August 28, 2015 eClips

State Library eClips
* Oregon Department of Agriculture to hire marijuana coordinator
* ‘Little casinos’? Cash-cow ‘delis’ flout Oregon Lottery rules, audit finds
* Oregon approves ‘largest liquor expansion since Prohibition’
* Oregon National Guard soldiers help efforts to contain the Canyon Creek Complex fires
* Travel Oregon wins Mercury Award for 7 Wonders of Oregon ad campaign
* Oregon pot rules prove challenging, says liquor commission boss Q&A
* ‘Kicker’ reform: Love it or hate it, your tax rebate remains invincible
* Golf developer’s lawyer defends wells, road-building at Oregon state park
* Labor unions and Oregon’s new New Deal — Guest Opinion
* Oregon revenue officials planning for influx of cash when marijuana businesses pay sales taxes next year
* Why Oregon lags on per capita income — Opinion
* Kindergarten testing is bad for kids — Guest Opinion
* ‘Explosive fire growth’ expected to drive out-of-control Canyon Creek blaze
* Campfire ban continues another week in Oregon’s state parks; rain on its way
* 21 Oregon districts, ranging from small to huge, miss targets for Smarter Balanced test participation
* Oregon shows big travel, tourism gains; 2015 on record pace
* Missing prison inmate captured in Salem 2 days after leaving work crew
* Vilsack unveils $211 million sage grouse plan
* Oregon’s drought expands
* Oregon State Fair kicks off 150th year
* SEIU home-care workers sign ‘historic’ contract
* Oyster growers fret about ocean acidification, Oregon State University study shows
* Oregon Climate Service worries when the wettest forests burn
* Brown’s workplace agenda — Opinion
* State’s budget meter running on wildfire costs
* State Audit: lottery delis may violate Constitutional ban on casinos
* State extends parks campfire ban
* Wyden, U.S. agriculture secretary to get update on Western wildfires
* For-profit colleges need regulating — Opinion
* 150 Years Of The Oregon State Fair
* Oregon Students Return To Changing Test Environment
* Oregon Considers Changing When To Issue Beach Advisories
* What’s The Deal With Dam Removals?
* Budget meter is running for Oregon wildfire costs
* Why initiatives should remain a power tool for citizens — Guest Opinion
* Incremental attacks on agriculture continue — Opinion
* Veterans advisory committee meeting planned
* EOU wins grant for low-income students
* Canyon Creek fire consumes another 11,000 acres overnight
* Strawberry Lake, campground within three miles of fire lines
* Dam removal ran roughshod over property owners — Guest Opinion
* Soil protects onions from E. coli
* Feds: Soda Fire area can be rehabilitated
* Buoy 10 Chinook fishery to close Friday
* Sea stars make comeback after wasting away
* Well-connected firm got tax credit rules changed
* Turnover at veterans center means less counseling available
* Drought leaves Crooked River a trickle
* The kicker is good but could be better — Opinion
* Crowdfunding tour to begin in Bend
* Many Oregon high school grads are not ready — Opinion
* ODFW to hold elk-management meeting
* Wildfires may limit archery opportunities
* Firefighters make progress on Falls Creek blaze
* Viewing the ‘kicker’ for exactly what it is — Opinion
* Child care challenge
* Wildfire Season Not Over, Burn Bans Still in Place
* Oregon breast cancer nos. alarming – Video
* ODOT beefs up rail incident prevention, response
* Bend forum Monday on changes to state in-home services

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OREGON DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TO HIRE MARIJUANA COORDINATOR (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Agriculture plans to hire a cannabis policy coordinator who would help answer questions from the industry about everything from pesticides to food safety.
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‘LITTLE CASINOS’? CASH-COW ‘DELIS’ FLOUT OREGON LOTTERY RULES, AUDIT FINDS (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Lottery has failed to flag cash-cow “delis” that might be operating illegally as casinos, a state report has found in part because regulators have increasingly shied away from basic financial checks.
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OREGON APPROVES ‘LARGEST LIQUOR EXPANSION SINCE PROHIBITION’ (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission voted Thursday to add as many as 17 liquor stores in the Portland area, a decision agency director Rob Patridge called “the largest liquor expansion since Prohibition.”
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OREGON NATIONAL GUARD SOLDIERS HELP EFFORTS TO CONTAIN THE CANYON CREEK COMPLEX FIRES (Portland Oregonian)

For the first time in more than a decade, Oregon’s citizen soldiers joined the fire lines.

Six crews of 20 newly minted firefighters on Thursday helped extend containment lines around the Canyon Creek Complex of fires, which have been burning near John Day since Aug. 12.
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TRAVEL OREGON WINS MERCURY AWARD FOR 7 WONDERS OF OREGON AD CAMPAIGN (Portland Oregonian)

The ballots are counted and the results are in The 7 Wonders of Oregon are a big winner.

The 7 Wonders of Oregon campaign was honored as the Best Branding and Integrated Marketing Campaign this week during the U.S. Travel Association’s annual Educational Seminar for Tourism Organizations conference.
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OREGON POT RULES PROVE CHALLENGING, SAYS LIQUOR COMMISSION BOSS – Q&A (Portland Oregonian)

The size of marijuana grow sites, as well as the cost of holding a state-issued license and the terms under which entrepreneurs can deal with out-of-state investors are among the thorniest issues state regulators will grapple with in the coming months.
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‘KICKER’ REFORM: LOVE IT OR HATE IT, YOUR TAX REBATE REMAINS INVINCIBLE (Portland Oregonian)

Love it or hate it. Either way, get used to it.

The 36-year-old “kicker” tax rebate remains politically invincible no matter how loudly critics insist the Oregon-only law leaves the state’s budget more unstable and does little to limit spending.
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GOLF DEVELOPER’S LAWYER DEFENDS WELLS, ROAD-BUILDING AT OREGON STATE PARK (Portland Oregonian)

A lawyer for the golf course developer who plans to buy a piece of an Oregon state park says his client had legal clearance to chop trees, blaze roads and dig test holes on the property without notifying its current owners.
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LABOR UNIONS AND OREGON’S NEW NEW DEAL — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s labor movement engineered a mini-New Deal in Salem this year, with the passage of laws that mandated sick leave benefits and launched a process to establish retirement plans for virtually all workers in the state. Next up, almost certainly, will be an increase in the state’s minimum wage, either through legislation next year or a subsequent ballot measure campaign.
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OREGON REVENUE OFFICIALS PLANNING FOR INFLUX OF CASH WHEN MARIJUANA BUSINESSES PAY SALES TAXES NEXT YEAR (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon officials are trying to figure out how to deal with an influx of sales tax revenue from recreational marijuana sales starting early next year.

Recreational cannabis sales begin Oct. 1, but won’t be subject to state taxes until January 2016, when under the state’s early sales program, a 25 percent sales tax kicks in.
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WHY OREGON LAGS ON PER CAPITA INCOME — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Few economic statistics are discussed as much in Oregon as per capita income. Oregonians don’t have as much money as Washington residents and lag the national average as well. That can make Oregonians feel a little bit inferior, even if people who live here put less emphasis on making money than residents of many states.
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KINDERGARTEN TESTING IS BAD FOR KIDS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In “Kindergarten assessments aren’t something to fear,” The Oregonian/OregonLive editorial board cites Oregon Save Our Schools as issuing “wild warnings” about the Oregon Kindergarten Assessment OKA. The board also argues that the test is necessary and that it helps disadvantaged children the most. None of these claims could be further from the truth.
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‘EXPLOSIVE FIRE GROWTH’ EXPECTED TO DRIVE OUT-OF-CONTROL CANYON CREEK BLAZE (Portland Oregonian)

Firefighters are bracing for “explosive fire growth” Thursday on the Canyon Creek complex east of John Day after the fire grew by more than 11,000 acres the day before.
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CAMPFIRE BAN CONTINUES ANOTHER WEEK IN OREGON’S STATE PARKS; RAIN ON ITS WAY (Portland Oregonian)

With the forecast for a wet weekend in parts of the Pacific Northwest, conditions in Oregon’s recreation areas may get some relief from the summer drought. But until then, the statewide campfire and open flame ban in Oregon state parks remains.
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21 OREGON DISTRICTS, RANGING FROM SMALL TO HUGE, MISS TARGETS FOR SMARTER BALANCED TEST PARTICIPATION (Portland Oregonian)

Twenty-one Oregon districts ranging from small to the state’s largest failed to meet federal testing targets for Smarter Balanced assessments, according to state data.
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OREGON SHOWS BIG TRAVEL, TOURISM GAINS; 2015 ON RECORD PACE (Portland Oregonian)

Big increases in visitors to Oregon coastal state parks and a July with 91 percent lodging occupancy in central Portland make 2015 shape up as a record year for Oregon travel and tourism.
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MISSING PRISON INMATE CAPTURED IN SALEM 2 DAYS AFTER LEAVING WORK CREW (Portland Oregonian)

William Beebe, an Oregon prison inmate who is accused of walking away from a work crew, was arrested Thursday, the Oregon Department of Corrections announced.
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VILSACK UNVEILS $211 MILLION SAGE GROUSE PLAN (Salem Statesman Journal)

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack on Thursday announced a four-year plan to invest about $211 million to conserve habitat for the greater sage grouse.
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OREGON’S DROUGHT EXPANDS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon’s drought has grown dramatically over the past week, according to data released Thursday by the U.S. Drought Monitor.
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OREGON STATE FAIR KICKS OFF 150TH YEAR (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon State Fair kicks off its 150th year today. Here’s an overview of opening day.

Hours: The fair is open 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. today.
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SEIU HOME-CARE WORKERS SIGN ‘HISTORIC’ CONTRACT (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Service Employees Union International Local 503, which represents 24,000 Oregon home-care workers, has signed a contract with the state they’re calling historic. The contract paves the way for a $15 an hour wage for home-care workers by 2017, among other provisions.
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OYSTER GROWERS FRET ABOUT OCEAN ACIDIFICATION, OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY STUDY SHOWS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Just like there are no atheists in fox holes, you’d be hard pressed to find many northwest oyster growers disbelieving in climate change and the related ocean acidification, according to an Oregon State University study.

Three quarters of oyster growers surveyed said they were either extremely or very concerned about ocean acidification, according to the study published this week in Journal of Shellfish Research.
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OREGON CLIMATE SERVICE WORRIES WHEN THE WETTEST FORESTS BURN (Eugene Register-Guard)

When a rain forest is on fire, its obvious something extraordinary is happening.

That’s the spooky start of an article by Kathie Dello in this months Terra, the Oregon State University magazine.

Dello is deputy director of the OSU-based Oregon Climate Service, part of a Legislature-created entity charged with the study of and public education on climate change.

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BROWN’S WORKPLACE AGENDA — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Governor to push for new family leave policy-

More than 40 million American workers get no paid sick leave and often have to work when ill or take unpaid days off, a financial hardship few low-income workers can afford. Yet only one state, Oregon, approved a paid sick leave law this year, an accomplishment that rightly drew the praise of U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez on Wednesday.
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STATE’S BUDGET METER RUNNING ON WILDFIRE COSTS (Portland Tribune)

Oregon has yet to burn through its firefighting budget, despite ongoing catastrophic wildfires around the state.

In what now appears to have been a prudent decision, lawmakers and a committee of forest landowners agreed earlier this year to more than double the amount of money budgeted for the Oregon Department of Forestry to fight fires to a total of $50 million annually.
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STATE AUDIT: LOTTERY DELIS MAY VIOLATE CONSTITUTIONAL BAN ON CASINOS (Portland Tribune)

Many lottery-oriented cafes are violating the Oregon Constitutional ban on nontribal casinos as interpreted by the Oregon State Lottery, according to a new state audit.
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STATE EXTENDS PARKS CAMPFIRE BAN (Portland Tribune)

State parks and recreation officials have extended a statewide campfire and open flame ban for another week.
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WYDEN, U.S. AGRICULTURE SECRETARY TO GET UPDATE ON WESTERN WILDFIRES (Portland Tribune)

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack will get a briefing Friday on the status of wildfires in Oregon and the West.

Wyden, a Democrat from Oregon, also will pitch his bipartisan proposal to draw firefighting costs stemming from the severest wildfires from a federal fund for natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods.
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FOR-PROFIT COLLEGES NEED REGULATING — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

The potential for fraud or deception by for-profit colleges in Oregon might seem to be a case of buyer beware.

And indeed, students ought to do thorough research about these privately operated institutions before they plunk down tens of thousands of dollars for an education that may or may not have value in the marketplace.
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150 YEARS OF THE OREGON STATE FAIR (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Its the first day of the 150th Oregon State Fair. We are live from the fairgrounds, on the Garden stage. We explore the agricultural roots of the fair and how county fairs all over the state feed into this event in Salem.
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OREGON STUDENTS RETURN TO CHANGING TEST ENVIRONMENT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Children in Oregon start going back to school this week. Students at Oregon’s largest district, Portland Public, head back Thursday.
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OREGON CONSIDERS CHANGING WHEN TO ISSUE BEACH ADVISORIES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon will likely see a lot more advisories for beach bacteria in the future, but its not because the state is finding more bacteria. Its actually lowering the bar for issuing an advisory.
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WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH DAM REMOVALS? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

In the past decade, several high-profile dam removals have happened in the Northwest. The Marmot Dam on the Sandy River in Oregon was demolished in 2007. Three dams along the main stem of Oregon’s Rogue River came down between 2008 and 2010.
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BUDGET METER IS RUNNING FOR OREGON WILDFIRE COSTS (Capital Press)

-The state of Oregon has budgeted $50 million annually to pay for fighting wildfires and has insurance to cover expenses above that.-

Oregon has yet to burn through its firefighting budget, despite ongoing catastrophic wildfires around the state.

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WHY INITIATIVES SHOULD REMAIN A POWER TOOL FOR CITIZENS — GUEST OPINION (Capital Press)

-The initiative process in Oregon played a key role in changing the U.S. Constitution.-

The Oregon Secretary of State has refused to certify a proposed initiative that sought to prohibit state pre-emption of local laws.

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INCREMENTAL ATTACKS ON AGRICULTURE CONTINUE — OPINION (Capital Press)

-Incremental demands made of the dairy industry threaten the well-being of farmers across the U.S.-

A look at the predicament faced by some Yakima Valley, Wash., dairies should give pause to dairy operators across the nation.

More importantly, all farmers and ranchers would do well to closely monitor the emerging picture of how environmental special interests use the legal system to attack agriculture.

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VETERANS ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING PLANNED (East Oregonian)

The Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs will host its quarterly meeting from 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Sept. 2 at the Hermiston Conference Center, 415 S. Highway 395.
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EOU WINS GRANT FOR LOW-INCOME STUDENTS (East Oregonian)

Eastern Oregon University will provide more support to low-income and first-generation college students over the next five years thanks to a $1.1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education.
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CANYON CREEK FIRE CONSUMES ANOTHER 11,000 ACRES OVERNIGHT (East Oregonian)

The Canyon Creek Complex fire jumped to 85,960 acres, an increase of 11,311 acres from Wednesday.

The 134-square-mile fire is 44 percent contained.

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STRAWBERRY LAKE, CAMPGROUND WITHIN THREE MILES OF FIRE LINES (East Oregonian)

The Canyon Creek Complex fire is less than three miles from the Strawberry Lake basin, but Oregon National Guard troops are working to keep it away from an iconic piece of Eastern Oregon’s wilderness.
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DAM REMOVAL RAN ROUGHSHOD OVER PROPERTY OWNERS — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Viewing news reports from various local news and TV stations has convinced me that most reporters have been unaware of both sides of the destruction of Fielder Dam.

For several years, Bob Hunter and private environmental groups Geos, Water Watch and River Design have been working feverishly to obtain permits to remove two small dams upstream, then an 11-foot dam at Wimer and finally the 19-foot Fielder Dam as well as Savage Rapids and Gold Ray large dams. It appears that in their eagerness and super confidence in pushing through the permitting process. when it got to the details, state and federal protocols were not followed.
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SOIL PROTECTS ONIONS FROM E. COLI (Argus Observer)

Early research indicates one of the best protections for onions against irrigation water-borne bacteria, such as E. coli, may be the soil itself.

That research is being conducted at the Malheur Experiment Station by Joy Waite-Cusic, assistant professor of Food Safety Systems at Oregon State University.
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FEDS: SODA FIRE AREA CAN BE REHABILITATED (Argus Observer)

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management has the ability to reseed and rehabilitate a giant burned area on the Idaho-Oregon border where a wildfire scorched primary sage grouse habitat and grasslands needed by ranchers, the agency’s director says.
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BUOY 10 CHINOOK FISHERY TO CLOSE FRIDAY (Daily Astorian)

-Following a week of record catch rates and angler turnout, state fishery managers from Washington and Oregon today agreed to close the popular fishery several days earlier than anticipated.-

Anglers fishing in the Buoy 10 area near the mouth of the Columbia River will have to release any Chinook salmon they catch after Friday.

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SEA STARS MAKE COMEBACK AFTER WASTING AWAY (Daily Astorian)

-After a wasting disease devastated the sea star population, researchers in Cannon Beach are seeing positive results for their recovery.-

Sea stars are making a comeback after a mysterious wasting disease killed off more than 90 percent of the population.

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WELL-CONNECTED FIRM GOT TAX CREDIT RULES CHANGED (Daily Astorian)

-Although the Legislature had other intentions, a well-connected consultancy firm was able to get Department of Energy bureaucrats to change the rules governing the sale of tax credits. The change gave their clients a competitive advantage over others trying to sell the credits.-

Its not every business that can convince state government to change regulations on its behalf.

But that is what a small Portland firm called Blue Tree Strategies did earlier this year.

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TURNOVER AT VETERANS CENTER MEANS LESS COUNSELING AVAILABLE (Bend Bulletin)

-VA hopes Bend opening draws talent-

Combat veterans in Central Oregon might face longer waits for individual counseling as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs tries to find mental health professionals to work in Bend.
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DROUGHT LEAVES CROOKED RIVER A TRICKLE (Bend Bulletin)

-River near Post flowing at the same rate as a drinking fountain-

The Crooked River near Post this year is down to a trickle. The sobering sight of the dwindling stream symbolizes the ongoing drought and tough times for irrigators dependent on the river.

The flow is just a fraction of normal, said Jeremy Giffin, Deschutes Basin watermaster. He went to check on the river early this week after a gauge near the tiny Crook County town stopped indicating any flow at all on the river.

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THE KICKER IS GOOD BUT COULD BE BETTER — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s kicker law is going to kick this year for the first time since 2007. The average kicker payout will be $244. The kicker law is one of a kind in the nation. If the state gets more than 2 percent in revenue than it planned in a two-year budget cycle, the surplus heads back to voters.

We like the kicker, but it could use a couple tweaks.
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CROWDFUNDING TOUR TO BEGIN IN BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-Oregon businesses seek investment from Oregon residents-

Since he began selling his specialized wooden baseball bats in 2010, John MacDougall, owner of MacDougall & Sons Bat Co. in Bend, has struggled to raise money through traditional channels.

If youre not an app, an insurance company or a medical device, the regular investment community would not even look at you, MacDougall said.
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MANY OREGON HIGH SCHOOL GRADS ARE NOT READY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon students have shown some modest improvement in college readiness, but theres little reason to celebrate.

The Oregonian reported the ACT test results show 31 percent of Oregon test takers demonstrated they were ready for college in multiple subjects.
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ODFW TO HOLD ELK-MANAGEMENT MEETING (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is inviting landowners in the area of the William Finley Wildlife Refuge to a meeting to discuss elk movements and management on Tuesday, Sept. 1, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Monroe High School Cafeteria.

The department seeks input from area landowners and also wants to get their observations on elk movement patterns during the hunts. The department also will continue to encourage landowners to harvest cows or allow hunter access to hunt cows on their property.
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WILDFIRES MAY LIMIT ARCHERY OPPORTUNITIES (Wallowa.com)

-Archers warned to beware of fire no matter where they hunt-

Juanita Jacobson of Lostine has an elk tag for archery season tha’s good for Sled Springs.

Well, that’s a gimme, isn’t it?

But Jaunita isn’t going to try to fill it.
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FIREFIGHTERS MAKE PROGRESS ON FALLS CREEK BLAZE (Wallowa.com)

-Fire grows to nearly 400 acres.-

Firefighters are gaining ground on the Falls Creek Fire, which is burning about four miles southwest of Joseph. Fire weather forecasters predict slightly higher wind conditions this afternoon, notes a Thursday morning update on the fire from incident managers.
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VIEWING THE ‘KICKER’ FOR EXACTLY WHAT IT IS — OPINION (The World)

The news out of Salem this week is that Oregon taxpayers will get $402 million in kicker rebates when they file their state income taxes next year.

State economists were predicting that rebates would be issued this year; it’s further evidence that Oregon has begun to emerge from the recent recession. And, of course, we all know that some parts of the state the metropolitan areas are recovering at a more rapid rate than others our humble rural regions.
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CHILD CARE CHALLENGE (Oregon Business)

-The high cost of child care-

Oregon is one of the least affordable states for infant and pre-school day care. It ties in second place with Colorado as the most costly state in the nation relative to median income for infant care, and the third mostly costly state for center-based care for a four-year old, according to ChildCare Aware of America, an advocacy group.
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WILDFIRE SEASON NOT OVER, BURN BANS STILL IN PLACE (KEZI)

The Oregon Department of Forestry says we’re not done with wildfire season.

That means you want to make sure you’re following the burn bans — right now there’s no backyard burning.

It runs through October 15th.
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OREGON BREAST CANCER NOS. ALARMING – VIDEO (KTVZ Bend)

Each week in Oregon, about 70 women and men are diagnosed with breast cancer – and 10 will die. Early detection and increased awareness can make a positive change.
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ODOT BEEFS UP RAIL INCIDENT PREVENTION, RESPONSE (KTVZ Bend)

-Agency also adding four rail inspectors-

The Oregon Transportation Commission has approved a proposed updated set of rules for transporting hazardous materials by rail.

Combined with ODOTs addition of four rail inspectors, the rules aim to improve the states ability to both prevent incidents in the first place and respond to them if they do occur.
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BEND FORUM MONDAY ON CHANGES TO STATE IN-HOME SERVICES (KTVZ Bend)

Beginning Monday in Bend and ending October 1, the Department of Human Services DHS and the Oregon Health Authority OHA are hosting educational forums throughout the state.

Next week, forums will take place in Bend, Keizer and Hillsboro.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 28, 2015 eClips

August 27, 2015 eClips Supplemental Edition

Portland Oregonian
*Cleanup group returns with details, mapping of massive Pacific Ocean trash field
*TriMet must expand along with the Portland region — Opinion
*Baby boomers have left millennials the bill for a bloated public sector — Guest Opinion
*Washington wildfires called state’s biggest ever; overseas help arrives
*California water districts sue U.S. over releases to help Klamath River salmon
*How a doughnut maker, pasta machine and science could save the sagebrush steppe
*U.S. travel industry booming; major growth forecast in international market
*Driverless crash trucks may soon protect road workers
*Good economy, bad traffic: Congestion at all-time high thanks to recession’s end
*Portland unemployment rises in July even with 8,600 new jobs
*Portland-area home prices climb 7.8% year-over-year

Salem Statesman Journal
*Fund for parks, forests, and trails set to expire

Eugene Register-Guard
*Boomers, improved economy drive RV sales
*AP survey: Outlook dims as economists see slower growth and tepid pay gains for next 2 years
*US home prices rise steadily in June, another sign of improvement in housing market

Oregon Public Broadcasting
*A Lot Of Heat Is Wasted, So Why Not Convert It Into Power?
*Rosa Parks Elementary Enters Year 2 Of Year-Round Pilot Program
*How Close Are We Really To A Robot-Run Society?
*What Happens When Wildfires Return?
*How Oregon Rivers Carried Millions Of Trees
*Wildfire Smoke: The Health Threat That Won’t Go Away
*Tracking Wildfires
*As Firefighters Leave, Oregon Town Sifts Through Rubble
*Stock Market Shakeup Highlights Oregon’s Ties To China

Capital Press
*Animal activists: Don’t link cougar hunts to wolf recovery
*Washington’s drought continues to deepen
*WDFW draws a line against Huckleberry wolf pack
*Nursery grows its own natural, edible plants
*Idaho partnership helps refugees learn how to farm
*Commission sticks with linking cougar hunts to wolf recovery
*In Washington, West Nile virus makes a comeback
*PNW gets new refrigerated rail service

East Oregonian
*Pendleton’s industrial evolution
*Less smoke could mean more fire in Washington state

Medford Mail Tribune
*No plans underway to expand Wild and Scenic designation on Rogue River

Albany Democrat Herald
*Bottle redemption center opens in Albany

Daily Astorian
*Humpback mingles with Buoy 10 fishing boats inside Columbia
*Western tribes strive to keep the light alive — Guest Opinion
*Apply lessons from all over to make towns to grow old in — Opinion

Bend Bulletin
*Court upholds home care rule
*Making affordable housing profitable for developers
*Ban on plastic bags is no sure bet for environment — Guest Opinion
*Fact or fiction: polygraphs just an “investigative tool”
*Taxpayers have a right to ‘snoop’ on scientists — Guest Opinion
*What’s the right police body camera policy? – Guest Opinion

Blue Mountain Eagle
*Tiny town holds its breath as fire rumbles in the distance

The Dalles Chronicle
*Public input sought on pot

Medford Mail Tribune
*New program helps out-of-work Ashlanders find jobs

Corvallis Gazette Times
*Ground broken on SHS campus for new LBCC health occupations building

Coos Bay World
*Southwestern Oregon Veterans Outreach gets more welcome assistance

New York Times
*From the Bench, a New Look at Punishment
*For Athletes, the Risk of Too Much Water — Blog
*Signs, Long Unheeded, Now Point to Risks in U.S. Economy
*Too Many Law Students, Too Few Legal Jobs — Opinion
*How High Schoolers Spent Their Summer: Online, Taking More Courses
*Square Root of Kids’ Math Anxiety: Their Parents’ Help — Blog
*As Workers Delay Retirement, Some Bosses Become More Flexible
*The Trucks Are Killing Us — Guest Opinion

Washington Post
*Why the healthy school lunch program is in trouble. Before/after photos of what students ate.
*The real reasons behind the U.S. teacher shortage – Blog
*The big fish story everyone is missing in the Western drought
*Universal flu vaccine is no longer science fiction. Scientists report major step in development.
*The FDA is making a big change to nutrition labels. And it’s probably a big mistake. – Blog
*Testers find twice as many ‘superbugs’ in conventional hamburger as organic ones
*The heroin epidemic’s toll: One county, 70 minutes, eight overdoses

Seattle Times
*Why we have such large wildfires this summer
*‘Transition fires’ — a firefighter’s worst nightmare
*Proliferation of ‘grassoline’ fueling Washington wildfires
*2 arrested in plot to fly contraband into prison with drone
*Pre-birth blues: Depression has no due date for some women

Los Angeles Times
*LAPD’s long-awaited body cameras will hit the streets on Monday
*When your TV can spy on you
*75% of Obamacare plans in California use narrow networks, study shows
*13,000 fall into homelessness every month in L.A. County, report says
*Why the U.S. is No. 1 — in mass shootings
*Here’s what happens when you ask parents multiple-choice questions
*Why so many teachers quit, and how to fix that — Opinion
*It’s true: Kindergarten is optional in California

Denver Post
*Colorado leaders to review TABOR, key political issues

Stateline: Pew Charitable Trusts
*As Legal Marijuana Expands, States Struggle With Drugged Driving
*Victims’ Voices for Reform – Q&A
*After Ferguson, States Struggle To Crack Down On Court Debt
*Many State Financial Agencies Struggle to Go Digital
*States Try to Counter Rural Flight
*To Survive, Rural Hospitals Join Forces
*Hispanic Poverty in Rural Areas Challenges States

Forbes
*Can We Stop A Traumatized Child From Becoming A Traumatized Adult?


