, according to the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center.

The fire grew from 20 acres Friday night to 252 acres on Saturday morning. Although it was burning uphill toward the University of Oregon’s Pine Mountain Observatory on Friday night, it was still about 2 miles away from it, Lisa Clark, an information officer with the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center, said Saturday morning.

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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATORS SHOULD LOOK AT GAS TAX FORMULA — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s gas tax may not be the best way to pay for roads in the future, but there’s a lot to like about it.

A gas tax is related to road use. If you drive more, you pay more tax. Electric vehicles, hybrids and other alternative fuel sources complicate matters.

Legislators are preparing to have a discussion next session about a transportation package to fix more state roads and bridges that need repairs. But they should also take a look at how the money collected under the fuel tax is distributed.

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COLUMN: DEATH BY MEDICAL ERROR: ADDING CONTEXT TO SCARY HEADLINES — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

When I started out as a doctor in 1999, the Institute of Medicine published a blockbuster report that declared up to 98,000 people were dying in U.S. hospitals each year as a result of preventable medical errors. Just a few months ago, a study in the BMJ declared that number has now risen to more than 250,000, making preventable medical errors in hospitals the third-largest cause of death in the country in 2013.

Those numbers warrant some further reflection. Although medical errors should concern us all, these statistics are more controversial than you might think.

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COLUMN: IS OBAMACARE ON THE BRINK? — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Outside the legal challenges it previously faced, the Affordable Care Act has never been as threatened as it is right now.

President Barack Obama’s signature law has so destabilized the individual market for insurance that three large companies have announced they are better off not participating in the exchanges.

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CROOKED RIVER LEGISLATION RESULTS IN MASSIVE DECLINES IN FISH POPULATIONS — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The 2016 Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife annual electro shocking survey of fish populations in the upper Wild & Scenic section of the Crooked River revealed that, during the past year, the wild redband trout population suffered a catastrophic 86.4 percent reduction in numbers while the native mountain whitefish mortality was an alarming 45.3 percent.

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EDITORIAL: COCC SHOULD GIVE DATA TO BEND POLICE — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Crime statistics help law enforcement decide where to deploy officers to make a city safer. But it doesn’t work if the statistics are bad. And Bend has incomplete stats.

Central Oregon Community College Campus Safety has not been fully reporting crimes on campus to the Bend Police.

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FUNGAL DISEASE GROWS AMONG DOUGLAS FIR TREES ON OREGON COAST (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A new survey finds a growing number of Douglas fir trees in the Oregon Coast Range have been infected over the past decade with the fungal disease known as Swiss needle cast.

Researchers with Oregon State University say the epidemic has grown by as much as 30 percent in a single year.

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RYAN BUNDY WANTS OREGON GOVERNOR TO TESTIFY FOR HIS TRIAL (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Ryan Bundy, one of the leaders of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupation, issued a subpoena this week to compel testimony from Oregon’s top government official related to his criminal trial.

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PORTLANDERS WARNED AGAINST EATING PRODUCE FROM SCHOOL GARDENS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Portland Public Schools is putting a virtual do not eat sign at the gates to about 75 community gardens. The Oregon Health Authority says it didn’t directly advise Portland, but the district found elevated lead levels in water spigots that may be used for gardening.

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UNDERFUNDED WILDLIFE ENFORCEMENT IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FAILS TO KEEP UP WITH POACHERS (Jefferson Public Radio)

Underfunding and low prioritization of wildlife crimes are hampering efforts to clamp down on wildlife poaching in the Pacific Northwest.

While poaching of animals like rhinos and elephants makes global headlines, in the US, species with horns are also ripe for targeting. The trophy antlers of a western mule deer can fetch $1,000 or more. In the face of strict limits on hunting, poachers often step in to meet the demand.

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POT PLANTS AT OREGON STATE FAIR A FIRST (Capital Press)

Nine living marijuana plants will be displayed at the Oregon State Fair in a first of its kind event for the United States starting next Friday.

The exhibit of the non-flowering, immature plants brings pot cultivation more into the agricultural mainstream less than two years after Oregon voters legalized recreational marijuana. The Oregon Cannabis Business Council, which organized the exhibit, says its the first time live cannabis will be shown at a state fair anywhere in the U.S.

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UMATILLA PRISON’S FIRST POW WOW DIGS INTO THE ROOTS (East Oregonian)

People sang, danced and drummed Saturday in Umatilla, behind the high prison fence.

Two Rivers Correctional Institution held its first powwow, attended by 63 inmates, more than 50 guests and 27 representatives from American Indian tribes and organizations. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and others provided salmon, huckleberries and traditional foods for the event. Prison administrators even directed staff overseeing the powwow to forgo uniforms for a more casual approach, including khakis, polos and shorts.

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MARINE PATROL WORKS TO PROTECT BOATS FROM MCNARY DAM, VICE VERSA (East Oregonian)

The Columbia River is a beacon for recreation. On any given summer day its shores are scattered with swimmers and anglers. Boats dot its waters, some on board fishing and some out for a relaxing ride.

Its the job of Sgt. Dave Johnson of the Umatilla County Sheriffs Office to monitor activity and help keep the waters safe for everyone.

This river is very hazardous, Johnson said.

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IRRIGATION DISTRICT RESPONDS TO LAWSUIT (East Oregonian)

The Westland Irrigation District has responded to a lawsuit filed by long-time patrons who argue they’ve been cheated out of water for years to benefit large farms with junior water rights.

Attorneys for the district are trying to get the case dismissed from federal court over lack of jurisdiction. A motion was filed Friday which states the plaintiffs did not exhaust their legal remedies by bringing their claims to the state first.

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WALDEN: COMBATING MENTAL ILLNESS AND DRUG ADDICTION — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

Across Oregon, Ive talked with many families who are struggling with mental illness and drug addiction. These touch every segment of our communities, no matter where you live or what you look like. Tragically, they often carry with them a major stigma in society, and help is hard to find. Fortunately, Congress is working in a bipartisan way to help solve these problems and offer relief to those who need help.

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PERS PAY (Argus Observer)

Local governments across Oregon, including those in Malheur County, are bracing for increases they will see in their payments into the Oregon Public Employees Retirement System.

Exact payment information will be released in September. In the meantime, Oregon Senate Republicans have produced a reform plan they believe will pass legal muster and reduce local governments payment into PERS.

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TVCC IS NOW TOBACCO-FREE AND THAT’S GOOD NEWS — OPINION (Argus Observer)

Treasure Valley Community College achieved a milestone this week.

The college banned tobacco products from its campuses after a unanimous Board of Directors vote Tuesday. The ban applies to cigarettes and smokeless products, including chewing tobacco and any form of vaping.

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OUR VIEW: PUBLIC RECORDS TASK FORCE FALLS SHORT — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Sometimes it takes a new generation to expose the complacency of their elders. A couple of University of Oregon School of Journalism students did that very well when they set out to test the state’s public records law in a very creative way _________________________________________

GUEST OPINION: SAFE, AFFORDABLE TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS FOR ALL — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Rural residents. Low-income households. Young people. The elderly. People with disabilities. Veterans. Communities of color.

These are some of the people who need to be considered when Oregons policy makers  Republicans and Democrats alike  consider a new transportation package in the 2017 session of the Oregon Legislature.

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‘DOC’ TO ALL (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Bates cared for patients, friends and family, fellow legislators and for the future of health care in Oregon-

Alan Doc Bates had a secret that only his closest family members knew, but it wouldn’t necessarily come as a surprise to his many close friends.

Alan was a romantic, says his wife, Laurie Bates. Every year on our anniversary, he insisted on planning it out for us. We would listen to music, have a glass of wine, and it would be wonderful. He just loved me, unconditionally.

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AIRPORT AWARDED $2.8M FOR HANGAR (Herald and News)

The Crater Lake-Klamath Falls Regional Airport was awarded a $2.8 million grant from the Oregon Transportation Commission Friday. The commission met in Klamath Falls.

The money, which comes from the non-transportation arm of ConnectOregon, will be used to build an aircraft maintenance facility to service commercial airliners.

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DAM REMOVAL DOCUMENT MISSES DEADLINE, PLAN STILL ON TRACK (Herald and News)

A plan to remove four Klamath River dams to improve water quality and habitat for fish and river communities will likely be submitted to the federal government in September, according to plan proponents.

The plan was originally set to be submitted to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FERC by the end of July, but has been delayed in order to address other steps needed to progress it forward.

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WITHERS FIRE HOLDS AT 56 PERCENT CONTAINMENT (Herald and News)

The Withers Fire held at 56 percent containment Saturday as threat levels for the Paisley area have been reduced.

According to a Saturday afternoon news release, the fire was still burning at 3,424 acres with 350 personnel assigned to the blaze including hand, engine, bulldozer and air crews. These figures saw no change from information released Friday night.

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HIGHWAY GROUP HEARS ECONOMIC UPDATE (Herald and News)

A few, large economic development projects are in the works in Klamath and Lake counties, as the Oregon Transportation Commission found out Friday.

The commission met for two days in Klamath Falls to hear the updates, discuss road improvments and award grants. For example, itt awarded the Crater Lake-Klamath Falls Regional Airport a $2.8 million grant for a new hangar, among other grants.

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AIRPORT AWARDED $2.8M FOR HANGAR (Herald and News)

The Crater Lake-Klamath Falls Regional Airport was awarded a $2.8 million grant from the Oregon Transportation Commission Friday. The commission met in Klamath Falls.

