September 23, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* ‘Flexible scheduling’ shaping up as next big legislative work-place fight
* ‘Incorrigible’ public masturbator shouldn’t be locked up for life, Supreme Court says
* Portland-area poverty rate falls as economic recovery spreads
* Leads still needed in Cape Kiwanda pedestal destruction, OSP says
* Oregon Supreme Court tosses Springfield murder conviction
* Sport fishing extended again for hatchery chinook in lower Columbia River
* Oregon State’s newest marine center necessary in the tsunami zone — Guest Opinion
* Celebrate national parks by fighting climate change — Guest Opinion
* Public pensions are being overly optimistic: Megan McArdle — Opinion
* Want to be a farmer? Incubator program to accept new growers
* Does Oregon discriminate against tax haven countries?
* Deadline looms for state to update IDs for air travel
* Governor should kill Nestles water bottling scheme for good — Guest Opinion
* Come talk about a third Salem bridge — or anything else — tonight — Opinion
* Oregon Supreme Court overturns Lane County mans murder conviction
* Face youth suicide problem — Opinion
* New York firm gets $1 million contract to review ODOT
* Brown says campus safety important ‘regardless of financial situation’
* Portland container shipping faces broad challenges
* Summit aims to rev up motorcycle safety
* As year winds down, locks task force plots way forward
* Lawsuit: Oregon wolf decision violated Endangered Species Act
* At long last, Oregon picks ODOT auditor
* Oregon proposes drop in workers comp rates
* State upholds zoning regulation
* Portland group spurs recommendation to list bumblebee as endangered
* Studies focus on acidic ocean impact on Dungeness crabs
* Editorial: Two historic cans cost Madras taxpayers hundreds of dollars — Opinion
* Renters Rights Highlighted At Rally At Oregon Capitol
* Oregon Works To Reduce Pain Pill Prescriptions In ER
* Cascade Locks Bottling Update
* Ahead Of UCC Shooting Anniversary, Group Issues Safety Recommendations
* Closures lifted on private forests
* Cleaner Air Oregon forum comes to Pendleton
* Our view: Tips and kicks — Opinion
* 2 horses test positive for West Nile
* Ontario officials continue work on new wastewater discharge permit
* Central Point the ‘Golden Spike’ for natural gas
* Utility, KRRC files to remove four hydro-dams
* C-flume project gets underway
* Cormorant case heads to Oregon
* Put down the cellphone and drive
* Buoy 10, lower Columbia River Chinook seasons grow
* Editorial: State promise to students falls short — Opinion
* As I See It: How childhood affects our health — Guest Opinion
* Predator Probe
* Report shows mining potential
* State fines city for wastewater violation
* Short on aquifer information — Opinion
* Bates Pond group comes close to consensus
* John Day cop killer may soon be freed
* Dying fir, pine trees dot horizon
* High bar to remove liquor license
* City, Main Street receive state awards
* Measure would clarify senate bill
* Measure 97 splits voters in Oregon
* ODF fire-protection fee could apply to more land in 2017
* Wallowa’s Uptmor a voice for small schools on state boards
* $100M Cover Oregon settlement comes with steep price tag for state– Blog
* Look Who’s Getting Oregon’s Housing Subsidy Dollars: The Rich
* One Question for Candidates: Should Portland Have Rent Control?
* Oregon DOC Will Not Open Second Women’s Prison For Now

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‘FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING’ SHAPING UP AS NEXT BIG LEGISLATIVE WORK-PLACE FIGHT (Portland Oregonian)

After passing paid sick leave in 2015 and raising Oregon’s minimum wage this spring, top Democrats on Thursday signaled next year’s likely flashpoint on worker rights: a mandate requiring some employers to give employees early notice of scheduling changes.

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‘INCORRIGIBLE’ PUBLIC MASTURBATOR SHOULDN’T BE LOCKED UP FOR LIFE, SUPREME COURT SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Supreme Court on Thursday for the first time reversed a life prison sentence for an unstoppable public masturbator — saying Oregon’s three-strikes-you’re-out law for repeat sex offenders isn’t always constitutional.

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PORTLAND-AREA POVERTY RATE FALLS AS ECONOMIC RECOVERY SPREADS (Portland Oregonian)

The Portland-area poverty rate took a steep dive in 2015, reflecting a broader economic recovery.

Some 26,000 residents  including the families of 12,000 children  rose above the poverty line.

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LEADS STILL NEEDED IN CAPE KIWANDA PEDESTAL DESTRUCTION, OSP SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

All leads have been exhausted in the investigation into the toppling of Cape Kiwanda’s duckbill sandstone pedestal, and investigators are appealing again to the public for help, the Oregon State Police said Thursday.

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OREGON SUPREME COURT TOSSES SPRINGFIELD MURDER CONVICTION (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Supreme Court on Thursday overturned the murder conviction of a Lane County man, ruling statements he made after requesting a lawyer should not have been admissible at his 2012 trial.

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SPORT FISHING EXTENDED AGAIN FOR HATCHERY CHINOOK IN LOWER COLUMBIA RIVER (Portland Oregonian)

Sport anglers can continue to fish for hatchery chinook salmon through the end of September from the Warrior Rock deadline Sauvie Island to Buoy 10.

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OREGON STATE’S NEWEST MARINE CENTER NECESSARY IN THE TSUNAMI ZONE — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Contrary to what you may have heard, Oregon State University can save more lives  and advance coastal safety  by building its next marine studies facility within a tsunami zone in Newport.

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CELEBRATE NATIONAL PARKS BY FIGHTING CLIMATE CHANGE — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

This year our country is celebrating 100 years of national parks. They are special places woven into the fabric of American life  from the iconic view of California’s Yosemite Valley to our own Crater Lake. Yet these places are threatened by the ever-increasing impacts of climate change.

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PUBLIC PENSIONS ARE BEING OVERLY OPTIMISTIC: MEGAN MCARDLE — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

This column often tackles controversial issues: race, gender, crime, the tragedy of people who order steak in restaurants. Today, however, we’re going to have some real fireworks. We’re going to talk about the appropriate discount rate for public-sector defined-benefit pension plans.

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WANT TO BE A FARMER? INCUBATOR PROGRAM TO ACCEPT NEW GROWERS (Portland Oregonian)

There are a lot of obstacles to starting a farm — land is expensive, equipment is expensive, business wasn’t your major in college. Now is your chance to knock down some of those barriers.

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DOES OREGON DISCRIMINATE AGAINST TAX HAVEN COUNTRIES? (Salem Statesman Journal)

Does having Oregon keep a list of tax haven nations curb foreign investment in the state?

Yes, and it’s akin to discrimination, according to one industry group that promotes “foreign direct investment,” a business practice where foreign companies own U.S. subsidiaries.

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DEADLINE LOOMS FOR STATE TO UPDATE IDS FOR AIR TRAVEL (Salem Statesman Journal)

In less than two years, Oregonians may find themselves unable to board a plane with their state ID card unless lawmakers act. That’s because Oregon is noncompliant with the federal REAL ID Act, a 2005 counter-terrorism law that requires states to put new security features on their ID cards  and pay for the upgrades.

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GOVERNOR SHOULD KILL NESTLES WATER BOTTLING SCHEME FOR GOOD — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

This week, our friend and colleague Anna Mae Leonard, a Columbia River Tribal fishing woman, is staging a five-day hunger strike to protest a Nestle bottling proposal that should have been irrelevant by now.

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COME TALK ABOUT A THIRD SALEM BRIDGE — OR ANYTHING ELSE — TONIGHT — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Dear Readers,

I’m posting this legislative press release to alert anyone who might be interested in attending the meeting tonight.

Dick Hughes

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Joint Transportation Committee To Hold 10th Public Hearing in Salem September 22 _________________________________________

OREGON SUPREME COURT OVERTURNS LANE COUNTY MANS MURDER CONVICTION (Eugene Register-Guard)

– Retrial possible in murder of teen mom, 18 –

The Oregon Supreme Court has overturned a Lane County mans murder conviction, ruling that a Springfield police officer improperly questioned him after he had invoked his rights to counsel and against self-incrimination.

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FACE YOUTH SUICIDE PROBLEM — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

– Time to join states effort and deal with it boldly –

After an 18-year-old South Salem High School honor student took his life last week in the forest near McKenzie Pass Highway 126/State Route 242 junction, the words of the poet Archibald MacLeish cry out for an answer: We leave you our deaths. Give them their meaning.

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NEW YORK FIRM GETS $1 MILLION CONTRACT TO REVIEW ODOT (Portland Tribune)

The state has awarded a nearly $1 million contract to New York-based McKinsey & Company to conduct a long-awaited management review of the Oregon Department of Transportation before lawmakers approve a transportation package in 2017.

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BROWN SAYS CAMPUS SAFETY IMPORTANT ‘REGARDLESS OF FINANCIAL SITUATION’ (Portland Tribune)

A work group formed in the wake of last fall’s shooting at Umpqua Community College has recommended the state certification of campus security officers, creating a state council on campus security and making building security upgrades.

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PORTLAND CONTAINER SHIPPING FACES BROAD CHALLENGES (Portland Tribune)

Labor disputes are often blamed for discontinued ocean container shipping at Port of Portland’s Terminal 6, but the facility faces broader problems, a port executive said.

Even if conflicts between the port, the terminal operator and the longshoremens union were resolved, turmoil in the global shipping industry would affect the facility, said Keith Leavitt, the ports chief commercial officer.

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SUMMIT AIMS TO REV UP MOTORCYCLE SAFETY (Portland Tribune)

Traffic fatalities are increasing this year in Portland, including deaths in motorcycle crashes. City officials are hoping to reduce the trend with Vision Zero policies that call for no traffic fatalities or serious injuries in the future.

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AS YEAR WINDS DOWN, LOCKS TASK FORCE PLOTS WAY FORWARD (Portland Tribune)

When the Willamette Falls Locks Task Force met for the first time in January 2016, representatives from a variety of state and local bodies generally agreed that the task force should work toward the eventual reopening of the locks.

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LAWSUIT: OREGON WOLF DECISION VIOLATED ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT (Bend Bulletin)

-Oregon prepares to update wolf management plan-

Oregon violated its own Endangered Species Act and failed to follow its rules when it removed gray wolves from the endangered list late last year, conservation groups argue in a lawsuit.

The Tuesday filing comes as the state prepares to update its wolf management plan  last updated in 2010  and as some federal legislators question protection levels for wolves and seek more state control over wolf management.

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AT LONG LAST, OREGON PICKS ODOT AUDITOR (Bend Bulletin)

-Agency audit is key step towards road funding proposal-

Oregon, we have liftoff.

After spending the better part of a year trying to get an audit of the Oregon Department of Transportation off the ground, the state has chosen a contractor to dig into the agency and send its findings to the Legislature by March, just as lawmakers will try to launch a major roads funding bill.

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OREGON PROPOSES DROP IN WORKERS COMP RATES (Bend Bulletin)

-Average premium would decline four fourth straight year-

Workers compensation insurance rates would drop for the fourth straight year in 2017 under a proposal by the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services.

The average rate, before insurers profits and other expenses, would decline by 7.2 percent, from $1.10 per $100 of payroll to $1.02 per $100, according to a department announcement.

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STATE UPHOLDS ZONING REGULATION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon state officials have upheld local regulations blocking people from growing medical marijuana on property zoned for rural residential use. County laws had already blocked growing marijuana for recreational use in that zone.

The Land Use Board of Appeals sided with Jackson County on the issue, releasing a decision this month that found the county’s regulations reasonable and moderate.

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PORTLAND GROUP SPURS RECOMMENDATION TO LIST BUMBLEBEE AS ENDANGERED (Bend Bulletin)

Federal wildlife officials on Thursday made a formal recommendation to list the rusty patched bumblebee as an endangered species because it has disappeared from about 90 percent of its historic range in just the past two decades.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made the recommendation after the Portland-based Xerces Society petitioned the agency on behalf of the bee in 2013 and presented studies showing it was struggling due to a combination of disease, habitat loss, climate change and overuse of pesticides on commercial crops.

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STUDIES FOCUS ON ACIDIC OCEAN IMPACT ON DUNGENESS CRABS (Bend Bulletin)

Millions of pounds of Dungeness crab are pulled from Pacific Northwest waters each year in a more than century-old ritual for commercial and recreational fishermen.

But as marine waters absorb more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, federal scientists are worried that the oceans changing chemistry may threaten the sweet-flavored crustaceans.

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EDITORIAL: TWO HISTORIC CANS COST MADRAS TAXPAYERS HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Would you pay hundreds of dollars for a couple of historic rusty cans, one squashed flat by vehicle traffic and the other likely to be no older than U2 frontman Bono? Its a question taxpayers in Madras should ask because, well, they did.

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RENTERS RIGHTS HIGHLIGHTED AT RALLY AT OREGON CAPITOL (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon lawmakers will take up two major pieces of legislation designed to improve rights for renters next year. That’s if a group that rallied at the state capitol in Salem on Thursday has its way.

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OREGON WORKS TO REDUCE PAIN PILL PRESCRIPTIONS IN ER (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The nation is in the middle of an opioid abuse epidemic. And Oregon is trying to find out just how many prescriptions are written in emergency departments  and then reduce them.

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CASCADE LOCKS BOTTLING UPDATE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Last May voters in Hood River County passed a ballot measure outlawing commercial water bottling plants. But now activists are raising concerns that plans for a Nestle water bottling plant in the city of Hood River may still be moving forward.

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AHEAD OF UCC SHOOTING ANNIVERSARY, GROUP ISSUES SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon college campuses should have better access to sworn police officers and develop active shooter training programs for all students and employees.

Those are some of the recommendations in a draft report issued Thursday by a work group convened by the Oregon Governors Office.

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CLOSURES LIFTED ON PRIVATE FORESTS (East Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Forestry will lift regulated use closures Friday on private forests within the agency’s Northeast Oregon District. However, fire season remains in effect for private, state, county, municipal and tribal lands protected by ODF.

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CLEANER AIR OREGON FORUM COMES TO PENDLETON (East Oregonian)

Cleaner Air Oregon, a program created by Gov. Kate Brown and jointly led by the Oregon Health Authority and Department of Environmental Quality, will hold its third regional forum Wednesday, Sept. 18 at the Pendleton Convention Center.

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OUR VIEW: TIPS AND KICKS — OPINION (East Oregonian)

A tip of the hat to emergency planning committees in both Morrow and Umatilla counties for working hard to prepare for a potential oil train derailment and crash.

A tip of the hat to allowing Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution inmates outside the prison to do manual labor and community projects.

Pendleton’s nearly three decade-long ban on inmates doing such work was overturned this year by city council. It was the only city to have such a ban, and we think its high time it was removed.

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2 HORSES TEST POSITIVE FOR WEST NILE (Argus Observer)

Although West Nile virus has not been detected in mosquitoes in Malheur County, two horses have tested positive with the virus, according to a release from the Oregon Health Authority.

One of the horses is near Vale and other one is near Rome, said Gary Page, manager of the county Vector Control District.

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ONTARIO OFFICIALS CONTINUE WORK ON NEW WASTEWATER DISCHARGE PERMIT (Argus Observer)

With its permit expiring to discharge wastewater into Snake River, the City of Ontario has been looking at ways to meet state requirements for a new permit.

Ontario City Council voted to approve going ahead with the second phase in the citys negotiations with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality on a required National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit.

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CENTRAL POINT THE ‘GOLDEN SPIKE’ FOR NATURAL GAS (Medford Mail Tribune)

Nearly four years after the first of three 40-foot liquid natural gas tanks were installed near the Pilot Travel Center, Clean Energy Fuels Corp. has opened the facility for business.

With the addition of the 275 Peninger Road location, Clean Energy Fuels’ Americas Natural Gas Highway” is now operational from San Diego to Seattle. But instead of being one of the oldest stops on the route, Central Point has become the “Golden Spike” location.

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UTILITY, KRRC FILES TO REMOVE FOUR HYDRO-DAMS (Herald and News)

The Klamath River Renewal Corporation KRRC will file Friday two applications with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FERC to decommission four dams on the Klamath River.

According to a press release from the KRRC, one application, filed jointly with PacifiCorp, asks FERC to transfer PacifiCorps licenses to operate the four dams in California and Oregon to the KRRC.

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C-FLUME PROJECT GETS UNDERWAY (Herald and News)

-KID breaks ground on water delivery pipeline-

Community members gathered around the entrance to a new era for the C-flume on Wednesday in Klamath Falls, with members of Klamath Irrigation Districts board of directors lifting the first shovels of dirt to kickoff the construction of the new structure planned for completion by summer 2018.

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CORMORANT CASE HEADS TO OREGON (Daily Astorian)

The federal lawsuit brought by an animal welfare group against the U.S. Coast Guard over the groups efforts to document the controversial shooting of double-crested cormorants near East Sand Island has been moved from San Diego to Portland.

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PUT DOWN THE CELLPHONE AND DRIVE (Daily Astorian)

Honor students, football stars, cheerleaders, cool kids and the girl they called granny at the wheel. All share one thing in common: they are among the 4,000 teenagers who die each year in preventable car crashes, the No. 1 killer of teens in the nation.

In 2015, 3,829 teens lost their lives on the roadway  and only 25 percent of those were attributable to drinking or drugs. Fifty percent of teens killed were passengers.

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BUOY 10, LOWER COLUMBIA RIVER CHINOOK SEASONS GROW (Daily Astorian)

Fish on through Sept. 30 for hatchery Chinook salmon from Buoy 10 upstream to the Warrior Rock/Bachelor Island deadline, under rules adopted today by fishery managers from Oregon and Washington.

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EDITORIAL: STATE PROMISE TO STUDENTS FALLS SHORT — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

One of the few good things that came out of this year’s short legislative session was the deal that Sen. Sara Gelser struck to preserve at least some semblance of the fifth-year programs that many mid-valley high schools have pioneered.

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AS I SEE IT: HOW CHILDHOOD AFFECTS OUR HEALTH — GUEST OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Yeah, yeah, Ive tried to quit. … I’m a dirt bag.

This 45-year-old had smoked for over 30 years and felt frustrated talking to me about his health. When we took time to connect, he realized cigarettes helped him manage stress and anxiety built in childhood, and he was not a dirt bag, but instead a survivor who sometimes struggles.

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PREDATOR PROBE (Baker City Herald)

-Biologists investigate ravens as a cause of the grouses decline-

Understanding Baker County’s Plummeting Population of Sage Grouse

A black bird with an appetite for sage grouse eggs could be the culprit  or at least one of the culprits  behind a precipitous decline in sage grouse populations in Baker County over the past decade.

A preliminary survey done this spring suggests raven numbers are high enough here to play a significant role in the sage grouses struggles, said Lee Foster, state sage grouse conservation coordinator for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife ODFW.

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REPORT SHOWS MINING POTENTIAL (Baker City Herald)

-Study ordered by 2015 Legislature rates Baker County’s potential high for gold & limestone, moderate for several other metals, minerals-

A new report from Oregon’s geology agency concludes that Baker County has rich potential for mining gold and limestone, and a moderate potential for several other metals and minerals.

The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries released the report last week as mandated by state lawmakers.

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STATE FINES CITY FOR WASTEWATER VIOLATION (Baker City Herald)

Baker City is appealing a $6,800 fine from the state, which issued the penalty because the city released wastewater into the Powder River last fall that exceeded chemical limits.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality DEQ levied the fine.

The violations, which happened in October 2015, involve whats known as the biochemical oxygen demand in the treated wastewater the city releases into the Powder River from its sewage lagoons about one mile north of town.

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SHORT ON AQUIFER INFORMATION — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

When you irrigate fields and pastures from a reservoir or a stream, its easy to tell when you’re running short on water.

You just have to look.

But the situation is nothing like as simple when it comes to some of Oregons larger sources of water for irrigation and for drinking.

Because these reservoirs are underground.

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BATES POND GROUP COMES CLOSE TO CONSENSUS (Blue Mountain Eagle)

A stakeholder work group discussing the future of Bates Pond and Bates State Park finished their three planned meetings but failed to reach a consensus about a recommendation to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

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JOHN DAY COP KILLER MAY SOON BE FREED (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The man who pleaded guilty to killing a John Day police officer in 1992 may soon be freed.

Today, the Oregon Court of Appeals overturned the Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervisions decision to postpone Sidney Dean Porters prison release date, stating the board lacked authority to rescind a release date absent a timely hearing, according to the court opinion.

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DYING FIR, PINE TREES DOT HORIZON (The Dalles Chronicle)

It is not unusual to see orange, rust and brown foliage dotting the landscape during the fall months, but when evergreens start changing colors, its indicative of a problem, Oregon Forestry Department officials say.

Chet Behling, stewardship forester for ODFs office in The Dalles, said the agency protects about 148,000 acres from fire in Wasco County. This year, 12,300 acres were mapped as being affected by drought-related stress and/or bark beetles, he said.

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HIGH BAR TO REMOVE LIQUOR LICENSE (The Dalles Chronicle)

A spokeswoman for the Oregon Liquor Control Commission on Monday laid out rigorous standards that must be met in order to deny a liquor license to an establishment.

The city of Dufur and the Wasco County sheriff have both recommended that the Dufur Pastime not have its liquor license renewed, and spokeswoman Christie Scott described the standards that would have to be met in order for that to happen.

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CITY, MAIN STREET RECEIVE STATE AWARDS (The Dalles Chronicle)

The city of Dalles and The Dalles Main Street have been recognized for their ongoing partnership to revitalize the downtown blocks.

Main Street has also received an award for its new promotional publication that provides an overview of its diverse programs.

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MEASURE WOULD CLARIFY SENATE BILL (LaGrande Observer)

One measure on the ballot in November would ensure public universities have the right to make investments, something legislation passed three years ago was originally supposed to do.

In 2013, legislation was passed that allowed universities within the Oregon University System to create governing boards. The same legislation, Senate Bill 270, also gave those universities the power to manage their finances and make investments.

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MEASURE 97 SPLITS VOTERS IN OREGON (LaGrande Observer)

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., did well in the Pacific Northwest during the presidential primary season with his lectern-pounding message about fairness, need and corporate greed.

A ballot measure this fall that would sharply raise corporate taxes is now testing just how deeply Sanders message about economic inequality has sunk in.

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ODF FIRE-PROTECTION FEE COULD APPLY TO MORE LAND IN 2017 (Wallowa.com)

Wallowa Countys so-called fire protection donut hole interior land vulnerable to fire but not currently assessed a fire protection fee  may be a thing of the past starting in 2017.

State forest officials, county representatives and local fire chiefs held meetings last week in Flora and Enterprise to announce a proposal to officially place all non-federal land in the county that isn’t within city limits or currently being farmed under the protection of the Oregon Department of Forestry.

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WALLOWA’S UPTMOR A VOICE FOR SMALL SCHOOLS ON STATE BOARDS (Wallowa.com)

Wallowa School Superintendent Bret Uptmor is broadening his influence and representing smaller schools with service on two state boards.

He has been serving on the Accountability Recording Advisory Committee for about 18 months. That board reports to the Oregon Department of Education and was mandated by the legislature to work on ways to hold schools accountable for student success and show their work. It also makes recommendations on appeals of information found in school report cards.

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$100M COVER OREGON SETTLEMENT COMES WITH STEEP PRICE TAG FOR STATE— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon’s $100 million settlement with Oracle America could end up costing state agencies at least twice that much, due to the installation fees associated with the free software under the deal, as well as maintenance down the road.

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LOOK WHO’S GETTING OREGON’S HOUSING SUBSIDY DOLLARS: THE RICH (Willamette Week)

– Oregon homeowners get more than $800 million a year in subsidy and fatcats take the biggest chunk.-

The Oregon House Revenue Committee met yesterday, in part to review the state’s role in addressing soaring real-estate costs.

One of the questions lawmakers examined is what programs the state currently has to subsidize affordable housing.

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ONE QUESTION FOR CANDIDATES: SHOULD PORTLAND HAVE RENT CONTROL? (Willamette Week)

– Lots of local office-seekers won’t talk about it, even when asked. –

Last week, House Speaker Tina Kotek D-Portland announced she’ll try to repeal Oregon’s ban on rent control next year.

