May 27, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* ‘Too complex to fail:’ The story behind the state’s aborted takeover of Moda
* FEI’s $4.2 billion sale how it stacks up to other big Oregon tech deals
* Tips on how to help protect bats from white-nose syndrome
* Sick-leave clash: Nine Oregon counties to sue Kate Brown, Brad Avakian
* State agency’s assessment of corporate tax proposal is flawed — Opinion
* Comcast loses key Oregon tax rulings, with ‘tens of millions’ at stake
* 13-year-old shouldn’t have been tried as an adult for aggravated murder, ruling says
* 10 Best Places to Buy a House in Oregon – Gallery
* Portland International Airport fence breached four times in 2015
* ‘Portland for Everyone’ housing coalition emerging, modeled after Seattle
* Top 10 Oregon Cities With the Worst Commute – Gallery
* Oregon issues guidelines on marijuana ‘gifting’ and giveaways
* Once again, Portland parks rank in top 10 of annual list
* Amid turnover, agency directors confirmed by Senate
* Should Detroit Lake be managed differently?
* State Rep. Nancy Nathanson will lead Oregon Legislatures budget committee
* Travel through Eugene Airport in April stays brisk, places facility on record-setting pace
* Politics and Cover Oregon — Opinion
* Oregon’s proposed business tax a turning point — Opinion
* Report: Portland has severe shortage of homes for sale
* Our Opinion: Gross receipts tax would only hurt those it aims to help — Opinion
* Oracle’s congressional ally calls for criminal investigation of Oregon ‘interference’
* My View: State’s open records laws need overhaul — Guest Opinion
* As spending on lobbying increases, transparency remains murky
* City database highlights old buildings that could be dangerous in a quake
* Another strikeout for limiting big money in Oregon politics
* Proposal would change funding for wildfires
* Highway construction project south of Bend to begin
* Students reject state standardized test
* Effort To Cap Campaign Contributions In Oregon Sputters Again
* Oregon Renews Wildfire Insurance Policy
* Montana, Idaho, Wyoming Want To Be Heard On Longview Coal Terminal Permit
* Portland Finds Lead In Water At 2 Schools, Plans More Tests
* Portland Maps The Most Dangerous Places To Be During An Earthquake
* Cascade Locks Leaders Say Nestle Fight Isn’t Over
* Class Of 2025
* Judges Reject Steens Mountain Wind Project
* Lead Tests For Bullseye Glass Neighbors Come Back Clean
* Precision Castparts Promises Independent Review Of New Air Pollution Controls
* What’s A Port Without Container Shipping?
* Under Proposed Federal Rules, Schools Could Pay For Opt-Outs
* Ruling hinders Oregon wind energy project
* Report says GMO’s are safe for people, environment — Opinion
* Lobbying, campaign contributions give interests clout
* Police safer than ever, but the job demands more than ever
* CRP acres on the decline in Umatilla, Morrow counties
* Interest in snack food plan grows
* CASA program a great way to help local foster children — Opinion
* Free fishing event set for Hyatt Lake
* County tops OLCC pot license list
* Our View: Whitewater park faces bureaucratic boulders — Opinion
* Our View: Don’t let the bankers delay blight ordinance — Opinion
* Water shutoffs start in upper Basin
* You can help Monarch butterflies along their journey
* Input sought on Volcanic Legacy byway projects
* Klamath County employment sees uptick
* As boating season starts, Coast Guard promotes safety
* Second set of bridge beams installed in East Fork Millicoma River project
* Want to be part of making Coos County a Blue Zone? — Opinion
* Feds reject request to lift Snake River fall chinook listing
* Astoria bridges get makeover and monument
* Editorial: Preventing landslides should be top priority — Opinion
* State educator to visit Astoria
* Linn County to challenge state’s paid sick leave law
* Editorial: Linn lawsuit shows frustration with state — Opinion
* Editorial: State must clarify rules on electioneering — Opinion
* Port of Portland faces challenges, opportunities, director says in Albany visit
* Low fuel prices favor increased holiday travel
* State board skeptical of city action in Kings case
* Cascade Locks city council continuing with Nestle plans despite passage of 14-55
* Douglas County unemployment rate continues to drop
* Sen. Wyden visits UCC: “Still some heavy lifting to do”
* Grant to help “rebrand” Douglas County
* Police Report Shows O’Dea Had Been Drinking When Shooting Incident Occurred

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‘TOO COMPLEX TO FAIL:’ THE STORY BEHIND THE STATE’S ABORTED TAKEOVER OF MODA (Portland Oregonian)

It was the last straw for Moda Health Plans.

After monitoring the struggling health insurer for months, Oregon regulators learned Jan. 25 that the Portland company’s annual losses had doubled in the fourth quarter of 2015.