The money, which comes from the non-transportation arm of ConnectOregon, will be used to build an aircraft maintenance facility to service commercial airliners.

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ADVISORY VOTE NOT LIKELY TO CHANGE ANYBODY’S BELIEFS ABOUT DAM REMOVAL — OPINION (Herald and News)

Whats the point of another vote about removing dams from the Klamath River?

Its an advisory vote and wouldn’t commit commissioners to follow them. Perhaps its aimed at morally binding a set of commissioners that will be profoundly different after the first of year when two new commissioners join the three-member board.

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RESEARCH: CHILDHOOD HUNGER CAN LEAD TO ADULT VIOLENCE — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

It would not be a stretch of the imagination to presume that if you are reading this column, you will have not experienced hunger today.

Yet, the same cannot be said for many young children in El Paso, across the United States and worldwide.

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SCOTTSBURG BRIDGE REPLACEMENT MAY NEED TO WAIT (The World)

Construction of a new bridge may need to wait until 2019 or longer because of a lack of $37 million.

Oregon Department of Transportation officials said “while the money needed to build the bridge hasn’t been secured yet, ODOT is designing a new bridge that will better accommodate modern traffic.”

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CASA PROGRAM OFFERS AN OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE CHILDREN (The World)

At the office of Coos County CASA, a whiteboard over director Greg Dalton’s desk gets updated regularly.

On Aug. 15, it read, “Today we have 36 CASAs advocating for 76 children 12 kids waiting”

It’s a constant reminder to anyone who enters the office that more people are needed to volunteer as Court Appointed Special Advocates. And if you think you might like to do that, a CASA training is coming up in September.

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THRILL-RIDE ACCIDENTS SPARK NEW DEMANDS FOR REGULATION (The World)

In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over.

The grisly death of a 10-year-old boy on a Kansas water slide and a Ferris wheel accident that injured three little girls at a county fair in Tennessee this summer have focused attention on what safety experts say is an alarming truth about amusement rides: How closely they are regulated varies greatly from state to state.

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NEW BUSINESSES CAN ANCHOR ON THE REEF (The World)

-Business incubator could open in 2018-

A new business incubator is in the works in downtown Coos Bay.

The REEF: Rural Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Framework is one of four pilot incubators conceived by Business Oregon, the state’s economic development agency, as a way to encourage business startups in rural Oregon.

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EDITORIAL: ENFORCEMENT WILL QUELL BEACH DRIVING COMPLAINTS — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Driving on the beach on the North Coast and sections of the Long Beach Peninsula is a privilege and not a right. So is using the beach in the first place.

Some beachfront homeowners in Gearhart and Warrenton are complaining, and understandably so, that beach driving and bad behavior have been at times, out of control, especially on July Fourth.

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THINK TOO MUCH: CITIZENS TAKE A DEEP DIVE INTO MEASURES — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

In a thankfully air-conditioned conference room at Western Oregon University, roughly two dozen Oregonians, a randomly selected group of men and women from throughout the state, have gathered around a U-shaped collection of tables.

It is Friday, the second day of the Citizens’ Initiative Review into Measure 97, the corporate gross-receipts measure on the November ballot.

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EDITORIAL: A SOLUTION TO ZIKA FUNDING WOES — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

When last we checked in with the debate about how best to fund research into the Zika virus, Congress was kicking around various proposals, while evidence was mounting that the virus would be with us for the duration.

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TURNING BACK THE CLOCK (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

At 11 a.m. Friday it is already 85 degrees, hot and stifling, on a day in which the temperatures will surpass 100 in Corvallis. The sky is hazy. A mixture of clouds and contrails streaks the across the field of view as we look down the ridge to the east.

We are gathered for a tour at a trailhead at the end of Northwest Lester Avenue where hikers normally enter the Chip Ross Natural Area.

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SOLAR ECLIPSE COUNTDOWN BEGINS (Blue Mountain Eagle)

Pay attention to where the sun is on Sunday, Aug. 21, at 10:21 a.m., because on that date next year, people in Grant County can view a full solar eclipse  experiencing totality.

The 365-day countdown begins Sunday.

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FIRE OFFICIALS URGING CAUTION TO PREVENT FIRES (LaGrande Observer)

-Indicators used to measure seasonal fire severity point to extreme fire conditions-

High temperatures and dry conditions have local fire managers battening down the hatches for a potentially dangerous fire weekend.

Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker is urging all Oregonians to take the utmost care and use thorough caution to prevent wildfires.

A majority of this years wildfires have been human caused, Walker said. This demonstrates that all of us need to take responsibility for protecting ourselves and our neighbors by preventing wildfires in these extreme conditions.

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MOTOR VOTER LAW PAYS OFF (LaGrande Observer)

-Oregon Motor Vehicle law increases registered voters-

A new law signed by Governor Kate Brown during the 2015 legislative session has increased the number of registered voters across the state.

The Oregon Motor Voter Law went into effect in January and automatically sends residents a voter registration card when they apply for a drivers license, identification card or a drivers permit, although residents must be 18 years old to vote.

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ANOTHER VOICE: THE GREENEST CORNER IN THE RICHEST NATION ON EARTH — GUEST OPINION (Hood River News)

The fiery wreck of an oil train at Mosier is what galvanized many of us to sit on the Burlington Northern railroad tracks in downtown Vancouver on June 18. Twenty-one protesters, ranging in age from 20 to 84, were repeatedly warned of 90 days jail time and $1,000 fines for criminal trespassing. And still, we sat.

Protesters got arrested and briefly jailed. Our legal status remained in limbo until recently, when criminal charges were dismissed.

Now we can talk.

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MOSQUITO-BORNE DISEASE DEVASTATES RABBIT HERD IN ROBERTS CREEK (Douglas County News-Review)

A spinner and weaver from the Roberts Creek area, Barbara Ferguson has spent 30 years of her life raising Angora rabbits for their soft fur and fertilizing manure, and they became a big part of her life.

They’re not just rabbits, they’re part of my family, Ferguson said.

As of June, Ferguson was taking care of about 90 rabbits, until a highly infectious mosquito-borne disease called myxomatosis spread through her animals, killing all but one.

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PUBLIC RECORDS REPORT NAMES ROSEBURG’S SEN. KRUSE (Douglas County News-Review)

A story that appeared in the Portland Tribune Thursday called out Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, for not responding to a public records request. The request was for copies of his emails and other communications sent and received regarding the states Public Records Law Reform Task Force, on which he serves.

The report was the end result of a journalism project by two University of Oregon students who graduated this year. They wanted to see how open the people charged with improving the states public records law would be when it came to their own records.

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INTERACTIVE MAP PUTS PORTLAND CRIME IN PERSPECTIVE – HINT: ITS SAFE OUT THERE (Willamette Week)

-The bullets may be flying but not like they do in other cities or did here 40 years ago.-

If you watch television news or read the daily paper, it’s easy to get the impression Portland is a dangerous place. One presidential candidate would like people to believe that’s the case as well.

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OREGON IS IN THE MIDST OF AN EXPLOSION OF FEMALE POLITICAL POWER (Willamette Week)

-Oregon: Where women rule.-

As at least some of the nation celebrates former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton’s shattering a monumental glass ceiling with her history-making nomination for president, the reaction in Oregon could be “what took so long?”

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WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH PORTLAND’S RISING RENTS? (Willamette Week)

-No issue is of greater concern to Portlanders right now than rising rents.-

Because it’s true. Rents are climbing even in parts of Portland where apartments traditionally could be had for reasonable sums.

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PORTLAND’S CHEAPEST APARTMENTS ARE SEEING THE FASTEST RENT SPIKES (Willamette Week)

-The Big Number: $997-

$997.

That’s the average monthly rent for a Portland apartment in a building constructed during the 1970s.

Buildings from that decade provide the city’s cheapest rents because of a trickle-down effect: As they age and as new units are built, these vintage units become less desirable.

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THE COMPLICATIONS OF ID FOR NONBINARY PEOPLE AND HOW IT COULD CHANGE SOON (PBS)

Jamie Shupe entered the military years before most of the country had heard of the word nonbinary.

Shupe, who uses the pronoun they, was born in 1963 and grew up in southern Maryland knowing that the way the rest of the world saw them  male  was wrong. But any efforts to correct that, or act less masculine, were met with abuse: a slap from their mother, someone calling them a sissy.

Ed Note: Discusses changes in Oregon regarding this issue.

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August 22, 2016 OSL eClips

* 2 Oregon universities make most LGBTQ-friendly campus list
* Who really would pay if Measure 97 passes? — Guest Opinion
* New court ruling limits historic designation statute
* Get the lead out of Oregon’s school water — Opinion
* There’s lots brewing at Hops & Brewing Archives at OSU
* Oregon prison holds its first American Indian powwow
* Ballot measure tide ebbs — Opinion
* Critter camera catches black bear in Central Oregon
* Restoration work continues on Whychus Creek
* Forest roads to reopen near Sheridan Fire
* Arson Suspected In At Least 14 Central Oregon Wildfires
* 20 Years Since Welfare’s Overhaul, Results Are Mixed
* Crazy Snake Worm
* Knocking em down
* 1 fire nearly contained, 1 burns into wilderness
* Big dreams
* Editorial: Public records proposal marks a small step forward — Opinion
* Hundreds Gather to Remember Senator Alan Bates
* The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: A Ranking of State Economies
* 2 men suspected of starting Oregon fire could get $37 million bill
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2 OREGON UNIVERSITIES MAKE MOST LGBTQ-FRIENDLY CAMPUS LIST (Portland Oregonian)

Portland State and Southern Oregon University are two of the most LGBTQ-friendly campuses in the nation, according to an annual list released Monday.