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OREGON DOC WILL NOT OPEN SECOND WOMEN’S PRISON FOR NOW (KLCC)

Oregon’s Department of Corrections has decided not to ask the state for funds to open a new women’s prison. Oregon only has one facility for women, and its overcrowded.

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September 22, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Oregon tech, loath to talk public policy, finds its voice in Measure 97 tax fight
* Panel recommends wider pay-per-mile road tax rollout in 2025
* Survey: Support for allowing rent control strongest in Portland area
* Take action to help prevent gun suicides — Guest Opinion
* Agency head says state should have done better job monitoring dwindling groundwater levels
* Protesters: It’s time to put Nestle bottling plant ambitions to rest
* Parents of baby discover rental home’s yard saturated with lead, sue for $1.3 million
* New Columbia River Gorge trail adds to 73-mile bike path, walking route
* Count Her In report shows status of women in Oregon
* Police seek help in Cape Kiwanda vandalism investigation
* Volunteers needed for beach, stream, parks cleanup this weekend
* Legislators weigh PERS options, but reach no consensus
* Oregon lawmakers discuss groundwater problems
* Poll: Majority support repealing statewide ban on rent control
* Washington County board OKs stand-by vehicle fee
* Panel hears views on transportation funding
* My View: Tax will create more bankrupt businesses — Opinion
* My View: Health services need business tax funding — Opinion
* Brown says endorsing corporate tax measure ‘most difficult decision I have ever made’
* Legislators hold their own PERS hearing, amid huge projected shortfall
* 2 cans, 2 ditches only finds at Madras Airport construction site
* Four competing to be Oregon treasurer
* Nursing offers pathway out of poverty
* Editorial: Leaders need to lead on PERS — Opinion
* Editorial: Say no to feel-good Measure 100 — Opinion
* Native Americans Protest Nestle’ Plant Proposal
* Report: Oregon Has Very High Rate Of Female Sexual Assault
* Oregon Detective Pioneers New Sexual Assault Reporting Program
* Interior secretary touts efforts to protect sage grouse
* Wildfire rehab in Idaho, Oregon includes fall herbicide
* Boards, commissions must represent all of Oregon — Opinion
* Klamath dam removal vote a victory for citizens — Guest Opinion
* States will receive millions to help implement produce safety rule
* Poll: Majority supports repealing rent control ban
* Our view: We’ve got 99 problems but this measure ain’t one — Opinion
* LUBA upholds Jackson County marijuana regulations
* Since You Asked: No confirmed wolves in Ashland now
* Our View: Marijuana regulations are a necessary evil — Opinion
* Toxic cleanup underway
* Editorial: So long, SeaPort. Hello, light rail? — Opinion
* Drilling down: Astoria is testing ground for new career-technical program
* Editorial: 48-hour rule for police — Opinion
* County unemployment rate rises to 7 percent in August
* Oregon Cannabis is Headed for a Tough Month Because of an Obscure Agency and Strict New Rules
* Oregon faces prescription opioid, heroin epidemic
* Independent Report Calls for Massive Child Welfare Overhaul, Increased Spending
* PEBB Considers Ideas to Align Benefits More Closely with Private Sector

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OREGON TECH, LOATH TO TALK PUBLIC POLICY, FINDS ITS VOICE IN MEASURE 97 TAX FIGHT (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon technologists have long steered clear of the state’s policy fights, ducking questions about shortfalls in education funding or the looming crisis in public pension obligations.

Faced with a prospective tax that would hit Silicon Forest software as hard as any other industry in the state, though, the tech sector is speaking up.

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PANEL RECOMMENDS WIDER PAY-PER-MILE ROAD TAX ROLLOUT IN 2025 (Portland Oregonian)

Legislators next session will weigh a wider rollout of Oregon’s pay-per-mile road usage charge program, but even with their approval, it wouldn’t expand beyond volunteers for almost a decade.

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SURVEY: SUPPORT FOR ALLOWING RENT CONTROL STRONGEST IN PORTLAND AREA (Portland Oregonian)

A slim majority of voters across Oregon support House Speaker Tina Kotek’s recent call to repeal the state’s ban on rent control policies.

Support for Kotek’s position, according to a new survey pdf released by DHM Research, is strongest in the Portland metro area, where nearly six in 10 said they would support a change in Oregon’s laws that would enable cities and counties to impose their own rent control policies.

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TAKE ACTION TO HELP PREVENT GUN SUICIDES — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

September is Suicide Prevention Month. Suicide is a major public health concern in Clackamas County and affects individuals of all ages. I have personally responded to far too many suicide deaths in my law enforcement career. I have also seen the profound impact the loss of a loved one by suicide has on family and friends. The emotional toll lasts well beyond the death  often for a lifetime.

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AGENCY HEAD SAYS STATE SHOULD HAVE DONE BETTER JOB MONITORING DWINDLING GROUNDWATER LEVELS (Portland Oregonian)

The head of Oregon’s Water Resources Department took responsibility Wednesday for his agency’s long-term failure to monitor groundwater levels in parts of the state that are now experiencing severe shortages.

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PROTESTERS: IT’S TIME TO PUT NESTLE BOTTLING PLANT AMBITIONS TO REST (Portland Oregonian)

Native Americans dressed in traditional garb gathered Wednesday at the Oregon State Capitol to protest persistent attempts to bring a Nestle water bottling plant to an Oregon county that rejected the plan in a ballot measure in May. One protester is on a hunger strike.

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PARENTS OF BABY DISCOVER RENTAL HOME’S YARD SATURATED WITH LEAD, SUE FOR $1.3 MILLION (Portland Oregonian)

A young family that rented a Southeast Portland home with 280 times the acceptable level of lead in at least one hotspot in the yard have filed a $1.3 million lawsuit against their former landlord.

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NEW COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE TRAIL ADDS TO 73-MILE BIKE PATH, WALKING ROUTE (Portland Oregonian)

The 73-mile bike and walking trail along the Columbia River Gorge is a little closer to completion.

This weekend marks the dedication of the latest segment of the paved Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail off the side of Interstate 84  a 1.2-mile stretch from Starvation Creek to Lindsey Creek on the eastern side of the gorge.

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COUNT HER IN REPORT SHOWS STATUS OF WOMEN IN OREGON (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon women contribute more but get less for it than women in other states, according to a new report.

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POLICE SEEK HELP IN CAPE KIWANDA VANDALISM INVESTIGATION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon State Police have exhausted leads in a high-profile case of vandalism at Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area and are turning to the public for help.

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VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR BEACH, STREAM, PARKS CLEANUP THIS WEEKEND (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/34821354-75/volunteers-needed-for-beach-stream-parks-cleanup-this-weekend.html.csp

Thousands of volunteers again are expected to descend  trash bags in hand  along Oregons 363-mile coastline and its stream banks, parks and neighborhoods Saturday for the fall SOLVE Beach & Riverside Cleanup.

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LEGISLATORS WEIGH PERS OPTIONS, BUT REACH NO CONSENSUS (Portland Tribune)

A bipartisan work group aimed at reforming the states Public Employee Retirement System started taking input on the issue Wednesday afternoon, but reached no consensus.

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OREGON LAWMAKERS DISCUSS GROUNDWATER PROBLEMS (Portland Tribune)

Groundwater depletion problems in Oregon discussed during a recent legislative hearing in Salem potentially foreshadow policy proposals during the upcoming 2017 legislative session.

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POLL: MAJORITY SUPPORT REPEALING STATEWIDE BAN ON RENT CONTROL (Portland Tribune)

-Support highest in Portland area –

As housing costs increase across the state, a slim majority of Oregon voters support repealing the statewide ban on rent control  with the most support being in the Portland area.

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WASHINGTON COUNTY BOARD OKS STAND-BY VEHICLE FEE (Portland Tribune)

-Amount will be assessed in mid-2018 if state fails to raise aid for road and bridge work. –

Washington County car and truck owners will face a stand-by local vehicle registration fee in addition to their statewide fee.

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PANEL HEARS VIEWS ON TRANSPORTATION FUNDING (Portland Tribune)

-Lawmakers stop in Hillsboro for ninth hearing on statewide tour.-

Lawmakers were told the timing is right to raise more money to maintain Oregon’s roads and ease the movement of people and goods on increasingly congested routes in the Portland area.

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MY VIEW: TAX WILL CREATE MORE BANKRUPT BUSINESSES — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

The assumption behind Measure 97 is that every corporation is profitable and that the profits that these corporations are generating are excessive. If that assumption is true, then Measure 97 makes a lot of sense.

The problem is that its not true.

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MY VIEW: HEALTH SERVICES NEED BUSINESS TAX FUNDING — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Because Measure 97 is such a bad tax, its hard to sell. Let me try.

Here’s why its bad. It confuses receipts with profits, a critical business distinction. It confounds high revenue-per-employee businesses for example, architecture firms with low revenue-per-employee firms e.g., Safeway. And businesses will pass the cost of this new tax on to consumers, increasing the cost of living.

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BROWN SAYS ENDORSING CORPORATE TAX MEASURE ‘MOST DIFFICULT DECISION I HAVE EVER MADE’ (Portland Tribune)

Gov. Kate Brown defended her decision to support a corporate sales tax measure Wednesday as the only viable alternative to deep cuts at state agencies and rollbacks to recent education and health care investments.

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LEGISLATORS HOLD THEIR OWN PERS HEARING, AMID HUGE PROJECTED SHORTFALL (Bend Bulletin)

-Former union official says workers may have to shoulder some of the pension costs-

A former union president made the case Wednesday that its time for legislators to enact pension reform that might include public employees shouldering some of the costs, as the system stands to clobber government budgets in coming months.

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2 CANS, 2 DITCHES ONLY FINDS AT MADRAS AIRPORT CONSTRUCTION SITE (Bend Bulletin)

-Area being prepared for truck testing facility-

At a cost north of $2,000, two rusted cans and two former irrigation ditches found at the Madras Airport have been recorded with the State Historic Preservation Office.

The cans and former canal ditches were noted as part of a survey of land adjacent to the city-owned airport where Daimler Trucks North America is developing a research and development hub. The $18 million project will employ 30 to 40 engineers, drivers and technicians once complete, and may serve as a testing site for the company’s experiments in self-driving trucks.

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FOUR COMPETING TO BE OREGON TREASURER (Bend Bulletin)

-Job involves oversight of billions in state investments-

Four candidates are vying in the November election to become Oregon’s next treasurer, overseeing approximately $90 billion in state investments, including those funds invested on behalf of the Public Employees Retirement System.

Oregon’s treasurer also sits on the State Land Board and the State Board of Education.

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NURSING OFFERS PATHWAY OUT OF POVERTY (Bend Bulletin)

-Easy entry and incremental steps help nurses achieve solid income-

Nicolette Paul has been interested in a health care career ever since she went on an ambulance ride-along at the age of 15. While still in high school, she shadowed local emergency medical technicians and got her EMT license at age 18.

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EDITORIAL: LEADERS NEED TO LEAD ON PERS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s public employee pension fund is in such sorry straits it reduced a member of the Oregon Investment Council to tears recently. Literally.

The Oregon Investment Council oversees the states Public Employees Retirement System investments, and the PERS account is some $22 billion in the red, a number that grows with each passing day. Those who are expected to pay that bill will find out at the end of the month just how much more they’ll have to send to PERS next year, and the amount is expected to be substantial. Those who must pay up include nearly every city, county, school district and state agency, plus a host of small districts such as irrigation, housing, cemetery and fire districts.

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EDITORIAL: SAY NO TO FEEL-GOOD MEASURE 100 — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Warm and fuzzy may be a nice way to feel, but its a poor reason to vote for a ballot measure. Knowing that, Oregonians should reject the oh, so warm and fuzzy Ballot Measure 100.

Well admit to having been caught up in the measures sentiment when we first heard about it last spring. Who, after all, doesn’t want to save creatures as noble as the elephant, as beautiful as the cheetah or as magnificent as an 80-year-old sea turtle?

Today were taking a much more reasoned approach.

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NATIVE AMERICANS PROTEST NESTLE PLANT PROPOSAL (Bend Bulletin)

Native Americans dressed in traditional garb came to the Oregon State Capitol on Wednesday to protest persistent attempts to bring a Nestle water bottling plant to an Oregon county that rejected the plan in a ballot measure in May. One protester is on a hunger strike.

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REPORT: OREGON HAS VERY HIGH RATE OF FEMALE SEXUAL ASSAULT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Women and girls in Oregon are more likely to be victims of sexual violence than the national average and have the highest incidence of reported depression in the country.

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OREGON DETECTIVE PIONEERS NEW SEXUAL ASSAULT REPORTING PROGRAM (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

OPB Editor’s Note: Names of sexual assault victims have been changed in this story, to protect their privacy.

Haley woke up early one morning in June 2014. She had been out with a few friends at a bar in Ashland, Ore., the night before, and she felt safest going home with them rather than walking home alone.

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INTERIOR SECRETARY TOUTS EFFORTS TO PROTECT SAGE GROUSE (Capital Press)

A broad effort to save the greater sage grouse across the West without resorting to the Endangered Species Act is making progress, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said Wednesday.

There’s some really good work going on, Jewell said during a visit to a national wildlife refuge outside Denver, where she announced a year ago that the rare bird wouldn’t be listed as endangered or protected.

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WILDFIRE REHAB IN IDAHO, OREGON INCLUDES FALL HERBICIDE (Capital Press)

The federal governments 5-year, $67 million rehabilitation effort following a 2015 rangeland wildfire in southwest Idaho and southeast Oregon is entering its second year with another round of herbicide applications combined with plantings of native species.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management has started applying the herbicide Imazapic on federal lands to knock out invasive weeds in Oregon and will begin in Idaho in October, officials said this week.

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BOARDS, COMMISSIONS MUST REPRESENT ALL OF OREGON — OPINION (Capital Press)

One of the least-heralded and most-important jobs a governor has is appointing members of the many boards and commissions that populate the state government.

In Oregon, Gov. Kate Brown is responsible for filling the rolls of 195 boards and commissions. In doing that, she shapes the voice and advice they provide to her administration.

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KLAMATH DAM REMOVAL VOTE A VICTORY FOR CITIZENS — GUEST OPINION (Capital Press)

A great victory for all the citizens of Klamath County, Ore., was achieved on Aug. 31.

This was accomplished by the Klamath County Board of Commissioners holding the line against the well-funded, well-connected, dam removal and Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement supporters.

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STATES WILL RECEIVE MILLIONS TO HELP IMPLEMENT PRODUCE SAFETY RULE (Capital Press)

State agriculture departments will receive millions of dollars in grant money from FDA to educate farmers about the agency’s new produce safety rule and help them comply with its many requirements.

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POLL: MAJORITY SUPPORTS REPEALING RENT CONTROL BAN (East Oregonian)

As housing costs increase across the state, a slim majority of Oregon voters support repealing the statewide ban on rent control  with the most support being in the Portland area.

According to a new poll by DHM Research, 52 percent of statewide voters support eliminating the existing ban on rent control.

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OUR VIEW: WE’VE GOT 99 PROBLEMS BUT THIS MEASURE AIN’T ONE — OPINION (East Oregonian)

In Hermiston and Pendleton, outdoor school is an important part of each elementary students career.

And when the program was threatened by reduced state funding and cutbacks, each community stepped up and leveraged private dollars and volunteer hours. School boards and administrations made it a priority. Together, they ensured the week-long educational program in the Blue Mountains continued, even when dollars were thin.

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LUBA UPHOLDS JACKSON COUNTY MARIJUANA REGULATIONS (Medford Mail Tribune)

The state Land Use Board of Appeals has upheld Jackson County regulations that block medical marijuana growing on property zoned for rural residential use.

In a decision issued this month, LUBA rejected arguments put forward by Sandra Diesel, president of the local group Right to Grow USA.

Diesel said Wednesday she plans to appeal the decision to the Oregon Court of Appeals.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: NO CONFIRMED WOLVES IN ASHLAND NOW (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: There are red things on wire fences at the north edge of Ashland along Eagle Mill Road. Someone told me they are to rattle wolves and keep them away. The rumor is these fences are here because there are wolves in town now. Is that the case?

A: Those fences you saw adorned with red flags indeed were meant to deter wolves, but the fences are now gone because there is presently no known wolf activity in the area, according to state and federal biologists.

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OUR VIEW: MARIJUANA REGULATIONS ARE A NECESSARY EVIL — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Oregon’s foray into legalizing recreational marijuana has been a learning experience for everyone involved, not least for the state’s many growers of medical marijuana, who had the luxury of operating with little oversight for years under Oregon’s 18-year-old medical marijuana law. Those days are over.

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TOXIC CLEANUP UNDERWAY (Herald and News)

-North Ridge Estates getting a makeover-

Picture a football field. If one took the entire amount of dirt to be removed from the North Ridge Estates Superfund site, it would fill the field, past the goal posts, up to 150 feet in height.

That’s how the EPA describes the massive amount of earthmoving that is going on up Old Fort Road in Klamath Falls. City and county officials, state and local contractors and others all toured the site on Wednesday.

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EDITORIAL: SO LONG, SEAPORT. HELLO, LIGHT RAIL? — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-Better bus service, other travel options are better fit for coast-

Full-scale bankruptcy liquidation of SeaPort Airlines is the least-surprising news all month.

The company was the latest to try to bring air service between Astoria and Portland and Newport between 2008 and 2010, and has continued trying to make its business profitable since then, for example in Pendleton. Its name alludes to an original plan of connecting smaller markets to national airlines in Seattle and Portland.

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DRILLING DOWN: ASTORIA IS TESTING GROUND FOR NEW CAREER-TECHNICAL PROGRAM (Daily Astorian)

Inside the new engineering lab at Astoria High School, Glen Fromwillers students are busy learning the skills of modern manufacturing.

Split into two-person teams in front of computers and instrumentation panels, they learn to manipulate robotic arms, read industrial prints, configure electrical circuits, design 3-D objects for printing, operate pneumatic equipment and program drills  a baseline education for the mechanically inclined.

Astoria is the testing ground for the new career-technical education program secured by a coalition of Clatsop County school districts and businesses last year.

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EDITORIAL: 48-HOUR RULE FOR POLICE — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

A tentative contract agreement between the city of Portland and the city’s Police Bureau caught our eye because of one detail that could be relevant in the mid-valley.

The agreement, which Portland police officers have yet to ratify, does away with the controversial “48-hour rule.” That’s the rule allowing officers who were involved in an incident that included the use of deadly force to wait two days before being interviewed by investigators.

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COUNTY UNEMPLOYMENT RATE RISES TO 7 PERCENT IN AUGUST (Douglas County News-Review)

Douglas County’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate rose from 6.8 percent in July to 7 percent in August, less than a percentage point below the August 2015 rate of 7.7 percent. Meanwhile, the statewide seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 5.4 percent and the national rate was 4.9 percent in August.

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OREGON CANNABIS IS HEADED FOR A TOUGH MONTH BECAUSE OF AN OBSCURE AGENCY AND STRICT NEW RULES (Willamette Week)

Unless a dozen more labs are magically approved in the next week, you can expect a very different selection on dispensary shelves this fall.

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OREGON FACES PRESCRIPTION OPIOID, HEROIN EPIDEMIC (KOIN)

An average of 3 Oregonians die each week from prescription opioid overdose, according to the Oregon Health Authority.

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INDEPENDENT REPORT CALLS FOR MASSIVE CHILD WELFARE OVERHAUL, INCREASED SPENDING (The Lund Report)

A report from Washington state consultant Public Knowledge argues the Oregon Department of Human Services needs increased staffing and foster care programs must be better funded.

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PEBB CONSIDERS IDEAS TO ALIGN BENEFITS MORE CLOSELY WITH PRIVATE SECTOR (The Lund Report)

The Public Employees Benefit Board met Tuesday to hear ideas from consultants to improve the management of its prescription drug benefit and crunch data on emergency department utilization and dental benefits.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on September 22, 2016 OSL eClips

September 21, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Is it harder to be a woman in Oregon? New report finds high rates of alcohol use, trauma, childcare costs
* ‘This is becoming a moral issue’: Officials face truth behind Oregon’s soaring pension costs
* As Oregon Promise students gear up for first year, some learn attendance isn’t free
* Dead whale returns to an Oregon beach, this time in Oswald West State Park
* Elk season outlook should be about the same as 2015 in oregon
* Duck numbers remain high across the continent; Oregon season outlook is good again
* Deer season is on tap next weekend across Oregon
* SeaPort Airlines to be liquidated, fleet grounded
* Forget a $15 minimum wage. What about bonuses?: Bloomberg View
* Person with TB at Sunset High School in Beaverton no longer infectious
* Willamette Falls project says no to whitewater park
* Iconic Portland buildings to go dark in campaign to cut light pollution
* Measure 98 will help Oregon students avoid dead ends — Guest Opinion
* Portland Harbor advisory group’s concerns are ignored — Guest Opinion
* Bringing the governor’s campaign to the kids
* Oregon’s poor treatment of half its population — Opinion
* Legislature holds memorial for State Sen. Alan Bates
* Island hopping at spectacular Waldo Lake
* Oregon’s promise of ‘free community college’ includes a few caveats
* Oregon can improve on its nickel-ante recycling law — Guest Opinion
* To serve and protect — Opinion
* Oregonians have one in 239 chance of hitting deer with car, study shows
* Lane County job rate in August remains steady from a month earlier at 5.9 percent
* Meteorologists: 2016-17 winter likely warmer than average
* Local climate change concerns focus on fire
* Bend, Redmond No. 8 in nation in GDP growth
* COCC gets $2.25M grant to help new students
* Community colleges try to streamline developmental courses
* Report: U.S. wildlife refuges face staff shortages
* Editorial: Measure 96 is wrong way to fund veterans services — Opinion
* Editorial: Vote yes on M94 to stop mandatory retirement for judges — Opinion
* Health Care Budget Hole & Foster Care Update
* How Meaningful Is ‘The American Dream’ Today?
* Some farm groups endorse Hanson for ODA chief
* SeaPort planes grounded, company liquidation begins
* EOCI readies for inmate workers outside the fence
* EOCI and TRCI to hold recruiting event
* Pacific Power contracts with wind, solar projects
* Umatilla, Morrow counties to collaborate on rail safety plan
* Our view: Measure 98 fills needed niche with dollars — Opinion
* Construction demand helps improve jobless rate
* Measure 97 is a hidden sales tax we’ll all pay — Guest Opinion
* Port wavers on whether to ditch LNG sublease
* County unemployment rate rises slightly in August
* Editorial: Senate action great news for local ports, environment — Opinion
* County unemployment rate rises slightly in August
* Anchovies pick up where sardines left off in Astoria
* County to seek state grant to help with mill site building removal
* Editorial: Fight begins over records proposals — Opinion
* Household Income Growth by Quintiles– Blog
* Oregon’s free preschool program starts Sept. 21

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IS IT HARDER TO BE A WOMAN IN OREGON? NEW REPORT FINDS HIGH RATES OF ALCOHOL USE, TRAUMA, CHILDCARE COSTS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon women have the nation’s highest rates of reported depression and heavy alcohol use. More than half say they have experienced sexual or domestic violence, one of the worst rates in the country, officials at a new Oregon foundation have found.

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‘THIS IS BECOMING A MORAL ISSUE’: OFFICIALS FACE TRUTH BEHIND OREGON’S SOARING PENSION COSTS (Portland Oregonian)

Just how bad is Oregon’s public pension funding crisis?

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AS OREGON PROMISE STUDENTS GEAR UP FOR FIRST YEAR, SOME LEARN ATTENDANCE ISN’T FREE (Portland Oregonian)

Thousands of community college students will start fall classes next week through the Oregon Promise  a program designed to make school more affordable _________________________________________

DEAD WHALE RETURNS TO AN OREGON BEACH, THIS TIME IN OSWALD WEST STATE PARK (Portland Oregonian)

The dead humpback whale that disappeared off an Oregon beach Monday before scientists could investigate its cause of death is back on a nearby beach today.

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ELK SEASON OUTLOOK SHOULD BE ABOUT THE SAME AS 2015 IN OREGON (Portland Oregonian)

Elk numbers are relatively stable across Oregon, with some exceptions and again, as with deer, don’t appear yet to be too impacted by wolves, at least in the Wallowa district.