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FEI’S $4.2 BILLION SALE HOW IT STACKS UP TO OTHER BIG OREGON TECH DEALS (Portland Oregonian)

Friday’s $4.2 billion sale of Hillsboro electron microscope company FEI Co. is the second-largest deal in history for an Oregon tech business.

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TIPS ON HOW TO HELP PROTECT BATS FROM WHITE-NOSE SYNDROME (Portland Oregonian)

Officials with the Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington have outlined precautions everyday people can take to help fight the spread of white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that has decimated bat populations.

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SICK-LEAVE CLASH: NINE OREGON COUNTIES TO SUE KATE BROWN, BRAD AVAKIAN (Portland Oregonian)

Nine Oregon counties have agreed to sue Gov. Kate Brown and Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian over the state’s 2015 paid sick-leave law, seeking permission to opt out of the measure on the grounds that it’s an unfunded mandate.

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STATE AGENCY’S ASSESSMENT OF CORPORATE TAX PROPOSAL IS FLAWED — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

We were disappointed to see The Oregonian/OregonLive editorial Tuesday about the Oregon Legislative Revenue Office LRO report on Initiative Petition 28, which proposes raising the minimum tax on large, global corporations with more than $25 million a year in sales in Oregon.

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COMCAST LOSES KEY OREGON TAX RULINGS, WITH ‘TENS OF MILLIONS’ AT STAKE (Portland Oregonian)

Comcast lost a pair of major tax rulings in Oregon this week in unrelated cases, each of which could have broad implications on telecommunications in the state. One ruling could even have bearing on whether Google Fiber comes to Portland.

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13-YEAR-OLD SHOULDN’T HAVE BEEN TRIED AS AN ADULT FOR AGGRAVATED MURDER, RULING SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

A Washington County judge erred in 2011 when he determined a 13-year-old boy should be tried as an adult for aggravated murder, the Oregon Supreme Court ruled Thursday.

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10 BEST PLACES TO BUY A HOUSE IN OREGON – GALLERY (Portland Oregonian)

Buy or Rent?

Not sure whether to buy or rent?  SmartAsset, a financial technology company, put together a list of the best places to buy throughout the county, and ranked the top 10 counties in Oregon.

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PORTLAND INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT FENCE BREACHED FOUR TIMES IN 2015 (Portland Oregonian)

Portland International Airport had a record four perimeter fence breaches in 2015, including one instance in which a person scrambled over the fence to avoid being hit by gang gunfire.

In three other 2015 breaches, people crashed their cars into the fence; in June, after driving through a fence, the driver and passenger fled and were later arrested. Last year saw a big jump in security breaches at Portland, which has five others going back to 2004.

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‘PORTLAND FOR EVERYONE’ HOUSING COALITION EMERGING, MODELED AFTER SEATTLE (Portland Oregonian)

An emerging coalition of housing activists is calling on Portland leaders to increase density in single-family residential neighborhoods, strengthen renter protections and put a general obligation bond on November’s ballot that would fund affordable housing.

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TOP 10 OREGON CITIES WITH THE WORST COMMUTE – GALLERY (Portland Oregonian)

Lots of folks like to complain about their commute, but some have it objectively worse.

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OREGON ISSUES GUIDELINES ON MARIJUANA ‘GIFTING’ AND GIVEAWAYS (Portland Oregonian)

Marijuana is legal to possess in Oregon, but rules around where you can consume remain a puzzle of state and local rules.

Portland officials this month said they’d begin cracking down on events where people pay admission and receive cannabis samples once they’re in.

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ONCE AGAIN, PORTLAND PARKS RANK IN TOP 10 OF ANNUAL LIST (Portland Oregonian)

For the fifth time in five years, Portland’s park system has made it into the top 10 of a national list.

The Rose City ranks 6th nationally this year, according to an annual analysis by the Trust for Public Land. Before that, we were 5th, 3rd, 7th and 6th.

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AMID TURNOVER, AGENCY DIRECTORS CONFIRMED BY SENATE (Salem Statesman Journal)

The state Senate has voted unanimously to appoint several state agency directors and dozens of commission and board members.

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SHOULD DETROIT LAKE BE MANAGED DIFFERENTLY? (Salem Statesman Journal)

Scott Lunski believes the time has come for changes in the way Detroit Lake is managed.

The owner of Detroit Lake Marina said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has struggled to keep the reservoir east of Salem high enough for summer recreation.

He pointed out that guidelines for filling the reservoir havent been significantly updated since the 1950s, and that water releases for fish conservation have pushed the reservoir to lower summer levels.