The Oregon universities ranked in the top 30 of the Campus Pride Index, which has recognized colleges and universities with LGBTQ-inclusive policies, programs and amenities since 2007.

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WHO REALLY WOULD PAY IF MEASURE 97 PASSES? — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Where will the $3 billion or so that Measure 97 collects each year come from? The Legislative Revenue Office estimates that about two thirds of the total will be paid by us, Oregon’s consumers, that most of the rest would be shifted to the Internal Revenue Service, with the remainder borne by corporate shareholders about $200 million a year, which is enough to explain a lot of opposition and their employees about $100 million. I think that’s probably about right.

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NEW COURT RULING LIMITS HISTORIC DESIGNATION STATUTE (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Supreme Court has narrowed property owners’ options for removing their historic designation.

The court’s Aug. 4 decision allows only the original property owner to request the local government remove the historic designation; subsequent owners can not make such a request.

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GET THE LEAD OUT OF OREGON’S SCHOOL WATER — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Lead contamination from one school faucet in the Salem-Keizer School District was worse than in Flint, Michigan  the city whose lead-tainted water launched a national outcry.

Salem-Keizer’s startling finding at Pringle Elementary School illustrates the pervasiveness, and the danger, of lead in water.

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THERE’S LOTS BREWING AT HOPS & BREWING ARCHIVES AT OSU (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon’s craft brewing industry may not be growing at the gallop it was in the mid-2000s, but Tiah Edmunson-Morton is riding along with the state’s 206 brewing companies and she’s moving at a brisk and bouncy cantor.

In the three years since Edmunson-Morton launched the Oregon Hops & Brewing Archives at Oregon State University, state hops growing increased 60 percent to 7,700 acres and state brewing increased 20 percent to 1.7 million barrels.

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OREGON PRISON HOLDS ITS FIRST AMERICAN INDIAN POWWOW (Eugene Register-Guard)

People sang, danced and drummed Saturday in Umatilla, behind the high prison fence.

Two Rivers Correctional Institution held its first powwow, attended by 63 inmates, more than 50 guests and 27 representatives from American Indian tribes and organizations. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and others provided salmon, huckleberries and traditional foods for the event. Prison administrators even directed staff overseeing the powwow to forgo uniforms for a more casual approach, including khakis, polos and shorts.

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BALLOT MEASURE TIDE EBBS — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregonians will vote on seven statewide ballot measures in November, the same number as in 2010. The last time an Oregon general-election ballot featured fewer than seven ballot measures was in 1982, when Gov. Vic Atiyeh was re-elected. In between, the state has seen a glut of ballot measures  18 in 1994, 23 in 1996 and a modern record of 26 in 2000. The fever has been broken, with numbers subsiding to the single or low-double digits in the past decade, improving the odds that voters will take the time to study each ballot measure carefully.

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CRITTER CAMERA CATCHES BLACK BEAR IN CENTRAL OREGON (Bend Bulletin)

-Bear strikes a pose on Deschutes Land Trust camera-

A local group is showcasing a photo shoot with a black bear in Central Oregon.

The Deschutes Land Trust set up a slideshow on its website after a bear showed up this season in pictures from a wildlife camera at one of the sites the trust manages. In color and black-and-white shots, the short series shows the bear seemingly posing against a log, walking on it, ducking behind it and staring almost directly at the camera.

Ed. Note: Quote from ODFW employee at end of story.

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RESTORATION WORK CONTINUES ON WHYCHUS CREEK (Bend Bulletin)

-Work crews diverting the creek into nearby channels that wind through and adjacent meadow-

Work crews began diverting a portion of Whychus Creek into a restored channel last week in an effort to return the tributary to its natural state and create habitat for fish and wildlife.

Crews recently dug out portions of the former channel network that had existed before the creek was straightened to prevent flooding in the 1960s.
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FOREST ROADS TO REOPEN NEAR SHERIDAN FIRE (Bend Bulletin)

-Fire officials ask for public’s help in reporting suspicious activity on public lands-

The Sheridan Fire near Sunriver has been held to 200 acres and fire officials plan to reopen forest roads at 8 a.m. Monday, according to a news release.

Fire officials also announced Sunday that several fires in Central Oregon are being investigated as potential cases of arson. No details were released about which fires may have been intentionally started.

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ARSON SUSPECTED IN AT LEAST 14 CENTRAL OREGON WILDFIRES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

State authorities and forest officials say at least 14 wildfires that have erupted across central Oregon over the last three weeks are believed to have been intentionally started.

Officials on Sunday did not release details on which fires were started by arsonists, but they are urging the public to report suspicious activity.

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20 YEARS SINCE WELFARE’S OVERHAUL, RESULTS ARE MIXED (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Twenty years ago, welfare as Americans knew it ended.

President Bill Clinton signed a welfare overhaul bill that limited benefits and encouraged poor people to find jobs.

“We’re going to make it all new again, and see if we can’t create a system of incentives which reinforce work and family and independence,” Clinton said at a White House bill signing ceremony.

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CRAZY SNAKE WORM (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Department of Agriculture entomologist Jim LaBonte fills us in on the “crazy snake worm.” This invasive species of earthworm recently discovered in Oregon could pose a threat to northwest forests.

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KNOCKING EM DOWN (Argus Observer)

-Districts in Oregon, Idaho hold mosquitoes in check-

Eight years into their continuous campaigns of locating and controlling the mosquito that carries the dangerous West Nile Virus, taxing districts in Malheur and Payette counties appear to be getting the upper hand against their unvanquishable flitting foe.

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1 FIRE NEARLY CONTAINED, 1 BURNS INTO WILDERNESS (Argus Observer)

Despite windy conditions in the Owyhee River Canyon, Vale and Burns Bureau of Land Management firefighters are getting a handle on the Rim Reservoir Fire, burning east of Rome.

It was expected the lightning-caused blaze, which started Wednesday, would be controlled by Saturday evening, according to a report from Larry Moore, Vale BLM spokesman.

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BIG DREAMS (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Butte Falls School District launches ambitious effort to turn old fish hatchery into a destination learning center-

Fish raceways used to raise millions of young salmon and steelhead for nearly a century could be used to grow shiitake mushrooms, wasabi and perhaps even shrimp, all cultivated by kids and sold for profit.

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EDITORIAL: PUBLIC RECORDS PROPOSAL MARKS A SMALL STEP FORWARD — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

No one thought this would be easy, the state’s attempt to reform its public records laws.

In fact, as a task force convened by Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum tackled its work, it became apparent just how difficult the work would be. Participants in the group, which included journalists, government officials, members of the public and others, worked to try to unravel the more than 400 exemptions to the records law  in other words, documents that used to be open to the public but now are not.
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HUNDREDS GATHER TO REMEMBER SENATOR ALAN BATES (KEZI)

Hundreds of people came to the Southern Oregon University campus on Saturday to honor Dr. Alan Bates.

In addition to being a doctor in the Rogue Valley, Bates was a State Representative and then a State Senator.

Just two weeks ago, he suffered a sudden cardiac event while he was fishing on the Rogue River with his son. He was 71 years old. While his death came as a shock to many, those who knew him say “a day on the river doing what he loved” would have been just how he wanted to go.

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THE BEST OF TIMES, THE WORST OF TIMES: A RANKING OF STATE ECONOMIES (Governing)

-Few of the best- and worst-performing states were in the same position just three years ago.-

If the 2016 presidential election is all about Donald Trump, the gubernatorial landscape remains, to a large degree, about a more commonplace issue: the economy.

For the first time since 2013, we’ve ranked the overall economic performance of the 50 states. The results show a connection between a state’s economic performance and its governor’s approval ratings.

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2 MEN SUSPECTED OF STARTING OREGON FIRE COULD GET $37 MILLION BILL (Seattle Times)

Two men suspected of starting a wildfire last year that scorched 40 square miles of Oregon forestland soon could get a bill for at least $37 million.

Jeff Bonebrake with the Oregon Department of Forestry says they’re still finalizing firefighting costs for the 2015 Stouts Creek fire that burned east of Canyonville. The agency will send a bill once that’s done.