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DUCK NUMBERS REMAIN HIGH ACROSS THE CONTINENT; OREGON SEASON OUTLOOK IS GOOD AGAIN (Portland Oregonian)

Federal flyway biologists predict another strong fall flight forecast for most ducks, despite much dryer conditions across much of prairie Canada.

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DEER SEASON IS ON TAP NEXT WEEKEND ACROSS OREGON (Portland Oregonian)

Hunting conditions for the Oct. 1 deer opener are much improved over 2015, when most of Oregon was in dire distress from drought.

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SEAPORT AIRLINES TO BE LIQUIDATED, FLEET GROUNDED (Portland Oregonian)

SeaPort Airlines, an 8-year-old commuter carrier that tried to carve a niche serving subsidized routes to small regional airports, will ground its flights Tuesday as it faces liquidation in bankruptcy.

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FORGET A $15 MINIMUM WAGE. WHAT ABOUT BONUSES?: BLOOMBERG VIEW (Portland Oregonian)

A striking 5.2 percent rise in U.S. household income last year, the largest increase since the last recession, is a rare bit of good news for the beleaguered American middle class. Still, we shouldn’t get too excited.

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PERSON WITH TB AT SUNSET HIGH SCHOOL IN BEAVERTON NO LONGER INFECTIOUS (Portland Oregonian)

The person at Sunset High School who contracted tuberculosis got sick in June and has since recovered. But the school only just notified staff and parents about the case on Monday.

Oregon public health officials said Tuesday that there was no need to alert the public sooner because it was very unlikely the disease would spread through casual contact at a school, on the street or while sharing a bus ride.

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WILLAMETTE FALLS PROJECT SAYS NO TO WHITEWATER PARK (Portland Oregonian)

It’s official: A whitewater park will not be a part of the Willamette Falls Legacy Project in Oregon City.

The heads of the development project  made up of officials from Oregon City, Clackamas County, the state of Oregon and Metro  decided Monday night to not include a proposed whitewater park at the site of its public Riverwalk from downtown Oregon City to the falls.

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ICONIC PORTLAND BUILDINGS TO GO DARK IN CAMPAIGN TO CUT LIGHT POLLUTION (Portland Oregonian)

It’s going to be a long, dark night on Sept. 30, but not because of any celestial event or power outage.

Sept. 30 is the kickoff of an ambitious campaign by the Audubon Society of Portland to cut down on light pollution in an effort to save energy and the lives of migrating birds.

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MEASURE 98 WILL HELP OREGON STUDENTS AVOID DEAD ENDS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Not everybody learns best learning by reading books or doing math from a book. That’s no secret. Everyone I know likes hands-on learning, regardless of their learning style.

Unfortunately, too many Oregon high school students are missing out because most of our high schools had to cut hands-on learning. That means too many students don’t get to discover what they really like doing and what they could see themselves doing into the future.

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PORTLAND HARBOR ADVISORY GROUP’S CONCERNS ARE IGNORED — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In regard to The Oregonian/OregonLive editorial on September 17, “Portland Harbor cleanup must move forward this year,” there is a vital stakeholder the board failed to mention  the community, the largest stakeholder in the cleanup and owner of the river. Representing the community is Portland Harbor Community Advisory.

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BRINGING THE GOVERNOR’S CAMPAIGN TO THE KIDS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Maybe it was the events tone. Maybe it was the setting.

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OREGON’S POOR TREATMENT OF HALF ITS POPULATION — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

So much for Oregon’s progressive reputation.

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LEGISLATURE HOLDS MEMORIAL FOR STATE SEN. ALAN BATES (Salem Statesman Journal)

Legislature holds memorial for State Sen. Alan Bates.

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ISLAND HOPPING AT SPECTACULAR WALDO LAKE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Waldo Lake is one of those places every Oregonian should visit at least once.

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OREGON’S PROMISE OF ‘FREE COMMUNITY COLLEGE’ INCLUDES A FEW CAVEATS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Thousands of community college students will start fall classes next week through the Oregon Promise  a program designed to make school more affordable.

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OREGON CAN IMPROVE ON ITS NICKEL-ANTE RECYCLING LAW — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon was a pioneer in beverage container recycling back in the early 1970s, and for that we should be lauded. Oregonians started thinking about taking containers out of the waste stream and out of the landfills, and making an effort to reduce roadside litter.

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TO SERVE AND PROTECT — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

A recent New York Times story about bad police officers who are forced out of one department only to resurface in another focused a spotlight on a problem in law enforcement: The system for screening out people who don’t belong in policing has some holes.

A former Coquille officer, Sean Sullivan, was the poster child for this scenario. Sullivan, who was convicted of sexual harassment of a child, was fired from the Coquille department in 2005 and barred from working as a police officer.

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OREGONIANS HAVE ONE IN 239 CHANCE OF HITTING DEER WITH CAR, STUDY SHOWS (Eugene Register-Guard)

On average, one out of every 239 Oregon drivers this year will have a collision caused by a deer, an auto insurance company said. That is up more than 5 percent from last year.

The study, by insurer State Farm, also found that the likelihood of colliding with a deer more than doubles in October, November and December, during deer mating season.

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LANE COUNTY JOB RATE IN AUGUST REMAINS STEADY FROM A MONTH EARLIER AT 5.9 PERCENT (Eugene Register-Guard)

-County’s total employment has grown by 5,200 jobs from August 2015-

Hiring by Lane County employers in August kept the unemployment rate steady from the month before, the state Employment Department reported on Tuesday.

At 5.9 percent, the seasonally adjusted monthly unemployment rate remained unchanged in August from July, the department said.

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METEOROLOGISTS: 2016-17 WINTER LIKELY WARMER THAN AVERAGE (Bend Bulletin)

-Weather experts back off earlier La Nina predictions-

Skiers and snowboarders in the Pacific Northwest were giddy when weather experts announced a La Nina watch a few months ago.

But that watch, issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, was called off last week, perhaps tempering some excitement for the upcoming snow sports season.

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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE CONCERNS FOCUS ON FIRE (Bend Bulletin)

-Forest discussion, climate conference slated for Bend-

Climate change-related concerns for the region are heating up with a focus on fire.

During a conference call last week about Western forests, Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., and several scientists warned of a clear trend with climate change contributing to the severity of wildfires in the West, longer fire seasons and earlier disappearance of snowpack.

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BEND, REDMOND NO. 8 IN NATION IN GDP GROWTH (Bend Bulletin)

-Construction, software out front-

The value of all goods and services produced in the Bend-Redmond metro area increased by $425 million, or 6.9 percent, adjusted for inflation, between 2014 and 2015, according to data released today.

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COCC GETS $2.25M GRANT TO HELP NEW STUDENTS (Bend Bulletin)

-Grant will also go to improving developmental math, writing-

After being passed over last year, Central Oregon Community College officials were surprised to learn the college had received a $2.25 million federal grant to help students who need remedial math and writing courses and to ensure they return for a second year.

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COMMUNITY COLLEGES TRY TO STREAMLINE DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES (Bend Bulletin)

-Research shows the more developmental courses students take, the less likely they are to graduate-

Ashlynn Brusewitz graduated high school three years ago and has been working as a home caregiver for seniors. She is starting at Central Oregon Community College this fall and wants to go into the medical field, maybe as a nurse or technician. She plans to go part time at first and says shell probably end up transferring to a four-year school.

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REPORT: U.S. WILDLIFE REFUGES FACE STAFF SHORTAGES (Bend Bulletin)

Hundreds of national wildlife refuges that provide critical habitat for migratory birds and other species are crippled by a staffing shortage that has curtailed educational programs, hampered the fight against invasive species and weakened security at facilities that attract nearly 50 million visitors annually, a group of public employees and law enforcement said today.

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EDITORIAL: MEASURE 96 IS WRONG WAY TO FUND VETERANS SERVICES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Ballot Measure 96, a constitutional amendment referred to the people by the 2016 Oregon Legislature, was no doubt written with the best of intentions. That said, it has enough flaws to make voting against it something of a no-brainer.

The measure would dedicate 1.5 percent of net lottery proceeds each biennium to services for veterans.

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EDITORIAL: VOTE YES ON M94 TO STOP MANDATORY RETIREMENT FOR JUDGES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Measure 94 would eliminate a damaging provision of the Oregon Constitution that forces state judges out of office shortly after they turn 75.

By voting yes, Oregonians can correct an injustice to individual jurists while also giving themselves the benefit of being served by mature judges with critical knowledge and experience.

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HEALTH CARE BUDGET HOLE & FOSTER CARE UPDATE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Lynne Saxton, director of the Oregon Health Authority, tells us about a massive $1.2 billion shortfall in Oregon’s healthcare budget, and Gov. Kate Browns healthcare policy adviser, Jeremy Vandehey, tells us about how the state might tackle the issue.

An independent review committee just came out with a final report on problems plaguing Oregon’s foster care system. We talk with the head of Department of Human Services Clyde Saiki, and Senator Sarah Gelser, who was on the review committee.

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HOW MEANINGFUL IS ‘THE AMERICAN DREAM’ TODAY? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

What do we mean when we talk about achieving the American Dream?

Who is we? And how did we come up with those ideas? Is the dream still relevant today? Those are all questions were exploring in conversations with Oregonians leading up to the November 2016 election. We’ve been gathering survey responses and talking with people on Think Out Loud to get a variety of perspectives on the American Dream.

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SOME FARM GROUPS ENDORSE HANSON FOR ODA CHIEF (Capital Press)

Multiple Oregon farm and agribusiness groups have requested that outgoing Oregon Department of Agriculture Director Katy Coba be replaced with Lisa Hanson, the agency’s deputy director.

Some organizations, however, are withholding judgment until Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has a chance to vet multiple candidates for the position.

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SEAPORT PLANES GROUNDED, COMPANY LIQUIDATION BEGINS (East Oregonian)

For the moment, Eastern Oregon Regional Airport has no commercial air service.

SeaPort Airlines, the only company that flies into Pendleton, ceased operations Tuesday.

In a court hearing Tuesday, a judge ordered the SeaPort be converted into Chapter 7 liquidation effective at noon Wednesday.

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EOCI READIES FOR INMATE WORKERS OUTSIDE THE FENCE (East Oregonian)

The end is nigh for Pendleton’s 29-year agreement that bars Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution inmates from working outside the prison.

A 10-inmate crew and its overseeing officer from Two Rivers Correctional Institution, Umatilla, started landscaping work this week outside the Pendleton prison. Capt. Jeff Frazier at EOCI said staff are training with the Umatilla unit and screening minimum-custody inmates to work outside the fence come Oct. 24, a first for the facility.

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EOCI AND TRCI TO HOLD RECRUITING EVENT (East Oregonian)

Information about working in the corrections system will be available at a joint recruiting event for Two Rivers Correctional Institution and Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution.

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PACIFIC POWER CONTRACTS WITH WIND, SOLAR PROJECTS (East Oregonian)

Pacific Power has agreed to purchase the renewable energy from seven wind and solar projects across the West, including four new solar installations in Oregon.

The utility has until 2040 to start generating half its electricity from renewable sources under the Oregon Renewable Portfolio Standard. These contracts will help keep Pacific Power in compliance through 2028, said Rick Link, the companys director of origination.

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UMATILLA, MORROW COUNTIES TO COLLABORATE ON RAIL SAFETY PLAN (East Oregonian)

Three months after an oil train derailed and caught fire in the Columbia River Gorge near Mosier, the Local Emergency Planning Committees for Umatilla and Morrow counties are working to prepare for a similar disaster close to home.

Both committees held a joint meeting Tuesday at Good Shepherd Medical Center in Hermiston, where they decided to collaborate on a rail safety plan that would outline what to do should another oil train derail in the region.

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OUR VIEW: MEASURE 98 FILLS NEEDED NICHE WITH DOLLARS — OPINION (East Oregonian)

In contrast to the controversial question above it on the November ballot, Measure 98 will take money already collected into the general fund and require that it be spent on education.

It is an attempt to solve a glaring problem in Oregon, comes with a reasonable price tag and should be supported.

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CONSTRUCTION DEMAND HELPS IMPROVE JOBLESS RATE (Medford Mail Tribune)

There were 460 more construction workers employed in Jackson County during August than a year ago.

It’s possible that the number reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics might have been even larger had there been more skilled construction workers. Between July and August, just 30 construction jobs were added, but the help is still wanted.

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MEASURE 97 IS A HIDDEN SALES TAX WE’LL ALL PAY — GUEST OPINION (The World)

I’m a third-generation farmer in Coos County and I’m deeply concerned about the impact Measure 97 on this years ballot will have on our family, the regions other family farmers and on every individual and business in the state.

Measure 97 is unlike anything we’ve ever seen in Oregon. Aside from being the largest tax increase in state history, its also a hidden sales tax for every Oregonian. Proponents claim Measure 97 is a tax only for out-of-state corporations. They’re wrong.

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PORT WAVERS ON WHETHER TO DITCH LNG SUBLEASE (Daily Astorian)

The Port of Astoria Commission came close Tuesday to voting to abandon the agency’s sublease with Oregon LNG on the Skipanon Peninsula, but pulled back amid the concerns of two commissioners.

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COUNTY UNEMPLOYMENT RATE RISES SLIGHTLY IN AUGUST (Daily Astorian)

Clatsop County’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 5.4 percent in August, up 0.3 percent from the previous month but down 0.3 percent from the year prior, according to the state Employment Department. The county had the same unemployment rate as the state, and was one-half percent higher than the national rate.

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EDITORIAL: SENATE ACTION GREAT NEWS FOR LOCAL PORTS, ENVIRONMENT — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Consistent funding for navigation maintenance is a big deal

Last week included major wins in the U.S. Senate for issues of pivotal importance for Columbia River and Pacific Coast communities.

The Water Resources Development Act of 2016 passed the Senate Sept. 15. It includes reforms of the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund and passage of the Columbia River Basin Restoration Act. These will have big positive impacts.

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COUNTY UNEMPLOYMENT RATE RISES SLIGHTLY IN AUGUST (Daily Astorian)

Clatsop County’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 5.4 percent in August, up 0.3 percent from the previous month but down 0.3 percent from the year prior, according to the state Employment Department. The county had the same unemployment rate as the state, and was one-half percent higher than the national rate.

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ANCHOVIES PICK UP WHERE SARDINES LEFT OFF IN ASTORIA (Daily Astorian)

The factory sounds and briny scent of fish processing have returned to the Astoria Riverwalk at Ninth Street after a two-year lull.

SeaA Inc., a business that sorts, freezes and conveys anchovies wholesale to domestic and international markets, has reanimated the warehouse and processing plant once occupied by Astoria Holdings Inc.

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COUNTY TO SEEK STATE GRANT TO HELP WITH MILL SITE BUILDING REMOVAL (Albany Democrat Herald)

Linn County will apply for two state grants to assist with the demolition of a building at the former Willamette Industries mill site in Sweet Home that burned to the ground last year.

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EDITORIAL: FIGHT BEGINS OVER RECORDS PROPOSALS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

In an editorial last month, we discussed the first batch of recommendations from a task force that’s been examining the sorry state of Oregon’s public records laws.

Those recommendations struck us as a worthwhile step forward, but we also warned that any significant overhaul to the records laws could be a tough sell.

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HOUSEHOLD INCOME GROWTH BY QUINTILES— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

Noted in yesterdays look at how median household incomes are finally rising was that, at least nationally, the lowest incomes increased by the largest amount. That was based on the CPS data available for the U.S. In the ACS data, which we have at the local level you can do something similar as well, which brings us to the latest edition of the Graph of the Week.

In 2015, incomes for Oregonians in the bottom quintile  the 20% of households making approximately less than $23,000 per year  increased by the largest percent. This amounted to nearly a 7 percent increase after accounting for inflation.

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OREGON’S FREE PRESCHOOL PROGRAM STARTS SEPT. 21 (KOIN)

-The program supports children and families living at 200 percent of the poverty level-

Oregon’s free preschool program, Preschool Promise, kicks off on Wednesday with rolling starting dates across the Beaver State.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on September 21, 2016 OSL eClips

September 20, 2016 OSL eClips

* Dead whale on Oregon coast disappears before experts can determine what killed it
* Feds want to take over licensing when cars drive themselves
* Report finds racial wage gap widest in nearly 4 decades
* State-based insurance regulatory system reliable, successful — Guest Opinion
* Candidates disagree on scope of state audits
* ODFW looks at bottle, income tax to raise money
* NW Natural seeks rate reduction
* Oracle pact calls for big state money
* Portland rolls up one spot to No. 3 in Bicycling Magazine best cities survey
* My View: Residents want better cleanup — Guest Opinion
* Oregon conservation projects score funds
* Agencies kick off new wildfire dispatch center
* Editorial: Measure 99 doesn’t make the case for outdoor school — Opinion
* Editorial: Vote yes on Measure 95 to give universities better financial tools — Opinion
* Kidney Only Trace Of Whale That Washed Ashore In Oregon
* Rate Of Oregonians With Health Coverage Climbs To 93 Percent
* Ocean conditions portend uncertain winter weather across West
* Drone operators seek permission to fly beyond line of sight
* Our view: Wrong solution for housing pinch — Opinion
* Ashland woman didn’t want life prolonged, but state says she must be spoon-fed
* Our View: When money matters more than lives — Opinion
* Stepping up STEM
* Exploited youths need federal help — Guest Opinion
* Drugmakers fought domino effect of Washington opioid limits
* DEQ fines Hood River $2,380 for wastewater violations
* First Responders: Community should join governor in giving a well-earned thank you — Opinion
* Sheriff’s office ‘hopeful’ UCC shooting investigation will be completed by end of year
* Oregon Median Household Income Rises, Finally– Blog
* Oregon’s Uninsured Rate Drops To 7 Percent

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DEAD WHALE ON OREGON COAST DISAPPEARS BEFORE EXPERTS CAN DETERMINE WHAT KILLED IT (Portland Oregonian)

A crew of marine life scientists gathered all the equipment they needed to conduct a whale version of an autopsy on a 38-foot-long humpback on a Oregon beach Monday — but arrived to find it had disappeared.

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FEDS WANT TO TAKE OVER LICENSING WHEN CARS DRIVE THEMSELVES (Portland Oregonian)

The federal government, rather than states, should be in charge of regulating self-driving cars since the vehicles are essentially controlled by software, not people, Obama administration officials said Monday as they laid out the outlines of their plans to help get the technology safely onto the nation’s roadways _________________________________________

REPORT FINDS RACIAL WAGE GAP WIDEST IN NEARLY 4 DECADES (Salem Statesman Journal)

As wages for American workers have stagnated for more than a generation, the income gap between black and white workers has widened, and discrimination is the main reason for the persisting disparity, according to a new report.

The Economic Policy Institute also found that young black women are being hit the hardest. This gap remains even after controlling for factors like education, experience, or geography.

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STATE-BASED INSURANCE REGULATORY SYSTEM RELIABLE, SUCCESSFUL — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

The U.S. has the largest, most resilient, pro-consumer and competitive insurance market in the world. Despite this 150-year record of success, however, international regulators are devising new and untried standards and pressuring U.S. negotiators to accept them and change our system.

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CANDIDATES DISAGREE ON SCOPE OF STATE AUDITS (Portland Tribune)

Oregon Secretary of State candidate and current labor commissioner Brad Avakian says he believes the secretary has statutory authority to audit private companies when red flags have been raised in the execution of public contracts.

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ODFW LOOKS AT BOTTLE, INCOME TAX TO RAISE MONEY (Portland Tribune)

A task force convened to suggest new sustainable funding sources for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife have settled on two recommended options that each take the form of tax surcharges  one on income and one on beverage containers.

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NW NATURAL SEEKS RATE REDUCTION (Portland Tribune)

NW Natural has filed for a rate reduction with the Public Utility Commission of Oregon.

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ORACLE PACT CALLS FOR BIG STATE MONEY (Portland Tribune)

Oregon’s settlement of its long-running legal war with Oracle last week comes with a hidden price tag for the state  hundreds of millions in likely spending for new IT projects.

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PORTLAND ROLLS UP ONE SPOT TO NO. 3 IN BICYCLING MAGAZINE BEST CITIES SURVEY (Portland Tribune)

Portland is the third best city in the nation for bicycle riders, according to Bicycling Magazines biennial America’s 50 Best Bike Cities list in the November/December issue, on newsstands Oct. 11.

The Rose City jumped one spot from the previous survey. It is still behind Chicago and San Francisco, according to the magazine. Eugene is ranked No. 18 on the list. Seattle is No. 5.

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MY VIEW: RESIDENTS WANT BETTER CLEANUP — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Poor disposal practices by industry on the lower Willamette River have indeed resulted in the need for a cleanup that will be complex, as noted in the Tribunes Sept. 1 editorial, EPA should let Superfund cleanup begin.

Residents, the largest group of stakeholders and those who literally own the river, have never asked for a return to pristine conditions, as the editorial states.

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OREGON CONSERVATION PROJECTS SCORE FUNDS (Bend Bulletin)

-Grants help Deschutes Basin, areas in Southern Oregon-

Central and Southern Oregon conservation projects got about $2.2 million last week, part of a pot of federal grants meant to help protect imperiled species throughout America.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Friday announced nearly $45 million of Endangered Species Act grant program funding for projects in 20 states. The competitive grants help states work with private landowners, conservation groups and other government agencies on projects that protect federally listed species and their habitats.

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AGENCIES KICK OFF NEW WILDFIRE DISPATCH CENTER (Bend Bulletin)

-Interagency dispatch center to move from Prineville to Redmond-

Local, state and federal agencies on Monday kicked off the building of a new wildfire dispatch facility in Redmond that will shift existing services from Prineville Airport.

The move to the Redmond Air Center aims to make operations more efficient for the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center, according to a news release from the city of Redmond and the U.S. Forest Service.

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EDITORIAL: MEASURE 99 DOESN’T MAKE THE CASE FOR OUTDOOR SCHOOL — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

No doubt outdoor school is a wonderful thing for many students. No doubt most kids love several days away from parents at a camp in the Cascades or on the Oregon Coast. No doubt they learn while away.

But is outdoor school the best thing since sliced bread? Probably not. If it were, Oregons schools would make outdoor school attendance a priority.

Many dont, and that should tell voters something.

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EDITORIAL: VOTE YES ON MEASURE 95 TO GIVE UNIVERSITIES BETTER FINANCIAL TOOLS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The most appealing argument for Measure 95 is that it might limit future tuition increases at Oregon universities without any cost to taxpayers.

Proponents say thats because it will open up investment options that allow the universities to manage their money wisely.

Those investment options were part of the plan when the Legislature created independent governing boards for the universities in 2013. But lawmakers later realized the provision conflicted with the states constitution.

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KIDNEY ONLY TRACE OF WHALE THAT WASHED ASHORE IN OREGON (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A whale that washed up on the northern Oregon coast this weekend has washed back out to sea.

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RATE OF OREGONIANS WITH HEALTH COVERAGE CLIMBS TO 93 PERCENT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Oregon Health Authority says a record number of Oregonians now have health insurance.

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OCEAN CONDITIONS PORTEND UNCERTAIN WINTER WEATHER ACROSS WEST (Capital Press)

-Weather forecaster: Get the dart board out-

Weather forecasters are backing off their earlier prediction that La Nina atmospheric conditions would drive weather patterns this fall and winter.

That means all bets are off when it comes to how  and how many  storms will approach the West Coast, advises Michelle Mead, a National Weather Service warning coordinator.

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DRONE OPERATORS SEEK PERMISSION TO FLY BEYOND LINE OF SIGHT (Capital Press)

As thousands of commercial drones take to the skies under new Federal Aviation Administration rules, some small operators are pursuing a coveted exemption that would allow them to fly their drones where they cant be seen by the pilot.

The companies who want them say the so-called line-of-sight exemptions are essential to someday use drones for such tasks as cleanup and repair after storm damage and monitoring widespread crop conditions.

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OUR VIEW: WRONG SOLUTION FOR HOUSING PINCH — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Not content to legislate wages, a Portland Democrat now wants state government to act as Oregon’s Chief Landlord. Its one more example of the wave of proprietary governance that began in our largest city and has swept south to our state capital.

Housing already is one of the most regulated industries. And rent controls exacerbate the problems supporters claim they fix: affordability and supply.