Cleanup group returns with details, mapping of massive Pacific Ocean trash field (Portland Oregonian)

Far away from California’s coast, where the Pacific Ocean currents swirl, the blue of the sea was replaced by fishing nets, buckets, buoys, laundry baskets and unidentifiable pieces of plastic that floated past the Ocean Star, a ship carrying a team of scientists and volunteers gathering data on plastic garbage.


TriMet must expand along with the Portland region — Opinion (Portland Oregonian)

Portland once expanded outward, gobbling up stumpy land turned to farms. Then it filled in side to side, growing sleepy outposts into industrial and technology-making hubs ringed by suburban housing developments. In recent years, many of its new commercial structures have aimed skyward.


Baby boomers have left millennials the bill for a bloated public sector — Guest Opinion (Portland Oregonian)

If it feels like our politics is stuck, it is especially in Oregon. The baby boomers have kept it that way. We’ve been in charge since November of 1992 when Bill Clinton defeated George H.W. Bush, ending a string of 10 consecutive World War II-generation presidents.


Washington wildfires called state’s biggest ever; overseas help arrives (Portland Oregonian)

Firefighters from as far as Australia and New Zealand have arrived in the West as massive wildfires raging in Washington state and elsewhere in the region taxed resources and led officials to put out a wide call for help.

In Washington, a series of fires raging in the north-central part of the state that earlier killed three firefighters has now grown to become the largest in state history, fire spokesman Rick Isaacson said Monday.


California water districts sue U.S. over releases to help Klamath River salmon (Portland Oregonian)

Agricultural water providers in the Central Valley of California are asking a federal judge to stop releases of extra water intended to help salmon in the Klamath Basin survive the drought.


How a doughnut maker, pasta machine and science could save the sagebrush steppe (Portland Oregonian)

Some of the West’s most promising rangeland research is taking place in an industrial kitchen where scientists might be mistaken for pastry chefs.

They spend their winters tweaking ingredients, running dough through a pasta machine and doughnut maker, and whirling batter in a massive stand mixer.


U.S. travel industry booming; major growth forecast in international market (Portland Oregonian)

The travel business is booming, especially in the travel business.

Portland was host early this week to the annual Education Seminar for Tourism Organizations, a gathering of travel professionals at the Oregon Convention Center.


Driverless crash trucks may soon protect road workers (Portland Oregonian)

Roving construction crews — the kind you see blacktopping a road, painting lines, inspecting a bridge or installing a traffic signal — are often protected from oncoming traffic by a specialized truck outfitted with a crash barrier.


Good economy, bad traffic: Congestion at all-time high thanks to recession’s end (Portland Oregonian)

More jobs and cheaper gasoline come with a big, honking downside: U.S. roads are more clogged than ever now that the recession is in the rearview mirror.


Portland unemployment rises in July even with 8,600 new jobs (Portland Oregonian)

Portland-area employers created thousands of jobs in July.

Yet despite the hiring spree, the metro unemployment rate still rose, from 5.4 percent in June to 5.7 percent in July.


Portland-area home prices climb 7.8% year-over-year (Portland Oregonian)

Portland-area home prices grew faster in June than they did nationwide, according to the Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller home price index released Tuesday.

From May to June, housing prices swelled by 1 percent nationally and 1.5 percent in the Portland area. The year-over-year increase was 4.5 percent nationally and 7.8 percent in Portland.


Fund for parks, forests, and trails set to expire (Salem Statesman Journal)

Conservation advocates are worried the looming expiration of a fund for buying park and forest land and funding recreation projects may get lost in the shuffle when Congress returns after Labor Day with a full agenda.


Boomers, improved economy drive RV sales (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Manufacturers are expecting to come close to pre-recession production records this year-

If you’re seeing a lot of travel trailers and motor homes on the highway these days, its more than a sign of summer. For the first time in a decade, the recreational-vehicle industry is poised to break production records. RV manufacturers are expected to ship 380,000 units this year, up 6.5 percent from 2014 and nearing the previous peak, set in 2006 before the recession.


AP survey: Outlook dims as economists see slower growth and tepid pay gains for next 2 years (Eugene Register-Guard)

For much of the economy’s fitful and sluggish six-year recovery from the Great Recession, analysts have foreseen a sunnier future: Growth would pick up in six months, or in a year.

That was then.

The latest Associated Press survey of leading economists shows that most now foresee a weaker expansion than they had earlier.


US home prices rise steadily in June, another sign of improvement in housing market (Eugene Register-Guard)

U.S. home prices rose solidly in June, another sign of health in the housing market.

The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 5 percent from a year earlier, a slight improvement on May’s 4.9 percent increase, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices.


A Lot Of Heat Is Wasted, So Why Not Convert It Into Power? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

What if there were a way to take the waste heat that spews from car tailpipes or power plant chimneys and turn it into electricity? Matt Scullin thinks there is, and hes formed a company to turn that idea into a reality. The key to Scullins plans is something called thermoelectrics. A thermoelectric is a material that turns heat into electricity, he says.


Rosa Parks Elementary Enters Year 2 Of Year-Round Pilot Program(Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Its nearly September, and most kids are sharpening their pencils and dusting off their bookbags as they prepare to head back to school. But thats not the case for all students in the state of Oregon. At Rosa Parks Elementary, a school in North Portlands New Columbia neighborhood, kids are already wrapping up their first parent-teacher conferences. They started classes more than five weeks ago.


How Close Are We Really To A Robot-Run Society? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

From Rosie, the Jetsons robot maid, to Arnold Schwarzeneggers cyborg in The Terminator, popular culture has frequently conceived of robots as having a human-like form, complete with eyes and mechanical limbs. But tech reporter John Markoff says that robots don’t always have a physical presence.


What Happens When Wildfires Return? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Carlton Complex fire ripped through Okanogan County last year. The same area is currently battling fires again. Reporter Michelle Nijhuis covered the burn last year and discusses how the community responded and recovered.


How Oregon Rivers Carried Millions Of Trees? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Around the same time famed photographer Carelton Watkins first captured the Columbia River Gorge with his traveling darkroom, on the south fork of the Coos River in southwest Oregon a large dam helped fuel Oregon’s burgeoning timber industry.


Wildfire Smoke: The Health Threat That Won’t Go Away (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

I stepped out my parents’ front door last Thursday, expecting a typically glorious summer day in southern Oregon. Instead I was hit with acrid wood smoke that stung my eyes and throat. The air was thick with haze that obscured the mountains. I quickly retreated inside.


Tracking Wildfires (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Current wildfires burning across the United States. Click a wildfire for more info.


As Firefighters Leave, Oregon Town Sifts Through Rubble (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Firefighters are gaining the upper-hand in containing the Canyon Creek Complex fires. But that’s not much relief to the wildfire’s worst-hit community. So far, 39 homes near John Day, Oregon, have been destroyed, along with around 50 barns, stores and other structures.


Stock Market Shakeup Highlights Oregon’s Ties To China (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The U.S. stock market showed signs of a rebound Tuesday. But reporter Matthew Kish with Portland Business Journal said 18 of Oregon’s 20 largest companies saw their shares lose value during the big crash on Monday.


Animal activists: Don’t link cougar hunts to wolf recovery (Capital Press)

Animal-rights and conservation groups are petitioning Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission to ditch a plan to hunt allow more cougar hunting to relieve tensions over wolves.


Washington’s drought continues to deepen (Capital Press)

-The U.S. Drought Monitor has classified a majority of Washington as being in “extreme drought.”-

Washington has joined California as the only places in the West where extreme drought or worse grips most of the state.


WDFW draws a line against Huckleberry wolf pack (Capital Press)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife says the Huckleberry wolfpack will be thinned if there’s one more depredation.


Nursery grows its own natural, edible plants (Capital Press)

-Owners of Rock Bottom Ranch Koi & Nursery in Bonanza, Ore., focus on hardy native plants for rugged Great Basin, high-desert conditions.-

Edible native plants can be an attractive option for residential landscaping, according to Southern Oregon growers.


Idaho partnership helps refugees learn how to farm (Capital Press)

A partnership between Idaho’s largest farmers’ market and an agricultural training program is teaching refugees the skills they need to become farmers.

Global Gardens, an Idaho Office for Refugees agricultural training program, provides small plots of farmland for refugees.


Commission sticks with linking cougar hunts to wolf recovery (Capital Press)

-Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission reaffirms decision to increase hunting of cougars in areas occupied by wolves.-

Washington will increase cougar hunting in wolf territory as a sympathetic gesture to communities concerned about the increasing presence of predators, the Fish and Wildlife Commission confirmed Friday.


In Washington, West Nile virus makes a comeback (Capital Press)

Washington state is seeing its worst summer for West Nile virus since 2009. The state veterinarian urges horse owners to vaccinate their animals.


PNW gets new refrigerated rail service (Capital Press)

-A new refrigerated rail service connecting the Pacific Northwest, the Midwest and East Coast has been announced by an Atlanta, Ga., company.-

Infinity Transportation Logistics, a subsidiary of Infinity Management Partners, Atlanta, announced Aug. 24 that it will provide door-to-door temperature-controlled intermodal service from Washington and Oregon to the greater Chicago area and farther east


Pendleton’s industrial evolution (East Oregonian)

Sausage, mustard, flour and wool are helping expand Pendleton’s industrial productivity. While only Hill Meat Co. is adding jobs at this point, Newly Weds Foods and Barhyte Specialty Foods are adding additional manufacturing space while Pendleton Woolen Mills has added a new loom that should increase the factory’s productivity by 10 percent.


Less smoke could mean more fire in Washington state (East Oregonian)

-Smoke expected to lift Sunday over Washington fires, possibly attracting explosive fire growth-

The massive cloud of smoke is expected to lift over Washington wildfires on Sunday. But as air quality improves, the fire’s behavior could become more erratic and intense, fire officials said.


No plans underway to expand Wild and Scenic designation on Rogue River (Medford Mail Tribune)

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management has identified portions of the middle and upper Rogue River as being suitable for designation under the federal Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, but BLM officials say that, contrary to some reports, there is no active push to seek the designation.


Bottle redemption center opens in Albany (Albany Democrat Herald)

Mid-valley residents are slowly discovering what Cherilyn Bertges says is a clean and convenient way to recycle their cans and bottles. Last week, the BottleDrop, an Oregon beverage container redemption center, opened next door to Los Dos Amigos on Santiam Highway in Albany. It’s the first such BottleDrop location in the mid-valley; the closest location previously was in Eugene.


Humpback mingles with Buoy 10 fishing boats inside Columbia (Daily Astorian)

-A large whale appears to making itself at home miles inside the Columbia River during the year’s busiest boating season. Observers are able to spot the whale from shore.-

Salmon fishermen in the Columbia Rivers Buoy 10 fishery this week encountered large and unexpected guests: Humpback whales have been sighted several times well within the Columbia River in recent days.


Western tribes strive to keep the light alive — Guest Opinion (Daily Astorian)

Growing up is hard enough without having to worry about your civilization going extinct.


Apply lessons from all over to make towns to grow old in (Daily Astorian)

-Walkability and community engagement are key-

An Aug. 15 story in the Vancouver (Canada) Sun asks the question, “What makes a city a good place to grow old?” For a start, the answer it provides is walkable neighborhoods and feeling part of the community.


Court upholds home care rule (Bend Bulletin)

-Bend company says costs of care would go up if it has to pay OT-

Hiring a home caregiver to look after an elderly or disabled loved one might get a lot more expensive. Or, it might not. Reversing an earlier courts decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled Friday the U.S. Department of Labor has the authority to make private home care providers and state agencies pay their employees minimum wage and overtime benefits.


Making affordable housing profitable for developers (Bend Bulletin)

-Private development uses new Bend density bonus rule-

A private developer says a new city of Bend rule will allow him to profitably build affordable housing. The city hopes other private builders will follow suit. The proposal set forth by Steven Rzonca, president of Eagle Mountain Construction, relies on something called the density bonus. The rule, which was approved this year, allows builders to fit more onto a lot than would otherwise be allowed, as long as a portion of the project is set aside as affordable housing.


Ban on plastic bags is no sure bet for environment — Guest Opinion (Bend Bulletin)

When the city council in Austin, Texas, passed a single-use plastic shopping bag ban in 2013, it assumed environmental benefits would follow. The calculation was reasonable enough: Fewer single-use bags in circulation would mean less waste at city landfills.


Fact or fiction: polygraphs just an “investigative tool” (Bend Bulletin)

-Exam was used in investigation of recent Bend shooting death-

With all of the snappy glamour of a noir film, polygraphs pose an attractive solution in the public eye: Just hook somebody up to a machine to figure out whether he or she is telling the truth.

The exams, which experts say aren’t well-understood, have been subject to controversy over the past decade. Their scientific validity has been called into question, and many states still don’t allow polygraph exam results into the courtroom.


Taxpayers have a right to ‘snoop’ on scientists – Guest Opinion (Bend Bulletin)

If the public pays your salary, citizens have the right — within limits — to see what you’re doing. That’s the principle at the core of the federal Freedom of Information Act and of the many similar state freedom of information laws.


What’s the right police body camera policy? – Guest Opinion (Bend Bulletin)

Body cameras are on the verge of changing policing as we know it. But along with the promise of more transparency and accountability come tough policy choices. A particularly thorny question is whether officers who use force against individuals should be permitted to view the video footage of their encounters before writing their incident reports.


Tiny town holds its breath as fire rumbles in the distance (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The town of Seneca is coping under the shadow of the nearby Canyon Creek Complex fire. The Bear Valley Roadhouse is mostly empty on a quiet Thursday afternoon in Seneca.


Public input sought on pot (The Dalles Chronicle)

Before the Wasco County Board of Commissioners make any decision on marijuana, they want to hear from the public first. Planning director Angie Brewer, who presented a marijuana legislation and local regulations overview to the board of commissioners at Wednesdays county meeting, said the planning department has received about a dozen inquiries from landowners interested in the commercial growing of recreational marijuana.


New program helps out-of-work Ashlanders find jobs (Medford Mail Tribune)

A newly launched Ashland Jobs Match program, funded with $15,000 from the city of Ashland and run by Ashland Community Resource Center, has already landed jobs for five people who are in marginal working or living situations.


Ground broken on SHS campus for new LBCC health occupations building (Corvallis Gazette Times)

“Welcome to a great neighborhood,” COMP-Northwest dean Dr. Paula Crone told Linn-Benton Community College President Greg Hamann Tuesday morning during a groundbreaking ceremony for the college’s new $16 million health occupations center.

The 40,000-square-foot, two-story facility will be constructed west of the medical college on the Samaritan Health Sciences campus.


Southwestern Oregon Veterans Outreach gets more welcome assistance (Coos Bay World)

-Coquille Tribal Community Fund grant will go toward emergency assistance-

It’s been a good summer for Southwestern Oregon Veterans Outreach. Not only did the group receive some needed financial help, but it also welcomed some vital new volunteers.

The latest grant that SOVO received was for $7,500, from the Coquille Tribal Community Fund.


From the Bench, a New Look at Punishment (New York Times)

Jessica Otero’s request to the judge, made in neat handwriting, was simple: She wanted a second chance. Ten years after being convicted of driving an illegal immigrant across the border, her felony record meant she could not get work in the medical field. “I have learned from my past mistakes and am headed down a positive path,” Ms. Otero wrote.


For Athletes, the Risk of Too Much Water – Blog (New York Times)

Are we, with the best of intentions, putting young athletes at risk when we urge them to drink lots of fluids during steamy sports practices and games?

A new report about overhydration in sports suggests that under certain circumstances the answer is yes, and that the consequences for young athletes can be — and in several tragic cases already have been — severe and even fatal.


Signs, Long Unheeded, Now Point to Risks in U.S. Economy (New York Times)

As investors scramble to make sense of the wild market swings in recent days, a number of financial experts argue that, for more than a year now, signs pointing to an equity crisis were there for all to see.


Too Many Law Students, Too Few Legal Jobs – Opinion (New York Times)

Ten months after graduation, only 60 percent of the law school class of 2014 had found full-time long-term jobs that required them to pass the bar exam.

Even that improvement over the class of 2013 (a 57 percent employment rate) came with three asterisks:


How High Schoolers Spent Their Summer: Online, Taking More Courses (New York Times)

As summer began, Dan Akim, a junior at Manhattan’s ultracompetitive Stuyvesant High School, planned to attend debate camp, to study for the PSATs and to go on some family vacations.

Yet he felt that he could pack more into these months, so he also signed up for three online courses, in precalculus, computer science and public health.


Square Root of Kids’ Math Anxiety: Their Parents’ Help – Blog (New York Times)

A common impairment with lifelong consequences turns out to be highly contagious between parent and child, a new study shows.

The impairment? Math anxiety.

Means of transmission? Homework help.


As Workers Delay Retirement, Some Bosses Become More Flexible (New York Times)

Corliss Fanjoy is turning 65 this year, but she is not ready for retirement. And at a small handbag maker in Maine, where Mrs. Fanjoy spends her working hours cutting intricate patterns in leather, she is not alone.

Most of her co-workers are over 55.


The Trucks Are Killing Us – Guest Opinion (New York Times)

Accidents like the one that critically injured the comedian Tracy Morgan, killed his friend and fellow comedian James McNair, known as Jimmy Mack, and hurt eight others on the New Jersey Turnpike last year are going to continue to happen unless Congress stops coddling the trucking industry.


Why the healthy school lunch program is in trouble. Before/after photos of what students ate. (Washington Post)

In the war to get America’s children to eat healthier, things are not going well.

Student E114 is a case in point. E114 — the identification code she was assigned by researchers studying eating habits at her public elementary school somewhere in the Northeast — left the lunch line one day carrying a tray full of what looked like a balanced meal: chicken nuggets, some sort of mushy starch, green beans and milk.


The real reasons behind the U.S. teacher shortage – Blog (Washington Post)

There’s a teacher shortage across the United States — but that’s not exactly news. The U.S. Department of Education maintains an annual list — state by state — showing the subject areas in which there are too few teachers going back to the 1990-91 school year. What’s new is the size of the shortage and the reasons for it.


The big fish story everyone is missing in the Western drought (Washington Post)

Here’s a news flash: fish need water to survive.

In California, they’re not getting much. If the state’s severe drought continues the way it has for another two years, its salmon, steelhead and smelt are in danger of going away forever.


Universal flu vaccine is no longer science fiction. Scientists report major step in development. (Washington Post)

Whenever Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, speaks about pressing medical needs he often brings up the universal flu vaccine. One of the costliest public health scourges, flu kills an estimated 23,000 to 36,000 people a year in the United States and causes tens of billions in lost productivity, hospitalizations and other burdens to the economy.


The FDA is making a big change to nutrition labels. And it’s probably a big mistake.- Blog (Washington Post)

-What sounds good in theory doesn’t always pan out in practice.-

The good news is that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is poised to make the Nutrition Facts label (pdf) on many packaged foods significantly more honest. The bad news is that this well-intentioned fix could seriously backfire.


Testers find twice as many ‘superbugs’ in conventional hamburger as organic ones (Washington Post)

Most people know that you can get sick from eating tainted ground beef.

Now a new report has a lot more detail about the safety of ground beef tested across the United States. Some of it has bacteria that produces a toxin that can’t be destroyed, even with proper cooking.


The heroin epidemic’s toll: One county, 70 minutes, eight overdoses (Washington Post)

The first call came at 7:33 p.m. last Sunday: Two people had overdosed on heroin in a home just a few hundred yards from the station where firefighters were awaiting their nightly round of drug emergencies.

Six minutes later, there was another. A 50-year-old man had been found in his bedroom, blue from lack of oxygen, empty bags of heroin by his body.


Why we have such large wildfires this summer (Seattle Times)

-With “unhealthy” forests choked by drought, conditions were ripe for wildfire. In the future, climate change won’t help.-

More than 900,000 acres have already burned this year in Washington wildfires, more than doubling last year’s total, and the Okanogan complex fire is the largest in state history.


Why we have such large wildfires this summer (Seattle Times)

-With “unhealthy” forests choked by drought, conditions were ripe for wildfire. In the future, climate change won’t help.-

More than 900,000 acres have already burned this year in Washington wildfires, more than doubling last year’s total, and the Okanogan complex fire is the largest in state history.


‘Transition fires’ — a firefighter’s worst nightmare (Seattle Times)

-The erratic weather conditions and fuel load have turned Northeastern Washington into an inferno this summer. Wildfire experts say the most dangerous and unpredictable situations that wildland firefighters can face are small fires about to turn very big.-

Wildland firefighter Zack Felice had a close call this month while he and his strike team were battling the Chelan complex fire. Their firetruck was on a hillside, in high winds, when they were told their escape route might be cut off by the fire.


2 arrested in plot to fly contraband into prison with drone (Seattle Times)

Police arrested two men with a drone near a Maryland state prison as the men prepared to fly drugs, tobacco and pornography into the maximum-security institution, state police and prison officials said Monday.

The arrests on Saturday near Cumberland highlight a growing problem for prison operators nationwide as they struggle to get ahead of the mini-helicopter technology.


Pre-birth blues: Depression has no due date for some women (Seattle Times)

-Pregnancy and depression go together more commonly than you might think, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and others.-

Kate Moser waited until the night before her due date to set up the nursery.

Dark emotions had persisted throughout her pregnancy, despite the 32-year-old’s efforts to be positive. Thus, the eve of her 2014 due date found Moser and her husband piecing together the crib.


LAPD’s long-awaited body cameras will hit the streets on Monday (Los Angeles Times)

Starting Monday, many Los Angeles police officers will hit the streets with new equipment: body cameras.

After nearly two years of fundraising, testing and negotiating policy, Monday’s rollout marks a significant moment for the police department’s long-awaited body camera program. The city plans to purchase and deploy more than 7,000 devices in the coming months, making it the largest in the country to use the cameras on a wide scale.


When your TV can spy on you (Los Angeles Times)

We’ve heard a lot of gee-whiz talk in recent months about “smart homes” and “smart appliances” — promises from the tech industry that Internet-connected devices will make our lives infinitely better and more convenient..

The flip side of all that connectivity, however, is that your wired dwelling will be watching you 24 hours a day, and there’s no telling where this river of data about your private life could end up.

As a result, California is now considering the nation’s first legislation to limit how much one of the most popular smart devices — your TV — can spy on you without your knowing.


75% of Obamacare plans in California use narrow networks, study shows (Los Angeles Times)

A new study finds that 75% of California’s Obamacare health plans have narrow physician networks — more limited choices than all but three other states..

The latest report examines health plans sold to consumers last year under the Affordable Care Act and shows wide variation in the prevalence of narrow networks across the country.

Only Georgia, Florida and Oklahoma had a higher percentage of small provider networks than California did in the insurance company directories analyzed by University of Pennsylvania researchers.


13,000 fall into homelessness every month in L.A. County, report says (Los Angeles Times)

About 13,000 people on public assistance tumble into homelessness every month in Los Angeles County, according to a new study that experts say provides the clearest picture yet of extreme poverty in the region.


Why the U.S. is No. 1 — in mass shootings (Los Angeles Times)

The United States is, by a long shot, the global leader in mass shootings, claiming just 5% of the global population but an outsized share — 31% — of the world’s mass shooters since 1966, a new study finds.


Here’s what happens when you ask parents multiple-choice questions (Los Angeles Times)

More white Americans dislike standardized testing than blacks and Latinos, according to a new poll.

Disdain for standardized testing is nothing new. But the poll released Sunday by Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup complicates this perception with its racial breakdown.


Why so many teachers quit, and how to fix that – Opinion (Los Angeles Times)

Every year, thousands of young and enthusiastic teachers all over the country start their first day of work. Within the following five years, at least 17% of them will leave the profession. Teacher attrition is especially high in poor, urban schools, where on average about a fifth of the entire faculty leaves annually — that’s roughly 50% higher than the rate in more affluent schools.


It’s true: Kindergarten is optional in California (Los Angeles Times)

Some kids who skip kindergarten have to play catch-up when they enter first grade: to learn how to hold a pencil, count to 100 and begin tackling spelling..

Educators and state lawmakers who want to close this achievement gap say it’s time to do away with optional kindergarten for California children. They are backing legislation to make it mandatory.

“Kindergarten is what first grade used to be,” said Telma Bayona, administrator for child development and preschool at Compton Unified School District.


Colorado leaders to review TABOR, key political issues (Denver Post)

-“Building a Better Colorado” may offer ballot measures in 2016-

A new organization led by prominent civic and business leaders is preparing to launch a campaign to tackle Colorado’s thorniest political problems as part of a project that may give rise to ballot measures in 2016.

Dubbed “Building a Better Colorado,” the bipartisan push will debut in September and feature a 40-stop statewide tour this fall to discuss topics ranging from term limits for lawmakers and the election system to the constitutional amendment process and the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights.


As Legal Marijuana Expands, States Struggle With Drugged Driving (Stateline)

Washington State Patrol Sgt. Mark Crandall half-jokingly says he can tell a driver is under the influence of marijuana during a traffic stop when the motorist becomes overly familiar and is calling him “dude.”

The truth in the joke, Crandall says, is that attitude and speech patterns can be effective markers for drugged driving.


Victims’ Voices for Reform (Stateline)

-Oregon profiled in piece-

In a growing number of states, crime victims and survivors are actively participating in the development of sentencing and corrections policies and funding decisions to help prevent others from being victimized. The reforms, many of which are part of the Justice Reinvestment Initiative (JRI), use data-driven strategies to hold offenders accountable, control costs, and protect public safety. In several states, these changes also have helped improve victim services, including notification systems that provide timely updates about offenders’ status within the criminal justice system.


After Ferguson, States Struggle To Crack Down On Court Debt (Stateline)

Say you’re caught driving 10 miles an hour over the posted speed limit in California. The state’s base fine for that offense is $35. But then the state adds an additional $40. The county adds $28. There’s an $8 fee to fund emergency medical services, a $20 fee to fund DNA testing, a $40 court operations fee and more.

In total, that relatively minor moving violation just cost you $238.00.


Many State Financial Agencies Struggle to Go Digital (Stateline)

Many state financial agencies say they are having a tough time transitioning to the digital revolution, citing a culture that often impedes innovation and collaboration and purchasing rules that make it tough to adapt to technological changes.


States Try to Counter Rural Flight (Stateline)

Bill Longnecker grew up in rural Nebraska and, after trying life in Kansas City, Missouri, and other urban areas, returned to his home state to start a jewelry store in Red Willow County, population 10,867.

He loves it there.

“All we need is more people,” he said.


To Survive, Rural Hospitals Join Forces (Stateline)

Ask Sam Lindsey about the importance of Northern Cochise Community Hospital and he’ll give you a wry grin. You might as well be asking the 77-year-old city councilman to choose between playing pickup basketball—as he still does most Fridays—and being planted six feet under the Arizona dust.


Hispanic Poverty in Rural Areas Challenges States (Stateline)

Today, one in four babies born in the U.S. is Hispanic. Increasingly they are being born into immigrant families who’ve bypassed the cities—the traditional pathway for immigrants—for rural America.

Hispanic babies born in rural enclaves are more likely to be impoverished than those in the city. And it’s harder for them to receive help from federal and state programs, such as the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).