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August 19, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Gov. Kate Brown seeks to quash subpoena from Oregon standoff defendant Ryan Bundy
* Backers of failed initiative accuse political group Our Oregon of violating election law
* Is Terminal 1 safe for homeless shelter? Depends, says DEQ
* Oregon reviewing nearly 1,300 applications for marijuana businesses
* Our children are sleeping in state offices — Guest Opinion
* Gov. Kate Brown appoints Employment Department director
* Oregon to receive half million for disabilities education
* Oregon to schools: Make lead tests public
* Oregon, Linn County spar in court over timber lawsuit
* Many towns across Oregon have limited access to prescription drugs
* Middle-income jobs rising
* New Oregon wildfires lead to evacuation notices near Sunriver, Paisley
* Voters of all stripes seek transparency — Opinion
* MEASURE 97: INCONSISTENT, INEFFECTIVE
* Dozens weigh in on Bend’s transportation needs
* ODOT tests out new Prineville roundabout
* Firefighters keep Sheridan Fire from growing
* Tourism economy brings jobs in other industries
* Redmond docs hearing begins next week
* Editorial: Public records task force forgets — Opinion
* Editorial: Protect forest health money — Opinion
* Oregon ‘Healthy School Plans’ Won’t Require Lead Testing
* Nothing easy about conservation easements
* Producers need tools to deal with eagle depredation — Opinion
* Specialty crops featured at OSU dinner
* Forests tighten public use restrictions
* Other views: Lighten 2025 vehicle fuel mandates — Guest Opinion
* Fire burning along Owyhee River Canyon
* Agency will double 250 miles of fuel breaks
* Group pushes for LNG pipeline in ads
* Since You Asked: Creek work will strengthen I-5 columns
* Pot plants eradicated from federal forest
* Weather service warns of prime fire conditions tonight
* Among titans
* Chum salmon prove surprisingly resistant to pollution
* Blue highway
* Editorial: Federal flood insurance should be fiscally sustainable and affordable — Opinion
* Editorial: Forests burn as Congress takes time off — Opinion
* Editorial: Wah Chang’s baffling stonewall — Opinion
* A search for solutions to housing crisis
* Rail fire crosses control line at southwest corner
* Spot fires contained as Rail Fire continues to grow
* State launches foreclosure prevention program
* Rural Oregon remains competitive with market choices
* State fire marshal urges vigilance and extreme care against wildfires
* Changes in some hunting units
* OUR VIEW: Holding lawmakers accountable — Opinion
* MY VOICE: Tax proposal is a gross idea — Guest Opinion
* Evacuation notices issued for Paisley due to Withers Fire
* ODF cautions: We have a long way to go for 2016 fire season
* Osteopathic school in Pomona shaping up as med-ed partner
* Most influential room in Oregon addresses Coasts economy — Guest Opinion
* Oregon health centers nab $2.5M in federal grants
* Oregon Income Update, 2016– Blog
* Secretary Atkins encourages Oregonians to submit photos for the Oregon Blue Book cover– Blog
* 27 years of economic pain for most Americans
* Finally, some good news for blue-collar workers– Blog
* Measure 97 Floods the State with $8 million in Campaign Cash

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GOV. KATE BROWN SEEKS TO QUASH SUBPOENA FROM OREGON STANDOFF DEFENDANT RYAN BUNDY (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown on Thursday asked a federal judge to quash a subpoena that seeks to compel her to testify at Oregon standoff defendant Ryan Bundy’s criminal trial next month.

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BACKERS OF FAILED INITIATIVE ACCUSE POLITICAL GROUP OUR OREGON OF VIOLATING ELECTION LAW (Portland Oregonian)

A signature-gathering firm that worked on an unsuccessful ballot measure filed a complaint this week accusing union-backed group Our Oregon and its executive director of violating state law in an effort to undercut the initiative.

According to a complaint filed with the Secretary of State’s office on Tuesday, Our Oregon and its director, Ben Unger, enticed a signature-gathering subcontractor away from the Initiative Petition 49 campaign by offering the subcontractor a more lucrative contract.

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IS TERMINAL 1 SAFE FOR HOMELESS SHELTER? DEPENDS, SAYS DEQ (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon environmental regulators have offered words of warning to Portland’s plan to convert a warehouse into a temporary homeless shelter.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality now says the city’s property is safe — so long as a layer of asphalt serves as a protective cap between people and contaminated dirt.

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OREGON REVIEWING NEARLY 1,300 APPLICATIONS FOR MARIJUANA BUSINESSES (Portland Oregonian)

Clipboard in hand, Leslie Kleinkopf stepped into the converted workshop and looked up.

She scanned the entry for sensors that detect open doors. She glanced around for security cameras and looked on as owner Chris Ford showed her how his battery backup keeps the cameras rolling even when the power goes off.

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OUR CHILDREN ARE SLEEPING IN STATE OFFICES — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Tonight, children in Oregon’s foster care system will sleep on cots in state offices. Others will sleep in motels, supervised by caseworkers. For some, this has been the situation for weeks.

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GOV. KATE BROWN APPOINTS EMPLOYMENT DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown announced the appointment of Kay Erickson as director of the Oregon Employment Department on Wednesday.

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OREGON TO RECEIVE HALF MILLION FOR DISABILITIES EDUCATION (Salem Statesman Journal)

The U.S. Department of Education is awarding $7 million in grants to seven states to recruit and train teachers, principals and other personnel to provide quality education for children with disabilities, including Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Education will receive $529,539, as announced Thursday.

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OREGON TO SCHOOLS: MAKE LEAD TESTS PUBLIC (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon schools must publicly report the results of tests for lead and other environmental hazards under rules adopted Wednesday by the State Board of Education.

Children and families  as well as educators  must be assured of safe and healthy school facilities, Gov. Kate Brown said in a statement _________________________________________

OREGON, LINN COUNTY SPAR IN COURT OVER TIMBER LAWSUIT (Eugene Register-Guard)

State attorneys told a judge that Linn County shouldn’t be allowed to represent other timber counties in a lawsuit that seeks $1.4 billion from Oregon because of its forest-management practices.

The county wants the case to proceed as a class action.

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MANY TOWNS ACROSS OREGON HAVE LIMITED ACCESS TO PRESCRIPTION DRUGS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Murray’s Drug is a throwback to a simpler time.

Opened in 1959 long before national drugstore chains and mail-order pharmacies dominated the prescription world, the family-owned business is still the only place in town the 1,200 residents of Heppner can fill a prescription. In fact, between their Heppner and Condon stores, pharmacists John and Ann Murray, and their daughter, Laurie Murray-Wood, run the only brick-and-mortar pharmacies in all of Morrow, Gilliam, Sherman and Wheeler counties.

Ed Note: Pushing for Legislation.

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MIDDLE-INCOME JOBS RISING (Eugene Register-Guard)

The U.S. economy is finally creating more middle-income jobs, according to a new analysis released Thursday by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, in a turnabout from the feast-and-famine pattern earlier in the recovery, when hiring was strongest at the bottom and top of the wage scale.

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NEW OREGON WILDFIRES LEAD TO EVACUATION NOTICES NEAR SUNRIVER, PAISLEY (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon’s wildfire season is picking up just as much of the state endures a stretch of triple-digit heat.

A fire west of Sunriver led officials to warn people in a subdivision they might have to evacuate

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VOTERS OF ALL STRIPES SEEK TRANSPARENCY — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

A recent poll of Independent Party of Oregon members has confirmed my suspicions that we are not as politically divided as we think  at least on one key issue.

The IPO is a new third party in Oregon, attracting supporters of both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. The IPO poll showed there was one thing the two camps could agree on with overwhelming support: government transparency.

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MEASURE 97: INCONSISTENT, INEFFECTIVE (Portland Tribune)

David Chown is in charge of operations and finance for Chown Hardware, while his brother Fred is president and in charge of sales and marketing.

Consequently, David is on the front line in dealing with his company’s reaction to the prospect of a gross receipts over $25 million tax if Measure 97 passes.

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DOZENS WEIGH IN ON BEND’S TRANSPORTATION NEEDS (Bend Bulletin)

-Legislative panel hears from the community and tours project sites-

A group of state lawmakers toured parts of Bend on Thursday with local leaders and officials to get a sense of the regions transportation needs ahead of the 2017 legislative session, when a transportation funding package is expected to be up for consideration.

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ODOT TESTS OUT NEW PRINEVILLE ROUNDABOUT (Bend Bulletin)

-Roundabout to be installed at Highway 126 and Tom McCall Road in 2018-

Engineers in neon vests and Oregon Department of Transportation workers lined the inside of the faux roundabout made of cones and sandbags, watching as a truck labeled oversized made its way through the course, skillfully  although narrowly  missing the cones.

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FIREFIGHTERS KEEP SHERIDAN FIRE FROM GROWING (Bend Bulletin)

-Weather favorable for crews on the wildfire west of Sunriver-

The Sheridan Fire west of Sunriver did not grow today and is about 25 percent contained, according to an evening news release from fire officials.

New mapping showed the fire has burned about 200 acres, according to the release from the Central Oregon Fire Management Service.

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TOURISM ECONOMY BRINGS JOBS IN OTHER INDUSTRIES (Bend Bulletin)

Tourism’s impact on Bends economy goes beyond room tax collections and tubing on the Deschutes River, according to a recent article from the Oregon Employment Department.

The article, Is Today’s Labor Force Drawn to Lifestyle Communities? argues that workers and employers are drawn to cities with a high quality of life and access to outdoor recreation, qualities that are driven and publicized by a regions tourism economy.

Ed Note: Article available at: http://tinyurl.com/jln9n93 _________________________________________

REDMOND DOCS HEARING BEGINS NEXT WEEK (Bend Bulletin)

-State says Dr. Rose Kenny overprescribes opiates, antibiotics-

The Oregon Medical Board will hold a hearing next week in the case of a Redmond physician it says may have endangered patients health by prescribing high amounts of narcotics, antibiotics and testosterone when it wasn’t medically indicated.

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EDITORIAL: PUBLIC RECORDS TASK FORCE FORGETS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Ellen Rosenblum, Oregon’s attorney general, created a task force last fall to work on a sorely needed overhaul of the states public records law. Though the law was a leader when it was adopted in 1973, its been amended so often its lost much of its clout. The task force came up with its recommendations earlier this month.

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EDITORIAL: PROTECT FOREST HEALTH MONEY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

With fire danger in the extreme range across Central and Eastern Oregon, now’s the time to take care in the woods. The last thing Oregon needs is a catastrophic blaze like those in northern and southern California.