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ASHLAND WOMAN DIDN’T WANT LIFE PROLONGED, BUT STATE SAYS SHE MUST BE SPOON-FED (Medford Mail Tribune)

Former librarian Nora Harris filled out an advance directive and told family and friends she didn’t want measures taken to prolong her life after she received the devastating diagnosis of early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Now unable to communicate, she is being spoon-fed because the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Office says the nursing facility where she lives must help her eat.

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OUR VIEW: WHEN MONEY MATTERS MORE THAN LIVES — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

The growing epidemic of addiction to prescription opioid painkillers is no secret. The problem has been attracting attention at the national and state levels for some time. President Barack Obama declared this week Prescription Opioid and Heroin Epidemic Awareness Week and is calling on Congress to increase funding to treat people with opioid addiction.

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STEPPING UP STEM (Herald and News)

-Community leaders hope to ease science anxiety-Not everyone had the best time in school learning about Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics or STEM.

Honestly most peoples experience within the K-12 system around STEM tends to maybe not have been as positive as it could have been, Mark Lewis, CTE and STEM education policy director for Oregons Chief Education Office, said. Thats the diplomatic way to say that a whole host of people who are mathematically traumatized in our society.

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EXPLOITED YOUTHS NEED FEDERAL HELP — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

If Backpage.com limited its online classified advertising to core services  auto repair, second-hand merchandise sales and honest jobs  chances are that neither the Supreme Court nor the U.S. Senate would give a hoot about the company’s activities.

Its that adult services category involving porn film casting, massage providers and escort services that has won Backpage mountains of well-deserved scorn.

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DRUGMAKERS FOUGHT DOMINO EFFECT OF WASHINGTON OPIOID LIMITS (Albany Democrat Herald)

When Washington state made one of the first major moves to place limits on opioid painkiller prescriptions, pharmaceutical companies fought back  using the Pain Care Forum, a national network of drug companies and opioid-friendly nonprofits, many of them funded by drugmakers.

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DEQ FINES HOOD RIVER $2,380 FOR WASTEWATER VIOLATIONS (Hood River News)

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has issued a $2,380 civil penalty to the City of Hood River for violating environmental standards at its municipal wastewater treatment plant.

DEQ said the plants treated discharge, which flows into the Columbia River near the Hook, exceeded permitted limits for oxygen demand and solid sewage earlier this year. The standards are designed to safeguard the river from pollution.

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FIRST RESPONDERS: COMMUNITY SHOULD JOIN GOVERNOR IN GIVING A WELL-EARNED THANK YOU — OPINION (Hood River News)

Coming on the heels of solemn observances of 9/11 is Gov. Kate Browns proclamation that Sept. 21-27 is First Responder Appreciation Week.

Oregon’s first responders are a vital part of every community, maintaining safety and order in times of crisis, and volunteering in our schools and community organization, Brown states.

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SHERIFF’S OFFICE ‘HOPEFUL’ UCC SHOOTING INVESTIGATION WILL BE COMPLETED BY END OF YEAR (Douglas County News-Review)

Completion of the Umpqua Community College police investigation within one year of the Oct. 1, 2015, tragedy is unlikely, according to the Douglas County Sheriffs Office.

Instead, the agency hopes to have the entire analysis completed by the end of this year.

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OREGON MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME RISES, FINALLY— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

The big economic news last week wasn’t our offices forecast, but the big jump in median household incomes nationwide. Two separate reports showed two different numbers: the Current Population Survey gains were 5.2% and the American Community Survey gains were 3.8%. The big takeaway isn’t the differences but the strong growth see in both.

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OREGON’S UNINSURED RATE DROPS TO 7 PERCENT (KUOW)

The rate of Oregonians without health insurance has dropped below the national average, according to the state health department.

The Oregon Health Authority puts the states uninsured rate at 7 percent. The agency says that puts Oregon in the top tier of states with the most residents who have health coverage. The latest figures are for the year 2015.

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newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on September 20, 2016 OSL eClips

September 19, 2016 eClips Weekend Edition

State Library eClips
* Voters around Oregon weigh pot business bans, local pot taxes
* Oregon needs collaboration between business, government — Guest Opinion
* Oregon school nurses in short supply
* High levels of selenium near Bullseye Glass prompt new restrictions
* Blue Lake health advisory lifted, officials say
* Portland Harbor cleanup must move forward this year — Opinion
* Oregon’s sad, sad record of paying to educate its young: David Sarasohn — Opinion
* Port of Portland’s path to idle container terminal began with shift in philosophy
* Sheridan plant pays reduced water pollution fine
* In wake of opiates crisis, pill makers spend on politics
* Oregon tax proposal ignores the real world — Opinion
* Charges dismissed against Eugene optometrist accused of practicing medicine without license
* Oregon hazelnut growers reach agreement for third-highest starting price ever
* Send fewer women to state prison — Opinion
* Well continue to pay for PERS long con — Guest Opinion
* Corporate tax will level states playing field — Guest Opinion
* Revving up EV’s — Opinion
* Schools could get $5 million to pay for lead testing
* State warns Bullseye Glass again
* Return of Civil War vet’s remains to Maine sparks skirmish on historic honor
* Voters to decide local pot measures
* Coding education in Bend gains momentum
* Outdoor School measure divides Bend business leaders
* State effort targets air, health
* Oregon accuses 2 people of starting wildfires in lawsuits
* Homeless families struggle to find shelter in Bend
* Measure 95: securing public universities right to make investments
* Bend could have 3,200 hotel rooms by 2018
* Editorial: Vote for Measure 98 — Opinion
* Commentary: Understanding the high level of child poverty — Guest Opinion
* OR Supreme Court Orders Eugene To Release Records In Taser Case
* Hazelnut growers reach minimum price agreement with packers
* ODFW looks at bottle, income tax to solve funding woes
* Our view: Hard to get the measure of 97 — Opinion
* Trail: Never say die when hunting for a rare species — Guest Opinion
* Ontario enters 2nd phase of negotiations
* Blacktail buck numbers look strong
* Our View: Cover Oregon debacle is finally over — Opinion
* Guest Opinion: Committee sees transportation achievements, challenges — Guest Opinion
* Guest Opinion: Why I support Measure 97 — Guest Opinion
* Fostering family
* Cities talk top goals for 2017 legislature
* School districts required to now test for radon
* Project on the Ross Slough aims to improve drainage, habitat
* This ‘green’ argument is a phony — Opinion
* Dead whale washes ashore in Arch Cape
* Editorial: Another million-dollar lesson for Oregon — Opinion
* Editorial: Legislators are watching pot-testing flap — Opinion
* As I See It: Protecting Oregon State’s endowment — Guest Opinion
* Herb Rothschild Jr.: Measure 97 explained — Opinion
* Why we need to know about co-sleeping deaths — Opinion
* Dealing with lead — Opinion
* Nelson appointed to state OYCC board
* Rural Oregon patients can have issues with Access
* MY VOICE: Supporting the arts in Oregon — Guest Opinion
* OUR VIEW: Headed in the right direction — Opinion
* Douglas County’s deer, elk hunting prospects vary
* Winter Predictions for Oregon Coast: the Blob, Normal Temps, and Wild Cards
* Oregon Was About to Open a Second Women’s Prison Because of 25 Inmates
* ‘Oregon’s graduation rates are among the worst in the nation’
* Senate OKs helping tribes rebuild housing lost to Columbia dams
* Despite better economy, some in C. Oregon still struggle
* University of Oregon falls behind OSU in national sexual health rankings
* California added 63,000 jobs in August, 42% of U.S. total

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VOTERS AROUND OREGON WEIGH POT BUSINESS BANS, LOCAL POT TAXES (Portland Oregonian)

It’s been nearly two years since Oregonians said yes to legalizing marijuana for recreational use, yet voters in dozens of places across the state will weigh in again in November.
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OREGON NEEDS COLLABORATION BETWEEN BUSINESS, GOVERNMENT — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In this unorthodox political year, some of the most volatile issues point toward a single problem: Too many Americans who once earned enough to provide a stable living for their families by working in factories have lost those jobs and can’t find comparable work in other occupations.
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OREGON SCHOOL NURSES IN SHORT SUPPLY (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon schools have so few nurses that, in 2014-15, there was only one nurse for every 4,664 students enrolled in the state’s public schools, a state task force on school nurses reported Friday.
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HIGH LEVELS OF SELENIUM NEAR BULLSEYE GLASS PROMPT NEW RESTRICTIONS (Portland Oregonian)

State officials have once again found high levels of a potentially toxic substance near Bullseye Glass, a Southeast Portland stained-glass plant that’s been at the center of a toxic air scare since February.
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BLUE LAKE HEALTH ADVISORY LIFTED, OFFICIALS SAY (Portland Oregonian)

Blue Lake is now open for fishing, swimming and wading after authorities shut down such activities there earlier this month because of an algae bloom.
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PORTLAND HARBOR CLEANUP MUST MOVE FORWARD THIS YEAR — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In the drawn-out 16 years of deciding how to clean up the sullied Portland Harbor, deadlines never quite applied. Debates whirled around the depths of pollution from past industrial practices, multiplying questions about present-day effects on wildlife as well as people who use the river for recreation or subsistence fishing.
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OREGON’S SAD, SAD RECORD OF PAYING TO EDUCATE ITS YOUNG: DAVID SARASOHN — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

There are phrases, once common in our local language, that have now almost disappeared from popular use, carrying no meaning in today’s Oregon:

“Moderate Republican.”

“Affordable housing.”

“Rural development.”
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PORT OF PORTLAND’S PATH TO IDLE CONTAINER TERMINAL BEGAN WITH SHIFT IN PHILOSOPHY (Portland Oregonian)

Michael Thorne remembers the Port of Portland’s container terminal as a high-maintenance money-loser.

As the Port’s executive director from 1991 to 2001, Thorne made hurried trips to Asia to maintain relationships with shipping companies.
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SHERIDAN PLANT PAYS REDUCED WATER POLLUTION FINE (Salem Statesman Journal)

State environmental regulators have lowered a $7,217 fine levied on a Washington company for discharging pollutants to the South Yamhill River above permitted levels at its Sheridan wood preserving facility.
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IN WAKE OF OPIATES CRISIS, PILL MAKERS SPEND ON POLITICS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon ranks third in the nation for the amount of money given to legislative campaigns by a group of pharmaceutical companies when compared to total campaign contributions, according to the Associated Press and Center for Public Integrity.
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OREGON TAX PROPOSAL IGNORES THE REAL WORLD — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Corporate CEOs fear two things:

Falling prices for the company stock.

A major lawsuit against the company.

Either factor can make investors jittery about a company’s short- and long-term value, and thus inspire the board of directors to oust the CEO.
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CHARGES DISMISSED AGAINST EUGENE OPTOMETRIST ACCUSED OF PRACTICING MEDICINE WITHOUT LICENSE (Eugene Register-Guard)

The Multnomah County district attorneys case against a Eugene optometrist accused of practicing medicine without a license has been dismissed, just before his trial was expected to begin.
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OREGON HAZELNUT GROWERS REACH AGREEMENT FOR THIRD-HIGHEST STARTING PRICE EVER (Eugene Register-Guard)

-The $1.18 per pound for the crop is down slightly from last years $1.22 but is likely to increase, growers say-

Northwest hazelnut growers will receive a minimum initial price of $1.18 a pound for their crop this fall, the third highest starting minimum price ever, the industry said Friday.
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SEND FEWER WOMEN TO STATE PRISON — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The state Department of Corrections was on the verge last week of asking the Emergency Board of the Oregon Legislature for upwards of $5 million to open a second women’s prison.
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WELL CONTINUE TO PAY FOR PERS LONG CON — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

After digesting the Aug. 7 Register-Guard editorial, Oregon swallowed by PERS costs, and reporter Saul Hubbard’s piece, Ex-coach slips from PERS pinnacle, I was compelled to drill down a bit deeper into this impending Public Employees Retirement System disaster perpetrated on the average worker and taxpayer in Oregon’s private sector.
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CORPORATE TAX WILL LEVEL STATES PLAYING FIELD — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

I’m a business owner trying to sort through the issues surrounding Measure 97. I have read three editorials and one guest viewpoint in this newspaper, all opposed, so I think I have a handle on the arguments against the measure.
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REVVING UP EV’S — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The Eugene Water & Electric Board, the University of Oregon and Drive Oregon, a nonprofit organization primarily funded by government grants, are working with a local car dealership, Lithia Nissan, to promote sales of one of its vehicles, the Nissan Leaf, an electric car.

The goals of EWEB, the UO and Drive Oregon are undoubtedly laudable promoting an electric car industry in Oregon and reducing pollution. And, in the case of EWEB, potentially increasing sales of electricity.
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SCHOOLS COULD GET $5 MILLION TO PAY FOR LEAD TESTING (Portland Tribune)

Public schools could receive up to $5 million to help pay for the cost of testing for lead in campus drinking water under a proposal lawmakers will consider on Friday.

The proposal sets up a fund administered by the Oregon Department of Education. School districts could submit invoices to request reimbursement for costs associated with lead testing between March and December of this year.
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STATE WARNS BULLSEYE GLASS AGAIN (Portland Tribune)

After elevated levels of selenium were recorded near Bullseye Glass, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Health Authority recently inspected the Southeast Portland glass manufacturer. They also asked the company to confirm it is using no more than five pounds of the potentially toxic metal a day, and only in furnaces with pollution controls.
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RETURN OF CIVIL WAR VET’S REMAINS TO MAINE SPARKS SKIRMISH ON HISTORIC HONOR (Portland Tribune)

For more than 90 years, Jewett B. Williams cremated remains sat unclaimed in a canister at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem.

Three weeks into his cross-country return to Maine, and after a lot of national attention on his life story, a handful of the Civil War veterans distant relatives surfaced, claiming the remains and planning a burial in a family plot in his hometown of Hodgdon, a small town of about 1,300 people north of Bangor near the Canadian border.
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VOTERS TO DECIDE LOCAL POT MEASURES (Portland Tribune)

-Some would impose local tax, others would continue ban on retail sales.-

Although marijuana is not on Oregon’s statewide ballot for the first time in four election cycles, many metro area voters will decide the fate of 29 marijuana-related measures in the Nov. 8 general election.

Some voters, particularly in Portland and Clackamas County, will decide whether to impose a 3 percent local tax on top of the statewide tax on retail sales of marijuana for recreational use.
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CODING EDUCATION IN BEND GAINS MOMENTUM (Bend Bulletin)

-Opportunities remain fragmented across K-12 system-

Ryan Comingdeer, chief technology officer at the Bend software development firm FiveTalent, took his first computer programming course as a seventh-grader and landed his first job in programming as a sophomore.

This was Comingdeers experience as a student in Oklahoma City public schools in the 1990s. Although computer science-driven jobs are among the highest-paying, fastest-growing in the modern economy, the effort to teach computer science and programming in Central Oregon public schools is fragmented.
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OUTDOOR SCHOOL MEASURE DIVIDES BEND BUSINESS LEADERS (Bend Bulletin)

-Concerns raised about diverting lottery money from economic development-

A ballot measure that would bring Outdoor School a program with deep roots in Oregon to students across the state has divided the business community in Bend, one of Oregons outdoor recreation hot spots.

Measure 99, which will appear on Oregon ballots in November, would allocate 4 percent of funds from the Oregon Lottery toward Outdoor School, a program that brings fifth- and sixth-grade students to one of the states designated camp areas for up to a week.
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STATE EFFORT TARGETS AIR, HEALTH (Bend Bulletin)

-Bend meeting seeks public input-

Oregon’s environmental and health agencies want ideas from Bend-area residents and businesses for new air pollution rules that aim to better protect peoples health.

The Department of Environmental Quality and Oregon Health Authority will host a meeting Tuesday in Bend as part of forums throughout the state to overhaul standards for industrial air toxics pollutants known or suspected to cause cancer or other serious health problems.
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OREGON ACCUSES 2 PEOPLE OF STARTING WILDFIRES IN LAWSUITS (Bend Bulletin)

The State of Oregon has filed lawsuits against people it says were responsible for starting two forest fires.

The state filed one suit against a man who is accused of napping while his campfire sparked a 200-acre Southern Oregon blaze. In that case filed against Joe Thurmond Askins, his wife and step-daughter, the state is seeking almost $900,000 to cover the costs of extinguishing the July 2014 fire.
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HOMELESS FAMILIES STRUGGLE TO FIND SHELTER IN BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-There’s only space for 20 or so families in local shelters-

Christina Medow was working at a grocery store when she had trouble coming up with enough money for rent. Eventually, she had run up too many late fees and was forced to move out of her Bend home with her 6-year-old daughter.
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MEASURE 95: SECURING PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES RIGHT TO MAKE INVESTMENTS (Bend Bulletin)

-Ballot measure would clarify what senate bill set out to do three years ago-

One measure on the ballot in November would ensure public universities have the right to make investments, something legislation passed three years ago was originally supposed to do.

In 2013, legislation passed allowing universities within the Oregon University System, including Oregon State University, to create governing boards. The same legislation, Senate Bill 270, also gave those universities the power to manage their finances and make investments.
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BEND COULD HAVE 3,200 HOTEL ROOMS BY 2018 (Bend Bulletin)

-Flurry of new hotels under construction-

Since the end of 2013, Bend has seen a flurry of lodging development, with five new and upgraded hotels opening or reopening in the city. With four more developments proposed or under construction, there is no sign of the industry slowing down.
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EDITORIAL: VOTE FOR MEASURE 98 — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s high school graduation rate is among the worst in the nation, hovering somewhere between 47th and 49th lowest of the 50 states. That’s despite eighth-grade test scores that show the states youngsters are learning apace with children nationwide. Its a serious problem, and proponents of Novembers Ballot Measure 98 have a response that should get your support.
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COMMENTARY: UNDERSTANDING THE HIGH LEVEL OF CHILD POVERTY — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The Census Bureau has released its annual poverty report, which shows that in 2015 the poverty rate of families with children was 16.3 percent. That’s a decrease from the previous year but still higher than the rate before the last recession.

In the long-term view, the poverty rate of families with children today is almost 50 percent higher than in the late 1960s, shortly after the War on Poverty began. This long-term increase has been driven by the extraordinary rise in single-parent families.
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OR SUPREME COURT ORDERS EUGENE TO RELEASE RECORDS IN TASER CASE (Northwest Public Radio)

The Oregon Supreme Court has ruled the City of Eugene must publicly release documents from a police investigation into the conduct of officers who used a stun gun to subdue a protester in 2008. The decision could have implications for future cases involving suspected police misconduct.
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HAZELNUT GROWERS REACH MINIMUM PRICE AGREEMENT WITH PACKERS (Capital Press)

Oregon’s hazelnut growers, with growth and market questions always in the background, agreed to a minimum price this year of $1.18 per pound.

The figure is the floor price, the lowest amount growers will receive from packing companies for nuts harvested this year. The finishing price is typically higher.
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ODFW LOOKS AT BOTTLE, INCOME TAX TO SOLVE FUNDING WOES (East Oregonian)

A task force convened to suggest new sustainable funding sources for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife have settled on two recommended options that each take the form of tax surcharges one on income and one on beverage containers.

The department is operating on a biennium budget of about $370 million. A third of that comes from hunting and fishing licenses, a third from the federal government, and the rest for various state funds.
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OUR VIEW: HARD TO GET THE MEASURE OF 97 — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Aside from electing the next leader of the free world, Measure 97 is the most important decision Oregonians will have to make on the November ballot.

And it will be a hard one.

The measure, if passed, would bring in nearly $3 billion a year to state coffers. Depending on your outlook, it will either solve many of Oregons chronic problems or be a crippling weight thrown over residents and the state economy.
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TRAIL: NEVER SAY DIE WHEN HUNTING FOR A RARE SPECIES — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

We dont look like ghost hunters. Were not dressed in ectoplasm-resistant overalls. Were out in broad daylight and look pretty normal, not like those glowing-eyed TV guys who are always whispering into night-vision cameras. Were a typical group of Oregonians gathered at a trailhead, men and women, old and young, with a couple of young kids racing around waving butterfly nets.
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ONTARIO ENTERS 2ND PHASE OF NEGOTIATIONS (Argus Observer)

The City of Ontario is looking to move into the second phase of its negotiation with the state to avoid the costly changes necessary to meet new standards for wastewater flowing into the Snake River.

The city is in discussions with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to acquire a possible variance for a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit, the citys public works department, CH2M, told the Ontario City Council during its work session Thursday.
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BLACKTAIL BUCK NUMBERS LOOK STRONG (Medford Mail Tribune)

Rogue Valley deer hunters know that fall brings a form of buck fever, and this year is no different.

Strong buck ratios in the fields of the Rogue Unit should help hunters looking for blacktail bucks during in Western Oregon’s hunting seasons.
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OUR VIEW: COVER OREGON DEBACLE IS FINALLY OVER — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

About the best that can be said for the settlement announced last week between the state of Oregon and Oracle over the failed Cover Oregon website is that the dispute is over. Neither side came out looking good, despite Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum’s description of the deal as a “win-win.”
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GUEST OPINION: COMMITTEE SEES TRANSPORTATION ACHIEVEMENTS, CHALLENGES — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Legislatures Joint Committee on Transportation Preservation and Modernization recently completed a tour of transportation infrastructure in the Medford area.

Our tour opened with a presentation from Julie Brown, executive director of the Rogue Valley Transportation District and an explanation from Leigh Johnson of Harry and David about the importance of dependable transportation infrastructure to the mail-order business.
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GUEST OPINION: WHY I SUPPORT MEASURE 97 — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

I support Measure 97 because I want to live in an equitable society. As a teacher and a mother, I have seen first-hand the impact on students and their families as well as on the education system as a whole when funding is cut. Student morale gets low, programs and departments get pruned in an effort to save costs, and students and their teachers are forced to absorb the impact and change gears into survival mode.
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FOSTERING FAMILY (Medford Mail Tribune)

An Ashland couple celebrated their new son Saturday and a new law that made his adoption possible.

The Dills family, particularly their newly adopted son, Christian, 2, are the first in Oregon to benefit from legislation enacted last year that gives foster parents greater consideration in adoption proceedings.
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CITIES TALK TOP GOALS FOR 2017 LEGISLATURE (Herald and News)

Klamath County residents Thursday evening got a front row seat to priorities identified by municipalities statewide for the 2017 session of the Oregon Legislature. The issues included property tax reform, transportation and PERS reforms.
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SCHOOL DISTRICTS REQUIRED TO NOW TEST FOR RADON (The World)

-State passed new rules for schools to follow-

The Coos Bay School District has submitted its preliminary plan to state officials to test its buildings for radon.

During the regular school board meeting last week, Maintenance Manager Rick Roberts presented the district’s Healthy and Safe Schools report, which included the district’s test results for lead in the water, exposure to lead paint, pest control, and, although not called for, asbestos.
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PROJECT ON THE ROSS SLOUGH AIMS TO IMPROVE DRAINAGE, HABITAT (The World)

The Coos Watershed Association has several ongoing projects, one of which aims to improve both fish and nearby landowners lives on the Ross Slough.

By remaindering a channel on the slough through a historic floodplain, Coos Watershed is hoping to improve drainage and fish habitat.
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THIS ‘GREEN’ ARGUMENT IS A PHONY — OPINION (The World)

The Coos Bay City Council has gotten itself wrapped around the wastewater axle so tightly, its doubtful at this point that the existing group of policy makers can extricate itself.

Witness the councils actions this week. First the members want to conduct another study, but this week decide they dont want to spend $50,000 for it.
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DEAD WHALE WASHES ASHORE IN ARCH CAPE (Daily Astorian)

Arch Cape residents and visitors reported a large whale stranded on a sandbank offshore about 250 yards out Friday.

As night fell, the humpback was driven by waves southward toward Falcon Cove. For more than two hours, the bloated carcass drifted closer to shore as the tide shifted. What had once been a blur on the horizon grew larger and larger.
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EDITORIAL: ANOTHER MILLION-DOLLAR LESSON FOR OREGON — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Could Oregon have won more from Oracle if the state’s lawsuits against the technology company over Cover Oregon had gone to trial?

We’ll never know: Gov. Kate Brown announced on Thursday that the six lawsuits and countersuits filed by the state and by Oracle had been settled for more than $100 million. Most of the settlement, ironically, will come in the form of Oracle technology. Only $25 million will come in the form of cash, and that will go to cover the state’s legal bills and other costs.