Can We Stop A Traumatized Child From Becoming A Traumatized Adult? (Forbes)

Every day a child somewhere will suffer from abuse and neglect, the result of growing up in a home with domestic violence, mental illness or addiction, or from the loss of a parent due to separation or imprisonment. Such trauma can inflict psychological and physical damage that appears when that child grows into an adult and lasts the rest of his life.


Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 27, 2015 eClips Supplemental Edition

August 27, 2015 eClips

State Library eClips

* Energy Department’s plan to rewrite tax credit rules faces blowback from lawmakers
* Facebook wins Prineville data center tax deal worth millions
* Tax ‘kicker’ comes with warning signs as Oregon’s economy cools
* Tantrum, defamatory email, harassment alleged in feud between judges
* Stable weather helps firefighters build on progress in Oregon, Washington
* 21 Oregon districts, ranging from small to huge, miss targets for Smarter Balanced test participation
* The ‘kicker’: Almost everyone wins but some more than others
* Naturopathic clinic designated as top tier primary care facility
* Forecast: $402 million in ‘kicker’ rebates
* Oregon Guard begin to arrive to fight Canyon Creek Complex near John Day
* New evacuations ordered near the Canyon Creek Complex fire
* Labor Secretary Thomas Perez touts Oregon’s leadership on paid leave policies
* Two-thirds of Oregon counties now in drought emergency
* Wine grape harvest starts with bar set high
* Oregon recruiting 11 recreational marijuana inspectors
* Oregon CAFO farmers want pollution permits kept private
* Court overturns mans conviction for resisting arrest at anti-pesticide rally in Eugene
* Agriculture chief promises more sage grouse spending in West as bird becomes political issue
* Feds: Giant burned area with sage grouse habitat on Idaho-Oregon border can be rehabilitated
* Oregon kicks itself again — Opinion
* After harsh winter, US economy likely grew more last quarter than government first estimated
* High turnover hampers care at Roseburg VA — Guest Opinion
* Could Major league baseball come to Portland?
* House races could be key to who’s in control
* Breathe a bit easier:Economy on upswing
* Sen. Steiner Hayward tapped for legislative fellowship
* Brown appoints group to promote offshore wind project near Coos Bay
* Environmental technology geeks, leaders converge at annual BESTFEST
* The Kicker Kicks
* Judge denies water districts motion to halt Trinity releases
* Oregons wine grape harvest is off to an early start, and looks good
* Legal action threatened over spotted frog habitat
* Oregon hazelnut harvest expected to increase over 2014
* Oregon soldiers arrive at wildfire near John Day
* Fielder Dam is gone, but controversy remains
* Independent Party starts at a disadvantage — Opinion
* More motion atop Oregon education — Opinion
* Public invited to weigh in on mine proposal
* Officials push FEMA for answers
* OLCC rolls out plans for recreational marijuana
* Draft study shows Astoria housing gap
* Affordable Astoria housing: A huge, permanent challenge — Opinion
* Gov. Brown makes a signature hire — Opinion
* With bans, pot tax revenue will be left on the table
* Steens Mountain ruling a victory for Bend group
* Let the unaffiliated in the primary — Opinion
* The dangers of the wildfire smoke are real — Opinion
* Oregon OB/GYNs will be cautious in prescribing low libido drug for women
* New committee assignment for Rayfield
* Crews continue to fight and maintain area wildfires
* Out on the fire lines
* About 400 Intel employees in Oregon were laid off
* Transforming the culture of Oregon’s educational leadership
* Chart: Uneven job recovery across Oregon
* How Many Jobs in Your County Pay Less Than $13 per Hour?– Blog
* Oregon soldiers arrive at wildfire near John Day
* Are local schools prepared for the big quake?
* Guard soldiers arrive on growing wildfire near John Day
* Winds push Warm Springs fire past containment lines
* Oregon AG forms police profiling working group
* Grant will help map Northwest wildfire threats

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ENERGY DEPARTMENT’S PLAN TO REWRITE TAX CREDIT RULES FACES BLOWBACK FROM LAWMAKERS (Portland Oregonian)

State lawmakers and others are telling the Oregon Department of Energy to back off plans to rewrite state rules governing the sale of energy tax credits.
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FACEBOOK WINS PRINEVILLE DATA CENTER TAX DEAL WORTH MILLIONS (Portland Oregonian)

Facebook won approval for a big new data center in Prineville Wednesday, with the city council and Crook County commissioners signing off unanimously on the deal.
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TAX ‘KICKER’ COMES WITH WARNING SIGNS AS OREGON’S ECONOMY COOLS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon taxpayers will get a kicker rebate for the first time since 2007, state economists announced Wednesday, though less of one than expected.
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TANTRUM, DEFAMATORY EMAIL, HARASSMENT ALLEGED IN FEUD BETWEEN JUDGES (Portland Oregonian)

One Washington County judge has accused another of “outrageous and unlawful” harassment in a courthouse feud that has spilled into rare public view.
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STABLE WEATHER HELPS FIREFIGHTERS BUILD ON PROGRESS IN OREGON, WASHINGTON (Portland Oregonian)

More than 10,000 firefighters continue to battle fires raging across the Pacific Northwest, and officials said Wednesday they are making progress because of favorable weather.
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21 OREGON DISTRICTS, RANGING FROM SMALL TO HUGE, MISS TARGETS FOR SMARTER BALANCED TEST PARTICIPATION (Portland Oregonian)

Twenty-one Oregon districts ranging from small to the state’s largest failed to meet federal testing targets for Smarter Balanced assessments, according to state data.
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THE ‘KICKER’: ALMOST EVERYONE WINS BUT SOME MORE THAN OTHERS (Portland Oregonian)

Do you earn more than $336,400 a year putting you in the top 1 percent of Oregon taxpayers? Or do you work in a public school or have a child who attends one?
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NATUROPATHIC CLINIC DESIGNATED AS TOP TIER PRIMARY CARE FACILITY (Portland Oregonian)

State health officials have certified a clinic at the National College of Natural Medicine as a top-tier primary care facility.

The designation as a patient-centered primary care home marks another advance in the fight of naturopathic doctors for recognition of their training and services, said Marilynn Considine, communications director of the college.
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FORECAST: $402 MILLION IN ‘KICKER’ REBATES (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon will send $402 million back to taxpayers next year after the state collected more than expected in personal-income taxes over the last two years, state economists said Wednesday.
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OREGON GUARD BEGIN TO ARRIVE TO FIGHT CANYON CREEK COMPLEX NEAR JOHN DAY (Portland Oregonian)

Soldiers with the Oregon Army National Guard’s 141st Brigade Support Battalion out of Portland began setting up a camp for other Guard soldiers due to arrive late Wednesday afternoon to help fight the Canyon Creek Complex fire near John Day.
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NEW EVACUATIONS ORDERED NEAR THE CANYON CREEK COMPLEX FIRE (Portland Oregonian)

The Canyon Creek Complex of fires near John Day pushed northeast dramatically toward a residential area Wednesday afternoon, threatening cabins and forcing a new round of evacuations.

By 9 p.m., residents in several areas generally between John Day and Prairie City had been told to get out.
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LABOR SECRETARY THOMAS PEREZ TOUTS OREGON’S LEADERSHIP ON PAID LEAVE POLICIES (Portland Oregonian)

U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez on Wednesday wrapped up a national tour promoting key workplace initiatives with effusive praise for Oregon as a national leader in expanding paid leave.
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TWO-THIRDS OF OREGON COUNTIES NOW IN DROUGHT EMERGENCY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown has declared a drought emergency in Linn County.

Twenty-four, or two-thirds of Oregon’s 36 counties, now have received drought declarations.
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WINE GRAPE HARVEST STARTS WITH BAR SET HIGH (Salem Statesman Journal)

Vineyards across the Mid-Valley are gearing up for harvest with the bar set much higher by last years haul, when overall grape harvest in the state jumped 39 percent compared with 2013.
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OREGON RECRUITING 11 RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA INSPECTORS (Salem Statesman Journal)

The day when recreational marijuana will be available for purchase in Oregon is fast approaching. At the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, jobs are being created to get ready for implementing recreational marijuana policies.
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OREGON CAFO FARMERS WANT POLLUTION PERMITS KEPT PRIVATE (Salem Statesman Journal)

State regulators will hold a public hearing on the proposed expansion of five dairies around Oregon after 17 requests from members of a Salem vegan group and others.

Its the first hearing in more than four years on changes to an Oregon confined animal feeding operation, or CAFO, sometimes called a factory farm.
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COURT OVERTURNS MANS CONVICTION FOR RESISTING ARREST AT ANTI-PESTICIDE RALLY IN EUGENE (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Ian Van Ornum was found guilty of disorderly conduct and resisting arrest in downtown Eugene-

The Oregon Court of Appeals on Wednesday overturned the conviction of a protester found guilty of resisting arrest at an anti pesticide demonstration in downtown Eugene, ruling that jurors should have been instructed to give more weight to his claim of self-defense.

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AGRICULTURE CHIEF PROMISES MORE SAGE GROUSE SPENDING IN WEST AS BIRD BECOMES POLITICAL ISSUE (Eugene Register-Guard)

The federal government plans to spend more than $200 million over the next three years on programs to protect greater sage grouse in Western states regardless of whether the bird receives federal protections, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said.
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FEDS: GIANT BURNED AREA WITH SAGE GROUSE HABITAT ON IDAHO-OREGON BORDER CAN BE REHABILITATED (Eugene Register-Guard)

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management has the ability to reseed and rehabilitate a giant burned area on the Idaho-Oregon border where a wildfire scorched primary sage grouse habitat and grasslands needed by ranchers, the agency’s director says.

“We’re going to stay after it and make sure we have a success in Idaho,” Neil Kornze said Wednesday in Boise, noting the effort could take years.
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OREGON KICKS ITSELF AGAIN — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Lawmakers must find way to reform destructive law-

As expected, the kicker will kick. But it wont leave quite as big a bruise on the states budgetary buttocks as feared.

For the first time since the Great Recession, unexpected personal-income tax revenues will trigger a kicker tax rebate, sending $402 million to taxpayers. Thats hardly the end of state government as we know it steady job and wage growth should still provide a modest bump in revenues for the next biennium.
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AFTER HARSH WINTER, US ECONOMY LIKELY GREW MORE LAST QUARTER THAN GOVERNMENT FIRST ESTIMATED (Eugene Register-Guard)

The U.S. economy likely gained more momentum in the spring than the government previously estimated. The question now is whether shrunken global stock markets and a sharp slowdown in China will weaken the economy in coming months.

The Commerce Department on Thursday will update its estimate of the economy’s growth, as measured by the gross domestic product, for the April-June quarter.
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HIGH TURNOVER HAMPERS CARE AT ROSEBURG VA — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Imagine that you work at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Portland. Youre sitting next to a person from the Human Resources Office and you say, Hey, I hear Dr. Does retiring. With the shortage of doctors, I guess you’ll have a hard time filling this position.
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COULD MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL COME TO PORTLAND? (Portland Tribune)

-Scoffers say no, and support needs to emerge, but city could be a candidate if MLB expands-

Speaking at a Baseball Writers Association of America luncheon during major league All-Star week in Cincinnati, Commissioner Rob Manfred said he is open to the possibility of expansion and, if necessary, relocation of existing franchises.
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HOUSE RACES COULD BE KEY TO WHO’S IN CONTROL (Portland Tribune)

At least two of the elections that will help decide who controls the 2017 Oregon Legislature will take place in the Portland area next year. That’s because two Democratic state representatives have announced they wont run for reelection, creating rare open seats heading into the 2016 campaign season.
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BREATHE A BIT EASIER:ECONOMY ON UPSWING (Portland Tribune)

Six years after the Great Recession was officially declared over, many Portland area residents are still unemployed or cannot find full-time work.

But a new economic report prepared for TriMet argues the region has almost fully recovered from the downturn that began in 2007.
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SEN. STEINER HAYWARD TAPPED FOR LEGISLATIVE FELLOWSHIP (Portland Tribune)

Portland state Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward is one of 48 state policymakers from across the country selected as a Council of State Governments’ Henry Toll Fellow for the Class of 2015.
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BROWN APPOINTS GROUP TO PROMOTE OFFSHORE WIND PROJECT NEAR COOS BAY (Portland Tribune)

Gov. Kate Brown has formed an advisory committee to identify locales where offshore wind turbines might be sites.

She called it the WindFloat Pacific Offshore Wind Advisory Committee.

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ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY GEEKS, LEADERS CONVERGE AT ANNUAL BESTFEST (Portland Tribune)

Oregon’s cleantech industry takes center stage at the annual BESTFEST conference, where inventors, academics, students and financiers mingle and discuss the latest ideas in biofuels, smart grid, solar energy, fuel cells, wastewater and other technologies.
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THE KICKER KICKS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

For the first time since 2007, Oregonians will receive a kicker. The state economist announced this morning that the total kicker amount is $402.4 million, with each Oregonian getting an average of $124 credit on their 2015 tax returns.
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JUDGE DENIES WATER DISTRICTS MOTION TO HALT TRINITY RELEASES (Capital Press)

A federal judge has denied San Joaquin Valley water districts request to halt the U.S. Bureau of Reclamations releases of as much as 88,000 acre-feet of water from the Trinity Reservoir in Northern California to aid fish.

The Westlands Water District and the San Luis and Delta-Mendota Water Authority asked for the injunction after the bureau began releasing water into the Trinity River to provide cooler and higher water for chinook salmon returning to the Lower Klamath River.
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OREGON’S WINE GRAPE HARVEST IS OFF TO AN EARLY START, AND LOOKS GOOD (Capital Press)

Oregon’s wine harvest gets off to an early start, and, as usual, vineyard operators and wine makers are optimistic.
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LEGAL ACTION THREATENED OVER SPOTTED FROG HABITAT (Capital Press)

Central Oregon irrigation districts worry spotted frog litigation will restrict water use. Two environmental groups have given notice they intend to sue over dam and reservoir operations on the Deschutes River.
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OREGON HAZELNUT HARVEST EXPECTED TO INCREASE OVER 2014 (Capital Press)

-Oregon produces nearly all of U.S. hazelnuts, and growers continue to add acreage as demand from China and elsewhere increases.-

Oregon’s hazelnut crop is projected to hit 39,000 tons this fall, an 8 percent increase over 2014, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service in Portland.

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OREGON SOLDIERS ARRIVE AT WILDFIRE NEAR JOHN DAY (East Oregonian)

National Guard soldiers newly trained as firefighters have started arriving at fire camp in Eastern Oregon to help mop up a blaze that destroyed more than three dozen homes and burned through more than 115 square miles.
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FIELDER DAM IS GONE, BUT CONTROVERSY REMAINS (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Dam removed following lawsuit to help Rogue River fish-

The 80-year-old Fielder Dam is gone, after more than a week of pounding from heavy equipment.

As of Friday all that remained was the fish ladder that fish biologists said severely restricted migration of salmon and steelhead, the impetus for dam removal.
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INDEPENDENT PARTY STARTS AT A DISADVANTAGE — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Independent Party of Oregon is now officially the state’s third major party, entitled to a primary election paid for by the state next year. But that status may be short-lived, thanks to a new law that will automatically register thousands of new voters.
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MORE MOTION ATOP OREGON EDUCATION — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Nancy Golden’s announcement that she plans to retire from her job as Oregons chief education officer serves as a stark reminder of how much work remains in our efforts to overhaul the states public education system.

And it suggests as well that this effort remains very much a work in progress and how easy it would be to just let this work slide, to let Oregon’s schools slip back to the status quo.
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PUBLIC INVITED TO WEIGH IN ON MINE PROPOSAL (Argus Observer)

Calico Resources USA, the company proposing a gold mine in Malheur County, is proposing a change of location of its ore processing facility.
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OFFICIALS PUSH FEMA FOR ANSWERS (Argus Observer)

Representatives from Malheur County, as well as the cities of Nyssa, Vale and Ontario were invited to attend the Malheur County discovery meeting Tuesday afternoon hosted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
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OLCC ROLLS OUT PLANS FOR RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA (Daily Astorian)

-A new fleet of inspectors and a new product tracking system are in the works.-

North Coast communities have been scrambling to deal with the fallout, both real and imagined, of Measure 91, which was passed in November 2014 and legalizes the use and possession of recreational marijuana for Oregon adults.

Meanwhile, it has been all marijuana, all the time, for the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, according Steven Marks, the agency’s executive director, at a lunch in Astoria Tuesday.
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DRAFT STUDY SHOWS ASTORIA HOUSING GAP (Daily Astorian)

-Low vacancy, high rents are a challenge-

Anyone who has tried to rent an apartment or buy a house in Astoria since the recession knows the story: few choices, relatively high cost.

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AFFORDABLE ASTORIA HOUSING: A HUGE, PERMANENT CHALLENGE — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-Employers are finding it more difficult to match new hires with places to live within the city.-

After decades of having too many dwellings for its population, Astoria’s housing market is much tighter.

Although this is a good thing for property owners and agents, a significant mismatch between supply and demand will make the city less interesting and hold back economic prospects.

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GOV. BROWN MAKES A SIGNATURE HIRE — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-The difficult but essential work of state government is done well beneath the headlines. Upgrading state computer systems will bring enormous efficiencies.-

Clyde Saiki is not a household name. But he will shortly become one of the most significant players in Oregon state government.
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WITH BANS, POT TAX REVENUE WILL BE LEFT ON THE TABLE (Bend Bulletin)

-Crook County’s share would have been minimal for first year-

Five Oregon counties and 11 cities have opted to ban marijuana businesses and by doing so have been cut off from state tax revenue that will be collected from recreational pot sales.

But sparsely populated cities and counties will not be missing out on much in 2017 when such revenue is doled out to local governments for the first time.
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STEENS MOUNTAIN RULING A VICTORY FOR BEND GROUP (Bend Bulletin)

-Judge tells BLM: No motorized vehicles for juniper removal-

A federal judge has ruled that the Bureau of Land Management cannot use motorized vehicles for juniper management work in wilderness study areas on Steens Mountain.
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LET THE UNAFFILIATED IN THE PRIMARY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

More than 530,000 Oregonians are unaffiliated with any political party. Thats about one quarter of Oregon’s 2.1 million registered voters. And because of Oregons election system, it means they usually have no voice in the primaries.

It doesn’t have to be that way.
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THE DANGERS OF THE WILDFIRE SMOKE ARE REAL — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

August 2015 may not be Central Oregon’s smokiest on record, but there have been enough hazy days to make it memorable nonetheless. Most days and for most people, that’s been annoying but not much worse.

That doesn’t mean smoky skies pose no danger. Even at moderate levels, like those reported Tuesday morning, smoke can be hazardous for some small number of very sensitive people.

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OREGON OB/GYNS WILL BE CAUTIOUS IN PRESCRIBING LOW LIBIDO DRUG FOR WOMEN (Bend Bulletin)

Leaders with Oregon Health & Science University’s Center for Women’s Health are bracing for an onslaught of patients requesting the new female libido drug when it hits the market in two months.

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NEW COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENT FOR RAYFIELD (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

State Rep. Dan Rayfield of Corvallis has as new committee assignment.

Rayfield, a Democrat who just finished his first term representing District 16, has been appointed to serve as co-chair of the Legislatures Joint Ways and Means Subcommittee on Public Safety for the 2015-16 interim session.
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CREWS CONTINUE TO FIGHT AND MAINTAIN AREA WILDFIRES (Douglas County News-Review)

The estimated containment date for the National Creek Complex fire is more than a month away, according to officials.

The fire, currently 10 percent contained, has burned approximately 10,833 acres in the northwest corner of Crater Lake National Park and the north portion of the High Cascades Ranger District on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.
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OUT ON THE FIRE LINES (LaGrande Observer)

A Type 2 hand crew from Camp Riverbend Youth Transitional Facility outside La Grande is offering its skills to fight local fires.

As national resources are being exhausted, Brett Dunten, Riverbend’s fire instructor and crew boss, says the Oregon Youth Authority can offer more resources for the governments toolbelt.

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ABOUT 400 INTEL EMPLOYEES IN OREGON WERE LAID OFF (Oregon Business)

WorkSource will hold a job fair for the former Intel workers who lost their jobs in the company’s latest round of layoffs.

The Portland Business Journal surmises that 400 Oregon employees were laid off from the job fair announcement.
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TRANSFORMING THE CULTURE OF OREGON’S EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP (Oregon Business)

If someone had told Krista Parent 30 years ago shed spend the next three decades of her career in the same school district, she would have laughed in disbelief.
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CHART: UNEVEN JOB RECOVERY ACROSS OREGON (Oregon Business Report)

Recently, we posted about the recovery of Oregon’s jobs to pre-recession levels across higher-, lower-, and mid-wage industries alike in the fourth quarter of 2014. We also mentioned that Oregon’s total nonfarm employment also returned to and exceeded pre-recession levels in the fourth quarter.

Today were taking a different angle on the jobs recovery. This one shows the uneven distribution of those recovered jobs across the state.
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HOW MANY JOBS IN YOUR COUNTY PAY LESS THAN $13 PER HOUR?– BLOG (Oregon Workforce & Economic Information)

We regularly receive questions about how many jobs pay less than a certain hourly wage. This question often comes up in relation to the minimum wage or a self-sufficiency wage. Having data by county is particularly useful when looking at how many local jobs might be impacted by changes in the minimum wage see for example Minimum-Wage Jobs a Smaller Share of Total in Metro Areas or how many local jobs are at the self-sufficiency level for given type of household.
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OREGON SOLDIERS ARRIVE AT WILDFIRE NEAR JOHN DAY (KATU)

National Guard soldiers newly trained as firefighters have started arriving at fire camp in Eastern Oregon to help mop up a blaze that destroyed more than three dozen homes and burned through more than 115 square miles.
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ARE LOCAL SCHOOLS PREPARED FOR THE BIG QUAKE? (KOIN)

-3,000 schools and critical facilities received seismic assessments in 2007-

There has been much talk recently of the impending earthquake projected to hit the Pacific Northwest. As families and communities devise emergency preparedness plans, many local schools are working to make seismic upgrades on campus.

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GUARD SOLDIERS ARRIVE ON GROWING WILDFIRE NEAR JOHN DAY (KTVZ Bend)

-New evacuations on nearly 75,000-acre blaze-

National Guard soldiers newly trained as firefighters have started arriving at fire camp in Eastern Oregon to help mop up a blaze that destroyed more than three dozen homes and burned through more than 115 square miles.
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WINDS PUSH WARM SPRINGS FIRE PAST CONTAINMENT LINES (KTVZ Bend)

-Blaze 70 percent contained; full containment pushed back to Monday-

Two weeks after it broke out, the nearly 66,000-acre County Line 2 Fire spotted across containment lines Wednesday, making uphill runs through heavy timber and tree plantations, officials said.

The estimated date for full containment has been pushed back from Friday to Monday,according to the late Wednesday InciWeb update.
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OREGON AG FORMS POLICE PROFILING WORKING GROUP (KTVZ Bend)

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum announced Wednesday the nine other members of the Law Enforcement Profiling Work Group, a panel formed at the direction of state lawmakers to review the issue.

The work group was established by House Bill 2002, which Governor Kate Brown signed into law on July 13.
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GRANT WILL HELP MAP NORTHWEST WILDFIRE THREATS (Spokesman-Review)

Mapping where severe wildfires are likely to occur in the Northwest is the focus of a $2.8 million National Science Foundation grant.

The four-year grant will help researchers at the University of Idaho and Washington State University model where fires will burn the hottest and cause the most destruction in Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 27, 2015 eClips

August 26, 2015 eClips

State Library eClips
* Oregon ACT scores show improved college readiness among black, white, Native American and Latino grads
* Oregon’s tax ‘kicker’ rebate, explained video
* Klamath County sheriff under investigation, seven deputies put on leave
* Oregon bow hunting season to start Saturday despite wildfire concerns
* Prison inmate walks away from SE Salem work crew
* Oregon stops issuing industrial hemp licenses
* A legislative session to watch for potential Democratic secretary of state candidates
* Oregon National Guard trains for fire duty
* Dairy expansion hearing scheduled after public requests
* Unemployment rate climbs in Lane County despite newly added jobs
* Official: Hemp regulations need to change because industry not what was envisioned
* Oregon education adrift — Opinion
* Hanging in the balance — Opinion
* Another state audit reveals poor computer security
* Prisoners on the fire lines: how inmates help battle wildfires
* Portland tied for 12th most congested city in country
* High School Behind Bars
* Investigative Reporter Turns Critical Eye To Oregon’s For-Profit Colleges
* Prisoners On The Fire Lines: How Inmates Help Battle Wildfires
* Chinese Tourists Expected To Continue Flocking To Oregon
* Monitors to gauge air quality near big Oregon wildfire
* Hermiston teacher, coach on leave pending investigation
* Pendleton-based National Guard crew prepares for deployment
* City, ODOT to discuss Eighth Street bridge replacement
* Falls Creek Fire slowly growing
* Hemp plants near Murphy may exceed potency limit
* Higher priority blazes in Northwest pull off crews from Crescent fire
* Attorney general investigating Klamath County Sheriff’s Office
* Student loan debt burdens today’s graduates — Guest Opinion
* Unemployment numbers up in Linn, Benton counties
* Bendire Complex contained, downgraded
* Fire management to transfer back to local agencies
* Map update
* Challenging FEMA: County agencies cooperate to fix flood maps
* Scientists searching for answers in bird die-off
* Oregon Department of Agriculture puts pause on hemp industry
* Want to run or bike? Check air first
* Security at state data center criticized by audit
* Appeals court will hear arguments on OSU-Cascades site
* Central Oregon jobless rates up in July
* Smoke threatens Oregon Shakespeare Festival
* Timeliness matters in disclosure of public records — Opinion
* Oregon’s disclosure forms need work — Opinion
* Veterans to gather for town hall meeting
* Kingsley Field airmen activated to fight fires
* Toxic algae levels still increasing
* BLM outlines Resource Management Plan comment process
* BLM multi-use forest plan won’t pay the bills — Opinion
* Money Troubles
* Get ready, Oregon business owners: The ‘Cadillac Tax’ may affect you– Blog
* Kicker rebates likely lower for Oregonians than projected
* Portland sees record home sales in July, with intense competition among buyers
* Schools, biz team to prepare workforce – Video
* C. Oregon jobless rates up, despite strong job growth

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OREGON ACT SCORES SHOW IMPROVED COLLEGE READINESS AMONG BLACK, WHITE, NATIVE AMERICAN AND LATINO GRADS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s graduating seniors of almost every race and ethnicity, particularly African Americans and Native Americans, scored better on one important test of college readiness than the class before them.
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OREGON’S TAX ‘KICKER’ REBATE, EXPLAINED VIDEO (Portland Oregonian)

So what is the kicker?

In 1980, voters approved a law to return or “kick” excess tax money back to the people.
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KLAMATH COUNTY SHERIFF UNDER INVESTIGATION, SEVEN DEPUTIES PUT ON LEAVE (Portland Oregonian)

Klamath County Commissioners placed seven of the county’s 30 sheriff’s deputies on paid leave Monday amid a state criminal investigation of Klamath County Sheriff Frank Skrah.
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OREGON BOW HUNTING SEASON TO START SATURDAY DESPITE WILDFIRE CONCERNS (Portland Oregonian)

Despite a plea by Baker County commissioners to Gov. Kate Brown to delay the opening of bow hunting season in the eastern Oregon county because of wildfire concerns, the season will begin as scheduled Saturday.
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PRISON INMATE WALKS AWAY FROM SE SALEM WORK CREW (Portland Oregonian)

An inmate from the Santiam Correctional Institution in Salem walked away from a work crew early Tuesday morning, officials said.
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OREGON STOPS ISSUING INDUSTRIAL HEMP LICENSES (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon has temporarily stopped issuing licenses for industrial hemp, citing a range of complex policy issues that emerged during the program’s first year.
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A LEGISLATIVE SESSION TO WATCH FOR POTENTIAL DEMOCRATIC SECRETARY OF STATE CANDIDATES – OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The secretary of state’s office took a star turn this year when Democrat Kate Brown became governor following the resignation of John Kitzhaber.
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OREGON NATIONAL GUARD TRAINS FOR FIRE DUTY (Salem Statesman Journal)

As smoke rose from a smoldering fallen tree, a member of the Oregon National Guard used an ax to smash through the burned wood.