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OREGON ‘HEALTHY SCHOOL PLANS’ WON’T REQUIRE LEAD TESTING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon has approved new rules for schools aimed at improving health conditions in the states aging buildings. The State Board of Education approved new regulations Wednesday, in response to prompting from Oregon Gov. Kate Brown last spring that education officials work with the Oregon Health Authority to tighten environmental health rules governing public schools and child care facilities.

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NOTHING EASY ABOUT CONSERVATION EASEMENTS (Capital Press)

Rancher Roger Ediger has no problem giving up the ability to subdivide his nearly 2,700-acre property near Mount Vernon in Eastern Oregon.

Development is the biggest threat to agriculture, wildlife and open space, Ediger believes, which is why he decided to place a conservation easement on the land that will preserve its current condition in perpetuity.

If we dont look farther than our own lifespan, then well have nothing, he said.

However, Ediger still faces a dilemma.

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PRODUCERS NEED TOOLS TO DEAL WITH EAGLE DEPREDATION — OPINION (Capital Press)

If a wolf kills a calf out on the range, the rancher is sure to let out a yell and report it to wildlife officials. But when sheep producers lose hundreds of lambs each year to depredation by eagles no one says anything.

Last week the Capital Press made public what has been an open secret among sheep producers for years  eagles love to feed on newborn lambs and theres not much they can do to stop them. If you didn’t know its because many sheep producers would just as soon everyone kept quiet.

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SPECIALTY CROPS FEATURED AT OSU DINNER (East Oregonian)

Phil Hamm is never one to hold back when it comes to promoting the Columbia Basin as an agricultural powerhouse.

Farmers throughout the region grow more than 200 types of crops, Hamm said, thanks to a unique combination of climate, soils and clean water. The result is a bounty of nutritious vegetables like potatoes, onions and carrots to go along with sweet treats like famous Hermiston watermelons.

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FORESTS TIGHTEN PUBLIC USE RESTRICTIONS (East Oregonian)

Officials on the Umatilla and Wallowa-Whitman national forests will implement Phase B public use restrictions beginning Friday to limit the potential for human-caused fires.

The increased restrictions come on the heels of increased fire danger, and pertain to campfires, smoking, chainsaws, internal combustion engines and generators.

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OTHER VIEWS: LIGHTEN 2025 VEHICLE FUEL MANDATES — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

Despite huge gains in fuel efficiency, automakers need relief from future stringent standards.

The fuel standards automakers are supposed to meet by 2025 are likely unattainable, according to a Technical Assessment Report that was recently released on the automotive industrys progress in this area. The reports findings were no surprise, but they underscore the need for the next administration to revisit the Corporate Average Fuel Economy CAFE standards for 2021 to 2025 at the official review next year.

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FIRE BURNING ALONG OWYHEE RIVER CANYON (Argus Observer)

Firefighters are battling a new blaze in Malheur County.

The Rim Reservoir Fire is burning about 13 miles southeast of Rome along the Owyhee River Canyon, on the river’s south side, according to a news release from the Bureau of Land Management’s Vale District. The fire is estimated at 1,000 acres.

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AGENCY WILL DOUBLE 250 MILES OF FUEL BREAKS (Argus Observer)

Fuel breaks are a necessary tool in fighting wildfires. Time and again, the barriers have proved their worth. That is why the Bureau of Land Managements Vale District is looking to double its 250 miles of existing fuel breaks.

Fuel breaks are designed to slow or help stop the progress of wildfires by reducing or eliminating available fuels, Vale BLM spokesman Larry Moore said.

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GROUP PUSHES FOR LNG PIPELINE IN ADS (Medford Mail Tribune)

-FERC still deciding whether to rehear the project-

Though the Jordan Cove liquified natural gas project was denied by federal regulators in March, a television ad began running in prime time during the Olympics touting its economic benefits.

“When the Jordan Cove Energy Project is built,” says the ad, “it will create hundreds of permanent, real jobs for local workers.”

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SINCE YOU ASKED: CREEK WORK WILL STRENGTHEN I-5 COLUMNS (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: What is going on under the I-5 overpass at Bear Creek near the Biddle Road bike path entrances? It looks like they’ve rerouted the creek.

A: Your observation skills are on point, B. Crews at the scene have rerouted the creek at the site, but it’s only temporary.

Jeremiah Griffin, assistant district manager for the Oregon Department of Transportation, tells us the work you see that necessitated that reroute is called a bridge scour repair.

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POT PLANTS ERADICATED FROM FEDERAL FOREST (Medford Mail Tribune)

-California man faces charges for his role in Josephine County site near Applegate-

A California man has been detained and nearly 2,500 marijuana plants were eradicated from a grow site on federal forest land near the Jackson-Josephine county line.

The Oregon State Police Marijuana Eradication Team collected 2,447 plants Tuesday from a Josephine County site in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest near Thompson Creek Road, about 14 miles from Applegate, according to an affidavit filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Medford.

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WEATHER SERVICE WARNS OF PRIME FIRE CONDITIONS TONIGHT (Medford Mail Tribune)

Triple-digit heat, stiff winds and plunging nighttime humidity has firefighters and meteorologists bracing for increased potential wildfire activity at high elevations around Southern Oregon.

The National Weather Service has issued a red-flag warning for high-elevation areas of the South Cascades and Siskiyou’s tonight through 9 a.m. Friday as east winds of up to 30 mph and humidity at or below 25 percent are expected, particularly around mountain ridges.

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AMONG TITANS (Daily Astorian)

All along Ellsworth Creek, soldiers were slaying giants. The year was 1918, and the enlisted men were part of the U.S. Armys Spruce Production Division. Their quarry  the thousand-year-old behemoth trees that once towered in our coastal forests. Cedar and Douglas fir were all knocked down; their enormous timbers would form the backbones and bows of allied ships. But the most prized carcass of all was that of the great Sitka spruce.

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CHUM SALMON PROVE SURPRISINGLY RESISTANT TO POLLUTION (Daily Astorian)

Chum salmon appear to have a cockroach-like resistance to pollution.

Scientists at Washington State University’s stormwater research center in Puyallup recently made the surprising discovery that chum are unaffected by the same levels of toxic road runoff that quickly kills their coho cousins.

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BLUE HIGHWAY (Daily Astorian)

A cherished right for Oregonians, or an environmental and safety nuisance?

Homeowners in Gearhart and Warrenton are taking their complaints about unsafe drivers on the beach to local and state officials. They want to see the elimination, reduction or increased enforcement of traffic.

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EDITORIAL: FEDERAL FLOOD INSURANCE SHOULD BE FISCALLY SUSTAINABLE AND AFFORDABLE — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Clatsop County communities facing a strict deadline to adopt new federal flood insurance rate maps are like little bubbles in a raging torrent of problems surrounding the National Flood Insurance Program.

Its bound to be worrying anytime a federal entity  in this case the Federal Emergency Management Agency  imposes dire consequences when local citizens dont do as were told. In this case, failing to implement new flood hazard ordinances would make local homeowners ineligible for flood insurance, disaster assistance and federally backed grants and loans.

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EDITORIAL: FORESTS BURN AS CONGRESS TAKES TIME OFF — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

With temperatures threatening to crack 100 degrees across the mid-valley Friday and Saturday, forest managers throughout the region wasted no time this week moving the fire-danger indicators from “high” to “extreme.”

You can’t blame them: High temperatures have cooked the fuels in the forests to the point where they’ll burn in a hurry if they get just one spark. Relative humidity levels are low.

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EDITORIAL: WAH CHANG’S BAFFLING STONEWALL — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio swung through the mid-valley on Monday, appearing at town halls in Albany, Corvallis and Lebanon and checking in with the editorial board at our sister publication, the Gazette-Times.

During the session with the Gazette-Times, DeFazio expressed bafflement at how ATI Specialty Alloys and Components better known as Wah Chang has decided not to cooperate with the Department of Labor to help workers and their families apply for a government benefits program.

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A SEARCH FOR SOLUTIONS TO HOUSING CRISIS (Ashland Daily Tidings)

A fundraising and awareness campaign about the lack of affordable housing in Ashland is the subject of an all-day forum Saturday organized by Southern Oregon Jobs with Justice, Wellness for Everyone WE community meals, the Residential Outreach Options Team, Ashland Culture of Peace Commission and several Southern Oregon University student groups at SOU’s Meese Auditorium.

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RAIL FIRE CROSSES CONTROL LINE AT SOUTHWEST CORNER (Baker City Herald)

-Fire crews will need to build a new line near Table Rock Lookout-

The Rail fire near Unity has burned more acres over the past 24 hours than on any day in the past week, growing by about 3,000 acres to an estimated 21,600 acres.

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SPOT FIRES CONTAINED AS RAIL FIRE CONTINUES TO GROW (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The Rail fire has expanded to 28,209 acres and is 20-percent contained, according to a Thursday update from the management team.

The large, pyro-cumulus clouds seen over the fire Wednesday afternoon were caused by accelerated burnout operations.

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STATE LAUNCHES FORECLOSURE PREVENTION PROGRAM (Blue Mountain Eagle)

A foreclosure prevention program called Home Rescue, designed to help struggling homeowners pay off their mortgages, launched Wednesday, Aug. 17.

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RURAL OREGON REMAINS COMPETITIVE WITH MARKET CHOICES (LaGrande Observer)

The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services said last week that all counties in Oregon will have at least two carriers participating both on and off Oregon’s Health Insurance Marketplace after a press release said BridgeSpan Health, Providence Health Plan and Regence Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oregon agreed to again offer statewide coverage in 2017. Previously, they had planned to withdraw from the area.