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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATORS ARE WATCHING POT-TESTING FLAP — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

You might have noticed the call for help a couple of weeks ago from the man who runs the state’s program to accredit marijuana labs: Gary Ward, who runs the Oregon Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program, sent a letter to officials at the Oregon Health Authority that the program was “on the verge of collapse” because of increased workload and inadequate staffing.
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AS I SEE IT: PROTECTING OREGON STATE’S ENDOWMENT — GUEST OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

As Oregon State University starts up the fall term of 2016, some members of Congress are proposing to tax OSU’s endowment, which is worth over $500 million, as a way to pay for President Obama’s noble goal of free tuition at two-year community colleges.

Concurrently, Wall Street has been aggressively competing for a cut of the billions of dollars held in university endowments, including the one at OSU that in April selected the bid of a New York-based asset manager Weinberg Partners to run OSU’s portfolio, according to a story by Michael McDonald in the Sept. 5-11, 2016 print edition of Bloomberg Businessweek magazine.

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HERB ROTHSCHILD JR.: MEASURE 97 EXPLAINED — OPINION (Ashland Daily Tidings)

Measure 97 is the most significant measure on our upcoming state ballot. If passed, it will raise funds dedicated to education, health care and senior services by increasing the minimum tax on corporations with more than $25 million in annual Oregon sales. Estimates of the new revenue range from $2 billion to $3 billion every year, so the stakes are high for Oregon residents and for the affected corporations.
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WHY WE NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CO-SLEEPING DEATHS — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

I hope I will never again type the phrase co-sleeping death.

I dont want to write sentences that include both autopsy and infant two words that collide in the mind with a terrible crash.

But what are we to do when a baby dies from a cause that is indisputably preventable?
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DEALING WITH LEAD — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

The revelation last week that there was lead in water collected from drinking fountains and sink faucets at some Baker City schools, and at levels that exceed federal standards, naturally worries parents.

Lead is a neurotoxin that can reduce a childs ability to learn. According to the federal government, there is no amount of lead, in the body, thats considered safe.
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NELSON APPOINTED TO STATE OYCC BOARD (Blue Mountain Eagle)

Long-time Grant County resident Katy Nelson has been appointed to the Oregon Youth Conservation Corps advisory board.

Nelson worked extensively with the OYCC when she was with the Grant County Center for Human Development.
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RURAL OREGON PATIENTS CAN HAVE ISSUES WITH ACCESS (LaGrande Observer)

-Getting medications in rural areas of Oregon can prove difficult for some patients-

Murray’s Drug is a throwback to a simpler time.

Opened in 1959, long before national drugstore chains and mail-order pharmacies dominated the prescription world, the family-owned business is still the only place in town for the 1,200 residents of Heppner to fill a prescription. In fact, between their Heppner and Condon stores, pharmacists John and Ann Murray and their daughter, Laurie Murray-Wood, run the only brick-and-mortar pharmacies in all of Morrow, Gilliam, Sherman and Wheeler counties.
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MY VOICE: SUPPORTING THE ARTS IN OREGON — GUEST OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

As chair of the Oregon Arts Commission, I read a recent editorial Dont exile arts east of the Cascades in The Bulletin with dismay and surprise. The core of the Oregon Arts Commission mission is to serve all of Oregon, every region of our great state. Our arts ecology is stronger because of the combined work of all of our communities.
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OUR VIEW: HEADED IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION — OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

Call it a small step in the right direction.

That should be the prevailing outlook on a seemingly mundane but very important decision this past week regarding public access to government records in Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Justice reversed a rule that compelled some state agencies to require a fee for access to public records.
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DOUGLAS COUNTY’S DEER, ELK HUNTING PROSPECTS VARY (Douglas County News-Review)

The Western Oregon hunting season for rifle hunters opens Oct. 1 and what those hunters find in Douglas County in terms of deer and elk will vary depending on location and elevation.

Of course, the weather will be a factor in the success of hunters over the next couple of months

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WINTER PREDICTIONS FOR OREGON COAST: THE BLOB, NORMAL TEMPS, AND WILD CARDS (Oregon Coast Beach Connection)

The National Weather Service NWS recently released its climate predictions for the winter season, calling for a very average winter meaning not good for skiers and not that great for stormwatchers.
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OREGON WAS ABOUT TO OPEN A SECOND WOMEN’S PRISON BECAUSE OF 25 INMATES (Willamette Week)

Oregon’s population of female prisoners keeps growing, and the state’s running out of space to put them.

Almost five years ago, WW highlighted a trend in Oregon prisons that had gotten little attention up to that point.
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‘OREGON’S GRADUATION RATES ARE AMONG THE WORST IN THE NATION’ (KVAL)

The League of Women Voters of Lane County hosted the state’s Education Innovation Director Thursday to talk about Oregon’s staggering graduation rates.

“We know Oregon’s graduation rates are among the worst in the nation,” said Colt Gill, the state’s new Education Innovation Director.
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SENATE OKS HELPING TRIBES REBUILD HOUSING LOST TO COLUMBIA DAMS (KTVZ Bend)

-Lawmakers say debt long overdue to be repaid-

The U.S. Senate passed provisions Thursday to help rebuild housing for Columbia River tribes lost to the construction of dams close to 80 years ago.

All four Northwest senators — Oregon’s Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley, and Washington’s Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell — backed the proposal.

The provisions are part of the proposed Water Resources Development Act.
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DESPITE BETTER ECONOMY, SOME IN C. OREGON STILL STRUGGLE (KTVZ Bend)

-NeighborImpact says rising housing costs have many needing help-

This week’s release of economic data for 2015 by the U.S. Census Bureau highlighted an improving economy and a major reversal of national economic trends plaguing the nation since the recession, NeighborImpact reported Friday.
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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON FALLS BEHIND OSU IN NATIONAL SEXUAL HEALTH RANKINGS (The Daily Emerald)

A recent study ranked Oregon State University the number one sexually healthy university in the U.S. The University of Oregon, however, was absent from the list.

Vice News online magazine, Motherboard, reported on the study conducted by an independent research group called The State of Education. The study used three indicators for their scoring: STD rate in the schools county, annual sexual assault rate and sexual health and education resources.
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CALIFORNIA ADDED 63,000 JOBS IN AUGUST, 42% OF U.S. TOTAL (Los Angeles Times)

California employers quieted any lingering doubts about the states economy in August, as an uptick in hiring helped absorb hordes of new job-seekers.

The state added a net 63,100 jobs last month and the unemployment rate remained at 5.5%, according to data released by the Employment Development Department on Friday.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on September 19, 2016 eClips Weekend Edition

September 19, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* State police respond to four fatal crashes in 12 hours over rainy weekend
* Cause of humpback whale’s death remains a mystery on Oregon coast
* Five killed in four separate crashes
* Rainy weekend results in five fatalites in 12 hours from four crashes
* University of Oregon to spend $26 million renovating Oregon Hall, Pacific Hall
* A community impact case — Opinion
* Tribal power an important check on ruling elite — Guest Opinion
* The Californication of Bend
* Bend: the largest in Oregon without an elected mayor
* Measure 100 targets wildlife trafficking
* Oregon Pharmacies Can Now Prescribe Naloxone For Overdoses
* Malheur Refuge Employees To Testify About Life During The Occupation
* Fewer Oregon Students Have Access To A School Nurse
* Oregon’s Uninsured Rate Drops To 7 Percent
* Report shows areas potential as mining mecca
* Wage woes
* Ashland woman didn’t want life prolonged, but state says she must be spoon-fed
* The water year was a welcome change — Opinion
* Editorial: States baffling embrace of Oracle — Opinion
* Editorial: A welcome win for public records — Opinion
* Oregon holds off on second women’s prison
* What I learned from executing two men — Guest Opinion

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STATE POLICE RESPOND TO FOUR FATAL CRASHES IN 12 HOURS OVER RAINY WEEKEND (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon troopers responded to four vehicle crashes on the rainy west side of the state in the span of about 12 hours this weekend.

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CAUSE OF HUMPBACK WHALE’S DEATH REMAINS A MYSTERY ON OREGON COAST (Portland Oregonian)

A 38-foot-long humpback whale that died at sea and washed up on the Oregon coast south of Cannon Beach Friday will undergo a necropsy Monday morning to determine its cause of death, Seaside Aquarium officials said Sunday.

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FIVE KILLED IN FOUR SEPARATE CRASHES (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon State Police investigated four separate crashes on three Western Oregon highways that killed five people this weekend.

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RAINY WEEKEND RESULTS IN FIVE FATALITES IN 12 HOURS FROM FOUR CRASHES (Eugene Register-Guard)

Five people were killed in four crashes on highways in four Western Oregon counties during a 12-hour period this weekend. Oregon State Police provided information that yielded this summary of the fatal accidents.

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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON TO SPEND $26 MILLION RENOVATING OREGON HALL, PACIFIC HALL (Eugene Register-Guard)

The University of Oregon will plow about $26 million into renovating two campus buildings, Oregon and Pacific halls.

The latter project is a central part of UO President Michael Schill’s ambition to elevate the university’s research enterprise.

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A COMMUNITY IMPACT CASE — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

As an open-records case involving a review of police conduct during a protesters arrest in Eugene made its way up the judicial ladder, courts at every level noted that a balancing test was involved: The public’s right to know must be weighed against a police departments interest in confidentiality. On Thursday the Oregon Supreme Court ruled that in this case the balance should tip toward the public, reversing lower court rulings. The decision is welcome, because if any case involving Eugene police demanded transparency, it was this one.

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TRIBAL POWER AN IMPORTANT CHECK ON RULING ELITE — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

In my many travels I regularly speak to many people about tribes, reservations, treaties and the multitude of social ills that continue to plague American Indian tribes. One common question I am asked involves the importance of maintaining tribes as part of our modern American political landscape: Why do we need Indians?

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THE CALIFORNICATION OF BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-Many who moved to Deschutes County from out of state between 2012 and 2014 were from California-

Oregon, despite its many draws, can be tough on Californians  but that hasn’t stopped them from moving here. Recent IRS migration numbers show what many Bend residents have already suspected: Lots of people from California are moving to Central Oregon.

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BEND: THE LARGEST IN OREGON WITHOUT AN ELECTED MAYOR (Bend Bulletin)

-Is Bends city government structure due for a change?-

Since 1990, Bend has grown from a town of slightly more than 24,000 to a city of around 80,000, with dozens of people moving to the area each month. Yet despite Bends rapid growth, the structure of its city government has remained largely unchanged in the last two decades.

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MEASURE 100 TARGETS WILDLIFE TRAFFICKING (Bend Bulletin)

-Proposal would ban sales in Oregon of body parts from lions, elephants, others animals-

A ballot measure aims to block the buying and selling of animal parts such as elephant tusks in Oregon, a move that advocates expect could help close the West Coast to such dealings.

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OREGON PHARMACIES CAN NOW PRESCRIBE NALOXONE FOR OVERDOSES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

People with a friend or family member addicted to opioids can now go to an Oregon pharmacy and get a prescription for Naloxone.

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MALHEUR REFUGE EMPLOYEES TO TESTIFY ABOUT LIFE DURING THE OCCUPATION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Prosecutors in the trial of seven people who occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge have one main goal: to prove that the defendants conspired to obstruct federal employees from doing their jobs through force, intimidation or threats.

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FEWER OREGON STUDENTS HAVE ACCESS TO A SCHOOL NURSE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

According to a new report from a state task force, the ratio of students to school nurses has more than doubled in the past five years in Oregon.

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OREGON’S UNINSURED RATE DROPS TO 7 PERCENT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The rate of Oregonians without health insurance has dropped below the national average, according to the state health department.

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REPORT SHOWS AREAS POTENTIAL AS MINING MECCA (Argus Observer)

-Malheur County has abundance of metallic and industrial commodities-

Malheur County is rich in mineral resources, including precious metals such as gold and silver. With that comes the potential for mining. This information was revealed this week in a report by the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries.

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WAGE WOES (Argus Observer)

-New minimum wage law doesn’t encourage growth-

It hasn’t been three months since Oregon raised its minimum wage, from $9.25 an hour, and already some businesses are having to change the way they do things. This past session, the Oregon Legislature approved the minimum wage bill, which went into effect July 1.

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ASHLAND WOMAN DIDN’T WANT LIFE PROLONGED, BUT STATE SAYS SHE MUST BE SPOON-FED (Medford Mail Tribune)

Former librarian Nora Harris filled out an advance directive and told family and friends she didn’t want measures taken to prolong her life after she received the devastating diagnosis of early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Now unable to communicate, she is being spoon-fed because the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Office says the nursing facility where she lives must help her eat.

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THE WATER YEAR WAS A WELCOME CHANGE — OPINION (Herald and News)

Well take fairly good any time it applies to a water year. That’s especially true when it comes after four years of drought that aggravated battles over water and who has the rights to it and how it should be used.

A better water year wont make those battles end, though it should lessen the intensity a bit and help those who depend on the water for the livelihoods. Conflict over other such deeply felt issues as tribal water rights will go on.

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EDITORIAL: STATES BAFFLING EMBRACE OF ORACLE — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

How’s this for cruel irony? Oregon state officials sue multinational computer giant Oracle for $6 billion for failed technology, then agree as part of a settlement to use more of the company’s products and services over the next six years.

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EDITORIAL: A WELCOME WIN FOR PUBLIC RECORDS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Advocates of open and transparent government in Oregon scored a rare victory last week: The Oregon Department of Justice overturned a rule requiring some state agencies to charge for public records.

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OREGON HOLDS OFF ON SECOND WOMEN’S PRISON (KTVZ Bend)

The Oregon Department of Corrections has decided to hold off on a request for an additional $5 million from the Legislature’s Emergency Board to open a second women’s prison in the state.

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WHAT I LEARNED FROM EXECUTING TWO MEN — GUEST OPINION (New York Times)

As superintendent of the Oregon State Penitentiary, I planned and carried out that states only two executions in the last 54 years. I used to support the death penalty. I don’t anymore.

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newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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September 16, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Port, state officials discussed letting Hanjin walk before increasing incentive package
* Oregon’s ITT Tech students can ask questions at Friday open house at MHCC
* Napping man, careless rancher caused 2 wildfires, $4.5 million lawsuits claim
* Oregon settles bitter legal fight with Oracle for $100 million
* Oregon’s ties with Colombia strengthen trade, community — Guest Opinion
* Columbia River tribes one step closer to federal government fulfilling housing promise
* Testing the Smarter Balanced test: Does it work for Oregon?
* Settlement with Oracle stops the Cover Oregon hangover — Opinion
* Smoke still impacting Salem’s air quality
* State settles lawsuit with Oracle over Cover Oregon website
* Eugene must release internal police investigation documents into high-profile stun gun case, Oregon Supreme Court rules
* The future of Oregon’s only deepwater container terminal remains murky
* Oracles advantage — Opinion
* Sharing the tax burden — Opinion
* School-work
* Will Bend meet water demands for 30,000 more residents?
* New motor voter registrants swell Oregon voter rolls
* What Summit Highs opt-out of testing rate means for Oregon
* Baby Boomers, able, willing, retire near grandchildren
* New Report: Malheur County Has Significant Mining Potential
* Oregon DHS Officials Brace For Possible Budget Cuts
* Katy Coba says goodbye to the Department of Agriculture
* Future of Portland container terminal remains murky
* Maine designation may foretell fate of Owyhee monument — Opinion
* Consumers must be educated about the science of modern agriculture — Opinion
* Pension bond among proposed PERS strategies
* Report shows Malheur County rich with gold mine potential
* College aims to find place for displaced ITT students
* Agency announces gather of Cold Springs wild horse herd
* PenAir staff on the ground in Klamath Falls
* C Canal flume project groundbreaking next week
* DHS services get competitive for charity
* Washington state to increase testing pot for pesticides
* Conditions in many older county jails are grim, dangerous
* Columbia River season extended for hatchery Chinook
* Editorial: Legislators are watching pot-testing flap — Opinion
* Wildland fire danger remains high in mid-valley
* Editorial: Legislators are watching pot-testing flap — Opinion
* Google will buy acreage
* Nonprofit to study irrigation upgrades on Catherine Creek
* CL Port plans electronic tolling amid unusual traffic boost
* Veteran reaches out to at-risk comrades
* Was the $100M Cover Oregon a win-win for both sides? Legal minds weigh in
* Oregon Health Authority Seeks $1 Billion Boost from General Fund for Next Cycle
* DHS Makes Changes in Leadership for Adult and Child Protection

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PORT, STATE OFFICIALS DISCUSSED LETTING HANJIN WALK BEFORE INCREASING INCENTIVE PACKAGE (Portland Oregonian)

Port of Portland officials appeared willing to let a major shipping company leave Terminal 6, according to emails and public records. But they later reversed course and doubled the amount of an incentive package for the company in a last-ditch effort to save its business.
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OREGON’S ITT TECH STUDENTS CAN ASK QUESTIONS AT FRIDAY OPEN HOUSE AT MHCC (Portland Oregonian)

Seven colleges scheduled an open house Friday to help answer questions for hundreds of Oregon students left stranded in the wake of for-profit higher education giant ITT Tech’s demise.
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NAPPING MAN, CARELESS RANCHER CAUSED 2 WILDFIRES, $4.5 MILLION LAWSUITS CLAIM (Portland Oregonian)

A 64-year-old man who is accused of napping while his campfire spread to start a 200-acre forest fire could have to foot the $892,000 bill of extinguishing the Southern Oregon blaze.
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OREGON SETTLES BITTER LEGAL FIGHT WITH ORACLE FOR $100 MILLION (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon and software giant Oracle have ended their bitter legal fight.

Gov. Kate Brown announced today the settlement of the six lawsuits the state and the company filed against one another after the failure of the Cover Oregon health exchange website.
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OREGON’S TIES WITH COLOMBIA STRENGTHEN TRADE, COMMUNITY — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Preparing for my visit to Portland this week, I have been encouraged to taste one of the city’s well-known cups of coffee. Many people consider themselves coffee aficionados, but like all Colombians, I picture myself unjustifiably, in my case as a world-renowned coffee critic. So, sampling the local coffee will definitely be on my agenda as I visit the city and meet with local business leaders to discuss the strong, dynamic relationship Colombia has with Oregon.
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COLUMBIA RIVER TRIBES ONE STEP CLOSER TO FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FULFILLING HOUSING PROMISE (Portland Oregonian)

The U.S. Senate passed a bill Thursday that would provide up to 50 new houses for Columbia River tribal members. Now it’s up to Congress to make it a reality.
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TESTING THE SMARTER BALANCED TEST: DOES IT WORK FOR OREGON? (Portland Oregonian)

Smarter Balanced tests remain poorly understood by parents and the public, but the exams can, in fact, do a good job of measuring whether students have learned the English and math skills that Oregon schools are supposed to teach, a statewide study group has concluded.

The tests also are important for helping Oregon identify learning gaps separating boys and girls as well as students of different races, ethnicities or language backgrounds, the panel found in a report released Wednesday.
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SETTLEMENT WITH ORACLE STOPS THE COVER OREGON HANGOVER — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Few legal settlements are satisfying. The $100 million deal between Oregon and Oracle to square differences over the state’s failed insurance exchange, announced Thursday, is no exception. But it is a wise and sobering outcome in the face of a high-stakes trial in which the state could have lost everything while paying an estimated $1.5 million a month to advance its fight against Oracle.
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SMOKE STILL IMPACTING SALEM’S AIR QUALITY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Salems air quality continues to be adversely impacted by a Wednesday afternoon fire at Browns Island Demolition Landfill.
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STATE SETTLES LAWSUIT WITH ORACLE OVER COVER OREGON WEBSITE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon settled with a California software giant in a lawsuit that accused Oracle America Inc. of collecting tens of millions of dollars to create a state health care exchange website that didn’t work.
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EUGENE MUST RELEASE INTERNAL POLICE INVESTIGATION DOCUMENTS INTO HIGH-PROFILE STUN GUN CASE, OREGON SUPREME COURT RULES (Eugene Register-Guard)

Overturning two lower court verdicts, the Oregon Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the city of Eugene must make public documents from an internal police investigation into the conduct of officers in their 2008 use of a Taser on University of Oregon student Ian Van Ornum.
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THE FUTURE OF OREGON’S ONLY DEEPWATER CONTAINER TERMINAL REMAINS MURKY (Eugene Register-Guard)

Michael Thorne remembers the Port of Portland’s container terminal as a high-maintenance money-loser.

As the Port’s executive director from 1991 to 2001, Thorne made hurried trips to Asia to maintain relationships with shipping companies. He lunched with Oregon importers to rustle up business for the carriers, giving ships a reason to stop in Portland. The Port built up other lines of business to prop up the container terminal’s losses.
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ORACLES ADVANTAGE — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Settling a lawsuit leaves neither the plaintiff nor the defendant wholly satisfied. Only the lawyers clearly come out ahead, and even their prospects of future paydays are curtailed. So it is with six claims and counterclaims between Oregon and Oracle America Inc., the software giant the state had accused of fraud and racketeering for its failure to deliver a working online portal for Cover Oregon, leading to the abandonment of the states health insurance exchange.
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SHARING THE TAX BURDEN — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Airbnbs agreement to collect city and county room taxes from local people who list lodgings on the online booking site is both fair and overdue.

Since its founding in 2008, San Francisco-based Airbnb has grown into an international business with a presence in almost 200 countries and 19 offices around the world.
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SCHOOL-WORK (Portland Tribune)

– Measure 98 aims to fix horrible high school drop out rate, pointless majors. –

November Ballot Measure 98 is about preventing kids from dropping out of high school and getting them into college, but it has been embraced by industries as a way of stocking the trades with young blood.
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WILL BEND MEET WATER DEMANDS FOR 30,000 MORE RESIDENTS? (Bend Bulletin)

-City planners say despite its arid climate, Bend is set for water supplies-

For more than a decade, Eric Nunez, owner of Bend Water Hauling, has been delivering thousands of gallons of drinking water to residents in rural areas surrounding Bend. Outside of the city, people have few ways to get drinking water they can drill private wells, haul in their own water or pay someone like Nunez to fill up big holding tanks on their properties, Nunez said.
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NEW MOTOR VOTER REGISTRANTS SWELL OREGON VOTER ROLLS (Bend Bulletin)

-Most choose not to choose a party-

Eight months after the state launched a program to register voters who do business with the Oregon Department of Motor Vehicles, voter rolls are fatter than ever before.

As of the end of August, in Deschutes County, the motor voter program had added 10,021 new voters, a group that makes up about 8.5 percent of the countys total current voter registration. The 1,415 newly registered voters in Crook County make up 9.6 percent of that countys totals, and in Jefferson County, 1,342 motor voter registrants represent 11 percent of the countys eligible voters.

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WHAT SUMMIT HIGHS OPT-OUT OF TESTING RATE MEANS FOR OREGON (Bend Bulletin)

-Fewer than 1 percent of Summit juniors took Smarter Balanced tests in 2015-16-

When it comes to rates of opting out of the controversial Smarter Balanced tests, one large high school Summit High in Bend, for instance can move the needle.

In 2015-16, fewer than six Summit students took the Smarter Balanced tests, rendering the schools results meaningless.

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BABY BOOMERS, ABLE, WILLING, RETIRE NEAR GRANDCHILDREN (Bend Bulletin)

-Insufficient data on Central Oregon grand-parenting trend-

When Sam Frank asked his mother, Roseann Frank, to relocate 2,600 miles to help him and his to wife raise their infant son Owen, she said yes.

Within six weeks, Roseann, a schoolteacher of 28 years living in Waterbury, Connecticut, had tendered her retirement papers, sold her house and relocated to Prescott, Arizona, where Sam lived with his expecting wife, Katie. They lived there three years before Sam was offered a job in Bend. Without deliberation, the quartet moved here in 2014.

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NEW REPORT: MALHEUR COUNTY HAS SIGNIFICANT MINING POTENTIAL (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A new report from Oregons Department of Geology and Mineral Industries shows that an area that conservationists want to protect has a rich vein of mining potential.