Make sure to yell, Swinging, said Daniel Cleveland, wildlands fire management officer for the Oregon Military Department, as a dozen other guardsman who traded in their camouflage uniforms for the solid yellow Nomex fire shirt and green pants looked on.
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DAIRY EXPANSION HEARING SCHEDULED AFTER PUBLIC REQUESTS (Salem Statesman Journal)

State regulators will hold a public hearing on the proposed expansion of five dairies around Oregon after 17 requests from members of a Salem vegan group and others.
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UNEMPLOYMENT RATE CLIMBS IN LANE COUNTY DESPITE NEWLY ADDED JOBS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Lane County continued to add jobs in July, but the unemployment rate still rose to a seasonally adjusted 6.5 percent, the highest its been this year.

The unemployment rate can be volatile at this time of year, said Brian Rooney, regional economist with the state Employment Department.
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OFFICIAL: HEMP REGULATIONS NEED TO CHANGE BECAUSE INDUSTRY NOT WHAT WAS ENVISIONED (Eugene Register-Guard)

A state agriculture official said Tuesday that Oregon’s hemp industry is not turning out the way lawmakers envisioned, so the department will recommend changes to the law regulating how it is grown.

The law authorizing industrial hemp production in Oregon was written to regulate it as an agricultural crop, with large fields of densely planted hemp grown for fiber, seed and oil, said Lindsay Eng, who oversees the hemp program for the Oregon Department of Agriculture.
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OREGON EDUCATION ADRIFT — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Vision of reform fades with a churning leadership-

Nancy Golden never intended to play more than a supporting role in Oregon’s education reform effort, but she became one of its key leaders by default. And when Gov. Kate Brown announced Monday that Golden was retiring as chief education officer, it amounted to an admission that the reform program had become rudderless if indeed it had ever had a rudder at all.
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HANGING IN THE BALANCE — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Concerned youths are suing over climate change-

In Oregon and nearly every other state, lawsuits and petitions have been filed seeking to force the more aggressive action on climate change that will be essential in helping to protect the planet for future generations.

These legal actions have several things in common. They’re all part of a shrewd campaign led by the Eugene-based nonprofit Our Children’s Trust, where the mission is to protect Earths natural systems for current and future generations.

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ANOTHER STATE AUDIT REVEALS POOR COMPUTER SECURITY (Portland Tribune)

A decade after lawmakers consolidated state computer operations, a new audit says there is still much to do to resolve security weaknesses in the State Data Center.
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PRISONERS ON THE FIRE LINES: HOW INMATES HELP BATTLE WILDFIRES (Portland Tribune)

This wildfire season has been exceptionally rough for the Northwest. Resources are stretched thin across the region and a state of emergency has been declared in Washington state.
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PORTLAND TIED FOR 12TH MOST CONGESTED CITY IN COUNTRY (Portland Tribune)

Portland is tied for the 12th most congested city in the country with Atlanta, Austin, Detroit and Miami, according to a new annual report by the the Texas A&M Transportation Institute and INRIX Inc.
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HIGH SCHOOL BEHIND BARS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Ben Sharvy teaches science to girls behind bars at the Oak Creek Correctional Facility in Albany. Hes a teacher at Three Lakes High School and while he loves his students, he thinks they deserve better than what the Oregon Department of Education is offering them.
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INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER TURNS CRITICAL EYE TO OREGON’S FOR-PROFIT COLLEGES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Portland Tribune reporter Peter Korn is working on a multi-part series about aggressive recruitment of low-income students and other questionable practices at Oregon’s for-profit colleges.
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PRISONERS ON THE FIRE LINES: HOW INMATES HELP BATTLE WILDFIRES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

This wildfire season has been exceptionally rough for the Northwest. Resources are stretched thin across the region and a state of emergency has been declared in Washington state.
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CHINESE TOURISTS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE FLOCKING TO OREGON (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon’s tourism industry is growing at 14 percent, but a fair slice of that growth relies on one country and its having problems.
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MONITORS TO GAUGE AIR QUALITY NEAR BIG OREGON WILDFIRE (Capital Press)

-Firefighters battling the blaze spent Monday patrolling, improving and holding control lines. The Canyon Creek Complex of fires is 30 percent contained.-

Two portable smoke monitors have arrived in Eastern Oregon, giving officials a more accurate reading of air quality near the Canyon Creek complex of wildfires.

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HERMISTON TEACHER, COACH ON LEAVE PENDING INVESTIGATION (East Oregonian)

-Former Hermiston High School boys basketball coach Jake McElligott is on administrative leave pending an investigation.-

A Hermiston teacher and former coach is on administrative leave pending an investigation by the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission.

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PENDLETON-BASED NATIONAL GUARD CREW PREPARES FOR DEPLOYMENT (East Oregonian)

Three soldiers crowd into the front of a new Oregon National Guard helicopter.

Chief Warrant Officer Steve McDaniel sits in the cockpit of the Chinook CH-47F or Fox, as the men call it and shows off the helicopters upgrades from its predecessor, the CH-47D that sits in a hangar just a few hundred yards away at the National Guard armory in Pendleton.
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CITY, ODOT TO DISCUSS EIGHTH STREET BRIDGE REPLACEMENT (East Oregonian)

Government officials will hold another open house Wednesday to discuss alternatives to upcoming improvements to the Eighth Street bridge in Pendleton.

According to a city press release, employees from the city, the Oregon Department of Transportation and the Oregon Bridge Engineering Consultants will describe the history of the bridge in greater detail, discuss the purpose and need of the proposed project, and review the alternatives that have been considered.
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FALLS CREEK FIRE SLOWLY GROWING (East Oregonian)

-More personnel for Falls Creek Fire, still zero percent contained.-

The Falls Creek Fire, located in the Eagle Cap Wilderness and on some private property about 2 miles above the Hurricane Creek trailhead, has grown to about 250 acres as of Tuesday morning

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HEMP PLANTS NEAR MURPHY MAY EXCEED POTENCY LIMIT (Medford Mail Tribune)

Unofficial samples from an Orhempco industrial hemp field near Murphy that was tested by the Oregon Department of Agriculture in June showed a THC level in excess of the legal limit of 3 percent.

THC is the primary ingredient in marijuana, hemp’s more potent cousin.
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HIGHER PRIORITY BLAZES IN NORTHWEST PULL OFF CREWS FROM CRESCENT FIRE (Medford Mail Tribune)

On Aug. 15, more than 800 firefighters were assigned to the National Creek fire complex burning near Crater Lake.

That number has dropped to less than half that this week, to about 343 on Tuesday. Many of those crew members have been reassigned to other more severe wildfires in Washington state and Eastern Oregon.
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ATTORNEY GENERAL INVESTIGATING KLAMATH COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Oregon attorney general’s office is investigating the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office, but it won’t say why.

Department of Justice spokesman Michael Kron acknowledged Tuesday that there is an investigation, but he said he could not say what it was about or what prompted it.
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STUDENT LOAN DEBT BURDENS TODAY’S GRADUATES — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

This retired educator was pleased to read your front page story, “Engineering, technology programs to be offered.” Aug 20 It is always good news when our schools promote educational excellence, and design programs to meet the needs and interests of our children.
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UNEMPLOYMENT NUMBERS UP IN LINN, BENTON COUNTIES (Albany Democrat Herald)

Unemployment rates in Linn and Benton counties rose in July, according to a monthly report from Patrick O’Connor, regional economist with the Oregon Employment Department.
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BENDIRE COMPLEX CONTAINED, DOWNGRADED (Argus Observer)

The Bendire Complex Fire burned nearly 45,000 acres of rangeland 15 miles north of Juntura before it was deemed contained over the weekend, according to a news release from the Vale District Bureau of Land Management.
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FIRE MANAGEMENT TO TRANSFER BACK TO LOCAL AGENCIES (Argus Observer)

Crews continue to mop around the El Dorado and the Cornet-Windy Ridge fires as they move toward containment, with both fires estimated to be fully contained by Sept. 1.

Management of the fires will transfer back to local agencies Wednesday, with each fire having four engines and a 20-person crew left behind by the current incident management team, according to Tom Fields, public information officer for Oregon Department of Forestry.

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MAP UPDATE (Argus Observer)

-FEMA in town to discuss floodplains-

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is in town today to discuss floodplain updates and the emergency management plan with representatives of local cities and counties in Oregon and Idaho.
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CHALLENGING FEMA: COUNTY AGENCIES COOPERATE TO FIX FLOOD MAPS (Daily Astorian)

-County agencies cooperate to address errors in flood maps.-

Five Clatsop County agencies looking to challenge the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s preliminary flood maps of the Columbia River believe that more work is needed to correct FEMAs data and draw more accurate maps.

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SCIENTISTS SEARCHING FOR ANSWERS IN BIRD DIE-OFF (Daily Astorian)

-Many small birds along the coast are dying off, but researchers differ as to the cause.-

Judi Grucella and her friend Jane Santarsiere visit Cannon Beach every year. Dead birds spread out on the beach were an unexpected sight.

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OREGON DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUTS PAUSE ON HEMP INDUSTRY (Bend Bulletin)

-Agency decision gives lawmakers time to ensure marijuana, hemp coexist outdoors-

After coming under fire from lawmakers and farmers for the way it administered a hemp program six years after the state legalized the plant, the Oregon Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday it wouldn’t issue any new licenses under the program until at least March.

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WANT TO RUN OR BIKE? CHECK AIR FIRST (Bend Bulletin)

-Smoke expected to linger in region at least until Friday-

Central Oregonians used to going on long runs or hard bike rides may want to hold off until the smoke clears.

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SECURITY AT STATE DATA CENTER CRITICIZED BY AUDIT (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon technology managers never resolved known security vulnerabilities at a state data warehouse that stores a trove of sensitive information about Oregonians, state auditors concluded in a report released Tuesday.

The audit by the secretary of states office says the state data center has only recently begun addressing concerns outlined in at least 11 security audits or letters since 2006, some public and others confidential. Most of the weaknesses remain unresolved, it says.
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APPEALS COURT WILL HEAR ARGUMENTS ON OSU-CASCADES SITE (Bend Bulletin)

The Oregon Court of Appeals will hear oral arguments Wednesday concerning a challenge to the OSU-Cascades campus under construction on Bends west side.

Truth in Site, the organization opposing the location, is fighting the campus because it contends added traffic will overwhelm the neighborhood.
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CENTRAL OREGON JOBLESS RATES UP IN JULY (Bend Bulletin)

-Rates in Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson counties still lower than 2014-

Unemployment rates rose across Central Oregon in July, although they remained well below those in July 2014, the Oregon Employment Department said today.

In Crook County, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased from 8.2 percent in June to 8.6 percent in July. A year ago, it was 9.8 percent.
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SMOKE THREATENS OREGON SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL (Bend Bulletin)

These days, even Shakespeare cant avoid the smoke.

The Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland has canceled four outdoor performances this month, most recently a production of The Count of Monte Cristo on Sunday, due to thick smoke from nearby wildfires.
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TIMELINESS MATTERS IN DISCLOSURE OF PUBLIC RECORDS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

When Gov. Kate Brown spoke after being sworn in, she said the state must do a better job to ensure timely release of public documents. Timeliness matters.

Officials at Oregon’s State Historical Preservation Office would be one place to start. They have not been completely forthcoming with records about a proposal to designate a stretch of Central Oregon Irrigation Districts Pilot Butte canal as historic.
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OREGON’S DISCLOSURE FORMS NEED WORK — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

If former Gov. John Kitzhaber did nothing else for the people of Oregon, he destroyed our belief that Oregons government was about as clean as government can be. Questions about his behavior and that of his fiancee, Cylvia Hayes, exposed serious flaws in state ethics laws.

Among them is the lack of information required on the states Annual Verified Statement of Economic Interest, which must be filled out by candidates and elected and appointed public officials, from members of the state Supreme Court to the superintendent of the local education service district.
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VETERANS TO GATHER FOR TOWN HALL MEETING (Douglas County News-Review)

Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs Director Cameron Smith will host a town hall meeting with local veterans from 10 a.m. to noon Wednesday at Patrick W. Kelley Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2468, 1127 Walnut St., Roseburg. The event is free and open to the community.
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KINGSLEY FIELD AIRMEN ACTIVATED TO FIGHT FIRES (Herald and News)

Forty-nine volunteer citizen-airmen from the 173rd Fighter Wing and 270th Air Traffic Control Squadron are part of the additional 250 Oregon National Guard members called up by Oregon Gov. Kate Brown to assist with ongoing firefighting efforts throughout the state.

The additional personnel are scheduled to report to the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training DPSST in Salem to undergo firefighting training starting Wednesday, Aug. 26.
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TOXIC ALGAE LEVELS STILL INCREASING (Herald and News)

Recent samples taken from Upper Klamath and Agency lakes indicate toxic levels of blue-green algae are increasing.

David Farrer, a toxicologist for the Oregon Health Authority, said the most recent samples of the toxic blue-green algae, Microcystis aeruginosa, contaminating the lakes were collected the second week in August.

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BLM OUTLINES RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN COMMENT PROCESS (The World)

As the comments and criticisms about the Resource Management Plan for Western Oregon continue to pour in, the Bureau of Land Management is assuring communities and public officials that their viewpoints will not go unheard.
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BLM MULTI-USE FOREST PLAN WON’T PAY THE BILLS — OPINION (The World)

-While trying to satisfy everyone, BLM fails our economic need-

The federal Bureau of Land Management has, according to its critics, written off timber harvesting as a viable economic base for Western states.

The BLMs recently released Draft Resource Management Plan for Western Oregon, blasted last week by commissioners here in Coos and in Lane County, is recommending timber harvests that are a ghost of what they had been a generation ago.
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MONEY TROUBLES (Oregon Business)

-The states angel investing fund gets hammered in Salem-

State Treasurer Ted Wheeler was frustrated. His baby was suffering from malnutrition, and he wasn’t sure what to do about it. The baby’s name? The Oregon Growth Board, conceived by Wheeler in 2012 as a vehicle to stoke economic development in the state by funding the folks who fund Oregon startups.
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GET READY, OREGON BUSINESS OWNERS: THE ‘CADILLAC TAX’ MAY AFFECT YOU– BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

As many as one in four employers that offer health benefits could be affected by the Cadillac Tax in 2018, unless they make changes to their plans, according to a new analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The tax, which stems from the Affordable Care Act, targets the most generous health plans.
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KICKER REBATES LIKELY LOWER FOR OREGONIANS THAN PROJECTED (KGW)

Oregon residents will almost definitely get a kicker rebate on their tax returns next year, but state officials say it won’t be as big as originally projected.
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PORTLAND SEES RECORD HOME SALES IN JULY, WITH INTENSE COMPETITION AMONG BUYERS (KPTV)

A record setting month of July for home sales in Portland capped another strong year for the citys real estate market.

According to a recent report from the Regional Multiple Listing Service, 3,452 home sales closed in July, which is an all-time record for Portland.

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SCHOOLS, BIZ TEAM TO PREPARE WORKFORCE – VIDEO (KTVZ Bend)

Central Oregon education and business leaders are partnering in a new effort to tie schools’ curriculum to the skills industries need.
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C. OREGON JOBLESS RATES UP, DESPITE STRONG JOB GROWTH (KTVZ Bend)

-Deschutes adds 3,810 jobs in year; region sees largest gains in state-

Unemployment levels are on the rise across Central Oregon, following the statewide trend over the past few months, but job gains also are up significantly from a year ago, the state Employment Department reported Tuesday.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 26, 2015 eClips

August 25, 2015 eClips

State Library eClips
* Oregon Chief Education Officer Nancy Golden to retire
* One in five UO undergrad women surveyed report rape, sexual assault or evading sex abuse
* ‘Kicker’ tax rebate expected to kick, but not as hard
* By the numbers: Oregon wine’s 2014 was one of best yet
* Oregon National Guard to hit fire lines as John Day area blaze grows
* Should Oregon public officials’ reveal their mystery money?
* The crazy good rise of Oregon wine-making: Oregonomics — Opinion
* Oregon needs a new constitutional amendment for education funding — Guest Opinion
* 5 myths about wildfires: Washington Post opinion — Opinion
* Should Oregon public officials’ reveal their mystery money? video
* Police certification revoked for ex-cop who had inappropriate encounters with women
* I-5 in Portland to close nightly at I-405, Fremont and Marquam bridges for resurfacing project
* Hagg Lake now open as firefighters mop up brushfire off US 26
* Hop harvest heats up after warm summer
* Oregons Chief Education Officer retires
* Officials developing rehab plan for burned Oregon forest
* Living in the Ring of Fire — Guest Opinion
* Chief education officer Golden to retire
* Oregonians will get final ‘kicker’ figure Wednesday
* New law requires schools to screen students early for dyslexia
* Declaration of Independents
* Tourists Flock To Oregon, Especially From Abroad
* State Says Portland’s Mobile Medical Marijuana Cart Illegal
* Oregon Chief Education Officer To Retire
* Judge says no to motorized vehicles for juniper removal in wilderness
* Oregon ag and food exports find an expanding market in Asia
* Seed, cereal crop meetings feature slug researcher
* No Clean Water Act permit needed for Klamath drain
* IMESD superintendent stunned by Golden resignation
* Smoky air expected all week in Umatilla County
* Fires a reminder that forests need protection — Guest Opinion
* Fires won’t burn out Southern Oregon hunting season
* Relief may be in the air for Rogue Valley from fires, smoke
* Highway 26 now open
* Local task force sent to help fight Oregon fire
* Buoy 10 hatchery-only
* Dangerous decisions: In Clatsop County, gaps in the mental health safety net
* Quit distorting Oregons assisted suicide law — Opinion
* Crews gain control on Cornet-Windy Ridge, Eldorado fires
* Eagle Complex growth slows significantly
* Open primary would bring added cost to Oregon elections
* How to help Oregons wildfire victims
* Forest Service defends Canyon Creek response
* First responders continue to be wary of distracted or confused drivers
* Time’s up, VA: Fix your problems now — Opinion
* Stouts Creek fire surrounded
* Hermiston judge appointed to top legal post in Oregon National Guard
* Grizzly Bear blaze at 65,000 acres; Falls Creek still at 200
* Mussel harvesting reopened on Oregon coast
* Education Czar Nancy Golden’s Retirement Raises Questions About Direction of K-12 Reforms
* Wanted: People to fight fires in Washington and Oregon
* ‘Your Voice, Your Vote:’ Portland traffic increase – Video
* Proper car seat installation a priority in Oregon
* Warm Springs wildfire may be contained by Friday
* Demand grows for new ways to consume marijuana

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OREGON CHIEF EDUCATION OFFICER NANCY GOLDEN TO RETIRE (Portland Oregonian)

Nancy Golden, who for two years has overseen public education in Oregon from preschool to college, will retire in two weeks, Gov. Kate Brown announced Monday.
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ONE IN FIVE UO UNDERGRAD WOMEN SURVEYED REPORT RAPE, SEXUAL ASSAULT OR EVADING SEX ABUSE (Portland Oregonian)

One in five University of Oregon undergraduate women say they’ve been raped, sexually assaulted or evaded some form of sexual intrusion since starting school in Eugene.
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‘KICKER’ TAX REBATE EXPECTED TO KICK, BUT NOT AS HARD (Portland Oregonian)

Will Oregon’s “kicker” kick?
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BY THE NUMBERS: OREGON WINE’S 2014 WAS ONE OF BEST YET (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Wine Board praised 2014’s warm, dry wine grape growing season as key to one of the best years on record.
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OREGON NATIONAL GUARD TO HIT FIRE LINES AS JOHN DAY AREA BLAZE GROWS (Portland Oregonian)

The first Oregon soldiers activated this season to wildfire duty are expected to take the field outside John Day Wednesday, helping on one of the state’s most dangerous fires.
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SHOULD OREGON PUBLIC OFFICIALS’ REVEAL THEIR MYSTERY MONEY? (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s ethics rules have been on the books since 1974, when states around the country answered Watergate with new laws meant to air conflicts of interest and promote transparency.
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THE CRAZY GOOD RISE OF OREGON WINE-MAKING: OREGONOMICS — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon agriculture has had its struggles in the last decade.
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OREGON NEEDS A NEW CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT FOR EDUCATION FUNDING — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

I believe it is time for Oregon to end the game and adopt a state amendment that guarantees the right of all children to receive a quality public education. Imagine if these advocacy groups, who proselytize about saving our schools or school choice, came together and agreed that all children have the right to free education. Once that is done they can go back to issuing unread policy papers and organizing the annual pilgrimage to Salem to “save our schools.”
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5 MYTHS ABOUT WILDFIRES: WASHINGTON POST OPINION — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Northern California’s burning. Oregon’s ablaze. Three firefighters died in Washington on Wednesday while trying to keep flames from razing the entire town of Twisp. With weeks of fire season still to go, the federal government has already spent more than $800 million trying to extinguish blazes that promise to rival history’s worst in terms of size, destructiveness and cost. In other words: same sad stories, new year. This weekend, while the American West glows that weird and terrifying orange of the fire season, consider that it may only look like the apocalypse. And maybe we’re just thinking about wildfires in the wrong ways.
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SHOULD OREGON PUBLIC OFFICIALS’ REVEAL THEIR MYSTERY MONEY? – VIDEO (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s ethics rules have been on the books since 1974, when states around the country answered Watergate with new laws meant to air conflicts of interest and promote transparency.
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POLICE CERTIFICATION REVOKED FOR EX-COP WHO HAD INAPPROPRIATE ENCOUNTERS WITH WOMEN (Portland Oregonian)

A former Forest Grove police sergeant who resigned this spring after he was accused of engaging in a sex act while on duty has had his police certification revoked, according to state records.

Wayne Hart resigned April 1 after spending eight months on paid administrative leave while police investigated a woman’s claims that he had sexually abused her while on duty in 2013, police said. He was criminally investigated last year, but prosecutors declined to file charges against him.
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I-5 IN PORTLAND TO CLOSE NIGHTLY AT I-405, FREMONT AND MARQUAM BRIDGES FOR RESURFACING PROJECT (Portland Oregonian)

Parts of Interstate 5 in Portland will be closed nightly this week as the Oregon Department of Transportation resurfaces the highway.

On Monday, Interstate 405 south to I-5 south will be closed starting at 10 p.m. Traffic normally entering I-405 southbound from the downtown area will be diverted to northbound I-405, across the Fremont Bridge and back to southbound I-5. The highway is expected to reopen at 5 a.m.
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HAGG LAKE NOW OPEN AS FIREFIGHTERS MOP UP BRUSHFIRE OFF US 26 (Portland Oregonian)

Hagg Lake has reopened to swimmers and boaters Monday evening after officials closed it to provide water for firefighting efforts at a fire near Manning.
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HOP HARVEST HEATS UP AFTER WARM SUMMER (Salem Statesman Journal)

Across the Mid-Valley, hop farms are coming alive with activity as harvest begins, wrapping up a season that started with a mild winter, a dry spring and an even dryer and hotter summer.
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OREGON’S CHIEF EDUCATION OFFICER RETIRES (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown announced Monday that Oregon’s Chief Education Officer Dr. Nancy Golden will retire after working for 42 years in Oregon education.
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OFFICIALS DEVELOPING REHAB PLAN FOR BURNED OREGON FOREST (Eugene Register-Guard)

The damage caused by the Canyon Creek Complex wildfire south of John Day isn’t just limited to 39 destroyed houses.

Flames have also torched tens of thousands of acres of trees and vegetation throughout the Canyon Creek watershed, leaving the barren landscape vulnerable to future soil erosion and flooding.

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LIVING IN THE RING OF FIRE — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The West has been on fire all month, with dream homes falling to a combustive punch, wild horses seared by flame and suffocated by smoke, even a rare firenado dancing across a landscape in which 7 million acres have been burned this year.
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CHIEF EDUCATION OFFICER GOLDEN TO RETIRE (Portland Tribune)

Nancy Golden will retire as Oregon’s chief education officer after a recent legislative reorganization that left her with a staff but abolished the governor-led board that oversaw all education spending.
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OREGONIANS WILL GET FINAL ‘KICKER’ FIGURE WEDNESDAY (Portland Tribune)

-Individuals to get credit for taxes, rather than check-

When lawmakers hear the first quarterly revenue forecast of the new two-year state budget cycle this week, they also will learn the amount that Oregon taxpayers will get back in excess personal income tax collections next spring.
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NEW LAW REQUIRES SCHOOLS TO SCREEN STUDENTS EARLY FOR DYSLEXIA (Portland Tribune)

The first time Lincoln High School senior Emery Roberts realized she was different was in kindergarten.

She and a frenemy were neck-and-neck in a reading contest. Emery even remembers which book proved an insurmountable hurdle; it had a tiger on the cover.
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DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENTS (Portland Tribune)

Larry Morgan is the potential future of the Independent Party of Oregon and a good example of why young people especially are shunning the Democratic and Republican parties.
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TOURISTS FLOCK TO OREGON, ESPECIALLY FROM ABROAD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Tourists are flocking to Oregon and Portland, especially from overseas. Travel Oregon said the local tourism industry grew about 14 percent last year.

The first time an overseas tourist visits the United States, they go to New York City or Disneyland in California. But the next time, they want to see authentic America, according to tourism officials.
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STATE SAYS PORTLAND’S MOBILE MEDICAL MARIJUANA CART ILLEGAL (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

It didn’t take long for an entrepreneur to combine two of Portland’s favorite things: marijuana and food carts.

But state officials aren’t thrilled. The Oregon Health Authority on Monday said the Smoke Buddy, a mobile cart selling medical marijuana, is illegal.
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OREGON CHIEF EDUCATION OFFICER TO RETIRE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon’s top education official is stepping down.

Oregon’s top education official is stepping down. Chief Education Officer Nancy Golden took over in 2013 after Rudy Crew, who was the first person to serve in the position.
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JUDGE SAYS NO TO MOTORIZED VEHICLES FOR JUNIPER REMOVAL IN WILDERNESS (Capital Press)

-Using vehicles for juniper removal in wilderness study areas is unlawful, according to a federal judge.-

A federal judge has ruled that its unlawful to use motorized vehicles to remove juniper from nearly 80,000 acres in the vicinity of Oregon’s Steens Mountain.

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OREGON AG AND FOOD EXPORTS FIND AN EXPANDING MARKET IN ASIA (Capital Press)

-Agricultural and food products are Oregon’s third largest export sector, and experts believe it will continue to grow as Asian economies expand.-

Oregons agricultural exports, already the third leading sector among the $21 billion worth of products leaving the state annually, appear poised for continued expansion.

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SEED, CEREAL CROP MEETINGS FEATURE SLUG RESEARCHER (Capital Press)

-Penn State entomologist John Tooker will share his knowledge of the slimy pests during a series of September meetings and seminars.-

In 2009, Pennsylvania State University entomologist John Tooker said he naively waded into the slug world after slug problems were the topic of 50 percent of his extension calls that year.