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STATE FIRE MARSHAL URGES VIGILANCE AND EXTREME CARE AGAINST WILDFIRES (LaGrande Observer)

With Oregon’s hottest temperatures and driest conditions occurring throughout the next few days, Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker is urging all residents to take the utmost care and thorough caution to prevent wildfires.

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CHANGES IN SOME HUNTING UNITS (LaGrande Observer)

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission recently approved elk and deer management objectives recommended by state biologists to balance wildlife and human needs.

At its Aug. 5 meeting in Salem, the commission approved recommendations presented by Doug Cottam, South Willamette Watershed manager. Cottam presented findings for mule deer as well as Roosevelt and Rocky Mountain elk.

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OUR VIEW: HOLDING LAWMAKERS ACCOUNTABLE — OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

The news last week regarding Oregon’s projected revenue shortfall was sobering. We as a state are now at a point where our elected leaders need to address our rickety tax system and find an equitable and proficient method of revenue support.

That sounds easy, but it is not. In fact, while various factions scramble to push their issues before the public as a priority, Oregon’s single most pressing challenge is the search to find a stable revenue-generating mechanism.

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MY VOICE: TAX PROPOSAL IS A GROSS IDEA — GUEST OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

In the classic Aesop fable The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs, a family owns a goose that lays a single solid-gold egg once every day. Assuming the goose is filled with gold, the family butchers it with the hope of finding gold, but it instead finds the goose to be nothing more than an ordinary bird on the inside.

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EVACUATION NOTICES ISSUED FOR PAISLEY DUE TO WITHERS FIRE (Lake County Examiner)

According to the USFS, the Withers Fire northwest of Paisley has grown as of this morning to 2,000 acres. The fire is one mile north of Paisley along Hwy 31, one of four started yesterday. The Withers Fire is at this time 0% contained.

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ODF CAUTIONS: WE HAVE A LONG WAY TO GO FOR 2016 FIRE SEASON (Hood River News)

An abandoned campfire on Aug. 1 in Douglas County burned one-half acre and cost more than $12,000 to put out.

The 2016 fire season is off to a promising start. Following three consecutive prolific fire seasons, the Oregon Department of Forestry is having early success, notes ODF in a press release. But as always, there is room for improvement. To date, 470 wildfires have burned 2,685 acres on ODF-protected land. Acres burned at this time each of the last three years accounted for 93,613 2013, 46,583 2014 and 17,800 2015 respectively.

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OSTEOPATHIC SCHOOL IN POMONA SHAPING UP AS MED-ED PARTNER (Douglas County News-Review)

A college based in Pomona, California, with a branch already built in Lebanon, Oregon, has emerged as a potential suitor in Roseburgs search to land a medical education college within the city.

As recently as this week, representatives from the city of Roseburg, the Roseburg Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Mercy Medical Center and The Partnership for Economic Development in Douglas County met with officials from the College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific Northwest  also known as COMP-Northwest  from Lebanon.

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MOST INFLUENTIAL ROOM IN OREGON ADDRESSES COAST’S ECONOMY — GUEST OPINION (Tillamook County Pioneer)

It was both exciting and productive to join together with nearly 500 representatives from the business, nonprofit, education, government and economic development fields to discuss issues unique to our Coast at the Fifth Annual Oregon Coast Economic Summit, held this year on Aug. 8 and 9 in Coos Bay. With so many decision makers in one place, I describe the summit as the most influential room in Oregon.

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OREGON HEALTH CENTERS NAB $2.5M IN FEDERAL GRANTS (Oregon Business Journal)

Thirty health centers in Oregon will receive federal government 30 awards totaling nearly $2.5 million.

The money, from the Health and Human Services Department, aims to help the groups “expand current quality improvement systems and infrastructure and to improve primary care service delivery in the communities they serve.”

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OREGON INCOME UPDATE, 2016 — BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

As we work on the next economic and revenue forecast release date September 14th, I just wanted to share a quick update on Oregon personal income. Just as the economy and labor market are doing well, personal income is growing fairly quickly too. Gains today are as strong as those seen during the housing boom. Right now Oregon’s income growth over the past year ranks 5th best among all states and DC.

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SECRETARY ATKINS ENCOURAGES OREGONIANS TO SUBMIT PHOTOS FOR THE OREGON BLUE BOOK COVER — BLOG (Oregon Secretary of State)

-Oregonians have until October 12th to submit photos for the 2017-2018 edition of the Blue Book-

On the eve of World Photo Day, the Oregon Secretary of State encourages Oregonians to submit their photo entries for the cover of the 2017-2108 Oregon Blue Book. The Oregon Blue Book is the official state fact book about all levels of government in Oregon, Oregons arts and history organizations, our education systems, our elections history, our economy and how various levels of government are financed. Published every odd-numbered year since 1911, the Oregon Blue Book is compiled, edited and produced by the Oregon State Archives, a division of the Secretary of States office.

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27 YEARS OF ECONOMIC PAIN FOR MOST AMERICANS (CBS News)

If one could put a price tag on pain, look no further than the lack of economic progress for most American families since 1989.

In that year, Ronald Reagan left the White House after two terms of his trickle-down economics, and a new era of democratization was heralded as the Berlin Wall fell. Since then, U.S. GDP has more than tripled, while the S&P 500 has surged more than sixfold.

Ed Note: Report available at: https://www.cbo.gov/publication/51846

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FINALLY, SOME GOOD NEWS FOR BLUE-COLLAR WORKERS — BLOG (Washington Post)

An important shift is underway in Americas job market, and it hasn’t gotten enough attention.

In the early days of the recovery from the Great Recession, the labor market was divided. The first workers to find new jobs were either employed in high-paying, high-skilled fields such as engineering, management and technology or they were in low-paying, low-skilled industries such as food service, maintenance or sales. In other words, the top and the bottom bounced back, but the middle-income jobs that had long formed the backbone of the American workforce were still in short supply.

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MEASURE 97 FLOODS THE STATE WITH $8 MILLION IN CAMPAIGN CASH (The Lund Report)

It could bolster Oregon’s lagging schools; shore up the Oregon Health Plan and public health system; and ensure that all Oregon’s children get medical care, all by simply skimming from the top of soaring corporate profits.

Or it could drive up food and utility costs, cramp the ability for large and mid-size companies to do business in Oregon, and stifle employment.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 19, 2016 OSL eClips

August 18, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Task force issues draft recommendations for pot industry energy, water conservation
* New wildfires prompt evacuation notices in southern Oregon, near Sunriver
* New Portland college hopes to transform higher education, starting in St. Johns
* City Club of Portland report suggests support for $3 billion corporate tax measure
* Grand Ronde could lose 41 percent of revenue to new casino
* Political group Our Oregon accused of election law violations
* Gov. Kate Brown appoints Employment Department director
* More Oregon workers now looking for jobs
* ODOT to drill test wells in bed of Umpqua River
* Dead bird in Eugene tests positive for West Nile virus
* 15 nonprofit groups in Lane County receive Oregon Arts Commission grants
* Manage our forests with science, not ideology — Guest Opinion
* Socking it to the students — Opinion
* State board adopts lead testing rule for Oregon schools
* UO students put public records law to the test
* My View: Fix WES line, don’t derail it — Guest Opinion
* Records law applies to task force members
* MEASURE 97: INCONSISTENT, INEFFECTIVE
* Voters of all stripes seek transparency — Guest Opinion
* Next stop on transit listening tour: Bend
* Limited pharmacy access linked to hospital readmission
* OSU-Cascades funding requests clear hurdle
* Oregon computer tech jobs stand well above 2000 peak
* Sheridan Fire: Workers fight blaze near Sunriver overnight
* Federal lawsuit targets Ochoco thinning plan
* Editorial: Legislature needs to address growth — Opinion
* Editorial: Growing allies for change in pot laws — Opinion
* Native American Trade Routes
* Forest Service Responds & Crazy Snake Worm
* As Temperatures Soar, Oregon Wildfires Lead To Evacuation Notices
* Crews Make Progress On Sheridan Fire Near Sunriver In Central Oregon
* Conservationists File Lawsuit Against PGE Over Lower Deschutes Water Quality
* Oregon, county spar over timber lawsuit seeking $1.4 billion
* Schools looking at next steps after testing.
* Groups challenge EPA over high river temperatures
* Applications sought for Wheeler County Judge
* Our view: Could anyone have stopped Canyon Creek Fire? — Opinion
* Voters to decide on tax relief for fallen officers’ spouses
* Judge sides with Ashland Gun Club
* Council reviews goals to forward to the 2017 Legislature
* Vinting by numbers: Annual report released
* State education board adopts lead testing rule
* Unlicensed contractors victims line up
* Oregon wave energy supporters say they’re in good shape as $40M grant looms– Blog
* Landmark ruling on historic Lake Oswego house is a ‘big win’ for preservationists– Blog
* Feds Fund an Early Warning ShakeAlert System for the Big Cascadian Quake
* High School Principals Beg the Board: Fix Dangerous Buildings Now
* Confused About the Proposed Corporate Tax Hike Everyone’s Talking About? Check Out This Report– Blog
* In Our View: Feds Can Span I-5 Challenge — Opinion
* BLM’s New Flawed Forest Plan
* Charity care costs

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TASK FORCE ISSUES DRAFT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR POT INDUSTRY ENERGY, WATER CONSERVATION (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon lawmakers should back a certification process that encourages the marijuana industry to pay closer attention to how it uses natural resources and to examine potential water-regulation changes to encourage small cannabis growers.