Malheur County has a lot of gold, silver and uranium, says DOGAMI spokeswoman Ali Ryan Hansen.
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OREGON DHS OFFICIALS BRACE FOR POSSIBLE BUDGET CUTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Officials with the Oregon Department of Human Services are telling people who rely on its services to prepare for a potential round of budget cuts next year. Thursday, agency leaders outlined possible cost-cutting scenarios.
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KATY COBA SAYS GOODBYE TO THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (Capital Press)

Paulette Pyle is a Reagan Republican and Katy everyone calls her Katy is a Robert Kennedy Democrat. But Pyle, who for many years was grass roots coordinator with the pro-industry Oregonians for Food and Shelter, loves Katy Coba.

When Pyle deemed The Oregonian newspaper was picking on Katy in its coverage of pesticide mishaps, she called a reporter with a rival publication to complain.

Because everybody loves Katy.
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FUTURE OF PORTLAND CONTAINER TERMINAL REMAINS MURKY (Capital Press)

Michael Thorne remembers the Port of Portlands container terminal as a high-maintenance money-loser.

As the Ports executive director from 1991 to 2001, Thorne made hurried trips to Asia to maintain relationships with shipping companies. He lunched with Oregon importers to rustle up business for the carriers, giving ships a reason to stop in Portland. The port built up other lines of business to prop up the container terminals losses.

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MAINE DESIGNATION MAY FORETELL FATE OF OWYHEE MONUMENT — OPINION (Capital Press)

Residents of Oregons Malheur County, who strongly oppose a plan to turn more than 2 million acres of BLM land into a national monument, can only be dismayed by what happened in the woods of Maine last month.

The story of the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument and the Down Easterners who opposed it bear strong similarities to the ongoing saga of the Owyhee Canyonlands National Monument proposal.

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CONSUMERS MUST BE EDUCATED ABOUT THE SCIENCE OF MODERN AGRICULTURE — OPINION (Capital Press)

When it comes to food, there are two main types of consumers.

The first type of consumer just wants to fill a cavity. He follows the See Food Diet he sees food and eats it and asks few questions beyond, How much does it cost?

The second type is the foodie. He wants to know everything there is to know about the food he eats.

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PENSION BOND AMONG PROPOSED PERS STRATEGIES (East Oregonian)

As Oregonians talk budgets and the economy, the Public Employees Retirement System has become the $22 billion elephant in the room with no easy answer in sight.

The system currently has about 71 cents in assets for every dollar it owes, creating a $21.8 billion debt for the state. Schools, cities and other public employers are already struggling to pay their share, and the latest report from the systems actuary shows those employers will be asked to find an extra $885 million in their budgets next biennium a 44 percent increase from the $2 billion theyre currently paying.

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REPORT SHOWS MALHEUR COUNTY RICH WITH GOLD MINE POTENTIAL (East Oregonian)

A new report from Oregons Department of Geology and Mineral Industries shows that an area that conservationists want to protect has a rich vein of mining potential.

Malheur County has a lot of gold, silver and uranium, says DOGAMI spokeswoman Ali Ryan Hansen.

Theres enough of it that it might be economically feasible to develop a mining operation there, said Hansen.

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COLLEGE AIMS TO FIND PLACE FOR DISPLACED ITT STUDENTS (Argus Observer)

Colleges across the country are scrambling to acquire students who were dropped by the nationwide ITT Technical Institute when it closed its doors last week. That includes Treasure Valley Community College.
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AGENCY ANNOUNCES GATHER OF COLD SPRINGS WILD HORSE HERD (Argus Observer)

Bureau of Land Managements Vale District will begin gathering horses in the Cold Springs Herd Management Area Thursday. A bait-trap method, which will draw horses to a predetermined trap site stocked with food and water, will be used.
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PENAIR STAFF ON THE GROUND IN KLAMATH FALLS (Herald and News)

PenAirs Regional Manager Northwest Jonathon Peltz and Customer Service Manager Chris Lehrbach were in the terminal of the Crater Lake-Klamath Regional Airport Thursday making preparations for Day One of the aircraft flights scheduled to start Oct. 5.

PenAir has started training employees and Peltz said he plans to staff the airport with a total of 10. Transportation Security Administration employees are set to arrive soon, and could include at least six jobs, for a total of at least 16 new to the area.

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C CANAL FLUME PROJECT GROUNDBREAKING NEXT WEEK (Herald and News)

A groundbreaking ceremony for the C-Canal flume replacement project by the Klamath Irrigation District will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday, according to a news release.
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DHS SERVICES GET COMPETITIVE FOR CHARITY (The World)

-Clothing donations requested to help needy youth-

To stock up the clothes closets at North Bend High School and the Ark Project in Coos Bay, local Department of Human Services offices are getting competitive.

Coos Health and Wellness, Adults and People with Disabilities, Child Welfare Division teaming with Kairos, and the Western Oregon Advanced Health have come together to not only develop healthy competition, but to help students as the seasons start to change.

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WASHINGTON STATE TO INCREASE TESTING POT FOR PESTICIDES (The World)

More than two years after Washington state launched legal marijuana sales, it’s planning to test pot for banned pesticides more regularly.

The state’s Liquor and Cannabis Board said Thursday it’s paying the Washington Department of Agriculture more than $1 million to buy new equipment and hire two full-time workers to conduct the tests.

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CONDITIONS IN MANY OLDER COUNTY JAILS ARE GRIM, DANGEROUS (The World)

The noise in the tiny jail, built decades ago to house firefighting equipment, is constant. Voices bounce off the walls.

Nothing dissipates the dank smell. There’s no natural light. Fluorescent bulbs give the green walls a sickly hue.

If a fire broke out, a jailer notes, each cell door must be unlocked individually and someone would have to run outside to unlock an emergency exit.

“I personally think this is an embarrassment to our community,” Sheriff John Gautney says of the 16-bunk Crook County Jail in central Oregon.

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COLUMBIA RIVER SEASON EXTENDED FOR HATCHERY CHINOOK (Daily Astorian)

Hatchery Chinook salmon, from Buoy 10 upstream to the Warrior Rock/Bachelor Island, can be kept through Thursday.

The season extension for recreational fishing was recently approved by fishery managers from Oregon and Washington state because of catch rates being lower than expected.

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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATORS ARE WATCHING POT-TESTING FLAP — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

You might have noticed the call for help a couple of weeks ago from the man who runs the state’s program to accredit marijuana labs: Gary Ward, who runs the Oregon Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program, sent a letter to officials at the Oregon Health Authority that the program was “on the verge of collapse” because of increased workload and inadequate staffing.
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WILDLAND FIRE DANGER REMAINS HIGH IN MID-VALLEY (Albany Democrat Herald)

If recent cool nights and heavy morning dew are tempting you to toss a match onto that pile of tree limbs, dead grass and other debris that’s accumulated over the summer in your backyard, Neil Miller, wildland fire supervisor for the Oregon Department of Forestry, has some advice: Dont do it.
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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATORS ARE WATCHING POT-TESTING FLAP — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

You might have noticed the call for help a couple of weeks ago from the man who runs the state’s program to accredit marijuana labs: Gary Ward, who runs the Oregon Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program, sent a letter to officials at the Oregon Health Authority that the program was “on the verge of collapse” because of increased workload and inadequate staffing.
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GOOGLE WILL BUY ACREAGE (The Dalles Chronicle)

Google purchased 42 acres of industrial land in June and has made a prospective purchase agreement to buy another 96 acres the old Northwest Aluminum smelter site.

The 42 acres were purchased from Northwest Aluminum Co. and are located on the river side of Interstate 84, near the fish overpass at exit 82, said Darcy Nothnagle, Googles head of external affairs, Northwest

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NONPROFIT TO STUDY IRRIGATION UPGRADES ON CATHERINE CREEK (LaGrande Observer)

One river restoration nonprofit just received $114,265 to study the irrigation ditches along Catherine Creek and the on-farm improvements that can be made to keep the water flowing in an 8.7-mile stretch of the creek.

The Freshwater Trust is an organization that uses a variety of different tools to improve the condition of waterways, according to Caylin Barter, flow restoration director at Freshwater Trust.

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CL PORT PLANS ELECTRONIC TOLLING AMID UNUSUAL TRAFFIC BOOST (Hood River News)

Traffic surged this year at Bridge of the Gods, prompting the Port of Cascade Locks to hone in its pursuit of an automated toll system.

#The Ports engineer, HDR Inc., is looking into options for putting in new electric tolling technology at the bridge, cooperating with the Port of Hood River as they push their technology forward.

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VETERAN REACHES OUT TO AT-RISK COMRADES (Douglas County News-Review)

Heather Gilbert knows a lot about suicide.

We lose more veterans to suicide here at home than we did in the Middle East to war, said Gilbert, a veterans service officer with the local VFW.

From 1999 through 2014, the national suicide rate increased 24 percent, with the pace rising after 2006.

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WAS THE $100M COVER OREGON A WIN-WIN FOR BOTH SIDES? LEGAL MINDS WEIGH IN (Oregon Business Journal)

Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum calls the states and Oracle Americas $100 million settlement of the messy Cover Oregon litigation a win-win for both sides.
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OREGON HEALTH AUTHORITY SEEKS $1 BILLION BOOST FROM GENERAL FUND FOR NEXT CYCLE (The Lund Report)

– The 2017-2019 budget proposal shows a 56 percent increase in general fund spending from the current budget from $2.1 billion to $3.3 billion. –

Oregon Health Authority Director Lynne Saxton has released her agencys budget request for 2017 to 2019, asking that the state pony up a billion dollars more than the current budget, raising the states stake in the healthcare agency from $2.14 billion to $3.33 billion.
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DHS MAKES CHANGES IN LEADERSHIP FOR ADULT AND CHILD PROTECTION (The Lund Report)

– Marie Cervantes has stepped down from her job as director of the Office of Adult Abuse Prevention and Investigations and been replaced by her deputy, John Thompson. –

Oregons Department of Human Services has shuffled personnel, moving Marie Cervantes from director of the Office of Adult Abuse Prevention and Investigations over to the Aging & People with Disabilities Division, where she will work as an adult protective services manager.
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WHY WE NEED MEASURE 97 — OPINION (Salem Weekly)

The United States used to do big things. In World War II, for example, we almost tripled production to defeat fascism. After the war, federal and state governments constructed the interstate highway system, built the worlds best system of public higher education, sent astronauts to the moon, created Medicare to complement Social Security, expanded the National Park system, and much more. The country was rich and people demanded a growing array of public goods and services to enhance opportunity and the quality of life for all.
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September 15, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Oregon’s Latino population is growing faster than the nationwide average
* Oregon best state to be a teacher, study finds
* Forecast: Oregon’s economy coming ‘back down to earth’
* The Oregonian/OregonLive to host public forum on business of cannabis
* Oregon ‘motor voter’ law powers 14% jump in voter registrations
* Two takeaways from Rosa Parks Elementary’s higher test scores: Editorial Agenda 2016 — Opinion
* How is full-day kindergarten panning out?
* Gov. Brown retools aging cybersecurity systems
* Concerns about Smarter Balanced continue in new audit
* Report: Oregon’s economy is growing, job market tightening
* Crews work to contain forest fire near Elkton
* Newer type of health plans gaining favor with employers
* Airbnb agrees to collect taxes on lodging from its operators in Lane County
* Safety nets do their job, but can entangle, too
* Forecast: U.S. trends could drag down Oregon’s economic boom
* Brown consolidates state agency IT security staffs
* Audit: Oregon needs to get more out of expensive Smarter Balanced tests
* Complaints, solutions aired at public safety meeting in Donald
* Our Opinion: Measure 97 based on deceptions — Opinion
* DHS told ‘culture change’ needed at agency
* Portland schools that can change students’ destinies
* Our Opinion: Measure 97 based on deceptions — Opinion
* Economist says no to Measure 97
* Feds decline review to list American pika as endangered
* Drones ready for take off in Warm Springs
* Editorial: Oregon cities need to be able to expand — Opinion
* Rising Portland Traffic Deaths
* Oregon Audit: Smarter Balanced Exams Take Up Scarce Time, Resources
* Current Oregon Revenues Steady, But Storm Clouds Loom
* Health Insurance Premiums Increase 3 Percent For Working People
* Education Work Group Finds State Tests ‘Valid,’ But Not Helpful To Students
* Tree-Planting Robots Could Save Northwest Forests
* Whats Up With All The Dead Trees?
* NRCS grants include Oregon orchard soil nutrition study
* Maine monuments creation concerns Malheur County ranchers
* Farmers welcome WTO challenge of Chinese price supports
* DHS told culture change needed at agency
* Judge invalidates Public Forest Commission
* Bag limit lowered to one steelhead above McNary Dam
* Bill to clean Columbia River added to water package
* PGG fined for operating grain elevator without DEQ permit
* Agriculture director thankful for support in bucking cancer
* Our view: State audits Smarter Balanced — Opinion
* Update: Wildfire along Highway 227 lined, in mop-up phase
* Oregon registered voters surge under novel ‘motor voter’ law
* Medford lodging hits a record
* Small town advantages
* BOR: “A fairly good” water year
* Oregon Tech moves up in national rankings
* Transportation to health policy meeting being organized
* Oregonians get more tough financial news — Opinion
* Wildfire causes traffic delays on Oregon 138
* Council rejects all wastewater treatment comparison bids, will consider new plant RFP next week
* League hopes to protect parks from lawsuits
* Feds combat ocean noise on marine mammals
* Son of a Blob springs to life in Pacific
* Editorial: Governor should address coastal issues — Opinion
* Southern Exposure: Protecting land, wildlife an acre at a time
* Sprenger: Measure 97 scary for small businesses, low-income families
* Editorial: A highway project that went well — Opinion
* Editorial: PERS ideas offer start for reform — Opinion
* Sprenger: Measure 97 scary for small businesses, low-income families
* Guest Opinion: Are taxes too high or too low? — Guest Opinion
* Tenants and Landlords Gearing Up for Fight over Rent Control and No Cause Evictions
* ODOT has plans in works to improve Highway 20 safety
* The Unhoused and the Right to Rest
* Opt-out Movement Continues in Lane County Public Schools

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OREGON’S LATINO POPULATION IS GROWING FASTER THAN THE NATIONWIDE AVERAGE (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s Latino population is growing faster than the national rate and is significantly younger than others in the state, a new report from the Oregon Community Foundation finds.

The numbers of Latinos here increased by 78 percent since 2000, compared to only 50 percent nationwide. Nearly 474,000 Latinos live in Oregon, up from 275,000 in 2000.
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OREGON BEST STATE TO BE A TEACHER, STUDY FINDS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon is the best state in the country in which to work as a teacher, a new study says, citing competitive pay, supportive principals and co-workers and excellent job security.
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FORECAST: OREGON’S ECONOMY COMING ‘BACK DOWN TO EARTH’ (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s state revenues could be lower than expected over the next three budget cycles, state economists told a panel of lawmakers in a forecast on Wednesday.

Economists predicted the state will bring in $67.9 million less general fund and lottery revenue in 2017-19, compared with the last forecast in June. That would add to the challenge lawmakers face next year, with a looming $1.35 billion budget deficit.
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THE OREGONIAN/OREGONLIVE TO HOST PUBLIC FORUM ON BUSINESS OF CANNABIS (Portland Oregonian)

Whether you grow your own marijuana, process the plant or run a cannabis shop, it’s not like any other business. Conventional banking isn’t possible. Tax credits and deductions aren’t available. And investing in the new industry comes with significant risks.
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OREGON ‘MOTOR VOTER’ LAW POWERS 14% JUMP IN VOTER REGISTRATIONS (Portland Oregonian)

A recent Oregon law that automatically registers residents to vote when they get or renew a driver’s license has fueled a surge in newly minted voters.
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TWO TAKEAWAYS FROM ROSA PARKS ELEMENTARY’S HIGHER TEST SCORES: EDITORIAL AGENDA 2016 — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Rosa Parks Elementary Principal Tamala Newsome barely paused on Monday to celebrate the double-digit gains that students at her North Portland school showed on standardized tests.
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HOW IS FULL-DAY KINDERGARTEN PANNING OUT? (Salem Statesman Journal)

More than 3,150 kids started kindergarten in Salem-Keizer schools Wednesday, the second group of 5- and 6-year-olds to attend all-day classes.

How did that extra instructional time influence the district’s first all-day kindergartners?
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GOV. BROWN RETOOLS AGING CYBERSECURITY SYSTEMS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown issued an executive order directing state agencies to completely overhaul their cybersecurity systems and they’ll have less than two months to figure out how to do it.
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CONCERNS ABOUT SMARTER BALANCED CONTINUE IN NEW AUDIT (Salem Statesman Journal)

State auditors said Smarter Balanced student assessments are confusing and unpopular, according to a new audit report.

Though these concerns have come up in the past, the audit team now suggests a handful of things to improve the current system.
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REPORT: OREGON’S ECONOMY IS GROWING, JOB MARKET TIGHTENING (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon is experiencing “full-throttle rates of growth,” the state says in its economic and revenue forecast, which predicted businesses will find it harder to fill vacancies in a tight labor market.
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CREWS WORK TO CONTAIN FOREST FIRE NEAR ELKTON (Eugene Register-Guard)

Underscoring the danger posed by the extremely dry conditions in Western Oregon, a forestland blaze near Elkton scorched 60 acres Tuesday and Wednesday before firefighters brought it under control.
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NEWER TYPE OF HEALTH PLANS GAINING FAVOR WITH EMPLOYERS (Eugene Register-Guard)

A growing number of U.S. workers are covered by health insurance that sticks them with a bigger share of the medical bill but also softens that blow by providing a special account to help with the expense.
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AIRBNB AGREES TO COLLECT TAXES ON LODGING FROM ITS OPERATORS IN LANE COUNTY (Eugene Register-Guard)

Airbnb, the online lodging reservation service, has agreed to collect local and county room taxes from its operators in Lane County.

The agreement will require Airbnb, based in San Francisco, to collect lodging taxes from property owners who rent all or some of their homes to visitors for overnight lodging.
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SAFETY NETS DO THEIR JOB, BUT CAN ENTANGLE, TOO (Eugene Register-Guard)

America is on the mend. Witness the good news in the latest version of the nations economic report card: the Census Bureaus annual estimates of the median household income and the poverty rate.
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FORECAST: U.S. TRENDS COULD DRAG DOWN OREGON’S ECONOMIC BOOM (Portland Tribune)

Oregons economy remains healthy across the board, outperforming other states in job growth and other indicators, state economists told lawmakers in Salem Wednesday.

But the economists also warned that a slowdown in the U.S. economy would likely drag down the states economic boom.

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BROWN CONSOLIDATES STATE AGENCY IT SECURITY STAFFS (Portland Tribune)

Gov. Kate Brown issued an executive order Tuesday that centralizes authority for the states information technology security in the state Office of the Chief Information Officer.
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AUDIT: OREGON NEEDS TO GET MORE OUT OF EXPENSIVE SMARTER BALANCED TESTS (Portland Tribune)

Statewide school tests through the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium are nearly twice as expensive as the old tests, confusing to educators and time-consuming.

Thats according to a new audit from the Oregon Secretary of State released today.

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COMPLAINTS, SOLUTIONS AIRED AT PUBLIC SAFETY MEETING IN DONALD (Portland Tribune)

-New Donald/Aurora I-5 interchange project could cost up to $70 million-

Marion County officials acknowledge that traffic and traffic accidents in north Marion County are getting worse, but say it will take money and time to fix.

More than 100 people filled the Donald Fire Hall on Sept. 7 to vent their frustrations and ask questions of Sheriff Jason Myers, Marion County Public Works Director Alan Haley and an Oregon Department of Transportation ODOT official.

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OUR OPINION: MEASURE 97 BASED ON DECEPTIONS — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Supporters of Measure 97 a massive corporate sales tax on the November ballot have pushed two deceptive arguments to try to persuade Oregon voters that they magically wont be hurt by what would be the largest tax increase in the states history.
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DHS TOLD ‘CULTURE CHANGE’ NEEDED AT AGENCY (Portland Tribune)

Saying the state has a deep and abiding moral obligation to keep children in its care safe, a committee assembled by the governor to assess the safety of children in substitute care agreed Wednesday that the Department of Human Services and state leaders need to follow through on ongoing reform efforts.
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PORTLAND SCHOOLS THAT CAN CHANGE STUDENTS’ DESTINIES (Portland Tribune)

About three-quarters of Portland Public Schools average English, math or science scores from the 2015-16 school year were exactly in the range of what one could predict given each schools demographics.
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OUR OPINION: MEASURE 97 BASED ON DECEPTIONS — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Supporters of Measure 97 a massive corporate sales tax on the November ballot have pushed two deceptive arguments to try to persuade Oregon voters that they magically wont be hurt by what would be the largest tax increase in the states history.
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ECONOMIST SAYS NO TO MEASURE 97 (Portland Tribune)

– Willamette University scholar questions fairness of tax proposal –

Dr. Fred Thompson, a decorated economist and director of the Willamette University Center for Governance and Public Policy Research, was preaching to the choir Thursday afternoon, Sept. 8, as he discussed why he doesnt support Measure 97.
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FEDS DECLINE REVIEW TO LIST AMERICAN PIKA AS ENDANGERED (Bend Bulletin)

-Citing climate change, New York high schooler sought animals protection-

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has decided against doing a full review of whether to list the American pika as an endangered or threatened species.

The decision Tuesday comes in response to a New York high school students petition for the federal agency to list the small mammal as endangered or threatened and to designate critical habitat for it. The small animals live in mountains in Canada and the Western U.S., including in the Cascades.

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DRONES READY FOR TAKE OFF IN WARM SPRINGS (Bend Bulletin)

-Construction of training center nearly complete at test range-

Just over six months after the first drone flight launched at Warm Springs Indian Reservation, building updates are helping attract interest to Central Oregons only FAA-approved drone testing range.

The reservation became home to one of Oregons Pan-Pacific UAS three test ranges along with Pendleton and Tillamook at the end of 2013, according to Aurolyn Stwyer, business development and marketing manager for Warm Springs Ventures.

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EDITORIAL: OREGON CITIES NEED TO BE ABLE TO EXPAND — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregons land use planning laws have a couple of major aims, They were written to preserve farm and forest land, and theyre designed to prevent urban sprawl. That sounds wonderful, but theres a downside that too many Oregonians seem unwilling to address.

Sprawl, for all of its problems, makes housing more affordable.
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RISING PORTLAND TRAFFIC DEATHS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The number of traffic-related deaths in Portland is higher than it was at the same time last year. We check in with Portland Bureau of Transportation Director Leah Treat and two members of the Vision Zero Task Force to hear what the city is doing to curb the rate of fatalities.
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OREGON AUDIT: SMARTER BALANCED EXAMS TAKE UP SCARCE TIME, RESOURCES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

– Radio Interview –

An Oregon audit of the states Smarter Balanced standardized exams found that the tests arent well understood, and that they take up scarce time and resources in schools.
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CURRENT OREGON REVENUES STEADY, BUT STORM CLOUDS LOOM (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Steady job growth means Oregons economy will continue to do well in the short term. But storm clouds are on the horizon. That was the prediction Wednesday from state economists.
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HEALTH INSURANCE PREMIUMS INCREASE 3 PERCENT FOR WORKING PEOPLE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

– Radio Interview –

The average annual cost of employer provided health insurance increased 3 percent this year, to more than $18,000.
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EDUCATION WORK GROUP FINDS STATE TESTS ‘VALID,’ BUT NOT HELPFUL TO STUDENTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Two significant reports came out Wednesday on the state tests Oregon students are required to take.

The Oregon Legislature called for both inquiries into the Smarter Balanced exams that students first took as the states federally-required assessments in Spring 2015. Some teachers criticized the exams for the time they took, their difficulty and the technological demands, as OPB summarized in a 2015 series.
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TREE-PLANTING ROBOTS COULD SAVE NORTHWEST FORESTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

In the summer of 2015, Grant Canary, an entrepreneur with two startups under his belt who was looking for his next venture, was brainstorming ways to make a dent in carbon dioxide pollution, one of the main culprits in climate change. He mocked up idea after idea but always got the same response form his colleagues: His scheme would never pencil out as a business. There was no customer appeal, Canary explains.
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WHATS UP WITH ALL THE DEAD TREES? (Jefferson Public Radio)

Gaze across the mountains of the Northwest these days and you may notice an unusual number of dead firs, pines and other conifer trees scattered among the green ones. Drought is usually considered the prime culprit. But recent research suggests the damage that has historically been done to conifer forests by routine dry spells is being compounded by climate change.
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NRCS GRANTS INCLUDE OREGON ORCHARD SOIL NUTRITION STUDY (Capital Press)

Oregon orchardist Mike Omeg will test a soil and plant nutrition program developed by an Amish farmer with an eighth grade education who has become one of the countrys leading advocates of alternative farming methods.
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MAINE MONUMENTS CREATION CONCERNS MALHEUR COUNTY RANCHERS (Capital Press)

The presidents recent creation of a national monument in Maine, despite local opposition, has Malheur County residents concerned.