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NO CLEAN WATER ACT PERMIT NEEDED FOR KLAMATH DRAIN (Capital Press)

-Draining water from the Klamath Irrigation Project into the Klamath River doesn’t require a Clean Water Act permit, a federal appeals court ruled.-

In 1997, the Oregon Wild environmental group filed a legal complaint against the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which operates the project, for allegedly violating the Clean Water Act.
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IMESD SUPERINTENDENT STUNNED BY GOLDEN RESIGNATION (East Oregonian)

-For the second time since its creation in 2012, the state chief education officer has been vacated.-

Gov. Kate Brown announced Monday that Nancy Golden, 64, will retire and will be replaced by the governors education policy adviser, Lindsey Capps, who will hold the title of acting chief education officer.

In a statement, Golden said she never intended to hold the position long-term.

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SMOKY AIR EXPECTED ALL WEEK IN UMATILLA COUNTY (East Oregonian)

-Health department urges indoor recess, caution for the very old and very young.-

The Umatilla County Public Health department is urging residents to limit outdoor activity when air quality is visibly poor. Residents should take precautions as smoke from northwest fires continues to drift into this part of the state.

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FIRES A REMINDER THAT FORESTS NEED PROTECTION — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

At this point in the summer with wildfires seemingly raging across the West and region it would seem that common sense regarding fire precautions among the public would be second nature.

At least it should be.

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FIRES WON’T BURN OUT SOUTHERN OREGON HUNTING SEASON (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Archery season expected to start as planned on Saturday-

The upcoming hunting season for archers will begin as scheduled Saturday despite land closures and activity restrictions amid the current wildfire season.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has no plans to delay or extend the various deer and elk hunting seasons, which will see hunters herded onto public lands thanks to access banned on virtually all private industrial forest lands in western Oregon due to extreme fire danger and active wildfires.
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RELIEF MAY BE IN THE AIR FOR ROGUE VALLEY FROM FIRES, SMOKE (Ashland Daily Tidings)

-Rain is possible at week’s end-

Forest fires continue to burn to the north, south, east and west of the Rogue Valley, and the resulting smoky skies continue to hang over our heads. But fire officials and forecasters say there is reason for some optimism.
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HIGHWAY 26 NOW OPEN (Daily Astorian)

-Oregon Department of Transportation hopes to open the road sometime on Monday.-

U.S. Highway 26 has opened to traffic, though flaggers are still on the scene near milepost 43 allowing one direction to move at a time. Both lanes are expected to open later in the day, according to ODOT District Manager Mark Buffington.

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LOCAL TASK FORCE SENT TO HELP FIGHT OREGON FIRE (Daily Astorian)

-The Clatsop County task force will primarily be used for structure protection.-

Another Clatsop County task force was mobilized Friday morning by the State Fire Marshal for response and assistance on the Grizzly Bear Fire in northeast Oregon near Troy. The fire has expanded to 12,000 acres.

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BUOY 10 HATCHERY-ONLY (Daily Astorian)

-The Buoy 10 salmon fishery goes hatchery-only today.-

Stick to hatchery salmon, as of today.

To continue the Buoy 10 salmon fishery through Labor Day, state managers limited catches to hatchery adipose fin-clipped salmon

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DANGEROUS DECISIONS: IN CLATSOP COUNTY, GAPS IN THE MENTAL HEALTH SAFETY NET (Daily Astorian)

-Documents show challenges, frustrations of crisis response-

Patients placed into custody because of mental illness in Clatsop County do not always receive adequate notice of their legal status or clinical services and can face lengthy delays to get into psychiatric hospitals for treatment.

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QUIT DISTORTING OREGON’S ASSISTED SUICIDE LAW — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-Oregon’s physician-assisted suicide law continues to be an object of misinformation.-

Misinformation industry turns law into something its not

Oregon’s self-image is about an iconoclastic, pioneering spirit. Oregon enacted a bottle bill in 1971. Nine states have imitated it. Oregon voters agreed to death with dignity legislation physician-assisted suicide in 1994.

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CREWS GAIN CONTROL ON CORNET-WINDY RIDGE, ELDORADO FIRES (Baker City Herald)

The Cornet-Windy Ridge and Eldorado blazes remain under firefighters control, while the Eagle Complex Fire continues to burn 20 miles northwest of Richland.

As of this morning, the Eagle Complex fire has burned 8,129 acres and is 5 percent contained.
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EAGLE COMPLEX GROWTH SLOWS SIGNIFICANTLY (Baker City Herald)

Smoke aided firefighters Sunday in their battle against the Eagle Complex fires, burning 10 miles east of Medical Springs.

Smoke from the fires did not lift as much as expected Sunday, preventing the Eagle Complex blazes from growing significantly.
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OPEN PRIMARY WOULD BRING ADDED COST TO OREGON ELECTIONS (Bend Bulletin)

-Independent Party says it will allow non-members vote in primary election-

By late April 2016, some of Oregon’s more than 530,000 unaffiliated voters may have to make a choice: Do they want to receive a ballot for the Independent Party’s first election as a major political party in Oregon or just nonpartisan offices and referenda?

Its a somewhat obscure question in Oregon elections, but its one that counties and the secretary of states office are focusing on because an open primary will add to the cost of running elections in Oregon.
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HOW TO HELP OREGON’S WILDFIRE VICTIMS (Bend Bulletin)

-Grant County still in need of goods, Warm Springs financial support-

Wildfires around Oregon this summer have left people without homes and in need of aid.

As they begin to rebuild, what might help them the most varies, said Paula Fasano Negele, communications director for the American Red Cross Cascades Region, based in Portland.

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FOREST SERVICE DEFENDS CANYON CREEK RESPONSE (Blue Mountain Eagle)

-The Malheur National Forest has detailed, step by step, what they did to try and suppress the Canyon Creek Complex before homes were destroyed.-

Fire officials knew trouble was coming when a series of lightning storms rolled over the Malheur National Forest earlier this month.

Yet despite an initial attack that included both air and ground support, crews simply couldnt corral the two fires that would eventually form the hellish Canyon Creek Complex south of John Day.

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FIRST RESPONDERS CONTINUE TO BE WARY OF DISTRACTED OR CONFUSED DRIVERS (Douglas County News-Review)

A driver cut across two lanes on I-5 north in front of Roseburg police officer Kody Inda, forcing Inda to lightly tap the brakes of his patrol car.

About 15 minutes later, another driver straddled two lanes for a few seconds directly in front of Inda before finally moving over.
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TIME’S UP, VA: FIX YOUR PROBLEMS NOW — OPINION (Douglas County News-Review)

In Sunday’s front page story, senior staff writer Carisa Cegavske wrote about various horrible experiences that veterans had recently endured when they visited the emergency room of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Roseburg.
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STOUTS CREEK FIRE SURROUNDED (Herald and News)

Fire operations managers have secured the fire and are confident the firelines will hold at the Stouts Creek Fire in the Upmqua Valley, according to a press release.

The threat to structures has decreased to the point that as of 7 a.m. today, all evacuation levels have been reduced to a Level 1 Ready.
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HERMISTON JUDGE APPOINTED TO TOP LEGAL POST IN OREGON NATIONAL GUARD (Hermiston Herald)

-A Hermiston-based circuit court judge was recently named the top legal official for the Oregon National Guard.-

In July, Gov. Kate Brown appointed Col. Daniel J. Hill state judge advocate, where he will supervise more than 25 judge advocates and legal personnel for the guard and serve as a legal advisor to the adjutant general.
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GRIZZLY BEAR BLAZE AT 65,000 ACRES; FALLS CREEK STILL AT 200 (Wallowa.com)
-More than 600 firefighters battling Grizzly Bear Complex blaze.-

More than 600 firefighters are now battling the Grizzly Bear Complex fire in northern Wallowa County as it crossed the 65,000-acre threshold on Sunday.

An active day is expected again on Monday, according to the U.S. Forest Service, as dry, hot weather conditions could result in a column forming by late afternoon.

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MUSSEL HARVESTING REOPENED ON OREGON COAST (The World)

Recreational and commercial mussel harvesting has been reopened on the Oregon coast.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife announced Monday that mussel harvesting would be reopened from Cape Meares, south of Tillamook Bay, to Heceta Head, north of Florence.
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EDUCATION CZAR NANCY GOLDEN’S RETIREMENT RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT DIRECTION OF K-12 REFORMS (Willamette Week)

-Departure of Kitzhaber ally leaves uncertainty.-

Gov. Kate Brown this morning announced that the state’s chief education officer, Nancy Golden, is retiring.
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WANTED: PEOPLE TO FIGHT FIRES IN WASHINGTON AND OREGON (KATU)

If you think you could be a wildland firefighter, both Washington and Oregon could use your help.
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‘YOUR VOICE, YOUR VOTE:’ PORTLAND TRAFFIC INCREASE – VIDEO (KATU)

Portland traffic has increased by 6 percent this year.

ODOT Region 1 Manager Rian Windsheimer, Jana Jarvis with Oregon Trucking Associations and Marion Haynes with the Portland Business Alliance join KATU’s Steve Dunn to discuss the impact of increased traffic in the Rose City.
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PROPER CAR SEAT INSTALLATION A PRIORITY IN OREGON (KOIN)

-According to ODOT, 90% of parents install children’s car seats improperly-

Police agencies around the state are kicking off car safety campaigns as summer comes to an end and kids head back to school.
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WARM SPRINGS WILDFIRE MAY BE CONTAINED BY FRIDAY (KTVZ Bend)

-At 69 pct. containment by 600 personnel on 65,200-acre blaze-

A threat of thunderstorms had crews on the 65,000-acre County Line 2 Fire on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation watching for new problems to emerge Monday, but it moved to 69 percent containment – and if all goes well, it’ll be fully contained by Friday, officials said.
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DEMAND GROWS FOR NEW WAYS TO CONSUME MARIJUANA (The Columbian)

-Tonics, breath sprays and candies offer consumers options-

Smoking is clearly the popular way to consume marijuana, as demonstrated by the thousands of pounds of marijuana flower legally sold each week. A growing number of consumers seek a more discreet and portable experience that companies continue to develop anything from coffees to breath sprays to candies

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 25, 2015 eClips

August 24, 2015 eClips Weekend Edition

State Library eClips
* Disease kills 150,000 fish in hatchery’s 2nd major die-off this year
* Brush fire that closed U.S. 26 caused by person, authorities say
* Kindergarten assessments aren’t something to fear — Opinion
* Beaverton School District takes next step in getting OK to fill wetlands
* Bow hunters open deer and elk season despite widespread fires
* Destructive Oregon wildfire prompts questions: help too little, too late?
* Mystery money: Oregon lets officials keep income details in shadows
* Rogue River’s Boundary Springs to Pacific Ocean in photos
* Republicans and immigration — Opinion
* Decreasing winds give Northwest firefighters hope, even as blazes fill skies with smoke
* Wind blows wildfire smoke over Cascades into Portland area, triggering unhealthy readings in Beaverton, Government Camp
* Arctic oil extraction vital for Oregon’s energy future — Guest Opinion
* Oregon needs a new constitutional amendment for education funding — Guest Opinion
* Elizabeth Hovde: Smarter Balanced tests need smart response — Opinion
* Another 250 Oregon National Guard members called up for wildfire duty
* Freedom Foundation provides resources to aid Oregonians — Guest Opinion
* Smoke blanketing Salem ‘to take a little while’ to clear
* Brown: Guardsman who subdued gunman ‘pride of Oregon’
* 150 years of the Oregon State Fair: Down memory lane
* 3 ways to reduce greenhouse emissions right now — Opinion
* Time for energy realism in Oregon — Guest Opinion
* Hundreds protest at Planned Parenthood in Salem
* Woman reports being stopped by fake cops
* Governor: National Guardsman who subdued French train gunman is ‘the pride of Oregon’
* Fragrance or stench? — Opinion
* Wine boom will have a cost — Guest Opinion
* Elliott State Forest sale wont solve anything — Guest Opinion
* Don’t blame health agency — Opinion
* 2 birds test positive for West Nile in Jackson County
* Gov. Kate Brown seeks applicants for judicial vacancy in Lane County Justice Court
* McDougal Brothers moving ahead with railroad siding in west Eugene
* Officials investigating a string of 19 summertime fires near Oakridge
* Not bogged down
* Wildfire smoke blankets Willamette Valley
* Try a real open primary — Opinion
* Fire closes Hwy. 26 in Washington County
* Governor, president praise bravery by Oregon Guardsman in Paris train attack
* Fire closes Hwy. 26 in Washington County
* Gov. Brown Invokes Conflagration Act In Wallowa County Fire
* More Than 875K Acres Burning Across The Northwest
* Relief Funds Available For People Who’ve Lost Homes To Wildfire
* New Oil Train Safety Rules Approved In Oregon
* Oregon officials add up fire damage to obtain federal aid
* Farmers should report fire, drought losses to Farm Service Agency, officials say
* Grizzly Bear Complex Fire nears 60,000 acres
* Canyon Creek fire sizzles, remains stable Sunday
* Troy fire destroys three homes
* What now for burned forests?
* Megafires no longer if, but when — Opinion
* BLM caught in the middle over forest policy — Opinion
* Are smoky skies the new normal for the Rogue Valley?
* Walden: Act will give hope to disease sufferers — Guest Opinion
* A change at the pump
* Final kicker amount to be announced Wednesday
* Oregon inmates battle blazes
* Economics: Pie charts, booze and video poker — Opinion
* Soldiers arrive in Salem for fire training
* Marine patrols issue 52 citations
* Why no audit of the mess? — Opinion
* Helping the victims of Oregon’s wildfires — Opinion
* The unseemly fight against the Independent Party — Opinion
* Two reports highlight Medicaid patients experiences
* Progress being made on Canyon Creek Complex fire
* Fire updates: Crater Lake North Entrance closed
* Warrior Spirit: Pulling out of poverty no easy task
* BOR wins lawsuit over water transfer
* Feds release extra water to save Klamath salmon
* Fire above Hurricane Creek trailhead gets new name, personnel
* Selling the Elliott Forest is the best option — Opinion
* What Do Forest Fires Burning Across the State Mean for Portland’s Air Quality? — Blog
* Is Oregon’s assisted suicide law rife with problems?
* Decades after woman’s death in Oregon, remains buried alongside sister’s grave in Iowa

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DISEASE KILLS 150,000 FISH IN HATCHERY’S 2ND MAJOR DIE-OFF THIS YEAR (Portland Oregonian)

Disease stemming from warm water in the North Umpqua River has killed 150,000 fish at a Roseburg area fish hatchery, marking the facility’s second mass die-off this summer.
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BRUSH FIRE THAT CLOSED U.S. 26 CAUSED BY PERSON, AUTHORITIES SAY (Portland Oregonian)

A fire that has torched four acres of heavy brush west of Manning on Saturday is likely human created, according to the Oregon Department of Forestry.
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KINDERGARTEN ASSESSMENTS AREN’T SOMETHING TO FEAR — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

It may seem like overkill at first. A test for kindergartners in their first week at school?
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BEAVERTON SCHOOL DISTRICT TAKES NEXT STEP IN GETTING OK TO FILL WETLANDS (Portland Oregonian)

The Beaverton School District has secured one of two permits to fill wetlands on property where a new high school is scheduled to open in September 2017.
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BOW HUNTERS OPEN DEER AND ELK SEASON DESPITE WIDESPREAD FIRES (Portland Oregonian)

Those weren’t clouds causing Saturday’s deep orange sunrise, but despite the regional conflagration, the 2015 bow-hunting season will open as scheduled Aug. 29.
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DESTRUCTIVE OREGON WILDFIRE PROMPTS QUESTIONS: HELP TOO LITTLE, TOO LATE? (Portland Oregonian)

The knock on the door from police Thursday afternoon alerted Jolynn and Ted Swartzendruber they may have to evacuate their Prairie City home.

It was the family’s second confrontation with wildfire in days. And now, just miles to the north, a new wildfire was boiling to life, and once again threatening homes.
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MYSTERY MONEY: OREGON LETS OFFICIALS KEEP INCOME DETAILS IN SHADOWS (Portland Oregonian)

If John Kitzhaber had been governor of California or 16 other states, voters might have known years sooner how much first lady Cylvia Hayes was paid to push a private agenda similar to her public one.
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ROGUE RIVER’S BOUNDARY SPRINGS TO PACIFIC OCEAN IN PHOTOS (Portland Oregonian)

It’s a bit early for an anniversary celebration, but Oregon’s Rogue River is worth cheering about at any time.
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REPUBLICANS AND IMMIGRATION — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

It was always hard to figure out the logistics of just how more than 100,000 undocumented immigrants in Oregon were going to be quickly shipped out of the country, as the hardest-line voices have been demanding. PDX is indeed an international airport, but it doesn’t have that many flights out of the country, and a lot of those flights go to Vancouver.
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DECREASING WINDS GIVE NORTHWEST FIREFIGHTERS HOPE, EVEN AS BLAZES FILL SKIES WITH SMOKE (Portland Oregonian)

As wildfires continued to burn across hundreds of miles of Oregon and Washington Saturday, officials were hoping that Saturday’s weather conditions would help slow the blazes’ growth.
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WIND BLOWS WILDFIRE SMOKE OVER CASCADES INTO PORTLAND AREA, TRIGGERING UNHEALTHY READINGS IN BEAVERTON, GOVERNMENT CAMP (Portland Oregonian)

Winds blowing smoke from eastern Oregon wildfires blew over the Cascades on Saturday, turning the air in Portland and much of the Willamette Valley into a gray haze and leaving Beaverton and Government Camp with unhealthy air quality.
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ARCTIC OIL EXTRACTION VITAL FOR OREGON’S ENERGY FUTURE — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

From lower energy and fuel costs to a stronger economy, greater geopolitical influence and a better sense of national security, the historic American energy revolution is the gift that keeps on giving.
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OREGON NEEDS A NEW CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT FOR EDUCATION FUNDING — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

With the start of the school year, I am eager to transfer my daughter’s preferred leisure activities watching TV, reading fairy books and listening to Taylor Swift to the academic essentials of reading, writing and math.
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ELIZABETH HOVDE: SMARTER BALANCED TESTS NEED SMART RESPONSE — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Washington and Oregon’s education leaders are pleased that last year’s students did better than predicted on Smarter Balanced assessments. Now, mind you, the predictions, based on a field test the year before, were pretty scary.
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ANOTHER 250 OREGON NATIONAL GUARD MEMBERS CALLED UP FOR WILDFIRE DUTY (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown announced Saturday that she has authorized another 250 Oregon National Guard members to help battle wildfires.

The latest group will join the 125 guard members who began wildfire training Saturday in Salem and are expected to be deployed to fires across the state on Wednesday.
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FREEDOM FOUNDATION PROVIDES RESOURCES TO AID OREGONIANS — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

I am responding to the Aug. 16 editorial related to the lawsuit filed by the Freedom Foundation on behalf of Oregon home care worker Julian Brown.
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SMOKE BLANKETING SALEM ‘TO TAKE A LITTLE WHILE’ TO CLEAR (Salem Statesman Journal)

While crews worked to corral the Willamina Creek Fire, burning closest to Salem, far-flung blazes in Eastern Oregon had the greatest impact on the city.
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BROWN: GUARDSMAN WHO SUBDUED GUNMAN ‘PRIDE OF OREGON’ (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown is saluting the courage of an Oregon National Guard specialist who helped stop a gunman on a high-speed train in Europe.
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150 YEARS OF THE OREGON STATE FAIR: DOWN MEMORY LANE (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon State Fair has a history as rich as the soil of the Willamette Valley.
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3 WAYS TO REDUCE GREENHOUSE EMISSIONS RIGHT NOW — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

In 10 seconds you could do more to help the environment right now than the 2015 Oregon Legislature did.
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TIME FOR ENERGY REALISM IN OREGON — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Somehow the notion has taken hold in the Northwest that oil and natural gas the energy sources that actually power the U.S. economy are socially acceptable targets for destructive campaigns aimed at keeping fossil fuels in the ground Arctic-bound ship leaves Portland after oil drilling protest, July 31.
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HUNDREDS PROTEST AT PLANNED PARENTHOOD IN SALEM (Salem Statesman Journal)

Hundreds of people gathered outside the Salem Planned Parenthood clinic Saturday morning to protest the organization, which offers health services, including abortions, to women.

The protest was among many nationwide Saturday that called on Congress to withdraw federal funding for Planned Parenthood.
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WOMAN REPORTS BEING STOPPED BY FAKE COPS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon State Police arrested two men on charges of impersonating peace officers Friday morning after they allegedly used a law enforcement-type vehicle to pull over and intimidate a woman on Highway 22 in Polk County.
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GOVERNOR: NATIONAL GUARDSMAN WHO SUBDUED FRENCH TRAIN GUNMAN IS ‘THE PRIDE OF OREGON’ (Eugene Register-Guard)

Gov. Kate Brown is saluting the courage of an Oregon National Guard specialist who helped stop a gunman on a high-speed train in Europe.

The governor said in a statement Saturday that Alek Skarlatos of Roseburg “is the pride of Oregon.” She says Skarlatos’ action “saved many lives and earned him the gratitude of the nation and the world.”
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FRAGRANCE OR STENCH? — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

For some folks, the smell of marijuana smoke is a fragrant reminder of good times for others, its an intolerable stench.

Those in the latter group might want to consider an Oregon Court of Appeals ruling Wednesday that overturned the convictions of a Philomath man found guilty of three counts of misdemeanor second-degree criminal mischief.
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WINE BOOM WILL HAVE A COST — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

In response to The Register-Guards Aug. 15 editorial about how important agricultural balance is to Oregon, I share my tale.

While wine is wonderful and vineyards are wonderful and people having a good time is wonderful, too much wonderful is not wonderful.

I write this comment as an early caution, a caution that the federal governments Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau and certainly the state government of Oregon should want to consider for the long term.

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ELLIOTT STATE FOREST SALE WONT SOLVE ANYTHING — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The State Land Boards decision to sell the Elliott State Forest illustrates the willingness of Oregon’s timber-industry-dominated politicians to privatize public forests. They justify their efforts to transfer public forests to private timber corporations with the usual unverifiable or questionable claims of increased jobs and revenues.
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DON’T BLAME HEALTH AGENCY — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

An Aug. 20 editorial unfairly criticized the Oregon Health Authority for setting rules limiting purchases of recreational marijuana to one-quarter of an ounce per day. The rule will apply starting Oct. 1, when medical pot dispensaries will be able to start selling marijuana to customers in the recreational market. The quarter-ounce limit, however, was set by the Legislature, and the health authority cant be held accountable for it.
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2 BIRDS TEST POSITIVE FOR WEST NILE IN JACKSON COUNTY (Eugene Register-Guard)

Jackson County officials say West Nile virus was been found in two dead birds and nine groups of mosquitoes.
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GOV. KATE BROWN SEEKS APPLICANTS FOR JUDICIAL VACANCY IN LANE COUNTY JUSTICE COURT (Eugene Register-Guard)

Applications are now being accepted for the justice of the peace position on the Lane County Justice Court in Florence, Gov. Kate Brown has announced.
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MCDOUGAL BROTHERS MOVING AHEAD WITH RAILROAD SIDING IN WEST EUGENE (Eugene Register-Guard)

The Creswell-based McDougal Brothers mining and logging company is moving ahead with plans to build a railroad siding in west Eugene, potentially for hauling gravel and logs between the south Willamette Valley and the Oregon Coast.
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OFFICIALS INVESTIGATING A STRING OF 19 SUMMERTIME FIRES NEAR OAKRIDGE (Eugene Register-Guard)

A string of 19 fires over the summer near the communities of Oakridge and Westfir has caught the attention of investigators.
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NOT BOGGED DOWN (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Oregon cranberry growers starting harvest early-

At this rate, the Thanksgiving turkey will show up on Halloween.
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WILDFIRE SMOKE BLANKETS WILLAMETTE VALLEY (Eugene Register-Guard)

-The thick haze is likely to last until late today or Monday-

Strong winds carried smoke from the blazes ravaging large swaths of Oregon and Washington, creating a low-visibility haze in Lane County and across the Willamette Valley.
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TRY A REAL OPEN PRIMARY — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Independent Party’s status provides opportunity-

On Monday, Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins announced that the Independent Party of Oregon had qualified, barely, as a major political party, with more than 5 percent of registered voters signed up as party members. The achievement is likely to be short-lived, and its brevity offers an opportunity: The Legislature should approve a mail-ballot trial of an open primary for the IPO in 2016.
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FIRE CLOSES HWY. 26 IN WASHINGTON COUNTY (Portland Tribune)

A brush fire closed Hagg Lake and U.S. 26 in Washington County on Sunday.
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GOVERNOR, PRESIDENT PRAISE BRAVERY BY OREGON GUARDSMAN IN PARIS TRAIN ATTACK (Portland Tribune)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and President Obama praised the actions of 22-year-old Oregon National Guard Specialist Alek Skarlatos of Roseburg, who helped stop a deadly shooting attack Friday on a train from Amsterdam to Paris.
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FIRE CLOSES HWY. 26 IN WASHINGTON COUNTY (Portland Tribune)

A brush fire closed Hagg Lake and U.S. 26 in Washington County on Sunday.

The fire began around 3 p.m. off near Manning around Milepost 43 and quickly burned at least 12 acres, according to the Oregon Department of Forestry.
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GOV. BROWN INVOKES CONFLAGRATION ACT IN WALLOWA COUNTY FIRE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Gov. Kate Brown invoked Oregon’s Emergency Conflagration Act Thursday night in response to a Wallowa County fire.
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MORE THAN 875K ACRES BURNING ACROSS THE NORTHWEST (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

President Obama declared a state of emergency Friday for Washington state, where several wildfires are burning uncontained.
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RELIEF FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR PEOPLE WHO’VE LOST HOMES TO WILDFIRE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

After 36 homes were burned at the Canyon Creek Wildfire outside John Day this week, Oregon is trying to let owners know that relief is available.
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NEW OIL TRAIN SAFETY RULES APPROVED IN OREGON (Jefferson Public Radio)

The Oregon Transportation Commission adopted new rules Friday requiring railroads to increase the amount of information they share with state officials. Months in the making, the rules come in response to concerns over the states readiness for oil train spills and fires.
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OREGON OFFICIALS ADD UP FIRE DAMAGE TO OBTAIN FEDERAL AID (Capital Press)

-Damage reports must be completed before the federal government can declare the Canyon Creek Complex fire a major disaster and provide financial assistance.-

Oregon emergency authorities will have to assess damages from the Canyon Creek Complex fire before seeking financial assistance from the federal government.

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FARMERS SHOULD REPORT FIRE, DROUGHT LOSSES TO FARM SERVICE AGENCY, OFFICIALS SAY (Capital Press)

-The USDA Farm Service Agency is starting to hear from growers impacted by wildfires. State outreach coordinator Chris Bieker recommends photo documentation.-

Help is available.

Thats the message for farmers and ranchers who have sustained losses because of wildfires, a representative of the USDA Farm Service Agency says.

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GRIZZLY BEAR COMPLEX FIRE NEARS 60,000 ACRES (East Oregonian)

-Helicopters dropping water had to take a break Saturday afternoon as skies became too smoky to fly.-

The Grizzly Bear Complex fire reached nearly 60,000 acres on Saturday afternoon and has destroyed five homes and 19 outbuildings as fire crews worked to create fire lines around the northern Wallowa County blaze.