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NEW WILDFIRES PROMPT EVACUATION NOTICES IN SOUTHERN OREGON, NEAR SUNRIVER (Portland Oregonian)

New wildfires have prompted Level 1 evacuation notices near Sunriver and the southern Oregon city of Paisley, officials said.

The blazes, which started Wednesday, come as the Rail fire burns more than 23,700 acres in eastern Oregon and in advance of a period of hot, dry conditions in much of the state.

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NEW PORTLAND COLLEGE HOPES TO TRANSFORM HIGHER EDUCATION, STARTING IN ST. JOHNS (Portland Oregonian)

Michelle Jones quit her job as a full-time associate professor at Northeast Portland’s Concordia University in 2015 on a leap of faith.

For years, Jones had discussed with friends and colleagues her dream of starting a college from scratch.

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CITY CLUB OF PORTLAND REPORT SUGGESTS SUPPORT FOR $3 BILLION CORPORATE TAX MEASURE (Portland Oregonian)

A City Club of Portland research committee recommended the group support a $3 billion corporate tax measure headed to the ballot in November, in a draft report released early Wednesday.

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GRAND RONDE COULD LOSE 41 PERCENT OF REVENUE TO NEW CASINO (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Grand Ronde Tribe expects to lose as much as 41 percent of its revenue after a decision by the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals allowing the Cowlitz Tribe to build a casino in southwest Washington.

This will be a big financial hit to the tribe, and as a government that offers essential services like health care and education, we have to decide where we go from here because of this decision, tribal lobbyist Justin Martin said.

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POLITICAL GROUP OUR OREGON ACCUSED OF ELECTION LAW VIOLATIONS (Salem Statesman Journal)

A complaint filed against political group Our Oregon and its director claims they illegally interfered with a signature gathering effort by offering the signature gathering company a more lucrative contract.

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GOV. KATE BROWN APPOINTS EMPLOYMENT DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown announced the appointment of Kay Erickson as director of the Oregon Employment Department on Wednesday.

Erickson has served as the agency’s acting director since June. Her appointment will need to be confirmed by the state Senate.

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MORE OREGON WORKERS NOW LOOKING FOR JOBS (Salem Statesman Journal)

The percentage of unemployed Oregon workers dropped to the lowest it had been in 40 years earlier this year, but the percentage is now starting to rise.

A report released Tuesday by the state Employment Department finds that in July, roughly 5.2 percent of the working population in Oregon was unemployed.

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ODOT TO DRILL TEST WELLS IN BED OF UMPQUA RIVER (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Agency needs rock formation data to pursue new Scottsburg Bridge-

The Oregon Department of Transportation will drill test holes into the bed of the Umpqua River near Scottsburg Bridge, on Highway 38, as part of its long-term plan to tear down the 87-year-old span and build a new one.

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DEAD BIRD IN EUGENE TESTS POSITIVE FOR WEST NILE VIRUS (Eugene Register-Guard)

In the first reported case in Lane County this year, a dead bird found in Eugene has tested positive for the West Nile virus, the county health department said.

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15 NONPROFIT GROUPS IN LANE COUNTY RECEIVE OREGON ARTS COMMISSION GRANTS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Creative minds at 127 Oregon arts organizations  including 15 in Lane County  will be empowered by $1,214,638 in operating support grants announced Wednesday from the Oregon Arts Commission.

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MANAGE OUR FORESTS WITH SCIENCE, NOT IDEOLOGY — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Since the middle of June, more than half a dozen opinion pieces have appeared in The Register Guard about management of timber  some attacking forest management practices, and some standing up for the industry.

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SOCKING IT TO THE STUDENTS — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Tuition shouldn’t be UO’s default funding source-

As the University of Oregon confronts a future of steadily rising costs, it must strive to avoid a reflexive reliance on steadily increasing student tuition. That will require breaking a well-established habit of thought, because boosting tuition has become a reliable fallback when money is tight  and money is always tight.

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STATE BOARD ADOPTS LEAD TESTING RULE FOR OREGON SCHOOLS (Portland Tribune)

The Oregon Board of Education adopted a new rule Thursday, Aug. 17, that for the first time requires schools districts to test for lead in water at district owned buildings and report those results to the public.

The board in June agreed to fast-track adoption of the new rule at the request of Gov. Kate Brown, after widespread media coverage of a scandal in Portland Public Schools over lead in drinking water that went unreported.

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UO STUDENTS PUT PUBLIC RECORDS LAW TO THE TEST (Portland Tribune)

Two weeks ago, the states top lawyer revealed how she wants to fix what she calls a car wreck  Oregon’s troubled public records law.

That’s how Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum described the law when she visited our investigative reporting class last spring at the University of Oregon.

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MY VIEW: FIX WES LINE, DON’T DERAIL IT — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Regarding WES is a mess: Time to pull the plug July 28, My View: I agree with Bill MacKenzie that WES is a train wreck, but I do not agree with his solution. The reason it carries so few passengers is because it runs only on weekdays during peak hours, rendering it useless as reliable transportation for most potential riders.

To be useful, it must operate frequently  all day, seven days a week. It would then attract enough passengers to have a positive effect on reducing traffic demand on Highway 217, Tualatin Valley Highway and even I-5.

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RECORDS LAW APPLIES TO TASK FORCE MEMBERS (Portland Tribune)

Oregon law is clear: Documents created or received by public employees as part of their jobs are subject to the state public records law.

But what about private citizens who volunteer their time for the public good?

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MEASURE 97: INCONSISTENT, INEFFECTIVE (Portland Tribune)

David Chown is in charge of operations and finance for Chown Hardware, while his brother Fred is president and in charge of sales and marketing.

Consequently, David is on the front line in dealing with his company’s reaction to the prospect of a gross receipts over $25 million tax if Measure 97 passes.

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VOTERS OF ALL STRIPES SEEK TRANSPARENCY — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

A recent poll of Independent Party of Oregon members has confirmed my suspicions that we are not as politically divided as we think  at least on one key issue.

The IPO is a new third party in Oregon, attracting supporters of both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. The IPO poll showed there was one thing the two camps could agree on with overwhelming support: government transparency.

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NEXT STOP ON TRANSIT LISTENING TOUR: BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-Today, lawmakers will hear from residents about future of transportation in growing Central Oregon-

Today, a group of legislators wants a firsthand account of what its like to get around Bend.

The 14 senators and representatives want to see the congestion that comes from a region booming with new residents and thousands of tourists.

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LIMITED PHARMACY ACCESS LINKED TO HOSPITAL READMISSION (Bend Bulletin)

-In rural areas of Oregon, patients can have trouble getting their meds-

Murray’s Drug is a throwback to a simpler time.

Opened in 1959 long before national drugstore chains and mail-order pharmacies dominated the prescription world, the family-owned business is still the only place in town the 1,200 residents of Heppner can fill a prescription. In fact, between their Heppner and Condon stores, pharmacists John and Ann Murray, and their daughter, Laurie Murray-Wood, run the only brick-and-mortar pharmacies in all of Morrow, Gilliam, Sherman and Wheeler counties.

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OSU-CASCADES FUNDING REQUESTS CLEAR HURDLE (Bend Bulletin)

-Bend campus wants $69.5 million for next wave of construction-

A state commission on higher education has OKd requests for $69.5 million to pay for the next wave of construction at OSU-Cascades.

The Higher Education Coordinating Commission, which reviews capital funding requests from the states public universities, unanimously approved its 2017-19 budget plan at a meeting last week. It included major increases in funding for public universities and community colleges and a prioritized list of construction projects on campuses across the state.

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OREGON COMPUTER TECH JOBS STAND WELL ABOVE 2000 PEAK (Bend Bulletin)

-Growth over next decade forecast at 40 percent-

Employment in Oregon’s computer industry is stronger than it was even at the peak of the dot-com bubble, and economists expect growth to continue into 2024.

The industry that writes software, designs the integration of software and hardware and operates data centers employed 14,900 people in Oregon in June, and employment was 28 percent higher than the tech-bubble peak of 11,600 in 2000, according to the Oregon Employment Department.

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SHERIDAN FIRE: WORKERS FIGHT BLAZE NEAR SUNRIVER OVERNIGHT (Bend Bulletin)

-Fire burns 360 acres, prompts evacuation warning for fishery-

Firefighting crews planned to work through Wednesday night to try to contain the 360-acre Sheridan Fire west of Sunriver.

The blaze, spotted late Wednesday afternoon, prompted a Level 1 evacuation notice for the area of the Fall River Hatchery and Fall River Estates subdivision, meaning to monitor news and prepare for possible evacuation.

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FEDERAL LAWSUIT TARGETS OCHOCO THINNING PLAN (Bend Bulletin)

-Group questions changes for Walton Lake area-

An environmental group has sued the U.S. Forest Service, arguing that a plan to thin trees surrounding popular Walton Lake in Ochoco National Forest needed a fuller environmental review and public comment process.

The nonprofit League of Wilderness Defenders lawsuit filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Oregon argued that the Forest Service had illegally avoided an environmental review of the proposed work.

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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATURE NEEDS TO ADDRESS GROWTH — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

One sign the lingering effects of the Great Recession are fading showed up on the front page of The Bulletin on Tuesday. Some city residents are worried that the community’s current growth spurt will destroy the very things they love about the place.

Their sentiment is understandable, but their chances of actually changing the situation are limited under current state law. Oregon’s land use planning laws aim to keep rural land rural. The way they accomplish that is by forcing cities to build up before they build out.