Ranchers and other Malheur County residents formed the Owyhee Basin Stewardship Coalition this year to fight a proposed 2.5-million acre national monument in an area of the county known as the Owyhee Canyonlands.

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FARMERS WELCOME WTO CHALLENGE OF CHINESE PRICE SUPPORTS (Capital Press)

The Chinese governments programs supporting wheat, rice and corn farmers are distorting global trade and undercutting U.S. farmers, U.S. trade and industry representatives say.

The Obama administration launched a new trade enforcement action against the Peoples Republic of China at the World Trade Organization, concerning excessive government support provided for Chinese production of those crops, according to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.

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DHS TOLD CULTURE CHANGE NEEDED AT AGENCY (East Oregonian)

Saying the state has a deep and abiding moral obligation to keep children in its care safe, a committee assembled by the governor to assess the safety of children in substitute care agreed Wednesday that the Department of Human Services and state leaders need to follow through on ongoing reform efforts.
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JUDGE INVALIDATES PUBLIC FOREST COMMISSION (East Oregonian)

Grant County voters will not see Public Forest Commission candidates on the November ballot after a judge nullified the measure that created it.

Grant County Circuit Court Judge William D. Cramer Jr. ruled today that the measure creating the commission that was approved by county voters in 2002 conflicts with paramount law in both the State of Oregon and federally in a brief opinion letter to the county, which defended the measure, and Mark Webb, who challenged it.

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BAG LIMIT LOWERED TO ONE STEELHEAD ABOVE MCNARY DAM (East Oregonian)

Beginning Thursday through Dec. 31, anglers will only be allowed to keep one hatchery steelhead caught above McNary Dam on the Columbia River.
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BILL TO CLEAN COLUMBIA RIVER ADDED TO WATER PACKAGE (East Oregonian)

Congress is making headway on establishing a grant program for environmental cleanup projects in the Columbia River Basin.

Oregon Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley reintroduced the Columbia River Restoration Act last year, along with fellow Oregon Reps. Earl Blumenauer, Suzanne Bonamici and Peter DeFazio, all Democrats. The bill was added into a broader package of water legislation Wednesday, which could pass the Senate this week.

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PGG FINED FOR OPERATING GRAIN ELEVATOR WITHOUT DEQ PERMIT (East Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality fined Pendleton Grain Growers $16,737 for operating a grain elevator at 31005 Launch Lane in Umatilla without an Air Contaminant Discharge Permit.
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AGRICULTURE DIRECTOR THANKFUL FOR SUPPORT IN BUCKING CANCER (East Oregonian)

Katy Coba has been ready since April for this years Tough Enough to Wear Pink day at the Pendleton Round-Up.

It has been a turbulent year for Coba, a Pendleton native and longtime director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture. She was diagnosed with breast cancer on Oct. 19, 2015, undergoing 12 weeks of chemotherapy and another six weeks of daily radiation treatment.
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OUR VIEW: STATE AUDITS SMARTER BALANCED — OPINION (East Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Education should do more to address the concerns of educators and parents about Smarter Balanced testing and Common Core state standards.

At least that’s what the Oregon Secretary of State argued Wednesday in releasing the results of a mandated state audit.

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UPDATE: WILDFIRE ALONG HIGHWAY 227 LINED, IN MOP-UP PHASE (Medford Mail Tribune)

Wildland crews attacked a wildfire that burned about 15 acres Wednesday afternoon and had threatened some structures along Highway 227 about three miles northwest of Trail, authorities said.

By Wednesday evening, the fire was fully lined, and crews had begun the mop-up process, according to Oregon Department of Forestry spokesman Brian Ballou.
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OREGON REGISTERED VOTERS SURGE UNDER NOVEL ‘MOTOR VOTER’ LAW (Medford Mail Tribune)

A recent Oregon law that automatically registers residents to vote when they get or renew a driver’s license has fueled a surge in newly minted voters.

In January Oregon was the first state to put such a law into effect and since then, California, Vermont and West Virginia have adopted similar laws. So-called “motor voter” laws are also being considered in other states.
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MEDFORD LODGING HITS A RECORD (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Occupancy, rates and revenue all up for motels and hotels-

Overnight stays in Medford’s motels and hotels produced record revenue for the fiscal years ending June 30.

Nearly $3.7 million was generated during fiscal 2015-16, according to figures compiled by Travel Medford, which contracts with the city to promote tourism.
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SMALL TOWN ADVANTAGES (Herald and News)

-Rural towns are down, but not out-

While its true that small, rural towns have not seen the recovery from the recent recession that other parts of Oregon have, those towns can control their own destiny, experts told a diverse business audience Wednesday.

Despite all the reports, all the negative news, small towns have a future, said Becky McCray, a small towns economics advocate. We are too important to the future of society.

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BOR: “A FAIRLY GOOD” WATER YEAR (Herald and News)

There are no estimated shortages of water in Upper Klamath Lake and Gerber Reservoir, according to Jason Cameron, water operations chief and acting manager for the Klamath Basin Area Office of the Bureau of Reclamation BOR.
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OREGON TECH MOVES UP IN NATIONAL RANKINGS (Herald and News)

Oregon Institute of Technologys value rose in the U.S. News and World Reports Best Colleges 2017 rankings, released Tuesday.

The report once again lists Oregon Tech at No. 1 as Top Public Western Regional College and the university moved up two spots in the ranking of Best Western Regional Colleges to No. 3.

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TRANSPORTATION TO HEALTH POLICY MEETING BEING ORGANIZED (Herald and News)

Local transportation is being organized to an upcoming meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board in Medford, according to a news release.

The OHPB will hold a series of community meetings in September and October to gather public input about Oregons coordinated care organizations and how they deliver services to Oregons most vulnerable citizens.

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OREGONIANS GET MORE TOUGH FINANCIAL NEWS — OPINION (Herald and News)

Ouch

Oregon state government never seems to lack for bad financial news, with such things as increases in the cost of public employee pensions and the health care fiasco.

It got a real zinger last week when the Oregon Health Authority said it needs $1.2 billion more from the the states general fund in the 2017-19 two-year budget than it is getting in the present biennium.

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WILDFIRE CAUSES TRAFFIC DELAYS ON OREGON 138 (The World)

-Oregon 138 West reopened to one lane-

A wildfire is causing road delays on Oregon 138 West, six miles southeast of the Oregon Highway 38 junction in Elkton.

The road was closed on Tuesday, but reopened Wednesday at 4 a.m. according to Oregon Department of Transportation spokesman Jared Castle.

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COUNCIL REJECTS ALL WASTEWATER TREATMENT COMPARISON BIDS, WILL CONSIDER NEW PLANT RFP NEXT WEEK (The World)

The Coos Bay City Council on Tuesday voted to reject both proposals for a wastewater treatment plant comparison study, opting instead to place consideration of issuing a request for proposals to design and build a membrane bio-reactor MBR treatment plant on the agenda for the council’s next meeting.
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LEAGUE HOPES TO PROTECT PARKS FROM LAWSUITS (Daily Astorian)

In the next legislative session, the League of Oregon Cities will likely push for a bill restoring immunity for city parks employees against lawsuits filed by people injured at sites under the employees care.

The move is a response to a recent Oregon Supreme Court decision that allows parks employees to be held liable for injuries caused through their negligence a ruling that has compelled some cities to close parks out of caution.

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FEDS COMBAT OCEAN NOISE ON MARINE MAMMALS (Daily Astorian)

The federal government says a new strategy to address the issue of noise in the ocean will better protect the safety of marine mammals.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its Ocean Noise Strategy Roadmap on Tuesday. The agency says the roadmap will guide it in managing ocean noise and its effects on ocean life through the next 10 years.

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SON OF A BLOB SPRINGS TO LIFE IN PACIFIC (Daily Astorian)

The Blob, a news-making patch of unusually warm ocean surface water from late-2013 through autumn 2015, was reborn this month.

The ocean warmed quickly. As recently as July, The northeast Pacific off our coast was slightly above normal, but nothing exceptional, University of Washington meteorologist Cliff Mass noted Sunday in his popular blog.

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EDITORIAL: GOVERNOR SHOULD ADDRESS COASTAL ISSUES — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Its not surprising that polls show Gov. Kate Brown has a substantial lead against Republican challenger Bud Pierce heading into Novembers general election.

The governor is a Democrat in a heavily Democratic state and she has been concentrating on garnering votes, banking campaign contributions and voicing support for the controversial Measure 97 corporate tax initiative along the Interstate 5 corridor where most of the states population resides. Most career politicians would say thats a smart strategy, a sure way to win the race.

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SOUTHERN EXPOSURE: PROTECTING LAND, WILDLIFE AN ACRE AT A TIME (Daily Astorian)

Theres something magical about the huge swaths of land stretching for miles, mountain and sea. Thats what the North Coast is all about: a stunning and unique visual scenery.

This summer, a 360-acre parcel on Tillamook Head was transferred from timber property to conservation corridor. The North Coast Land Conservancy and GreenWood Resources closed on the Boneyard Ridge property for $1.3 million. The purchase creates 3,500 connected acres from the summit of Tillamook Head to the Necanicum River Valley.

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SPRENGER: MEASURE 97 SCARY FOR SMALL BUSINESSES, LOW-INCOME FAMILIES (Albany Democrat Herald)

State Rep. Sherrie Sprenger said Tuesday morning that Measure 97, a proposed 2.5 percent tax on gross sales by C corporation businesses doing more than $25 million per year, scares me to death in terms of what it means for the small communities in my district.

Sprenger, who represents House District 17-Scio, said that although there arent many large businesses in her district, their costs of doing business will increase for products or services they need to keep their doors open.

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EDITORIAL: A HIGHWAY PROJECT THAT WENT WELL — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

An odd occurrence happened this week, and it seems worthy of notice, and even a touch of praise.

As the Democrat-Herald’s Alex Paul reports elsewhere in today’s edition, the Oregon Department of Transportation’s project at the Sheep Creek Bridge, about 26 miles east of Sweet Home, has just about wrapped up.

Here’s the kicker: The highway, which had been closed for six weeks, reopened on time.

It gets better: The project came in on budget.

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EDITORIAL: PERS IDEAS OFFER START FOR REFORM — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

It would be an understatement to say that the Oregon Legislature has been unwilling to tackle any kind of serious reform regarding the state’s Public Employees Retirement System.

In fact, the party line, so to speak, has been something along these lines: “We tried in 2013, and we got slapped down by the state Supreme Court and now there’s nothing else that we can do.”

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SPRENGER: MEASURE 97 SCARY FOR SMALL BUSINESSES, LOW-INCOME FAMILIES (Albany Democrat Herald)

State Rep. Sherrie Sprenger said Tuesday morning that Measure 97, a proposed 2.5 percent tax on gross sales by C corporation businesses doing more than $25 million per year, scares me to death in terms of what it means for the small communities in my district.

Sprenger, who represents House District 17-Scio, said that although there arent many large businesses in her district, their costs of doing business will increase for products or services they need to keep their doors open.
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GUEST OPINION: ARE TAXES TOO HIGH OR TOO LOW? — GUEST OPINION (Ashland Daily Tidings)

Do you think that you pay too much in taxes? That the government wastes its tax money? That you get nothing by paying taxes?

Ed Note: discusses State Taxes and local taxes _________________________________________

TENANTS AND LANDLORDS GEARING UP FOR FIGHT OVER RENT CONTROL AND NO CAUSE EVICTIONS (Willamette Week)

– Landlords changed the name of their PAC and raises the specter of “radical tenant groups.” –

Tenants and landlords are already gearing up for war in next year’s Oregon legislative session, when rent control and a ban on landlords evicting tenants without cause are expected to be on the agenda.
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ODOT HAS PLANS IN WORKS TO IMPROVE HIGHWAY 20 SAFETY (KTVZ Bend)

– C.O. can expect ‘rumble strips’ among new safety precautions –

Just days after a 2-year-old was killed in a head-on collision, we looked into what is being done to make that stretch of Highway 20 safer. It turns out the Oregon Department of Transportation already was planning to make some changes to the highway to improve safety.
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THE UNHOUSED AND THE RIGHT TO REST (Eugene Weekly)

Standing still. Using the bathroom. Sleeping. These are things we all do and, in fact, all things we do to survive. But laws in some cities, including Eugene, penalize people for trying to meet their basic needs.
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OPT-OUT MOVEMENT CONTINUES IN LANE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS (Eugene Weekly)

Numbers published by the Oregon Department of Education last week show that across Lane County, some parents and students continue to choose opting out of the Smarter Balanced Assessment, a standardized test introduced to Oregon public schools last year.
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September 14, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Kotek pushes for statewide cap on rent hikes, end to ‘no-cause’ evictions
* Oregon best state to be a teacher, study finds
* Warm water ‘blob’ off northwest coast returns
* Oregon state song is an outdated anthem — Opinion
* Oregon colleges, as ranked by U.S. News and World Report
* Oregon’s jobless rate climbs as work force grows
* Oregon State celebrates opening of first new building at Bend campus
* State’s response to marijuana lab accreditation crisis inadequate, administrator says
* Measure 97 will help public schools — Guest Opinion
* Measure 97 would break Oregon-based businesses — Guest Opinion
* Grand Ronde appeals to U.S. Supreme Court
* Oregon DOJ overturns public records fee rule
* Preschool Promise to help hundreds
* OSU unveils very own campus in Bend after sharing space for years
* Water, water everywhere — Opinion
* Complaint alleges GOP candidate Rich Vial lives outside HD 26
* Clackamette boat ramp reopens; Oregon City planners seek input on Sept. 15 for replacement structure
* Oregon job growth rolls along, as August unemployment rate hits 5.4 percent
* House Speaker promises uncomfortable housing debate in 2017
* OSU-Cascades campus officially open
* Program gets students back on track to graduation
* Forest service considers limiting use in Three Sisters Wilderness
* Economic expansion now helping the middle
* Editorial: Don’t lift rent control restriction — Opinion
* Editorial: Public information should be free — Opinion
* Column: Fewer foreign entrepreneurs say they need the U.S. That’s a problem. — Guest Opinion
* Oregon’s Automatic Voter Registration Yields Surge In Registered Voters
* ODA plans for both budget cuts, increases
* Our view: Bipartisan ideas to reform PERS — Opinion
* Applegate residents fume over BLM plan
* Our View: Finding their own paths to success — Opinion
* OSU celebrates opening of Cascades Campus
* Northwest Firearms teams with Oregon Department of Forestry to reduce forest fire risks associated with target shooting
* Travel Oregon taps Tillamook County tourism organization for 2017 agritourism program
* Oregon sets record for job growth
* Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek Supports Rent Control
* How Many Cans and Bottles Actually Get Returned Each Year in Oregon?

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KOTEK PUSHES FOR STATEWIDE CAP ON RENT HIKES, END TO ‘NO-CAUSE’ EVICTIONS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek, referring to what she called a “statewide crisis” in housing, said she will push next session for an end to no-cause evictions and a statewide ban on rent increases above a “reasonable” percentage.

Kotek, in an address Monday night to the Oregon Opportunity Network, said she fully expects that the proposals are going to spark controversy.

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OREGON BEST STATE TO BE A TEACHER, STUDY FINDS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon is the best state in the country in which to work as a teacher, a new study says, citing competitive pay, supportive principals and co-workers and excellent job security.

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WARM WATER ‘BLOB’ OFF NORTHWEST COAST RETURNS (Portland Oregonian)

There is an ominous presence in the waters off the Pacific Northwest and it has the potential to play havoc with ocean wildlife and could interfere with your winter plans.

“The Blob,” a mass of warm water floating off the coast of northern Oregon, Washington, British Columbia and Alaska, is back, writes University of Washington atmospheric science professor Cliff Mass.

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OREGON STATE SONG IS AN OUTDATED ANTHEM — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Buried in the vault of the Oregon Historical Society are more than 200 rejected entries for the Oregon state song.

In 1919, the Society of Oregon Composers announced a contest for poets to submit their compositions “in which the beauties and the merits of the state are extolled,” according to an Oregonian article at the time.

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OREGON COLLEGES, AS RANKED BY U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT (Portland Oregonian)

The U.S. News and World Report is out with its annual ranking of American colleges and universities, a report that garners both praise and criticism in the education field.

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OREGON’S JOBLESS RATE CLIMBS AS WORK FORCE GROWS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s unemployment rate ticked up a notch in August as more workers returned to the labor force amid a rapidly improving economy.

The seasonally adjusted jobless rate climbed to 5.4 percent last month, according to data out Tuesday from the Oregon Employment Department, up from 5.2 percent in July. Nationally, the unemployment rate was unchanged last month at 4.9 percent.

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OREGON STATE CELEBRATES OPENING OF FIRST NEW BUILDING AT BEND CAMPUS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon State University celebrated the grand opening Tuesday of the first new academic building at its branch campus in Bend.

Tykeson Hall, a 43,650-square-foot academic building, is the first finished structure on the school’s 10-acre plot of land in west Bend. Construction on a dormitory and dining hall is ongoing and expected to finish in January.

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STATE’S RESPONSE TO MARIJUANA LAB ACCREDITATION CRISIS INADEQUATE, ADMINISTRATOR SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

The director of the state’s lab accreditation program said the agency will stop assessing cannabis labs next week because the Oregon Health Authority has not adequately addressed workload and staffing issues.

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MEASURE 97 WILL HELP PUBLIC SCHOOLS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

As president of the Oregon Parent Teacher Association, I am dedicated to addressing the problems facing our schools. Decades of disinvestment have led to large class sizes, short school years and fewer class offerings. Today, Oregon has one of the worst high school graduation rates in the county.

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MEASURE 97 WOULD BREAK OREGON-BASED BUSINESSES — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In 1931, Herb Sullivan began purchasing milk from local farmers and making butter and ice cream, which he sold to townsfolk in and around Roseburg, Oregon. Soon after, he was joined by our grandfather, Ormond Feldkamp who contributed his 1929 Hudson and $500 to the business.

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GRAND RONDE APPEALS TO U.S. SUPREME COURT (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon’s Grand Ronde tribe is appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court to halt construction of a 368,000-square-foot casino in La Center, Washington, after the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals denied its request on July 29.

“The council has made the decision to approve an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court,” tribal attorney Rob Greene said. He expects to file this fall.

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OREGON DOJ OVERTURNS PUBLIC RECORDS FEE RULE (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Department of Justice has overturned a 14-year-old rule requiring some state agencies to charge for public records.

The ruling was sparked by the Statesman Journal’s appeal of a decision by the Public Employees Retirement System to charge full price for release of public records. PERS asked for $112 to produce the 2015 travel receipts of the retirement system’s director and board members.

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PRESCHOOL PROMISE TO HELP HUNDREDS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Early learning hubs across the state will implement Preschool Promise this month, with the aim of helping hundreds of children.

Preschool Promise, Oregon’s free preschool program, will start with rolling starting dates across the state in September.

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OSU UNVEILS VERY OWN CAMPUS IN BEND AFTER SHARING SPACE FOR YEARS (Eugene Register-Guard)

College futurists predict that bricks and mortar will matter little in coming decades, but you’d be hard-pressed to find that sentiment in Bend on Tuesday, when Oregon State University celebrated the opening of its Cascades Campus.

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WATER, WATER EVERYWHERE — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-But Oregon’s aquifers are being drained-

A recent report by The Portland Oregonian about the massive amount of water being pumped from Oregon’s underground reservoirs, much of it for agricultural uses in Eastern Oregon, with little oversight or control, should set off enough alarm bells to wake the dead.

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COMPLAINT ALLEGES GOP CANDIDATE RICH VIAL LIVES OUTSIDE HD 26 (Portland Tribune)

Does Richard Vial live in the district he wants to represent in the Oregon Legislature?

If he doesn’t live in House District 26, the Republican nominee could run afoul of state election law.

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CLACKAMETTE BOAT RAMP REOPENS; OREGON CITY PLANNERS SEEK INPUT ON SEPT. 15 FOR REPLACEMENT STRUCTURE (Portland Tribune)

In December 2013, a winter flood severely damaged the boat ramp at Clackamette Park by lifting up its concrete panels.

Oregon City was able to shore up, salvage and stabilize the ramp panels and prevent more undermining.

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OREGON JOB GROWTH ROLLS ALONG, AS AUGUST UNEMPLOYMENT RATE HITS 5.4 PERCENT (Portland Tribune)

Oregon added about 4,600 new jobs in August, as the unemployment rate increased slightly to 5.4 percent, from July’s 5.2 percent.

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HOUSE SPEAKER PROMISES UNCOMFORTABLE HOUSING DEBATE IN 2017 (Bend Bulletin)

-Tina Kotek proposes controversial measures to help residents stay in homes-

Attacking Oregon’s rising housing costs and spurring affordable housing development has been central to the Legislatures work for the past two years, but a top Democrat this week promised to elevate the issue.

Calling Oregon’s housing crisis a man-made emergency that demands bold action, House Speaker Tina Kotek said at a Portland gala put on by affordable housing organizations that she plans to bring measures to the House floor in 2017 that will likely make for a difficult debate.

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OSU-CASCADES CAMPUS OFFICIALLY OPEN (Bend Bulletin)

-Locals, officials celebrate with Governor Brown-

Governor Kate Brown helped formally open the new OSU-Cascades campus at a ceremony Tuesday morning.

Visitors heard from Brown and others and were able to tour Tykeson Hall, the primary academic building on the new campus in southwest Bend. Classes will begin at OSU-Cascades on Monday, and the dining facility and residence hall are on track to open in time for the start of the winter term in January.

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PROGRAM GETS STUDENTS BACK ON TRACK TO GRADUATION (Bend Bulletin)

-Students who felt unsupported are catching up on credits-

For some students, the knowledge that adults in their lives are supporting them is enough to motivate them to change.

Heart of Oregon Corps YouthBuild program offers such support for teens and young adults behind on credits for school. It gives students an opportunity to catch up on credits and earn job experience. While Madras High School was included in Heart of Oregon Corps YouthBuild since the programs start in 2009, the program and Jefferson County School District only had a partnership from 2009 to 2011.

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FOREST SERVICE CONSIDERS LIMITING USE IN THREE SISTERS WILDERNESS (Bend Bulletin)

-The South Sister Climber Trail is one area that could be affected-

Climbing to the summit of Oregon’s third-tallest peak is supposed to be a wilderness experience, as the South Sister Climber Trail is located in the Three Sisters Wilderness.

But when hundreds of other hikers are also trekking to the summit, it is hard to consider the climb as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, as reads part of the Wilderness Act of 1964.

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ECONOMIC EXPANSION NOW HELPING THE MIDDLE (Bend Bulletin)

For years, the standard knock on this economic expansion has been twofold: Growth has been slow, and big businesses and wealthy investors have been its major beneficiaries, rather than middle-class wage earners.

And it has been a fair criticism. At least until recently.

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EDITORIAL: DON’T LIFT RENT CONTROL RESTRICTION — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Don’t be surprised if the issue of rent control comes up early in the 2017 Legislature. Speaker of the House Tina Kotek, D-Portland, makes clear on her campaign website she believes its an idea whose time has come.

Currently Oregon law prohibits communities from enacting rent control ordinances. There’s good reason for the limitation, which the Legislature passed in 1985.

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EDITORIAL: PUBLIC INFORMATION SHOULD BE FREE — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon government creates a less informed public and less accountability by charging for public information.

That’s why its worth noting a recent decision by the Oregon Department of Justice. Records from the Public Employees Retirement System may now be cheaper to get.