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CANYON CREEK FIRE SIZZLES, REMAINS STABLE SUNDAY (East Oregonian)

-Slowly but surely, firefighters are making progress on the Canyon Creek Complex south of John Day.-

The blaze, which burned out of control for more than a week and destroyed 39 houses, was officially 23 percent contained as of Sunday morning. Winds are expected to shift out of the southwest later this week, pushing flames back toward established fire lines and into previously burned areas within the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

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TROY FIRE DESTROYS THREE HOMES (East Oregonian)

Firefighters raced Friday to protect homes in a remote section of northeastern Oregon from a rapidly expanding wildfire that quadrupled in size in 24 hours as it destroyed three houses and a dozen other structures.

Gov. Kate Brown used her authority late Thursday to deploy firefighters from the Willamette Valley to protect property along the border with Washington.
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WHAT NOW FOR BURNED FORESTS? (East Oregonian)

The damage caused by the Canyon Creek Complex wildfire south of John Day isnt just limited to 39 destroyed houses.

Flames have also torched tens of thousands of acres of trees and vegetation throughout the Canyon Creek watershed, leaving the barren landscape vulnerable to future soil erosion and flooding.
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MEGAFIRES NO LONGER IF, BUT WHEN — OPINION (East Oregonian)

-Eastern Oregon is ablaze. Eastern Washington is ablaze. The Pacific Northwest is ablaze. The American West is ablaze.-

These are serious fires that have destroyed homes, taken human life, wrecked ecosystems and destroyed livelihoods. This brutally hot and dry year will have impacts well into the future, but may not be not as rare as we might first think.
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BLM CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE OVER FOREST POLICY — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

It’s not easy being the BLM.

The Bureau of Land Management is the federal agency charged with administering forest land in Western Oregon, specifically the former Oregon & California Railroad lands that are supposed to be managed for sustained yield timber production. Since the timber wars of the 1980s and 1990s, timber harvest levels have dwindled to a fraction of what they once were.
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ARE SMOKY SKIES THE NEW NORMAL FOR THE ROGUE VALLEY? (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Temps expected to be above average again next year-

On Saturday, Medford’s air quality index had not recorded a 24-hour period of measurably “good” air for more than three weeks.
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WALDEN: ACT WILL GIVE HOPE TO DISEASE SUFFERERS — GUEST OPINION (Argus Observer)

All of us have known someone affected by deadly diseases. In my own family, Ive had loved ones suffer from ovarian and brain cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, and more.
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A CHANGE AT THE PUMP (Daily Astorian)

-A new Oregon law allows for self-service at gas stations but within strict limits.-

Breaking with a long-standing and long-contested Oregon tradition, a new state law will allow drivers in small rural counties, including Clatsop County, to pump their own gas.

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FINAL KICKER AMOUNT TO BE ANNOUNCED WEDNESDAY (Daily Astorian)

-Legislators will hear the first revenue forecast of the new budget cycle Wednesday, and Oregonians will find out how much this year’s “kicker” will reduce their state income taxes.-

When lawmakers hear the first quarterly revenue forecast of the new two-year state budget cycle next week, they also will learn the final amount of what Oregon taxpayers will get back in excess personal income tax collections next spring.

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OREGON INMATES BATTLE BLAZES (Baker City Herald)

Oregon inmates from five minimum-security prisons have gone from behind bars to the front lines of the flames in Northeastern Oregon.

The Unity Lake Campground is serving as a makeshift settlement with large blue 20-man tents for the inmates.

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ECONOMICS: PIE CHARTS, BOOZE AND VIDEO POKER — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

The economists have had a go at gauging Oregon’s commerce, and they’ve examined the usual entrails of tax revenues and workforce trends and seasonally adjusted jobless rates.

The daunting columns of statistics that define the science of economics are well enough for its practitioners.

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SOLDIERS ARRIVE IN SALEM FOR FIRE TRAINING (Bend Bulletin)

-Strong showing of Central Oregon National Guard in volunteer assignment-

More than half of the Oregon National Guard soldiers volunteering to help fight wildfires come from units based in Central Oregon.

Gov. Kate Brown activated the National Guard to assist in firefighting during a visit earlier this week to Grant County, where three dozen homes have been lost to the Canyon Creek Complex Fire near Canyon City.
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MARINE PATROLS ISSUE 52 CITATIONS (Bend Bulletin)

-Tickets issued during enforcement effort on Lake Billy Chinook-

Multiple boaters were cited at Lake Billy Chinook Aug. 7 and 8 as part of a saturation patrol coordinated by the Oregon State Marine Board.
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WHY NO AUDIT OF THE MESS? — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The Oregon Department of Energy has been putting its energy into encouraging renewables. It has legislatively mandated goals. It has programs to implement them.

And it has a seemingly ever-growing mess on its hands with its tax credit programs.
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HELPING THE VICTIMS OF OREGON’S WILDFIRES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The Canyon Creek Complex Fire near John Day is the most destructive fire in Oregon in decades. It has destroyed many homes and outbuildings.

In Central Oregon, the County Line 2 Fire near Warm Springs is not nearly as destructive. Still, it has burned at least five homes.
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THE UNSEEMLY FIGHT AGAINST THE INDEPENDENT PARTY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s Democratic and Republican parties don’t show much restraint when taking on the growing power of the Independent Party of Oregon.

There was an egregious example earlier this year. House Bill 3500 would have formed a task force to look at how primaries should work. When state Sen. Betsy Johnson, D-Scappoose, protested that the bill unfairly excluded sufficient representation for the Independent Party, the leadership of the Democratic Party took action.
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TWO REPORTS HIGHLIGHT MEDICAID PATIENTS EXPERIENCES (Bend Bulletin)

-Authors urge CCOs to increase transparency-

Two new reports shed light on aspects of Oregon’s Medicaid program their authors say don’t get enough attention: the experiences of those using the program.

The Oregon Health Authority judges the success of the states 16 coordinated care organizations, the groups that administer Medicaid known here as the Oregon Health Plan on more than 40 metrics.

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PROGRESS BEING MADE ON CANYON CREEK COMPLEX FIRE (Blue Mountain Eagle)

-Fire conditions improve-

Slowly but surely, firefighters are making steady progress on the Canyon Creek Complex south of John Day.

The blaze, which burned out of control for more than a week and destroyed 39 houses, was officially 23 percent contained as of Sunday morning. At last count, 69,606 acres have been scorched.

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FIRE UPDATES: CRATER LAKE NORTH ENTRANCE CLOSED (Herald and News)

Crater Lake National Park has closed the north entrance road between State Highway 138 at the parks north boundary and the Crater Lake west rim drive at north junction.
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WARRIOR SPIRIT: PULLING OUT OF POVERTY NO EASY TASK (Herald and News)

-Brown University Professor Tricia Rose talks race, poverty and education-

According to the County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, 27 percent of Klamath Countys children live in poverty. Thats more than the state average of 22 percent.

Poverty, like other factors, puts an extra burden on students and educators alike to reach for the same high goals of graduating high school, college or finding a career.

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BOR WINS LAWSUIT OVER WATER TRANSFER (Herald and News)

An appeals court has upheld a ruling that the Bureau of Reclamation BOR does not need a pollution permit to transfer water from the Klamath Project to the Klamath River.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled Friday in favor of the BOR in a lawsuit brought by the Oregon environmental group ONRC Action, the Associated Press reported.

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FEDS RELEASE EXTRA WATER TO SAVE KLAMATH SALMON (Herald and News)

With water scarce in Northern California’s Klamath Basin, a federal agency is again releasing cool, clean water into the Klamath River to prevent a repeat of the 2002 fish kill that left tens of thousands of adult salmon dead.

That move could lead to a renewed fight about the Klamath River, which has long been subject to intense political battles over sharing scarce water between farms and fish.

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FIRE ABOVE HURRICANE CREEK TRAILHEAD GETS NEW NAME, PERSONNEL (Wallowa.com)

-Fire slightly increases in size, smoke jumpers on the way.-

The fire reported this morning in the Eagle Cap Wilderness above Hurricane Creek Trailhead has increased very little in size from the 30 acres reported earlier according to Kris Stein, the U.S. Forest Service District Ranger for the Eagle Cap Ranger District. The fire also gained an official name: the Falls Creek Fire.

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SELLING THE ELLIOTT FOREST IS THE BEST OPTION — OPINION (The World)

-Time and circumstance have negated the forests revenue value-

More than a year ago Dec. 12, 2013, to be exact we reluctantly endorsed the preliminary recommendation of the State Land Board to sell the Elliott State Forest and finally get this burden off the states back.

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WHAT DO FOREST FIRES BURNING ACROSS THE STATE MEAN FOR PORTLAND’S AIR QUALITY? — BLOG (Willamette Week)

-Depending on the way the wind blows, Portland could be in for some smoky weather.-

Forest fires are no joke, and there are currently 27 of them burning in Oregon and Washington State. The Pacific Northwest is currently experiencing some of the worst fire conditions in years, with three firefighters killed in blazes in Washington, more injured, and dozens of homes and other properties destroyed.
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IS OREGON’S ASSISTED SUICIDE LAW RIFE WITH PROBLEMS? (KGW)

Oregon’s physician-assisted suicide law has had unintended consequences with which the state has never come to terms, a Portland doctor said in a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed.
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DECADES AFTER WOMAN’S DEATH IN OREGON, REMAINS BURIED ALONGSIDE SISTER’S GRAVE IN IOWA (Fox News)

The remains of a woman who died in an Oregon mental institution nearly 60 years ago have finally been buried alongside her sister’s grave in Iowa.
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THE STATES SHOW UP CONGRESS ON ROAD REPAIRS — OPINION (New York Times)

As the nations bridges and roads deteriorate and Congress dawdles over a serious solution, statehouse politicians have been stepping up at a surprising rate to make some difficult choices.

At least half the states have passed transportation funding measures in the last two years to raise some of the billions of dollars needed to repair frayed bridges, highways and mass transit systems that increasingly bedevil commuters and businesses, threatening safety and undermining local economies.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 24, 2015 eClips Weekend Edition

August 24, 2015 eClips

State Library eClips
* National Weather Service: Pacific, westerly airflows to push the haze away
* Northwest wildfires: Crews make progress on some blazes while containment stagnates elsewhere
* Oregon’s hot hash oil market drives demand for marijuana ‘trim’
* New evacuations ordered as Canyon Creek complex pushes toward residential areas
* Tripwire’s retiring CEO has a parting message: Care for Portland’s core, boost education
* OSP reports incident between trooper, North Bend man; video claims to show altercation
* Lessons in workplace culture from Amazon, Gravity: Editorial
* Cleanup group returns with details, mapping of massive Pacific Ocean trash field
* Change is coming to Salem Capitol Mall parking meters
* Willamette Valley wildlife refuges battle drought
* Salem’s air quality may improve Monday afternoon
* Poor air quality from wildfires lingers into Monday across the Willamette Valley
* Fragrance — or stench?
* On The Front Lines Of A Wildfire
* Cooler temperatures, lower winds help Oregon firefighters
* Dangerous decisions: In Clatsop County, gaps in the mental health safety net
* 64,701-acre Warm Springs fire could flare today
* Open primary would bring added cost to Oregon elections
* UPDATE: Falls Creek Fire grows overnight
* Limited Number of Oregon Blue Books Are Available
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National Weather Service: Pacific, westerly airflows to push the haze away (Portland Oregonian)

These hazy days should go away.

The National Weather Service says evening airflows are returning from the sea. Combined with westerly and southwesterly winds, the onshore airflow should push the smoke and haze east of the Portland metro area.
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Northwest wildfires: Crews make progress on some blazes while containment stagnates elsewhere (Portland Oregonian)

Wildfires continue to seethe in the Pacific Northwest, and relief appears to be a mixed bag – with containment gaining on some fires while progress remains at a standstill on others.

The smoke blown into the Portland area from nearby wildfires is a reminder of this fire season’s “intensity,” the Oregon Department of Forestry wrote in a news release.
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Oregon’s hot hash oil market drives demand for marijuana ‘trim’ (Portland Oregonian)

Cameron Yee opened a gallon-sized plastic bag of dried leaves from a popular strain of cannabis called Lemon Haze. He thrust his hand into the bag and gave the leaves a vigorous stir.

As recently as a few years ago, the small leaves snipped from harvested cannabis flowers ended up in the trash. After all, when it comes to marijuana, the flower is the star.
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New evacuations ordered as Canyon Creek complex pushes toward residential areas (Portland Oregonian)

A fresh round of evacuations was ordered Sunday night near John Day as the growing Canyon Creek complex advanced toward populated areas, pushed by late afternoon winds.

Police ordered residents out from areas in the Upper Dog Creek and Upper Pine Creek areas just east of John Day. More than 130 homes are in that area, but police didn’t have an immediate count of how many had to be evacuated.
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Tripwire’s retiring CEO has a parting message: Care for Portland’s core, boost education (Portland Oregonian)

Tripwire chief executive Jim Johnson, who came out of retirement 11 years ago to rescue one of Portland’s most promising technology companies, will retire at the end of September — for real, this time, he says.

A 27-year Intel veteran, Johnson was a vice president in 2001 when he left without plans to work again. He stepped in at Tripwire on an interim basis in 2004 when company co-founder Wyatt Starnes was diagnosed with cancer, and the temporary assignment turned into a second career.
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OSP reports incident between trooper, North Bend man; video claims to show altercation (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon State Police on Sunday released information about a weekend incident in which a trooper, investigating a reckless driving report, attempted to stop a man from interfering with his investigation after the man began filming the officer.

The incident between the trooper and a North Bend resident, identified in an OSP news release as 25-year-old Michael Scott, appears to have been caught on cell-phone video by the man and shared on social media. The video includes a physical confrontation between the trooper and the man, who Scott claims is himself.
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Lessons in workplace culture from Amazon, Gravity: Editorial (Portland Oregonian)

Two Seattle companies have taken roughly opposite approaches to building a workplace culture. Their founders sought to create an environment that they thought would help the companies succeed while also holding true to strongly held personal philosophies. And each corporate leader has faced recent blowback from employees, followed by national media attention.
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Cleanup group returns with details, mapping of massive Pacific Ocean trash field (Portland Oregonian)

Far away from California’s coast, where the Pacific Ocean currents swirl, the blue of the sea was replaced by fishing nets, buckets, buoys, laundry baskets and unidentifiable pieces of plastic that floated past the Ocean Star, a ship carrying a team of scientists and volunteers gathering data on plastic garbage.
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150,000 steelhead die from warm water temperatures at Umpqua River hatchery (Portland Oregonian)

Unusually warm water has killed more than 150,000 summer steelhead fingerlings at an Umpqua River hatchery.

Rock Creek Hatchery manager Dan Meyer said many more may still die, potentially as much as 95 percent of this year’s batch.
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Change is coming to Salem Capitol Mall parking meters (Salem Statesman Journal)

Site preparation work is set to begin later this month for the installation of new parking pay stations within the Salem Capitol Mall.

The city’s existing old-style parking meters that accepted only coins will be replaced with kiosk-style pay stations that will accept debit or credit cards, as well as coins. The new stations will not accept bills.
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Willamette Valley wildlife refuges battle drought (Salem Statesman Journal)

Drought is taking a toll on the Willamette Valley’s three national wildlife refuges.

Some ponds have disappeared at Ankeny refuge, near Albany.

“A lot of our wetlands are seasonal wetlands. They do occasionally dry up,” said Damien Miller, project leader for the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex. “This year we’re seeing them dry up quicker than they normally would.”
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Salem’s air quality may improve Monday afternoon (Salem Statesman Journal)

On Sunday the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Washington State Department of Ecology issued an air quality alert, that’s in effect until noon Monday.

“A smoke air quality alert has been issued. Wildfires burning in the region combined with forecasted conditions will cause air quality to reach or remain at unhealthy levels. Some areas will see an improvement in air quality on Monday as westerly winds return to mix out the smoke.
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Poor air quality from wildfires lingers into Monday across the Willamette Valley (Eugene Register-Guard)

What weather watchers are calling the worst smoky air in at least 15 years led to the cancellation or alterations of some events and voluntary groundings of small aircraft locally.

The Lane Regional Air Protection Agency rated the Eugene/­Springfield area air quality as unhealthy — bordering on very unhealthy — at noon Sunday, with an air quality index reading of 196. A “very unhealthy” reading is 200 or above on the index. By 8 p.m., the reading had dropped to 163, still in the unhealthy range.
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Fragrance — or stench? (Eugene Register-Guard)

For some folks, the smell of marijuana smoke is a fragrant reminder of good times — for others, it’s an intolerable stench.

Those in the latter group might want to consider an Oregon Court of Appeals ruling Wednesday that overturned the convictions of a Philomath man found guilty of three counts of misdemeanor second-degree criminal mischief. In its decision, the three-judge panel said the smell of marijuana smoke was not inherently a “physically offensive” odor like the smell of “rotten eggs or raw sewage.”
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On The Front Lines Of A Wildfire (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Portland-based photographer Alan Thornton said growing up in dry, sun-baked New Mexico, wildfires had always fascinated him. But going out with crews to only shoot photos was limiting.

“I’ve always been interested, and did what I could do, but as a photographer, you really want to know what is it like,” said Thornton. “You can’t do that sometimes as just a photographer.”
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Cooler temperatures, lower winds help Oregon firefighters (East Oregonian)

Cooler temperatures and reduced winds helped firefighters on Saturday who were battling a large wildfire in Oregon south of the towns of John Day and Canyon City.

Fire officials expect wind to pick up on Sunday, but since winds were expected to blow out of the southeast, they will send the fire back into an area that has already burned.
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Dangerous decisions: In Clatsop County, gaps in the mental health safety net (Daily Astorian)

Patients placed into custody because of mental illness in Clatsop County do not always receive adequate notice of their legal status or clinical services and can face lengthy delays to get into psychiatric hospitals for treatment.

The findings, issued last year by the state Addictions and Mental Health Division after a review of Clatsop Behavioral Healthcare, the county’s mental health contractor, are not a revelation to law enforcement or mental health workers.
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64,701-acre Warm Springs fire could flare today (Bend Bulletin)

The interagency team managing the County Line 2 Fire on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation said the blaze could flare today with warming temperatures. The team also released updated damage figures.

Since starting on Aug. 12, the fire has destroyed two occupied homes and one vacant, inhabitable home, said Doug Epperson, spokesman for the team. It also damaged one occupied home beyond repair, causing its residents to leave, and lightly damaged four abandoned, uninhabitable houses and one vacant, inhabitable home.
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Open primary would bring added cost to Oregon elections (Bend Bulletin)

By late April 2016, some of Oregon’s more than 530,000 unaffiliated voters may have to make a choice: Do they want to receive a ballot for the Independent Party’s first election as a major political party in Oregon or just nonpartisan offices and referenda?

It’s a somewhat obscure question in Oregon elections, but it’s one that counties and the secretary of state’s office are focusing on because an open primary will add to the cost of running elections in Oregon. The party says it will allow unaffiliated voters access to its ballot if they’d like.
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UPDATE: Falls Creek Fire grows overnight (Wallowa.com)

At an agency cooperation meeting held this morning, Wallowa County officials learned from U.S. Forest service officials the Falls Creek Fire grew to 200 acres overnight. The meeting was held at the rodeo grounds in Joseph, the command post for the fire.

Wallowa County agencies including the sheriff’s office, emergency services and county commissioners Roberts and Hayward attended the meeting as did Joseph City Fire Department Chief, Jeff Wecks to discuss firefighting strategy for the blaze, located above Hurricane Creek Road in the Eagle Cap Wilderness about two miles above the Hurricane Creek Trailhead.
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Limited Number of Oregon Blue Books Are Available– Blog (Oregon Secretary of State)

A limited number of the newly-released 2015-16 Oregon Blue Book are still available. This edition features an expanded color section exploring Oregon’s early rural schools with photos, artwork and memorabilia from Oregon’s historical societies. The purpose of the exhibit is to look back at the colorful history of rural education in Oregon before World War II when small town life revolved around the local schoolhouse.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 24, 2015 eClips

August 21, 2015 eClips Supplemental Edition

  • All-cash home sales slightly down in Portland area, report finds
  • Study: First responders lack pediatric experience
  • Red Cross gives tools to families returning to burned homes
  • Measure of future health of US economy slips 0.2 percent in July after 4 strong gains
  • Cow Creek Tribe learning to speak its old language, Takelma
  • Plan To Give Teens Community Center Access Sees Results
  • Portland Sets Record For Most 90-Plus Days In A Year
  • Portland’s Hydropower In A Pipe Attracts Global Interest
  • Medicare: Doctors Should Get Paid For End-Of-Life Talks
  • 3 Firefighters Killed In Washington State Wildfire
  • Teacher Shortage? Or Teacher Pipeline Problem?
  • Ranchers, USDA spar over forest management
  • Feds hope to ramp up native plant seed production
  • USDA seeking proposals for production of bird flu vaccine
  • Feared Asian gypsy moths reappear in Washington
  • U.S. home sales soar in July to fastest pace since early 2007
  • Regulators only seek more regulation — Opinion
  • Umatilla council passes marijuana dispensary ban
  • A mile in a poor students shoes
  • Tip of the hat; kick in the pants — Opinion
  • Naloxone credited with nine overdose saves
  • Long Beach could build giant rock for tsunami evacuation
  • GMO labels don’t act as warnings
  • Help arrives for victims of Canyon Creek Complex fire
  • A tax to save lives — Guest Opinion
  • Now is the time to work together — Opinion
  • Eating their fill at Lunchbox Express
  • Growing pests to kill pests
  • Extension offers wildfire preparedness publication
  • Arago water not a hazard for most, but questions remain
  • Produce program produces prodigious results — Opinion
  • Ore. towns among Money Magazine’s ‘Best Places to Live’
  • Report: Groundwater pumping in California has land sinking
  • PGE keeping power going this summer as use hits all time high
  • C.O. schools, businesses partner for future workforce
  • Could C.O. handle big fire now? – Video
  • Study questions treatment for early stage of breast cancer
  • July was warmest month on Earth in 136 years, NOAA says
  • First wolf pack found in California in nearly a century
  • Another 2 or 3 years of drought? Report looks at what it might mean
  • Military children more likely to carry guns and use drugs, study finds
  • Are e-cigarettes a ‘gateway’ to teen smoking? A new study investigates
  • California, the new city state — Guest Opinion
  • Bill McKibben: Being carbon-foolish cost CalPERS and CalSTRS $5 billion — Guest Opinion
  • Obama orders fire aid; residents told this is no time for heroics
  • Shouldn’t Seattle’s growth pay for more growth through impact fees? — Opinion
  • More pot use found in fatal crashes, data says
  • Our forests burn, but we have initiative — Guest Opinion
  • Cascadia fault chatters and pops with little quakes
  • Standardized tests may be holding back the next generation of computer programmers
  • A lot of people have figured out the easiest way to lower their student loan payments
  • The problem that’s tearing restaurants apart– Blog
  • The shocking number of new moms who return to work two weeks after childbirth– Blog
  • Every county in America, ranked by scenery and climate– Blog

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ALL-CASH HOME SALES SLIGHTLY DOWN IN PORTLAND AREA, REPORT FINDS

(Portland Oregonian) Things are looking slightly better than they were a year ago for homebuyers worried a deep-pocketed investor will outbid them with an all-cash offer.

Cash sales accounted for more than 21 percent of total Portland-area home purchases in May, according to a report released Tuesday by the analytics company CoreLogic.
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STUDY: FIRST RESPONDERS LACK PEDIATRIC EXPERIENCE

(Salem Statesman Journal) The lack of exposure to pediatric emergency events compounded with not enough training for first responders leaves children in medical crises vulnerable to errors and safety gaps, a new study by an Oregon Health & Science University professor found.
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RED CROSS GIVES TOOLS TO FAMILIES RETURNING TO BURNED HOMES

(Eugene Register-Guard) The Red Cross is handing out shovels, rakes and flashlights to people returning to homes burned by a wildfire south of John Day in eastern Oregon.

Lisa Stroup, executive director for the Red Cross in central and eastern Oregon, said Tuesday families need the tools to sift through what was left by the wind-driven fire.
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MEASURE OF FUTURE HEALTH OF US ECONOMY SLIPS 0.2 PERCENT IN JULY AFTER 4 STRONG GAINS

(Eugene Register-Guard) An index designed to predict the future health of the U.S. economy declined slightly in July yet still pointed to modest growth in the months ahead.

The Conference Board said Thursday that its index of leading indicators dropped 0.2 percent in July, after healthy gains of 0.6 percent in both June and May.
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COW CREEK TRIBE LEARNING TO SPEAK ITS OLD LANGUAGE, TAKELMA

(Eugene Register-Guard) The flashcards in front of the children and the letters of the alphabet hanging on the walls made the classroom look similar to nearly every other language class.

The creatures on the flashcards, however, were not dogs and tigers and elephants but mythic monsters and guardians. Intense-looking words with accents and apostrophes were splashed across the flashcards, and the letters on the walls were pronounced with unfamiliar sounds “X,” for instance, sounded like a cat’s hiss.
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PLAN TO GIVE TEENS COMMUNITY CENTER ACCESS SEES RESULTS

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Even before the summer started, Portland city officials were concerned about the level of gang-related and youth violence much higher this year compared with last. So, the city decided to give free community center passes to youth 18 and younger for the summer.
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PORTLAND SETS RECORD FOR MOST 90-PLUS DAYS IN A YEAR

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Record heat is expected throughout the Willamette Valley on Tuesday and possibly Wednesday.

A strong high-pressure system over the region is preventing cooler ocean air from moving inland.
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PORTLAND’S HYDROPOWER IN A PIPE ATTRACTS GLOBAL INTEREST

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) A renewable energy company in Portland has cities across the globe taking a closer look at their water pipes.

Lucid Energy has designed a hydropower system that draws power from drinking water as it makes its way to the tap. Its turbines are small enough to fit inside a city water pipe, and they tap the power of gravity as water flows through.
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MEDICARE: DOCTORS SHOULD GET PAID FOR END-OF-LIFE TALKS

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Remember so-called death panels?

When Congress debated the Affordable Care Act back in 2009, the legislation included a provision that would have allowed Medicare to reimburse doctors when they meet with patients to talk about end-of-life care.
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3 FIREFIGHTERS KILLED IN WASHINGTON STATE WILDFIRE

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Three firefighters were killed and three to four others were injured, at least one critically, on Wednesday as raging wildfires advanced on towns in north-central Washington, authorities said.
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TEACHER SHORTAGE? OR TEACHER PIPELINE PROBLEM?

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Ahh, back to school in America. Time for annoyingly aggressive marketing of clothes and the annual warnings of a national teacher shortage.

But this year the cyclical problem is more real and less a media creation.
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RANCHERS, USDA SPAR OVER FOREST MANAGEMENT

(Capital Press) -The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and Public Lands Council are accusing the federal government of making this year’s wildfire season worse by mismanaging forests. A top federal official responds by urging support for a bipartisan bill that would treat widfires as other disasters for the purpose of funding.-

As wildfires rage throughout the West, two ranchers groups are engaging in finger-pointing with federal officials over what the cattlemen call the gross mismanagement of forests and rangelands.
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FEDS HOPE TO RAMP UP NATIVE PLANT SEED PRODUCTION

(Capital Press) Federal officials have announced a national strategy that seeks to build a network of seed collectors, farmers, nurseries and researchers to ensure a reliable supply of seed is available to restore landscapes following natural disasters.
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USDA SEEKING PROPOSALS FOR PRODUCTION OF BIRD FLU VACCINE

(Capital Press) -In case another outbreak gets out of hand, the government wants to acquire a stockpile of vaccines available for delivery within 24 hours.-

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is preparing to stockpile a bird flu vaccine as the agency plans for a possible return of the virus that led to the destruction of 48 million chickens and turkeys this spring.
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FEARED ASIAN GYPSY MOTHS REAPPEAR IN WASHINGTON

(Capital Press) -The Washington State Department of Agriculture has trapped eight Asian gypsy months this summer, the first time the destructive insect has been detected in the state since 1999.-

Eight Asian gypsy moths, seen as potentially more destructive to forests and orchards than their European cousins, have been trapped in Western Washington this summer.
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U.S. HOME SALES SOAR IN JULY TO FASTEST PACE SINCE EARLY 2007

(Capital Press) -Sales of existing homes rose 2 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.59 million.-

Americans stepped up their home-buying for a third straight month in July, as sales accelerated to the strongest pace in eight years.