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EDITORIAL: GROWING ALLIES FOR CHANGE IN POT LAWS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The federal governments refusal to relax restrictions on marijuana is detached from a different reality in the states: Legalization is growing like a weed.

Recreational marijuana may become legal in five states in November: Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada.

Arkansas, Florida, Montana and North Dakota will also be voting on creating or expanding medical marijuana programs. There may be medical marijuana initiatives in Michigan, Missouri and Oklahoma, as well.

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NATIVE AMERICAN TRADE ROUTES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Amelia Templeton brings us the story of one Willamette Valley mans accidental archeological discovery of a cache of obsidian stones and how they fit into our understanding of how native tribes existed and interacted before white settlers arrived.

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FOREST SERVICE RESPONDS & CRAZY SNAKE WORM (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A recent investigation by the Oregonian looked into the actions of the US Forest Service in the days leading up to the Canyon Creek fire last year. The Forest Service says the Oregonian got it wrong.

Oregon Department of Agriculture entomologist Jim LaBonte fills us in on the crazy snake worm. This invasive species of earthworm recently discovered in Oregon could pose a threat to northwest forests.

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AS TEMPERATURES SOAR, OREGON WILDFIRES LEAD TO EVACUATION NOTICES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon’s wildfire season is picking up right as much of the state prepares for triple-digit heat.

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CREWS MAKE PROGRESS ON SHERIDAN FIRE NEAR SUNRIVER IN CENTRAL OREGON (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Officials fighting the Sheridan Fire in central Oregon say cooler overnight temperatures have allowed them to make progress in their battle to contain it. The fire is burning at about 169 acres as of Thursday morning, thats down from nearly 360 acres late Tuesday night.

The Sheridan fire is located about 1.5 miles west of Sunriver in central Oregon.

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CONSERVATIONISTS FILE LAWSUIT AGAINST PGE OVER LOWER DESCHUTES WATER QUALITY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A central Oregon conservation group has filed a lawsuit against Portland General Electric over water quality on the lower Deschutes River.

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OREGON, COUNTY SPAR OVER TIMBER LAWSUIT SEEKING $1.4 BILLION (Capital Press)

Linn County shouldnt be allowed to represent other counties in a lawsuit seeking $1.4 billion from Oregon over its forest management practices, according to the states attorneys.

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SCHOOLS LOOKING AT NEXT STEPS AFTER TESTING. (East Oregonian)

The InterMountain Education Service District is taking the lead on lead.

Since elevated levels of lead were announced in Portland Public Schools water supply earlier this year, IMESD Superintendent Mark Mulvihill said one of the districts top priorities has been to help schools sort out the alphabet soup of bureaucracies offering their input on how to protect children from the harmful chemical element.

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GROUPS CHALLENGE EPA OVER HIGH RIVER TEMPERATURES (East Oregonian)

Conservation groups from across the Northwest are suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to protect salmon from lethally warm water in the Columbia and Snake rivers.

A notice of intent to sue the EPA was filed Monday by Columbia Riverkeeper, Idaho Rivers United, Snake River Waterkeeper, the Institute for Fisheries Resources and Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermens Association. They accuse the agency of failing to manage river temperatures for the fish, which could lead to massive die-offs.

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APPLICATIONS SOUGHT FOR WHEELER COUNTY JUDGE (East Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown is seeking applications to fill the vacancy for Wheeler County Judge after voters recalled Patrick C. Perry on Tuesday.

The county judge presides over juvenile and probate hearings, and also serves as chair of the county commissioners. With 1,381 residents, Wheeler County is Oregon’s smallest county by population.

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OUR VIEW: COULD ANYONE HAVE STOPPED CANYON CREEK FIRE? — OPINION (East Oregonian)

On Sunday, The Oregonian distributed a special 20 page report, the culmination of a year-long investigation into the Canyon Creek Fire. That fire destroyed 43 homes and nearly 100 other structures on August 14, 2015 near the town of Canyon City in Grant County.

It was a journalistic endeavor that produced a fascinating product.

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VOTERS TO DECIDE ON TAX RELIEF FOR FALLEN OFFICERS’ SPOUSES (Medford Mail Tribune)

The spouses of firefighters and police officers who die in the line of duty could receive a property-tax exemption if Jackson County voters approve.

The Jackson County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously Wednesday to place the issue on the Nov. 8 ballot.

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JUDGE SIDES WITH ASHLAND GUN CLUB (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Judge sides with Ashland Gun Club-

A judge has sided with the Ashland Gun Club and the city of Ashland in a lawsuit brought by neighbors claiming lead ammunition has caused environmental damage.

In a July 25 report and recommendation, U.S. District Magistrate Judge Mark Clarke said the neighbors did not prove the Endangered Species Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act had been violated. The judge’s report and recommendation has been sent to a district judge for a final decision.

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COUNCIL REVIEWS GOALS TO FORWARD TO THE 2017 LEGISLATURE (The World)

Property taxes, floodplain technical help, money for water systems and more support for community mental health are what city councilors want Oregon legislators to tackle for the 2017 session.

Each year, the League of Oregon Cities, also known as the LOC, contacts city officials to have them fill out surveys, which are intended to determine city needs.

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VINTING BY NUMBERS: ANNUAL REPORT RELEASED (Ashland Daily Tidings)

I don’t know how many people get excited about the annual release of the Oregon Vineyard and Winery Census Report. No doubt the term census keys the nerd alarm, but for those who follow the local wine scene it really does land with a muffled sort of clat when it hits the street.

The Census Report is the Oregon wine industry’s ground truth in terms of what was actually produced in a given year.

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STATE EDUCATION BOARD ADOPTS LEAD TESTING RULE (Wallowa.com)

The Oregon Board of Education adopted a new rule Wednesday that for the first time requires school districts to test for lead in water at district-owned buildings and report those results to the public.

The board in June agreed to fast-track adoption of the new rule at the request of Gov. Kate Brown, after widespread media coverage of a scandal in Portland Public Schools over lead in drinking water that went unreported.

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UNLICENSED CONTRACTORS VICTIMS LINE UP (The Daily Journal of Commerce)

Its not the driveway Michael Smith wanted.

The retired electrician had agreed to terms with a Craigslist contractor to pave the approach to his Rainier home and add a retaining wall and drainage. But after taking some measurements  and a $7,000 check  the man never came back.

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OREGON WAVE ENERGY SUPPORTERS SAY THEY’RE IN GOOD SHAPE AS $40M GRANT LOOMS— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

One of the architects of an effort to land $40 million for a wave energy facility said the group is well-prepared as it enters the next phase.

Oregon State University’s Belinda Batten heads the school’s effort as the Northwest National Marine Energy Laboratory seeks to collect funds for a Newport wave project. The group learned more information about the competition yesterday.

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LANDMARK RULING ON HISTORIC LAKE OSWEGO HOUSE IS A ‘BIG WIN’ FOR PRESERVATIONISTS— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

One of the joys of buying an old home or building is the sense of history that comes with it, a sense that is shared by neighbors and visitors alike.

In a recent case, Lake Oswego Preservation Society v. City of Lake Oswego, the Oregon Supreme Court ruled that structures that retain a pre-existing designation as historic cannot be removed from protection simply by request by a subsequent owner.

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FEDS FUND AN EARLY WARNING SHAKEALERT SYSTEM FOR THE BIG CASCADIAN QUAKE (Willamette Week)

-A grant to the University of Oregon will help scientists add earthquake sensors along the West Coast.-

Here’s your daily reminder: We’re all going to die, and it could be because the Big One strikes Portland as you’re sitting at your desk at the job you hate next to the book shelf that will crush you.

Now for the good news.

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HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPALS BEG THE BOARD: FIX DANGEROUS BUILDINGS NOW (Willamette Week)

-Principals pushing to move forward with a vote on the school bond in November.-

Portland Public Schools’ principals are urging the School Board to go to voters this November with a proposed $750 million school bond, instead of delaying until May.

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CONFUSED ABOUT THE PROPOSED CORPORATE TAX HIKE EVERYONE’S TALKING ABOUT? CHECK OUT THIS REPORT— BLOG (Portland Mercury)

Measure 97 is confusing. But the monster tax measure that’ll be on your November ballot, which the Merc hasn’t taken a position on no matter what you’ve heard, is also spurring vital conversations in a state with chronically underfunded public services.

You should educate yourself.

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IN OUR VIEW: FEDS CAN SPAN I-5 CHALLENGE — OPINION (The Columbian)

– Federal government must lead charge to replace deteriorating bridge –

There is nothing original or groundbreaking about the political notion of building bridges  either figuratively or literally. But when Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., used the metaphor this week for a speech in front of business leaders in Clark County, it got us to thinking about this regions need for strong leadership in creating a plan for the Interstate 5 Bridge.

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BLM’S NEW FLAWED FOREST PLAN (Eugene Weekly)

Like a horror movie zombie, the logging plan for about 2.5 million acres of Oregons public forests known as the Whopper is back, and within days of its Aug. 5 announcement, enviros and the timber industry filed lawsuits against it.

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CHARITY CARE COSTS (State of Reform)

-Oregon charity care down 66% from 2013-

The OHAs’ recent report on hospital utilization shows the continued drop in hospital charity care. In Q1, 2015, hospitals provided $69m in charity care. In Q1 2014, it was $133m. In 2013, Oregon charity care equaled $203m.  Taken together, that means 2015 is down 66% over 2013.

This is exactly what was hoped for under the ACA: that more folks would be covered, driving down charity care, and ending cost shift to the commercial space.

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