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COLUMN: FEWER FOREIGN ENTREPRENEURS SAY THEY NEED THE U.S. THAT’S A PROBLEM — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Apple is facing accusations it copied Chinese innovations in the iPhone 7. Indeed, China’s smartphone manufacturers released dual-camera systems and handsets without headphone jacks long before Apple did. And the stickers and animations Apple is adding to iMessage look like a direct knockoff from China’s WeChat. This is quite a twist from the days when Apple accused the Chinese of copying its inventions.

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OREGON’S AUTOMATIC VOTER REGISTRATION YIELDS SURGE IN REGISTERED VOTERS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Voter registration is surging in Oregon. The Secretary of States office said Tuesday that nearly 300,0000 new voters have been added over the past year.

But the uptick isn’t due to interest in the presidential election.

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ODA PLANS FOR BOTH BUDGET CUTS, INCREASES (Capital Press)

Oregon’s farm regulators are simultaneously planning for substantial budget cuts and increases due to the states uncertain revenue future.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture is anticipating a total budget ranging from roughly $103 million to $124 million in the 2017-2019 biennium, depending on whether voters approve a corporate tax increase in November.

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OUR VIEW: BIPARTISAN IDEAS TO REFORM PERS — OPINION (East Oregonian)

-Sens. Johnson & Knopp attempt to overcome leadership inertia-

Two state legislators have offered an impressive list of ideas for fixing Oregons ailing retirement system for public employees. Their suggestions are fair, constitutional and would protect government services. Their effort, notably, is bipartisan.

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APPLEGATE RESIDENTS FUME OVER BLM PLAN (Medford Mail Tribune)

-They say agency ignored its own charge to work with the public-

Some Applegate Valley activists are vowing to appeal a new multi-unit timber sale and fire-reduction project proposed by the Bureau of Land Management, saying the BLM “gave the finger” to residents trying to collaborate with the agency on the project.

The group Applegate Neighborhood Network is at odds with the BLM’s Nedsbar Forest Management Project, which includes logging on O&C lands, after the agency rejected the group’s community-generated alternative.

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OUR VIEW: FINDING THEIR OWN PATHS TO SUCCESS — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

It’s easy to get lost in the weeds when talk turns to boosting high school graduation rates. Teacher-student ratios, extra tutoring for students who are struggling, more school days. But when it comes down to individual students, the trick may be to keep it simple.

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OSU CELEBRATES OPENING OF CASCADES CAMPUS (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Oregon State University formally opened the first new four-year university campus in the state in more than 50 years at a Tuesday ceremony at its OSU-Cascades campus in Bend.

And the speakers at celebration noted the historic significance of the occasion.

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NORTHWEST FIREARMS TEAMS WITH OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY TO REDUCE FOREST FIRE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH TARGET SHOOTING (Tillamook County Pioneer)

The following news release is from the Oregon Department of Forestry:

Of the 807 human-caused fires in 2015 on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands, it is estimated that discharging firearms caused 25 of them, usually because a hot bullet fragment came into contact with flammable materials, such as dry vegetation.

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TRAVEL OREGON TAPS TILLAMOOK COUNTY TOURISM ORGANIZATION FOR 2017 AGRITOURISM PROGRAM (Tillamook County Pioneer)

Visit Tillamook Coast, the official Tillamook County tourism organization, is the recipient of the 2017 Travel Oregon Tourism Rural Studio program for agritourism development, according to Nan Devlin, Tillamook County tourism director.

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OREGON SETS RECORD FOR JOB GROWTH (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon added 4,600 jobs in August, marking 50 consecutive months with job gains, a string that’s unmatched since the state starting keeping detailed records in 1990.

Since June 2012, Oregon has added 208,200 jobs, according to a state report released Tuesday.

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OREGON HOUSE SPEAKER TINA KOTEK SUPPORTS RENT CONTROL (Willamette Week)

-She also wants to bar no cause evictions during the upcoming legislative session-

House Speaker Tina Kotek announced her support Monday night for changing state law to limit how much landlords can raise the rent.

For more than a year tenant groups have been pushing for rent freezes in the midst of the housing crunch, but state law explicitly bars rent control.

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HOW MANY CANS AND BOTTLES ACTUALLY GET RETURNED EACH YEAR IN OREGON? (Willamette Week)

Not enough.

1,118,150,066.

That’s how many cans and bottles Oregonians returned for refund last year: a big number, but the lowest percentage in four years.

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AUGUST MARKS 50 CONSECUTIVE MONTHS OF JOB GROWTH IN OREGON— BLOG (Oregon Employment Department – Research Div)

Oregon’s payroll employment grew for the 50th consecutive month as employers added 4,600 jobs in August, after a revised gain of 5,000 in July. Since June 2012, Oregon’s economy expanded rapidly, adding 208,200 jobs an average gain of 4,200 jobs per month. Oregon hasn’t seen such a long string of monthly job gains since comparable records began in 1990. Nationally, August was the 71st straight month of job growth.

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WOMEN IN OREGON’S CONSTRUCTION AND FORESTRY SECTORS— BLOG (Oregon Employment Department – Research Div)

In recent weeks we’ve fielded questions about the share of jobs held by women in Oregon, particularly in construction and forest-related industries. Since 1991, women have held between 45 percent and 48 percent of all private jobs in Oregon. In construction and forest-related jobs — both male-dominated industries — the shares have been lower.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on September 14, 2016 OSL eClips

September 13, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* EPA says Portland may need short-term fix for lead in water
* Fairgrounds asks state for more money
* Oregon Lottery opens 20-year-old time capsule
* A closer look at economic research on Measure 97
* Should Oregon cut private jobs to add government jobs? — Opinion
* Oregon conservation easement program will seek $4.25 million
* Report: Number of homeless dying on street jumped in 2015
* My View: Tax initiative is wrong remedy — Opinion
* M97: The wrong tool for the problem — Opinion
* Experts question why guidelines still back likely ineffective products
* DOJ reverses order on public-records fees
* Permitting penalty disputed as excessive
* Cannabis industry to expand to $50B by 2026, experts say
* Oregon Initiative Sees Inaugural Wave of Students Start College
* Gypsy moths pop up throughout Washington
* Oregon conservation easement program will seek $4.25 million
* Digital agriculture on display at experiment station
* Conditions promising for Oregon hunting seasons
* Maintenance required on Olive Lake Dam
* Fall prescribed burning set for national forest
* Businesses regroup after Biomass fire
* Local business challenges fine for unlicensed septic work
* Ample snowfall may return to Basin, says NWS
* Mills Addition ills reflect jobs needed — Opinion
* National Park system faces opportunities and two problems — Guest Opinion
* Marijuana could replace tobacco in hitting the sin-tax jackpot — Guest Opinion
* Coos Bay council to consider awarding wastewater treatment comparison contract
* Coast Guard to the rescue — Opinion
* Editorial: Energy tax credit report is infuriating — Opinion
* Editorial: Legislative road show due Oct. 24 — Opinion
* Think Too Much: Why OSU’s Bend campus matters in the mid-valley — Opinion
* Editorial: Test results only reveal part of the story — Opinion
* Turning tailings into cash — Opinion
* Pot use and guns — Opinion
* Barreto recognized by conservative group
* EOU online fire sciences degrees ranked among best and most affordable in 2016
* WCCF Native Circle throws pow wow
* Rail proposal draws fire
* Funding secured to help homeless vets
* Restrictions eased on northeast Oregon forests
* Guest column: Being prepared isnt just for Scouts — Guest Opinion
* Oregon colleges crack a coveted list
* Careful with the Data, Job Polarization and Housing Math editions– Blog
* It’ll take more than Hanjin’s crisis to fix shipping’s capacity problem: Expert
* Small Business Retirement Plan Mandates Coming In 2017

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EPA SAYS PORTLAND MAY NEED SHORT-TERM FIX FOR LEAD IN WATER (Portland Oregonian)

Federal regulators are turning up the heat on Portland’s lingering lead problem and now say the Rose City may need to take interim steps to reduce exposure at the tap.
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FAIRGROUNDS ASKS STATE FOR MORE MONEY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Administrators with the Oregon State Fairgrounds and Expo Center are planning to ask the state to pay for $20 million in deferred maintenance.

Oregon State Fair CEO Mike Paluszak confirmed to the Statesman Journal that fairgrounds staff are hoping the Department of Administrative Services will help fund the deferred maintenance, which has remained largely untouched since the fairgrounds and expo center became a public corporation in 2014.
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OREGON LOTTERY OPENS 20-YEAR-OLD TIME CAPSULE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Celebrations in the lobby of Oregon Lottery headquarters are usually organized to recognize a big winner or, on occasion, a retiring staff member.
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A CLOSER LOOK AT ECONOMIC RESEARCH ON MEASURE 97 (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregons chief revenue officer is defending his agency’s report predicting that proposed corporate tax Measure 97 would prove harmful to the state’s economy, despite sharp criticism from backers of the tax.
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SHOULD OREGON CUT PRIVATE JOBS TO ADD GOVERNMENT JOBS? — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Heres a question for you: Should Oregonians fundamentally change our economy by taking $3 billion a year from private businesses and giving that money to state government?

That is the basic question underlying Measure 97, which voters will decide at the Nov. 8 election.
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OREGON CONSERVATION EASEMENT PROGRAM WILL SEEK $4.25 MILLION (Portland Tribune)

Oregon legislators will likely be asked for $4.25 million next year to pay for conservation easements that would protect farmland from development.
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REPORT: NUMBER OF HOMELESS DYING ON STREET JUMPED IN 2015 (Portland Tribune)

Christopher Adams held two degrees and a job. Diagnosed with schizophrenia and biopolar disorder, he died April 19, 2015, in a Portland storage unit, from a perforated ulcer gone untreated.

Ryan Cowger, 32, was a 4.0 student who moved to Portland to start a new life after falling into opiate addiction. On Jan. 13, 2015, he was found dead in a shower at a transitional shelter after overdosing on heroin.

These are just two among the 88 deaths of homeless people detailed in an annual report released by Multnomah County Health Department.
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MY VIEW: TAX INITIATIVE IS WRONG REMEDY — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

There are a lot of good reasons for opposing the huge $6 billion tax measure on the November ballot, but the primary reason I oppose it is simple.

Measure 97 hurts my patients.
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M97: THE WRONG TOOL FOR THE PROBLEM — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Have you ever tried to fix something without the correct tool? It could be trying to hammer a nail with a rubber mallet, using a butter knife instead of a screwdriver, or maybe knitting with a pair of needles that are not the size the pattern called for in the first place.
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EXPERTS QUESTION WHY GUIDELINES STILL BACK LIKELY INEFFECTIVE PRODUCTS (Bend Bulletin)

-Resistance may make lice treatments futile-

With up to 98 percent of head lice now resistant to the chemicals in over-the-counter treatments, several of the nations leading experts on lice are questioning why current guidelines continue to recommend parents try them.
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DOJ REVERSES ORDER ON PUBLIC-RECORDS FEES (Bend Bulletin)

-Deputy AG: 2002 order requiring fee for records is flawed-

The Oregon Department of Justice on Monday lifted an order requiring some state agencies to charge the public for government records, overturning its own 14-year-old advice.

Deputy Attorney General Frederick Boss ruled that the Public Employees Retirement System declined to reduce or waive a fee it charged a journalist seeking records based on a 2002 DOJ order the agency no longer believes is valid.

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PERMITTING PENALTY DISPUTED AS EXCESSIVE (Bend Bulletin)

A Bend mobile park owner is appealing a state permitting penalty, calling it excessive.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality issued a $20,147 penalty Monday to Hank Elliott Investment Co. LLC for operating a sewage drill hole without a permit at the Mt. Vista Mobile Home Park in Bend. The violation is related to permitting, not the systems operations, and there is no evidence of harm or pollution resulting from the system, according to Kieran ODonnell, environmental law specialist at DEQ.

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CANNABIS INDUSTRY TO EXPAND TO $50B BY 2026, EXPERTS SAY (Bend Bulletin)

The legal cannabis industry in the U.S. may grow to $50 billion in the next decade, expanding to more than eight times its current size, as lawful pot purveyors gain new customers and win over users from the illicit market, according to a new report.
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OREGON INITIATIVE SEES INAUGURAL WAVE OF STUDENTS START COLLEGE (Jefferson Public Radio)

-Radio Story-

More than a year after Governor Kate Brown signed it into effect, the states 17 community colleges are welcoming their first class of Oregon Promise through their doors. KLCCs Brian Bull reports

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GYPSY MOTHS POP UP THROUGHOUT WASHINGTON (Capital Press)

The Washington State Department of Agriculture has not trapped any gypsy moths in areas it sprayed last spring, but it has caught 24 moths at 20 sites in nine counties, an unusually wide distribution that concerns the department, a WSDA spokeswoman said Sept. 9.

The troublesome pest has been detected this summer from the Kitsap Peninsula to Airway Heights near Spokane, the spokeswoman, Karla Salp, said.

Ed. Note: Oregon content and quote from Oregon Dept. of agriculture employee near end of story.
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OREGON CONSERVATION EASEMENT PROGRAM WILL SEEK $4.25 MILLION (East Oregonian)

Oregon legislators will likely be asked for $4.25 million next year to pay for conservation easements that would protect farmland from development.

Plans are beginning to solidify for the Oregon Agricultural Heritage Program, which would provide grants to farmers interested in easements and succession planning, said Meta Loftsgaarden, executive director of the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board.
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DIGITAL AGRICULTURE ON DISPLAY AT EXPERIMENT STATION (East Oregonian)

The Yamaha RMAX Type II drone growled like a motorcycle just before takeoff Monday at the Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Center.

Members of the Oregon Board of Agriculture watched from a safe distance as the unmanned helicopter hovered over a small plot of wheat stubble, carrying water to spray for imaginary weeds. Gusty winds cut the demonstration short after a few minutes, but it was enough to prove how the technology is capable of helping farmers better manage their fields.

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CONDITIONS PROMISING FOR OREGON HUNTING SEASONS (East Oregonian)

Conditions are much better than they were a year ago as hunters prepare for fall big game hunting seasons across Oregon.

Bow hunting season is already underway for deer and elk, with the first elk rifle season set for Oct. 26-30. Wildlife officials say a break from last years drought should benefit both animals and hunters alike.

The weather is much better suited to deer and elk production, said Mark Kirsch, district wildlife biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife in Pendleton.
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MAINTENANCE REQUIRED ON OLIVE LAKE DAM (East Oregonian)

A small portion of Olive Lake is closed to swimming and boating while workers make repairs to the Olive Lake Dam.

Less than 1 percent of the 149-acre lake is affected by the closure. The restricted area has been marked with signs, fences and a string of buoys, while the campground and hiking trail around the lake remain open.

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FALL PRESCRIBED BURNING SET FOR NATIONAL FOREST (East Oregonian)

Fall prescribed burning is set on the Umatilla National Forest, which could temporarily impact roads and trails across several hunting units in the forest.

Maps of the prescribed burns can be found online at www.inciweb.nwcg.gov. Burns typically take between two and five days to complete. Hunters are advised to plan ahead and avoid camping in affected areas.

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BUSINESSES REGROUP AFTER BIOMASS FIRE (Medford Mail Tribune)

– Whether sawdust fire led to burning buildings still being determined –

A fire that may have started in a sawdust pile at Biomass One Sunday evening damaged three businesses, forcing an insulation company to set up shop elsewhere and temporarily shutting down a wood manufacturing business.
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LOCAL BUSINESS CHALLENGES FINE FOR UNLICENSED SEPTIC WORK (Herald and News)

A local excavating company has challenged a fine by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality after they allegedly performed septic system work without a license.

G & G Pipeline Excavating, doing business as Drainpros of Klamath, has requested a contested case hearing after they were fined $6,450 by DEQ Aug. 11.

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AMPLE SNOWFALL MAY RETURN TO BASIN, SAYS NWS (Herald and News)

The National Weather Service expects the coming fall and winter to be closer to average than in recent years, with snowfall expected in the Klamath Falls area by November.

Meteorologist Brett Lutt said Monday current weather patterns are expected to be neutral with the possibility for cooler temperatures similar to a La Nina event toward the end of the year.

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MILLS ADDITION ILLS REFLECT JOBS NEEDED — OPINION (Herald and News)

-The issue is simple, but the answer is difficult-

It probably isnt the best beginning to a Sunday morning to pick up the Sunday paper and discover a section of your hometown featured to illustrate that, Extreme poverty persists in rural Oregon.

The feature was in the Portland Oregonian and reprinted Sunday in the Herald and News with photos by our local photographer.

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NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM FACES OPPORTUNITIES AND TWO PROBLEMS — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

The next U.S. president will face the challenge of bringing two parties together following a polarizing election campaign and years of partisan gridlock. It will be no easy task, but small victories are possible to achieve quickly, and our national parks offer a golden opportunity for the next president and Congress to get off on the right foot.
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MARIJUANA COULD REPLACE TOBACCO IN HITTING THE SIN-TAX JACKPOT — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

Is marijuana the new sin-tax gusher for the states? It sure looks that way.

In November, voters in five states will decide on whether to allow recreational use of the drug, while citizens in four other states have the option of legalizing medical marijuana.

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COOS BAY COUNCIL TO CONSIDER AWARDING WASTEWATER TREATMENT COMPARISON CONTRACT (The World)

Which wastewater treatment plant would better suit the City of Coos Bay’s needs: a sequencing batch reactor or membrane bio-reactor? City residents may soon get the answer.

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COAST GUARD TO THE RESCUE — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

There can be few if any federal services with a stronger local reputation than the search and rescue operations performed by Air Station Astoria.

As we reported Monday, the air station welcomed guests Saturday in honor of a century of Coast Guard aviation nationwide, and about half a century here at the mouth of the Columbia River.

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EDITORIAL: ENERGY TAX CREDIT REPORT IS INFURIATING — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The state finally got around to ordering an investigation of the Department of Energy’s troubled business energy tax credit program, and the report, released last week, confirms what most people suspected: The program is a mess.

How much of a mess? You can read for yourself: The online version of this editorial features a PDF version of the third-party report, conducted by Marsh Minick, a Portland-based financial crime consulting service.

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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATIVE ROAD SHOW DUE OCT. 24 — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The Legislature’s Joint Committee on Transportation and Modernization made it official last week: The panel, which is charged with crafting a transportation package for the 2017 Legislature to consider, has scheduled a meeting in Albany.
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THINK TOO MUCH: WHY OSU’S BEND CAMPUS MATTERS IN THE MID-VALLEY — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

On Tuesday, Oregon State University will hold a grand opening at its growing Cascades campus in Bend to mark the completion of the new Tykeson Hall.

It’s another important milestone for OSU, as it builds a four-year university in central Oregon. It’s important as well for that region, which has battled for decades to have a four-year institution.

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EDITORIAL: TEST RESULTS ONLY REVEAL PART OF THE STORY — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The second batch of annual results from the Smarter Balanced state test scores was released this week, and while there’s still controversy over the test and the Common Core standards that it measures, the hubbub seems to have died down considerably.
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TURNING TAILINGS INTO CASH — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

Baker County Commissioners have been kicking around for months now the idea of allowing a company to mine for gold on 900 acres of county-owned property in the dredge tailings of Sumpter Valley.

This is a worthwhile discussion.

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POT USE AND GUNS — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

We understand why the government prohibits certain felons from buying or owning guns.

These people have been convicted of committing serious crimes, which calls into question whether they would be responsible gun owners.

But were troubled by a recent federal appeals court decision that upholds a federal law banning gun stores from selling firearms to people who have medical marijuana cards.

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BARRETO RECOGNIZED BY CONSERVATIVE GROUP (LaGrande Observer)

-Cove legislator will receive award from American Conservative Union Foundation-

Rep. Greg Barreto, R-Cove, is being saluted by the American Conservative Union Foundation.

The ACU Foundation has announced that Barreto is one of seven Oregon state representatives chosen to receive its 2016 ACU Ratings Award.

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EOU ONLINE FIRE SCIENCES DEGREES RANKED AMONG BEST AND MOST AFFORDABLE IN 2016 (LaGrande Observer)

-EOU ranked No. 8 on list of affordable FSA degrees-

A new survey from OnlineU ranks Eastern Oregon University among the top 10 most affordable colleges in the nation offering online fire science degrees.

EOU is ranked No. 8 on the list of 22, and with the only bachelors level program for fire services administration in Oregon, the university is filling a need for an in-demand field, according to a press release from EOU.

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WCCF NATIVE CIRCLE THROWS POW WOW (Lake County Examiner)

Native American inmates at Warner Creek Correctional Facility WCCF came together with friends and family for the annual pow wow on Saturday, Aug. 20.

Beginning in the morning, visitors and guests were escorted into the facility for the first event setting apart the Smudge Circle for the days events. It was soon followed by the grand entry with flag raising, desert-storm prayer and round dance.

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RAIL PROPOSAL DRAWS FIRE (Hood River News)

-‘We know we dodged a bullet, Mosier mayor says during five-hour session in The Dalles-

Perhaps just two or three years ago, Union Pacific Railroads plan to add roughly four miles of new track in the Columbia River Gorge near Mosier probably would not have sparked much of a fuss. But times have changed, primarily due to several derailments involving trains carrying crude oil that exploded and burned and in one particularly horrific accident in eastern Canada took the lives of dozens of people. Locally, a June 3 derailment of an oil train at Mosier, which caught fire and burned for several hours, literally added fuel to the fire of opposition to oil train traffic.
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FUNDING SECURED TO HELP HOMELESS VETS (Douglas County News-Review)

Close to a million dollars in new funding to aid homeless veterans in southwestern Oregon was awarded last week.

U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Springfield, announced the new awards last week. Two Oregon organizations will receive a total of $985,293 in grants. The grant funding comes from the the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Supportive Services for Veteran Families SSVF program. The money is intended to help low-income veteran families avoid homelessness.

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RESTRICTIONS EASED ON NORTHEAST OREGON FORESTS (Wallowa.com)

Chainsaw and campfire restrictions for the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest have been scaled back as regional conditions have cooled and decreased fire danger. Effective Friday, Sept. 9, Public Use Restrictions PURS have been reduced to Phase A on the Wallowa-Whitman. Phase A is the second level of restrictions, generally implemented when fire danger is moderate to high.
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GUEST COLUMN: BEING PREPARED ISN’T JUST FOR SCOUTS — GUEST OPINION (Wallowa.com)

No matter where you live, a natural disaster can strike at any time. Here in the Northwest, were told to expect the next big earthquake at any time. Many of our majestic mountains are dormant volcanoes. The natural beauty of our forests can turn into horrible forest fires from a carelessly thrown cigarette butt. Extreme winter storms are a serious risk. Floods are common throughout our region and we also get the occasional tornado. While sometimes instantly fatal, survival often depends on whether you are prepared.
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OREGON COLLEGES CRACK A COVETED LIST (Oregon Business Journal)

A handful of Oregon higher education institutions have landed spots on a widely coveted list of national rankings.

U.S. News & World Report released its annual Best College Rankings this morning, and though only one Beaver State institution made the overall list, several ended up on the publication’s rankings for business, liberal arts and other schools.
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CAREFUL WITH THE DATA, JOB POLARIZATION AND HOUSING MATH EDITIONS— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

Ahead of Wednesdays forecast release, two quick notes on items that caught my eye recently.

First, as our office has written quite a bit about in recent years, job polarization continues to shape the economy and labor market. That is, jobs are increasingly concentrated at the low- and high-ends of the wage spectrum with shrinking opportunities in middle-wage occupations. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York, who pioneered the local and regional polarization work our offices uses, has a very useful update they are using in their presentations.
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IT’LL TAKE MORE THAN HANJIN’S CRISIS TO FIX SHIPPING’S CAPACITY PROBLEM: EXPERT (CNBC)

The crisis surrounding Hanjin Shipping has rocked the industry, but even more shipping lines could find themselves in trouble thanks to the huge amount of overcapacity in the industry, warns the CEO of a logistics company.

Hanjin, which had around 3 percent of market share in shipping, filed for court receivership at the end of August, which has meant that its ships have been denied access to ports and, in some cases, have been seized.
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SMALL BUSINESS RETIREMENT PLAN MANDATES COMING IN 2017 (Forbes)

Half of private sector employees don’t have access to a workplace retirement savings plan, but by next year several states expect to have new plans up and running. Washington state is anticipating an early 2017 start date for its Small Business Retirement Marketplace, where financial services firms will offer low-cost plans to businesses with less than 100 employees, including solo business owners.
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