The National Association of Realtors said Thursday that sales of existing homes rose 2 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.59 million, the fastest rate since February 2007
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REGULATORS ONLY SEEK MORE REGULATION — OPINION

(Capital Press) -Washington’s Department of Ecology is in the process of extending its regulatory power over hundreds of dairy and livestock manure lagoons now outside its jurisdiction.-

Nature and regulators abhor a vacuum.

Where no regulation exists, government moves in to fill the void. And where there is regulation, regulators find reason to justify more.
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UMATILLA COUNCIL PASSES MARIJUANA DISPENSARY BAN

(East Oregonian) -Umatilla city council votes on pot ban-

Umatilla joined the ranks of Eastern Oregon cities banning marijuana dispensaries Tuesday night.

Council members were careful to point out, however, that the ban is not irreversible and could be rescinded if the council feels differently after finishing a months-long project to rewrite its commercial zone regulations.
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A MILE IN A POOR STUDENTS SHOES

(East Oregonian) Students who live in poverty face a number of challenges that can negatively impact their educational performance.

To better understand what these students and their families experience, Stanfield and Echo school district staff participated in a poverty simulation Thursday provided by CoActive Connections.
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TIP OF THE HAT; KICK IN THE PANTS — OPINION

(East Oregonian) Tip of the hat to the wildland firefighters who are taking enormous risks to battle the blazes burning across the West, and especially those working here in Eastern Oregon.
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NALOXONE CREDITED WITH NINE OVERDOSE SAVES

(Medford Mail Tribune) Eight months after the Medford Police Department began stocking an anti-overdose medication in its patrol cars, the drug is credited with reversing nine opiate overdoses.

Chief Tim George says officers have used naloxone, also known as Narcan, nine times since March 9, about three months after the department first stocked the medication in its patrol cars.
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LONG BEACH COULD BUILD GIANT ROCK FOR TSUNAMI EVACUATION

(Daily Astorian) -The city is starting work on a vertical evacuation structure, which could save hundreds of lives during a tsunami.-

After years of planning, Long Beach is setting out to build one the country’s first tsunami vertical evacuation structures.
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GMO LABELS DONT ACT AS WARNINGS

(Daily Astorian) -A new study finds that GMO labels don’t frighten consumers.-

A new study concludes that shoppers aren’t scared off by labels on food containing genetically modified organisms, but labeling opponents are skeptical of the findings
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HELP ARRIVES FOR VICTIMS OF CANYON CREEK COMPLEX FIRE

(Bend Bulletin) Clothing, food and livestock feed poured into the eastern Oregon town of John Day to help the 26 families who lost their homes in a wind-driven wildfire.

Grant County Commissioner Boyd Britton said Monday that it is a poor county, but the people are generous. One man called to donate two truckloads of hay. In neighboring Crook County, a supermarket was sending food. Churches in nearby communities were sending clothing, bedding and household goods.
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A TAX TO SAVE LIVES — GUEST OPINION

(Bend Bulletin) A smokeless tobacco product called snus, which a user puts between his gums and his upper lip, has a long history in Sweden. At the start of the last century, it was the most common way Swedes ingested nicotine. By the early 1950s, however, sales of snus had been overtaken by cigarettes, a trend that continued for two decades.
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NOW IS THE TIME TO WORK TOGETHER — OPINION

(Blue Mountain Eagle) -Not for the first time, Grant County residents are grappling with an emergency that tests their resolve and their bootstraps.-

The Canyon Creek Complex fires arose last week out of an unfortunately perfect storm of conditions: widespread lightning storms, intense heat, stiff winds and thin firefighting ranks. The cost to the community to date is heart-wrenching. Some 26 homes burned beyond recognition, leaving so many families our neighbors, relatives and friends displaced with little or no possessions.
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EATING THEIR FILL AT LUNCHBOX EXPRESS

(Douglas County News-Review) Even though this summers free lunch program from Roseburg Public Schools fed 42 percent more kids than last year, Nutrition Services Director Kyle Micken expected a much bigger increase.
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GROWING PESTS TO KILL PESTS

(Herald and News) In a testing field at the University of California Intermountain Research and Extension Center, entomologist Charlie Pickett is intentionally growing a pest called cereal leaf beetle.

The more pests he grows, the more its predator, the parasitic wasp T. Julis, will grow, too.
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EXTENSION OFFERS WILDFIRE PREPAREDNESS PUBLICATION

(Herald and News) A guide to assist Klamath County landowners and communities with wildfire preparedness is available from the Oregon State University Extension Service/Klamath Basin Research and Extension Center, according to a news release.
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ARAGO WATER NOT A HAZARD FOR MOST, BUT QUESTIONS REMAIN

(The World) The high level of nitrate in Arago’s drinking water isn’t cause for concern, except for infants and pregnant women, said Rick Hallmark, Environmental Health Program Manager with Coos County Health and Wellness.

He issued a news release Aug. 14 about the high level of nitrate in Arago and cautioning people in those two groups to avoid drinking it.
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PRODUCE PROGRAM PRODUCES PRODIGIOUS RESULTS — OPINION

(The World) -North Bend schools should find a way to keep the fruits and veggies coming-

Well, you wont hear any of that kind of talk from North Bend kids. Seems they like their broccoli.

Or at least they like the free fruits and vegetables made available in school last year.
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ORE. TOWNS AMONG MONEY MAGAZINE’S ‘BEST PLACES TO LIVE’

(KGW) Money magazine released the results of its annual best places to live in America survey this week, and two Oregon towns made the top 100 list.
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REPORT: GROUNDWATER PUMPING IN CALIFORNIA HAS LAND SINKING

(KOIN) Vast areas of California’s Central Valley are sinking faster than in the past as massive amounts of groundwater are pumped during the historic drought, state officials said Wednesday, citing new research by NASA scientists.

The data shows the ground is sinking nearly two inches each month in some places, putting roads, bridges and vital canals that deliver water throughout the state at growing risk of damage.
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PGE KEEPING POWER GOING THIS SUMMER AS USE HITS ALL TIME HIGH

(KPTV) Rayna Carr may have seen her PGE bill double this summer compared to last, but she’s grateful she can crank on the air conditioning in this record-breaking summer of 25 90-degree-plus days.

Carr is keeping cool because she can count on the northwest power grid, managed for many by Portland General Electric.

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C.O. SCHOOLS, BUSINESSES PARTNER FOR FUTURE WORKFORCE

(KTVZ Bend) -Effort to expand interns, mentorships starts in Redmond-

Better Together has brought education and business leaders together throughout Central Oregon to help students prepare for careers.

The initiative is called Education@Work, and the partnership includes the High Desert Education Service District, Redmond School District, Central Oregon Community College, Redmond Economic Development, Inc. and, Oregon Institute of Technology.
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COULD C.O. HANDLE BIG FIRE NOW? – VIDEO

(KTVZ Bend) NewsChannel 21’s Lauren Martinez reports with firefighting resources stretched thin, do we still have what we need in case a fire breaks out on the High Desert?
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STUDY QUESTIONS TREATMENT FOR EARLY STAGE OF BREAST CANCER

(Boston Globe) As many as 60,000 American women each year are told they have a very early stage of breast cancer Stage 0, as it is commonly known a possible precursor to what could be a deadly tumor. And almost every one of the women has either a lumpectomy or a mastectomy, and often a double mastectomy, removing a healthy breast as well.
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JULY WAS WARMEST MONTH ON EARTH IN 136 YEARS, NOAA SAYS

(Los Angeles Times) Another month, another record high for global temperatures, U.S. government scientists announced Thursday..

Earths average surface temperature for the month of July was 61.86 degrees Fahrenheit or 16.61 degrees Celsius. That made July the hottest month since meteorologists began keeping track way back in 1880, according to a new report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
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FIRST WOLF PACK FOUND IN CALIFORNIA IN NEARLY A CENTURY

(Los Angeles Times) A gray wolf pack has established itself in Northern California, state wildlife officials confirmed on Thursday, the first family of wolves known in the state in nearly 100 years..

The group two adult black-furred gray wolves and five 4-month-old pups will be known as the Shasta Pack.
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ANOTHER 2 OR 3 YEARS OF DROUGHT? REPORT LOOKS AT WHAT IT MIGHT MEAN

(Los Angeles Times) Should the current drought extend for another two or three years, most California cities and much of the state’s agriculture would be able to manage, but the toll on small rural communities dependent on well-water and on wetlands and wildlife could be extensive.

That was the assessment of a new study from the Public Policy Institute of California, released late Tuesday.
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MILITARY CHILDREN MORE LIKELY TO CARRY GUNS AND USE DRUGS, STUDY FINDS

(Los Angeles Times) Children in military families are more likely than those with civilian parents to use alcohol and recreational drugs, carry weapons and be victims of harassment and physical violence, a new study has found..

The analysis was based on a 2013 survey from secondary school students in every California county. Of 688,713 children included in the data, 54,679 had a parent or caretaker in the military.
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ARE E-CIGARETTES A ‘GATEWAY’ TO TEEN SMOKING? A NEW STUDY INVESTIGATES

(Los Angeles Times) Although teenage smoking rates have plunged in recent decades, teen use of electronic cigarettes has been rising for the last few years. A new study involving more than 2,500 students at 10 Los Angeles schools has found that teens who had used e-cigarettes were far more likely than their peers to start smoking traditional cigarettes and other combustible tobacco products.
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CALIFORNIA, THE NEW CITY STATE — GUEST OPINION

(Los Angeles Times) California is rightly regarded as one of the bluest that is, most Democratic and most liberal states in the nation. But California’s political complexion is increasingly so distinctive that it should demand an entirely new coloration.

A sample of the liberal laws and administrative policies emanating from Sacramento in just the last year makes clear that this state is charting a course distinctly more progressive than the other 49.
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BILL MCKIBBEN: BEING CARBON-FOOLISH COST CALPERS AND CALSTRS $5 BILLION — GUEST OPINION

(Los Angeles Times) First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, and then they lose a truckload of money.

For three years now, a fossil fuel divestment campaign has been gaining traction around the world.
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POLL FINDS MOST BACK HEALTHY SCHOOL MEALS

(New York Times) A majority of Americans support providing schoolchildren with healthy meals that consist of more fruits and vegetables and fewer foods high in calories and sodium, according to a national poll released on Tuesday by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation.
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RECALLS OF ORGANIC FOOD ON THE RISE, REPORT SAYS

(New York Times) New data collected by Stericycle, a company that handles recalls for businesses, shows a sharp jump in the number of recalls of organic food products.

Organic food products accounted for 7 percent of all food units recalled so far this year, compared with 2 percent of those recalled last year, according to data from the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Agriculture that Stericycle uses to compile its quarterly report on recalls.
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CALIFORNIA DROUGHT IS MADE WORSE BY GLOBAL WARMING, SCIENTISTS SAY

(New York Times) Global warming caused by human emissions has most likely intensified the drought in California by 15 to 20 percent, scientists said on Thursday, warning that future dry spells in the state are almost certain to be worse than this one as the world continues to heat up.
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HEALTH OFFICIALS INVESTIGATING SECOND PLAGUE CASE IN CALIFORNIA

(New York Times) For the second time this summer, health officials in California are investigating a case of plague that a camper most likely contracted while visiting Yosemite National Park.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is testing a visitor from Georgia who camped at Yosemite, the Sierra National Forest and the surrounding areas in early August.
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RESEARCHERS LINK LONGER WORK HOURS AND STROKE RISK– BLOG

(New York Times) People who work 55 hours or more per week have a 33 percent greater risk of stroke and a 13 percent greater risk of coronary heart disease than those working standard hours, researchers reported on Wednesday in the Lancet.
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UBER MISSED CRIMINAL RECORDS OF DRIVERS, PROSECUTORS ASSERT

(New York Times) For more than a year, regulators in various cities have questioned whether Uber, the ride-hailing service, vets its drivers for criminal backgrounds as carefully as traditional taxi companies.

Now the district attorneys of San Francisco and Los Angeles have offered perhaps the most concrete evidence to date that people convicted of murder, sex offenses and various property crimes have driven for Uber, despite assurances from the company that it employs industry-leading screening.
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BABY BOOMERS READY TO SELL BUSINESSES TO THE NEXT GENERATION

(New York Times) Dan Bizzarro and Bill Jordan were still in college when they went to work at the Bimac Corporation, a castings manufacturer in Dayton, Ohio. After graduation, they joined full time as manufacturing and engineering executives. And eventually they teamed with a third employee to buy the business.
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OBAMA ORDERS FIRE AID; RESIDENTS TOLD THIS IS NO TIME FOR HEROICS

(Seattle Times) -Temperatures are expected to cool, but sustained winds of 30 to 40 mph will challenge firefighters across Central Washington. President Obama has declared a state of emergency.-

Strong winds blowing through the Okanogan Valley on Friday fanned several already raging wildfires, pushing them beyond containment lines toward several towns in the Northeastern part of the state.
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SHOULDN’T SEATTLES GROWTH PAY FOR MORE GROWTH THROUGH IMPACT FEES? — OPINION

(Seattle Times) -Seattle’s decision to forgo development impact fees is an artifact from a different era, writes columnist Jonathan Martin.-

Seattle decided a long time ago that it wouldn’t require growth to pay for growth with impact fees.

At least 80 cities in Washington think otherwise, including all the big Eastside cities, and impose impact fees.
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MORE POT USE FOUND IN FATAL CRASHES, DATA SAYS

(Seattle Times) -Marijuana use appears to have increased as a factor in deadly crashes last year in Washington.-

Marijuana use appears to have increased as a factor in deadly crashes last year in Washington.

New data from the Washington Traffic Safety Commission shows the number of drivers involved in fatal crashes with THC in their body increased from 38 in 2013 to 75 this past year.
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OUR FORESTS BURN, BUT WE HAVE INITIATIVE — GUEST OPINION

(Seattle Times) Without change to our physical landscape, we will continue to have devastating fires, said Ross Frank, commissioner for Chelan County Fire District 3. Federal land managers need funds and direction to reduce the fuel load on public lands and reduce the threat of wildfire. Until that happens we will not succeed. There needs to be a will to get this work done, said Frank.
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CASCADIA FAULT CHATTERS AND POPS WITH LITTLE QUAKES

(Seattle Times) -Initial results from a four-year seafloor monitoring project of the Cascadia Subduction Zone show the 700-mile-long fault off the Northwest coast isn’t as seismically quiet as it long seemed.-

Initial results from a program to monitor the Cascadia Subduction Zone in unprecedented detail show that the fault off the Northwest coast isn’t as seismically quiet as it has long appeared.
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STANDARDIZED TESTS MAY BE HOLDING BACK THE NEXT GENERATION OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS

(Washington Post) Is computer science as important as English, history or math? Most parents, teachers and students in schools today would say yes, according to a study released Thursday by Google and Gallup.

Parents told researchers that they want computer science taught in schools; 21 percent even said that they think computer science is more important than traditional core subjects such as math, science history or English.
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A LOT OF PEOPLE HAVE FIGURED OUT THE EASIEST WAY TO LOWER THEIR STUDENT LOAN PAYMENTS

(Washington Post) People saddled with student debt are warming up to the governments generous offer to cap their monthly loan payments to a percentage of their earnings. Use of so-called income-driven plans has gone up 56 percent since last year, with 3.9 million borrowers enrolled, the Education Department said Thursday.
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THE PROBLEM THAT’S TEARING RESTAURANTS APART– BLOG

(Washington Post) All across the country, restaurants are struggling to fill their kitchens. It’s happening on the East Coast, in New York City, and in the Midwest, in Chicago; it’s happening out West, too, in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. Good cooks, who were once in excess supply, are suddenly a lot tougher to find.
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THE SHOCKING NUMBER OF NEW MOMS WHO RETURN TO WORK TWO WEEKS AFTER CHILDBIRTH– BLOG

(Washington Post) In the United States, nearly a quarter of employed mothers return to work within two weeks of giving birth, according to a new report from In These Times, a nonprofit magazine, which analyzed data from the Department of Labor and collected stories from mothers who kept working through pain and grief.
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EVERY COUNTY IN AMERICA, RANKED BY SCENERY AND CLIMATE– BLOG

(Washington Post) Ventura County, Calif., is the absolute most desirable place to live in America.

I know this because in the late 1990s the federal government devised a measure of the best and worst places to live in America, from the standpoint of scenery and climate. The “natural amenities index” is intended as “a measure of the physical characteristics of a county area that enhance the location as a place to live.”
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 21, 2015 eClips Supplemental Edition

August 21, 2015 eClips

State Library eClips
* Oregon labor commissioner prepares run for secretary of state
* Little data exists about transgender people. A new survey wants to change that.
* Companies race to create marijuana breathalyzer; Oregon differs from neighbors in THC limit
* Feds oppose UO for releasing alleged gang-rape victim’s therapy records
* ‘At will’ employment works well for workers and businesses in Oregon — Guest Opinion
* The bottle bill is terrible for the poor — Opinion
* Migration, demographics help explain Oregon unemployment rate — Opinion
* Beaverton road project unearths Oregon history
* Wildfires erupt near Willamina, Detroit Lake
* State lists cities, counties seeking to ban marijuana facilities
* Gov. Kate Brown seeks applicants for judicial vacancy in Lane County Justice Court
* Eastern Oregon’s Canyon Creek wildfire grows to almost 100 square miles
* Parents of children killed in traffic crash at Springfield crosswalk file tort-claim notice against city, other government agencies
* University of Oregon case prompts new federal guidance on student therapy records privacy
* Respect students privacy — Opinion
* Regulate those e-cigs — Opinion
* Grass seed, wine grape growers discuss herbicide drift solutions
* Congress must pass PORTS bills — Opinion
* Court of Appeals rules marijuana odor not inherently offensive
* Canyon Creek slips in nations top fire priorities
* Canyon Creek firefighters brace for difficult weather
* Wine industry continues its winning ways — Opinion
* Drought declaration another sign of ‘the new normal’ — Opinion
* Climate change and drought — Opinion
* Extra melons go from prison to Food Bank
* Area fires closer to containment
* State can provide little in the way of aid to fire victims
* Fall salmon seasons set, with good forecasts
* Grants available for some wildfire victims
* District Attorneys hear from crime victim
* After boom years, COCC tries to plan ahead
* Oregon Attorney General comes to Bend
* Legend grows about start of County Line 2 fire
* Historic listing for Pilot Butte Canal is revisited
* A bad numbers game for Oregon — Opinion
* Forest collaboratives do find success — Opinion
* Wildfire erupts near Prairie City
* U.S. 395 closed after milepost 10
* Comments sought on state parks reservation system
* Sage grouse habitat funds available
* Conflagration Act approved by Gov.
* Evacuation of Troy begins

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OREGON LABOR COMMISSIONER PREPARES RUN FOR SECRETARY OF STATE (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s longtime labor commissioner, Brad Avakian, is floating his name as a candidate for secretary of state next year potentially turning the race for the open seat into a heavyweight fight among Democrats.
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LITTLE DATA EXISTS ABOUT TRANSGENDER PEOPLE. A NEW SURVEY WANTS TO CHANGE THAT (Portland Oregonian)

The music was loud, and the hugs abundant at a kickoff party Wednesday for the U.S. Trans Survey. The celebratory vibe was just right, 32-year-old Nico Quintana said: The survey, a kind of long-form census of transgender people, has the power to change state laws and save laws.
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COMPANIES RACE TO CREATE MARIJUANA BREATHALYZER; OREGON DIFFERS FROM NEIGHBORS IN THC LIMIT (Portland Oregonian)

If Colorado or Washington police pull you over and find more than 5 nanograms of the mind-altering ingredient of marijuana per milliliter of blood in your system, you’re guilty of stoned driving whether you smoked three days ago or three hours ago.
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FEDS OPPOSE UO FOR RELEASING ALLEGED GANG-RAPE VICTIM’S THERAPY RECORDS (Portland Oregonian)

A federal official advised universities this week to not share a student’s medical records without written consent, contradicting the University of Oregon’s release of an alleged gang-rape victim’s therapy records to the school’s lawyers.
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‘AT WILL’ EMPLOYMENT WORKS WELL FOR WORKERS AND BUSINESSES IN OREGON — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

A recent guest column in The Oregonian/OregonLive suggested that the legal protections offered to Oregon employees by the new paid-sick-leave statute and other workplace laws are little more than a sham, arguing that at-will employment destroys any real protection workers could hope to have.
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THE BOTTLE BILL IS TERRIBLE FOR THE POOR — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

We suggested in an Aug. 4 editorial that Oregon’s bottle bill has outlived its usefulness, what with the near ubiquity of curbside recycling. A number of readers defended the program by arguing, in part, that it’s good for the poor. As one online commenter wrote, “The deposit also gives the most down-on-their-luck homeless some means of earning a few bucks while doing some good for the community.”
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MIGRATION, DEMOGRAPHICS HELP EXPLAIN OREGON UNEMPLOYMENT RATE — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

At first glance, the Oregon employment report for July, released this week, looks discouraging. The unemployment rate jumped from 5.5 percent to 5.9 percent, more than half a percentage point higher than the national rate of 5.3 percent.
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BEAVERTON ROAD PROJECT UNEARTHS OREGON HISTORY (Portland Oregonian)

Splintered remnants of Oregon’s transportation history have been unearthed, fittingly, on the spot where a major road-widening project in Beaverton is now underway.

Contract crews late last month stopped work on a major widening of Southwest Farmington Road, when their excavation machine dug up a half dozen or so largely decomposed pieces of earth-darkened wood.
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WILDFIRES ERUPT NEAR WILLAMINA, DETROIT LAKE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Authorities say firefighters have made progress on the Willamina Creek Fire. The fire, estimated at more than 100 acres, was about five percent contained as of Thursday afternoon, according to the Oregon Department of Forestry. The fire is burning about nine miles north of Willamina in Yamhill County.
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STATE LISTS CITIES, COUNTIES SEEKING TO BAN MARIJUANA FACILITIES (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission late Thursday night released an updated list of the cities and counties in the state that have chosen to opt out of having licensed recreational marijuana facilities within their borders.
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GOV. KATE BROWN SEEKS APPLICANTS FOR JUDICIAL VACANCY IN LANE COUNTY JUSTICE COURT (Eugene Register-Guard)

Applications are now being accepted for the Justice of the Peace position on the Lane County Justice Court in Florence, Gov. Kate Brown has announced.
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EASTERN OREGON’S CANYON CREEK WILDFIRE GROWS TO ALMOST 100 SQUARE MILES (Eugene Register-Guard)

Officials are starting to report some containment of the wildfire that destroyed 36 houses near John Day, but gusty winds were expected to continue spreading the flames on the southeast flank.

The Canyon Creek Complex has scorched almost 100 square miles, much of it in the Malheur National Forest. Various evacuation orders continue.

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PARENTS OF CHILDREN KILLED IN TRAFFIC CRASH AT SPRINGFIELD CROSSWALK FILE TORT-CLAIM NOTICE AGAINST CITY, OTHER GOVERNMENT AGENCIES (Eugene Register-Guard)

Six months after their children were struck and killed by a pickup while stepping through a crosswalk at a busy intersection, a Springfield couple has announced that they are considering a wrongful death and personal injury lawsuit against various government agencies that may be responsible for keeping the area safe.

An attorney representing James and Cortney Hudson filed a tort-claim notice on Monday with the city of Springfield, Lane County and the state Department of Transportation and Department of Administrative Services.
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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON CASE PROMPTS NEW FEDERAL GUIDANCE ON STUDENT THERAPY RECORDS PRIVACY (Eugene Register-Guard)

A rape victims therapy notes are among the types of records that university attorneys ought to leave alone, the U.S. Department of Education has announced.

In a clarification of student privacy rights, the department issued a dear colleague letter to universities dated April 18.
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RESPECT STUDENTS PRIVACY — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Medical, counseling records are mostly confidential-

The University of Oregon shouldn’t need a six-page letter from the U.S. Department of Education to tell it to respect the privacy of students medical and counseling records. But the departments letter clarifies what ought to be a matter of common sense: Universities provide health services to promote their students physical and mental well-being, but students will avoid those services if they have reason to believe their medical records might somehow be used against them.
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REGULATE THOSE E-CIGS — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Most states have acted now its the feds turn-

The federal government has yet to put a single rule on the books regulating e-cigarettes, leaving it to the states to approve legislation keeping the devices and their nicotine payloads away from minors.

After some initial lobbyist-induced dithering and delay, the Oregon Legislature earlier this year finally joined dozens of other states in passing a bill doing just that.

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GRASS SEED, WINE GRAPE GROWERS DISCUSS HERBICIDE DRIFT SOLUTIONS (Capital Press)

-Chemical dealers, licensed pesticide applicators, grass seed and wine grape growers address a gathering of legislators, state agency officials, county commissioners, extension agents and others about herbicide drift.-

Grass seed farmer Denny Wilfong was enthused to learn that the Oregon Seed Council and the Oregon Winegrowers Association were organizing a tour to address issues of herbicide drift between grass seed fields and vineyards.

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CONGRESS MUST PASS PORTS BILLS — OPINION (Capital Press)

-Congress needs to make sure we don’t have a repeat of last winter’s container port debacle every time a contract expires.-

While most of the public has forgotten the months-long slowdown at West Coast container ports, farmers, ranchers, processors and agricultural exporters have not.

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COURT OF APPEALS RULES MARIJUANA ODOR NOT INHERENTLY OFFENSIVE (East Oregonian)

-Implications on Pendleton nusiance ordinance not immediately known.-

As the state continues to sort through marijuana regulations, a recent court ruling could affect a Pendleton ordinance prohibiting the odor of marijuana from spreading to another property.

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CANYON CREEK SLIPS IN NATIONS TOP FIRE PRIORITIES (East Oregonian)

When it comes to prioritizing the multitude of giant wildfires raging across the West, the Canyon Creek Complex is no longer on top of the nations list.

That distinction now belongs to the Okanogan Complex, a four-fire inferno burning nearly 90,000 acres in north-central Washington state.
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CANYON CREEK FIREFIGHTERS BRACE FOR DIFFICULT WEATHER (East Oregonian)

Conditions appear ripe for more explosive growth on the Canyon Creek Complex wildfire south of John Day, as firefighters now dig in their heels to protect the tiny mountain town of Seneca currently just five miles away from the fire lines.
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WINE INDUSTRY CONTINUES ITS WINNING WAYS — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

The numbers are in, and Southern Oregon’s wine industry is still expanding. Whether that trend continues in the future may depend as much on marketing as on production.

The 2014 Oregon Vineyard and Winery Census Report shows the number of vineyards spiked from 140 to 156 last year, and additional acres of vines produced 8,667 tons of grapes, an increase of 1,466 tons over the previous year. There are 80 wineries in the region now, up from 28 wineries 10 years ago.
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DROUGHT DECLARATION ANOTHER SIGN OF ‘THE NEW NORMAL’ — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

This weeks decision by Linn County commissioners to approve a drought declaration for the county likely was inevitable and might do some good somewhere down the road for county farmers who suffer drought-related losses.
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CLIMATE CHANGE AND DROUGHT — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

What?? No winter in Oregon in 2015-16? That’s ridiculous

That’s the reaction I would expect to get from most people if I bring up the possibility that winter as we normally experience it might not arrive this year. So I thought the best way to make that case would be to present my premise first explain why winter might be cut short and then draw my conclusion that the drought that’s gripping the entire west coast could continue for the foreseeable future.
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EXTRA MELONS GO FROM PRISON TO FOOD BANK (Argus Observer)

Snake River Correctional Institutions garden is up to its ears in watermelon and donated more than 2,300 pounds of the extra fruit to the Oregon Food Bank Wednesday.
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AREA FIRES CLOSER TO CONTAINMENT (Argus Observer)

With 85 percent of its perimeter contained, no growth is expected at the Bendire Complex north of Juntura. Full containment for the wildfire was predicted for sometime today.
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STATE CAN PROVIDE LITTLE IN THE WAY OF AID TO FIRE VICTIMS (Daily Astorian)

-A strict income test will likely prevent some Oregon residents who’ve lost homes from obtaining funds from a state relief program.-

Although Gov. Kate Brown said the state will do everything it can to make sure victims of the Canyon Creek Complex fire have the tools, resources and knowledge they need to rebuild, the state can provide little in the way of direct aid.

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FALL SALMON SEASONS SET, WITH GOOD FORECASTS (Daily Astorian)

-The 2015 coho forecast to the Columbia River is for a strong return of 539,600 adults, which includes 377,300 early stock and 162,300 late stock.-

Greater than average forecasts of fall chinook and coho salmon are opening the way for more commercial fishing in the Columbia River.

The U.S. v Oregon Technical Advisory Committee preseason forecast for the 2015 fall chinook adult return to the Columbia River totals 925,300 fish which would be another strong run.

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GRANTS AVAILABLE FOR SOME WILDFIRE VICTIMS (Bend Bulletin)

-Legislature approved $5,000 for homeowners whose houses burn-

A Central Oregon lawmaker is reminding victims of wildfires that have destroyed dozens of homes across the state they may be eligible for a $5,000 grant under a law that took effect in July.

House Minority Leader Mike McLane, R-Powell Butte, said in a written statement the grants for low-income victims of wildfire were available through the Oregon Housing and Community Services Department.

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DISTRICT ATTORNEYS HEAR FROM CRIME VICTIM (Bend Bulletin)

-She tells her story during Oregon DA’s annual meeting in Bend-

Danielle Tudor was 17 when serial rapist Richard Troy Gillmore broke into her family’s house in Portland in November 1979, assaulted and raped her. Nearly 30 years would unfold before she felt she could tell her story publicly.

On Thursday night, Tudor was the first crime victim to deliver the keynote speech for the annual conference of the Oregon District Attorneys Association, this year held at The Riverhouse Convention Center in Bend.
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AFTER BOOM YEARS, COCC TRIES TO PLAN AHEAD (Bend Bulletin)

-The college is trying to figure out what enrollment level would make the right size-

After an enrollment spike during the recession and an ensuing decline, officials at Central Oregon Community College are trying to be more proactive when it comes to size.
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OREGON ATTORNEY GENERAL COMES TO BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-Rosenblum discusses students privacy, police profiling, consumer scams-

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum shared projects her office has been working on and answered questions from community members Thursday at a City Club of Central Oregon forum in Bend.

Rosenblum wanted to give the public a taste, she said, of the programs and issues the Attorney Generals office becomes involved in, either through legislation, as the states lawyer or a combination of the two.
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LEGEND GROWS ABOUT START OF COUNTY LINE 2 FIRE (Bend Bulletin)
-Whether RV driver sparked 60,000-acre fire is being investigated-

As firefighters work to conquer the wildfire that forced the temporary evacuation of Kah-Nee-Ta Resort in Warm Springs and eventually grew to become one of the largest active wildfires in Oregon, a legend as to the fires start along U.S. Highway 26 is growing.
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HISTORIC LISTING FOR PILOT BUTTE CANAL IS REVISITED (Bend Bulletin)

-National Park Service wants more information about significance of nominated section-

The attempt to list a 1- mile section of the Pilot Butte Canal on the National Register of Historic Places has taken a step back.

The National Park Service, which maintains the register, intends to return the nomination form and ask for a more compelling case as to why the section should be listed apart from the rest of the canal, according to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office.
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A BAD NUMBERS GAME FOR OREGON — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregonians who allowed or encouraged their children to skip the Smarter Balanced assessments in the school year that just ended did their kids no favor. Moreover, if their numbers grow, they could cause problems for all school-age children in Oregon.
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FOREST COLLABORATIVES DO FIND SUCCESS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Forest collaboratives are a bid by the Forest Service to keep whatever it does in the forest from becoming a legal brawl.

But some environmental groups, including the Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project from Fossil, have already declared they have had enough and wont be a part of them. They wrote pages of criticisms, summarizing by saying, In essence, collaborative groups are backroom decision-making processes disguised as feel-good endeavors which aid agency decision-makers.
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WILDFIRE ERUPTS NEAR PRAIRIE CITY (Blue Mountain Eagle)

Wildfire has once again erupted in rural Grant County, this time near Prairie City, prompting a familiar refrain of smoke-filled skies and residents on evacuation alert.

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U.S. 395 CLOSED AFTER MILEPOST 10 (Blue Mountain Eagle)

U.S. Highway 395 remained closed to traffic Thursday between Canyon City and the Paulina-Izee Highway at milepost 17, except for fire and emergency crews.

Between the Canyon City road closure and milepost 10 Jay Bar L Ranch and Vance Creek Road, the Oregon Department of Transportation will escort traffic with pilot cars for public utility workers and residents needing to access their property in this area.
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COMMENTS SOUGHT ON STATE PARKS RESERVATION SYSTEM (Blue Mountain Eagle)

-State parks seeks comments.-

Rule changes would enable larger groups to gather

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is seeking comments through Aug. 28 on proposed rules that would amend the Oregon State Parks reservation process

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SAGE GROUSE HABITAT FUNDS AVAILABLE (Blue Mountain Eagle)

-Funds available for sage grouse habitat improvement.-

Financial and technical assistance is available to help Oregon ranchers improve sage grouse habitat in Grant, Baker, Crook, Deschutes, Harney, Lake, Malheur and Union counties,

The assistance comes from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

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CONFLAGRATION ACT APPROVED BY GOV. (Wallowa.com)

-County Commissioner returns with results of emergency meeting in Walla Walla-

On Thursday evening, Wallowa County Commissioner Mike Hayward confirmed that a conference call with the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal about invoking an Emergency Conflagration Act with regard to the Grizzly Bear Complex fire took place, but said the telephone connection was so bad he is unsure if the act was in process.

They made it sound like we would get a conflagration act, but they didnt confirm it, Hayward said.

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EVACUATION OF TROY BEGINS (Wallowa.com)

Evacuation of Troy begins as Grizzly Bear Complex fire roars down Wenaha Canyon

The voluntary evacuation of Troy has begun as the Grizzly Bear Complex Fire continues to roar down the Wenaha Canyon.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on August 21, 2015 eClips

August 20, 2015 eClips

State Library eClips

  • Oregon State Parks bans all campfires, fires on beaches
  • Oregon issues draft rules for recreational marijuana sales
  • Throwback Thursday: 10 things you can no longer do at the Oregon State Fair
  • Odor of marijuana smoke wafting from neighbor’s apartment not legally “offensive,” appeals court rules
  • Homes still smoldering, Canyon Creek fire victims ask: What’s next?
  • The audacity of Julie Parrish: Salem’s ‘Mama Grizzly’ blazes her own path
  • Oregon requires in-state residency for medical marijuana growers and patients
  • John Kitzhaber won’t sue over leak, Cylvia Hayes gives emails to judge
  • Oregon governor activates National Guard for wildfire duty
  • SEIU state workers ratify new contract
  • Was that a cougar in West Salem? Apparently not
  • Campfires banned at all state parks and beaches
  • Neonicotinoid pesticides found in half of nations streams
  • State of Oregon sues Liquidation LLC, accusing it of operating car-loan scam
  • Forest Service chief says wildfire season the new normal
  • Chasing pot buyers away — Opinion
  • Oregon’s persecution of homeless must stop — Guest Opinion
  • Gas export facility in earthquake zone a big risk — Guest Opinion
  • Study: Most head lice in Oregon is resistant to drug treatments
  • Governor calls on state troops to fight raging wildfires
  • For-profit colleges often leave Oregon students with debt, worthless credits
  • Governor appoints new DAS director
  • Toxic Algae Bloom Off Coast Is Vast
  • Trauma And ‘Blood Memory’
  • How Will A Third Major Party Affect Oregon Politics?
  • Resources Scarce As Northwest Wildfires Grow In Numbers
  • Interactive Map: Tracking Wildfires Across The Northwest
  • Gov. Brown Deploys Oregon National Guard To Fight Fires
  • Oregon’s Mount Emily wolves strike again, kill another sheep
  • Fire blazes on as governor activates National Guard
  • State parks department bans campfires
  • Southern Oregon wine industry growing like a vine
  • Commissioners approve drought declaration for Linn County
  • Unwanted marijuana grows — Guest Opinion
  • Looking ahead to bird hunts
  • Smoky skies throughout Oregon affect air quality
  • Oregon earns a B in business survey
  • Facebook is helping Crook County — Opinion
  • Medical board: Redmond doc may have harmed patients
  • Meeting for bighorn sheep, Rocky Mountain goat hunters set for July 18 in The Dalles
  • Large blazes create strain on firefighting resources
  • Wildfire forces OTEC to de-energize power line to John Day
  • Grant County sets example in face of danger — Opinion
  • Update: Reedsport marijuana dispensary closed
  • Fatal crashes involving marijuana double in Washington
  • Campfires banned in all Oregon parks, beaches
  • Firefighters battle wildfire on ODF land in Yamhill County
  •  Oregon National Guard members activated to help wildfire fighting efforts
  • Crook County bans marijuana businesses
  • Yellow jacket activity heats up with the weather
  • Appeals court affirms conviction of Gresham cat hoarder

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OREGON STATE PARKS BANS ALL CAMPFIRES, FIRES ON BEACHES (Portland Oregonian)

Fires are prohibited in Oregon’s state parks, effective Thursday, Aug. 19, except for stoves used for cooking.

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OREGON ISSUES DRAFT RULES FOR RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA SALES (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon dispensaries that plan to sell marijuana to people 21 and older must first notify the state health authority and record the birth dates of shoppers and the quantities of marijuana they buy, under draft rules issued Wednesday.

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THROWBACK THURSDAY: 10 THINGS YOU CAN NO LONGER DO AT THE OREGON STATE FAIR (Portland Oregonian)

With the lazy, deep-fried, watch-where-you-step, hey-I-remember-that-1980s-band days of the 150th Oregon State Fair approaching, this is probably as perfect a time as any to take a ride in a time-traveling Zipper cage.

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ODOR OF MARIJUANA SMOKE WAFTING FROM NEIGHBOR’S APARTMENT NOT LEGALLY “OFFENSIVE,” APPEALS COURT RULES (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Court of Appeals on Wednesday refused to declare the smell of marijuana smoke wafting into neighbors’ homes “unpleasant.”

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HOMES STILL SMOLDERING, CANYON CREEK FIRE VICTIMS ASK: WHAT’S NEXT? (Portland Oregonian)

Just the trim work remained.

Ira Hodge, founder and pastor of the Strawberry Mountain Christian Fellowship in John Day, had planned to spend Saturday putting those finishing touches on the house he and his wife, Carolyn, began building in 2008.

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THE AUDACITY OF JULIE PARRISH: SALEM’S ‘MAMA GRIZZLY’ BLAZES HER OWN PATH (Portland Oregonian)

Julie Parrish got the call she had dreaded for years one morning in June 2011.

Her older sister, Laurel De Jesus De La Cruz, was dead at 41. She had slipped away quietly overnight at a Northeast Portland homeless shelter. A methadone overdose, the medical examiner said.

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OREGON REQUIRES IN-STATE RESIDENCY FOR MEDICAL MARIJUANA GROWERS AND PATIENTS (Portland Oregonian)

For years, Oregon held the distinction of being the only state to issue medical marijuana cards to patients who lived out of state.

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JOHN KITZHABER WON’T SUE OVER LEAK, CYLVIA HAYES GIVES EMAILS TO JUDGE (Portland Oregonian)

Two developments played out quietly this week in the ongoing controversy surrounding former Gov. John Kitzhaber and his fiance, Cylvia Hayes.

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OREGON GOVERNOR ACTIVATES NATIONAL GUARD FOR WILDFIRE DUTY (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown has bicycled on the highway that winds along Canyon Creek south of John Day, where steep slopes of ponderosa pine shaded homes built sometimes decades ago.

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SEIU STATE WORKERS RATIFY NEW CONTRACT (Salem Statesman Journal)

State employees represented by the Service Employees International Union Local 503 have ratified their collective bargaining tentative agreement.

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WAS THAT A COUGAR IN WEST SALEM? APPARENTLY NOT (Salem Statesman Journal)

Earlier this week, the Statesman Journal reported that a cougar sighting in a West Salem was a dream come true for a local seven-year-old and also prompted a police response.

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CAMPFIRES BANNED AT ALL STATE PARKS AND BEACHES (Salem Statesman Journal)

For the first time in history, campfires are banned at every state park and on every mile of coastal beach in Oregon.

Rapid growth of wildfires in the Pacific Northwest and tinderbox conditions prompted the unprecedented closure that includes much of the state.

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NEONICOTINOID PESTICIDES FOUND IN HALF OF NATIONS STREAMS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Neonicotinoid pesticides show up in more than half of urban and agricultural streams sampled across the country, including one of two tested in Oregon, a U.S. Geological Survey investigation has found.

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STATE OF OREGON SUES LIQUIDATION LLC, ACCUSING IT OF OPERATING CAR-LOAN SCAM (Eugene Register-Guard)

State officials have sued a company they say ripped off hundreds of Oregonians by operating an illegal car-loan scam.

Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum and the Department of Consumer and Business Services have filed suit in Multnomah County Circuit Court against Liquidation LLC, alleging the company made predatory car title loans to more than 250 Oregonians and broke Oregon consumer and business laws by operating an illegal car title scam.

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FOREST SERVICE CHIEF SAYS WILDFIRE SEASON THE NEW NORMAL (Eugene Register-Guard)

The intense wildfire season ravaging the West and taxing fire crews and equipment to their limits is the new normal, the chief of the U.S. Forest Service said Wednesday at a fire site in Oregon.

The statement came as Chief Tom Tidwell visited the scene of the major fire 150 miles east of Portland that burned 36 homes last week before 600 firefighters started corralling it.

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CHASING POT BUYERS AWAY — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Don’t lose sight of goal of killing black market-

The Oregon Health Authority must balance a number of competing interests as it scrambles to devise rules for medical marijuana dispensaries that intend to sell pot to recreational users starting Oct. 1. A draft set of rules released Wednesday suggests that in its juggling act, the authority is in danger of dropping one important ball: the goal of moving the marijuana economy into the open, where it can be taxed and regulated, and away from the black market, where it helps finance criminal enterprises.

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OREGON’S PERSECUTION OF HOMELESS MUST STOP — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon Revised Statute 203.077 requires the development of humane policy for removal of homeless camps from public property. It requires that policies recognize the social nature of the problem of homeless individuals and that these policies ensure the most humane treatment for removal of homeless individuals from camping sites on public property.

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GAS EXPORT FACILITY IN EARTHQUAKE ZONE A BIG RISK — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The most shocking fact about earthquake and tsunami risks on the coast of Oregon is their inevitability.

We spend good money on fire insurance, although our house is unlikely to burn. Meanwhile, the geologic record indicates beyond scientific doubt that a major tremor and Fukushima-style tidal wave is due.

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STUDY: MOST HEAD LICE IN OREGON IS RESISTANT TO DRUG TREATMENTS (Portland Tribune)

A new analysis suggests most of Oregon’s head lice is resistant to over-the-counter treatments containing Permethrin, part of the pyrethroid class of insecticides.

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GOVERNOR CALLS ON STATE TROOPS TO FIGHT RAGING WILDFIRES (Portland Tribune)

Gov. Kate Brown has activated Oregon National Guard troops to help fight the nearly two dozen wildfires burning across the state.

Brown made the decision while touring hard-hit Grant County, where the Canyon Creek Complex fire has burned about 48,201 acres in the Malheur National Forest just south of John Day. Brown was touring the area to see the damage from one of the states largest wildfires.

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FOR-PROFIT COLLEGES OFTEN LEAVE OREGON STUDENTS WITH DEBT, WORTHLESS CREDITS (Portland Tribune)

Fantasia Spruill admits right up front that shes never been the best of students.

She dropped out her junior year at Parkrose High School, when she was 16. Her father had a stroke, her mother went to prison. For awhile, Spruill and her 14-year-old sister were homeless.

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GOVERNOR APPOINTS NEW DAS DIRECTOR (Portland Tribune)

-Clyde Saiki will oversee state government’s budget and management-

Clyde Saiki, a veteran of three decades in state government, is Gov. Kate Browns choice to lead the Department of Administrative Services, which oversees budget and management of state government.

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TOXIC ALGAE BLOOM OFF COAST IS VAST (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Commercial crab fishing has been closed off the Washington coast this summer because of a giant bloom of toxic algae all along the west coast. The bloom has also affected recreational razor clam and mussel harvests on the entire west coast.

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TRAUMA AND ‘BLOOD MEMORY’ (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

For American Indians, the making of the United States has had lasting and difficult impacts. War, disease, and forced re-education decimated populations and undermined existing ways of life. Though some of the more violent traumas inflicted upon Native people happened a century or more ago, current research suggests that that suffering continues to manifest across generations in inordinately high rates of depression, alcoholism, obesity, poverty, and more.

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HOW WILL A THIRD MAJOR PARTY AFFECT OREGON POLITICS? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Less that 10 years ago, a small group of civic minded voters created a new minor party and called it the Independent Party of Oregon. We’ve talked about the party’s decision to open its primary and how its relatively rapid growth is affecting the political landscape.

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RESOURCES SCARCE AS NORTHWEST WILDFIRES GROW IN NUMBERS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

There’s a large map of Oregon and Washington that hangs on the wall inside the dispatch center at the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center NWCC in Portland.

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INTERACTIVE MAP: TRACKING WILDFIRES ACROSS THE NORTHWEST (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

-Current wildfires burning in Oregon and Washington.-

Fire data from Northwest Interagency Coordination Center and is updated daily.

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GOV. BROWN DEPLOYS OREGON NATIONAL GUARD TO FIGHT FIRES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced Wednesday that she is deploying 125 National Guard soldiers to help fight wildfires.

She made the announcement while touring the Canyon Creek Complex fires near John Day.

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OREGON’S MOUNT EMILY WOLVES STRIKE AGAIN, KILL ANOTHER SHEEP (Capital Press)

-The wolfpack has been linked to previous attacks.-

For the second time in August and third time since June, Oregon’s Mount Emily wolf pack is blamed for killing a sheep in the northeast corner of the state.

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FIRE BLAZES ON AS GOVERNOR ACTIVATES NATIONAL GUARD (East Oregonian)

With a loud whoosh and blast of heat, flames shot high into the branches of several pine trees on a steep hillside in the heart of the Canyon Creek Complex Wednesday.

It has been a week since lightning touched off the nations highest-priority wildfire, and crews still have plenty of work cut out for them on the front lines.

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STATE PARKS DEPARTMENT BANS CAMPFIRES (East Oregonian)

-Open flames are prohibited in all state parks.-

Campfires and other open flames are prohibited at Oregon state parks until further notice.

The ban covers any property managed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and includes tiki torches, candles and fires on ocean beaches. It does not apply to propane stoves or charcoal briquettes used for cooking.

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SOUTHERN OREGON WINE INDUSTRY GROWING LIKE A VINE (Medford Mail Tribune)

-From vineyards to wineries, trends all point up-

As the Southern Oregon wine industry marches deeper into its second generation, not only is it growing in acreage and production, but in the diversity of its offerings.

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COMMISSIONERS APPROVE DROUGHT DECLARATION FOR LINN COUNTY (Albany Democrat Herald)

For the first time ever, Linn County Commissioners have approved a drought declaration for the county.

In a 2-1 vote, with John Lindsay voting no, the commissioners made a decision at their Wednesday meeting to move forward with the declaration, which was signed that afternoon.

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UNWANTED MARIJUANA GROWS — GUEST OPINION (Argus Observer)

Sen. Ferrioli says Eastern Oregon communities that voted against legal pot should be able to ban the substance, but warns that they should be prepared for the possible ramifications of more leakage to the black market.

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LOOKING AHEAD TO BIRD HUNTS (Bend Bulletin)

-After mild winter, game bird numbers are up throughout Oregon-

My favorite recipe for doves and band-tailed pigeons is simple. Start with skinless/boneless breasts, saute in olive oil and butter. Cook them hot and fast.

Apply a dollop of cream cheese, a spoonful of Justy’s Jelly Very Berry Jalapeno and wrap with bacon. Pin it with a toothpick and serve four breasts per person.

Dove hunting is as simple as that. A hunter needs a valid Oregon license and a free Harvest Information Program validation. And a place to hunt.

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SMOKY SKIES THROUGHOUT OREGON AFFECT AIR QUALITY (Bend Bulletin)

Smoke from wildfires around Oregon is causing air quality concerns for sensitive populations in much of the state this week, according to a report from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality.

Those with heart disease, asthma or other lung disease and those older than 65 have a higher risk of illness from wildfire smoke, according to the DEQ.

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OREGON EARNS A “B” IN BUSINESS SURVEY (Bend Bulletin)

-Survey measured friendliness to small businesses-

The state of Oregon received a B for overall friendliness to small businesses from the 2015 edition of the Small Business Friendliness Survey. The annual survey, put together by the consumer service website Thumbtack and the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, a national think tank, surveyed nearly 18,000 owners and operators to assess how helpful or harmful each state was for small businesses.

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FACEBOOK IS HELPING CROOK COUNTY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

It seems likely that Facebook will, after today, be able to go ahead with its third data center in Crook County. Both the Prineville City Council and the Crook County Commission are scheduled to vote on an agreement with the social media company today.

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MEDICAL BOARD: REDMOND DOC MAY HAVE HARMED PATIENTS (Bend Bulletin)

-Dr. Rose Kenny accused of improper judgment, prescribing-

A state licensing agency said this month that a Redmond physicians clinical judgment and prescribing practices either have already or may in the future put patients health or safety in danger.

The Oregon Medical Board made the determination following an external assessment it had ordered into the practice of Dr. Rose Kenny, a family practice physician at the Family Care Center.

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MEETING FOR BIGHORN SHEEP, ROCKY MOUNTAIN GOAT HUNTERS SET FOR JULY 18 IN THE DALLES (Blue Mountain Eagle)

-Bighorn sheep hunters and others invited to a meeting in The Dalles.-

The 115 hunters who drew a bighorn sheep or Rocky Mountain goat tag are invited to an orientation on July 18 at 9 a.m. in The Dalles. The orientation is required for all 2015 Rocky Mountain goat hunters; sheep hunters are strongly encouraged to attend.

Other interested hunters are also welcome to attend.

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LARGE BLAZES CREATE STRAIN ON FIREFIGHTING RESOURCES (Blue Mountain Eagle)

-Firefighting resources are stretched thin as numerous large blazes burn across Eastern Oregon such as the Canyon Creek Complex south of John Day.-

Crews are scrambling to gain control of a nightmarish wildfire that’s devoured more than two dozen homes, scattered livestock and knocked out power less than a mile south of John Day.

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WILDFIRE FORCES OTEC TO DE-ENERGIZE POWER LINE TO JOHN DAY (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The threat of a wildfire prompted the Oregon Trail Electric Co-op to de-energize a 138 kilovolt power line running from Hines to west John Day at 8:12 a.m. Wednesday.

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GRANT COUNTY SETS EXAMPLE IN FACE OF DANGER — OPINION (Wallowa.com)

-The fire danger remains high in the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest with extremely dry conditions continuing for some time.-

Watching wildfires devastate parts of Grant County is not just heart-wrenching. It should serve as a harsh reminder of what could happen here.

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UPDATE: REEDSPORT MARIJUANA DISPENSARY CLOSED (The World)

It appears the state of Oregon’s Health Authority, which is in charge of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, has shut down 101 OMMD for paperwork violations. The Umpqua Post is trying to update the story with an interview with state officials. There is a sign on the 101 OMMD door, which says “Closed Today. Sorry.” Owner Tom Gibbons says he hopes to reopen in 10 days.

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FATAL CRASHES INVOLVING MARIJUANA DOUBLE IN WASHINGTON (KGW)

The Washington Traffic Safety Commission says more marijuana-using drivers are getting into fatal crashes.

Data released Tuesday indicate that the number of Washington drivers involved in deadly crashes who tested positive for active marijuana doubled from 2013 to 2014 – the first year of legal marijuana sales in the state.

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CAMPFIRES BANNED IN ALL OREGON PARKS, BEACHES (KOIN)

-The state park ban doesn’t apply to propane stoves and/or charcoal briquettes for cooking-

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department on Wednesday announced a ban prohibiting all campfires and open flames in Oregon State Parks.

The ban includes but is not limited to designated fire pits, Tiki torches and candles. The ban also extends to fires on ocean beaches.

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FIREFIGHTERS BATTLE WILDFIRE ON ODF LAND IN YAMHILL COUNTY (KPTV)

Firefighters worked to control a fast-moving wildfire in Yamhill County on Wednesday.

The fire started nine miles north of Willamina on Oregon Department of Forestry land. Crews began responding to the scene with a helicopter at 4 p.m.

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OREGON NATIONAL GUARD MEMBERS ACTIVATED TO HELP WILDFIRE FIGHTING EFFORTS (KPTV)

After Gov. Kate Brown toured the largest and most destructive wildfire in Oregon, she announced Oregon National Guard members would begin training to assist in the firefighting efforts.

Brown toured the area around the Canyon Creek Complex fire near John Day on Wednesday. She had a private meeting with the dozens of people whose homes have been destroyed by the fire.

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CROOK COUNTY BANS MARIJUANA BUSINESSES (KTVZ Bend)

-Fifth Oregon county to act under new law-

Crook County commissioners voted 3-0 Wednesday to adopt an ordinance to opt out of allowing marijuana-related businesses.

The 3-0 vote came as counties around the state weigh an option under a new state law to take that step, and in Crook County’s case ban six state-licensed and registered marijuana businesses, from processing sites and dispensaries to retail marijuana producers, retailers and wholesalers.

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YELLOW JACKET ACTIVITY HEATS UP WITH THE WEATHER (KTVZ Bend)

-‘Just so quick and aggressive’-

Many Oregonians who have dined outside lately can attest to the fact that yellow jacket activity is starting to pick up. A hot summer may be at least partially responsible for increased visibility of the stinging insect.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture emphasizes again this year that yellow jackets are not the same as honeybees and bumblebees, and any action taken by homeowners needs to take that into account.

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APPEALS COURT AFFIRMS CONVICTION OF GRESHAM CAT HOARDER (KTVZ Bend)

The Oregon Court of Appeals has upheld the conviction of a woman who neglected more than three dozen cats at her Gresham apartment.

Terrianne Hess was sentenced to probation in 2011 after jurors convicted her of animal neglect.

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