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STATE REP. NANCY NATHANSON WILL LEAD OREGON LEGISLATURES BUDGET COMMITTEE (Eugene Register-Guard)

-The low-key Eugene legislator says shes ready to test her detail-oriented approach in a high-level position-

State Rep. Nancy Nathanson, a Eugene Democrat, has been appointed to one of the Oregon Legislatures top posts: co-chairwoman of the powerful budget committee.

House Speaker Tina Kotek of Portland made the appointment on Thursday, after lawmakers held three days of informal between-session meetings this week. Nathanson will replace retiring state Rep. Peter Buckley, an Ashland Democrat who has been co-chairman since 2008.

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TRAVEL THROUGH EUGENE AIRPORT IN APRIL STAYS BRISK, PLACES FACILITY ON RECORD-SETTING PACE (Eugene Register-Guard)

The number of travelers using the Eugene Airport surged in April, helping the city-owned facility remain on a record- setting pace for the year.

Last month, 75,933 passengers used the airport, an increase of 4,524, or 6.34 percent, compared with the number in April 2015, the airport reported.

For the year, passenger totals are up 13,386, or 4.94 percent, compared with the first four months of 2015.

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POLITICS AND COVER OREGON — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

A congressional committee wants to launch a criminal investigation into Cover Oregon, the states ill-fated attempt to set up an online health insurance exchange.

More than $300 million in federal money vaporized during this debacle, so Congress has a legitimate stake in finding out what went wrong.

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OREGON’S PROPOSED BUSINESS TAX A TURNING POINT — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Chances are very good that Oregonians will be voting in November whether to assess a gross receipts tax on businesses with sales that exceed $25 million annually. Once the shouting begins, the subtleties of history will be lost in the noise. So lets chat today about business efficiencies, sun-ripened tomatoes and a pamphlet written in 1837.

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REPORT: PORTLAND HAS SEVERE SHORTAGE OF HOMES FOR SALE (Portland Tribune)

The supply of homes for sale in Portland has declined 31.6 percent since last April, the largest drop of any major city in the country, according to a new report.

And the resulting shortage has helped push Portland home prices up 15.1 percent to $325,400 over the past year, the second-highest increase reported by the April Zillow Real Estate Market Report. Only Denver was higher with a 15.2 increase.

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OUR OPINION: GROSS RECEIPTS TAX WOULD ONLY HURT THOSE IT AIMS TO HELP — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

A new analysis by state economists should make public employees think twice about the harm they’d do to low-income Oregonians if the unions and their backers succeed in pushing through a gross receipts tax in November.

Initiative Petition 28, which would impose a 2.5 percent tax on the sales of large companies in Oregon, is not the progressive solution its supporters claim it to be. Rather, the measure, if approved by voters, would have the exact opposite effect.

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ORACLE’S CONGRESSIONAL ALLY CALLS FOR CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION OF OREGON ‘INTERFERENCE’ (Portland Tribune)

As Oregon and California software giant Oracle Corp. battle over who is to blame for the $305 million Cover Oregon website debacle, a congressional ally of the company wants state officials to be criminally prosecuted for political “interference” in the project.

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MY VIEW: STATE’S OPEN RECORDS LAWS NEED OVERHAUL — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

In elementary school, Franklin Weekley was diagnosed as mentally retarded. He was slow to learn, but quick to act out on impulse. Teachers at his rural school were unequipped to get a handle on him. Weekley ended up spending much of his time at home. Unsupervised, he often would get in trouble.

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AS SPENDING ON LOBBYING INCREASES, TRANSPARENCY REMAINS MURKY (Portland Tribune)

Businesses, special interest groups and governments have increasingly invested in lobbying Oregon lawmakers and other state officials over the last nine years.

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CITY DATABASE HIGHLIGHTS OLD BUILDINGS THAT COULD BE DANGEROUS IN A QUAKE (Portland Tribune)

Are you in a building that could crumble in a big earthquake?

The city of Portland has released a new map and database to help answer that question. The database provides locations and information on about 1,800 unreinforced masonry buildings in Portland that are vulnerable to quakes.

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ANOTHER STRIKEOUT FOR LIMITING BIG MONEY IN OREGON POLITICS (Bend Bulletin)

-Secretary of State rules measure to enact limits can’t go forward-

In the latest in a string of setbacks for limiting the amount of money in Oregon elections, a petition to change the state constitution and allow limits on donations candidates can accept cant move forward, the secretary of state announced this week.

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PROPOSAL WOULD CHANGE FUNDING FOR WILDFIRES (Bend Bulletin)

-Draft federal law looks to budget for forest work and fires-

A group of U.S. senators from both parties has released draft legislation that looks to change the budgeting of federal money for firefighting.

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HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION PROJECT SOUTH OF BEND TO BEGIN (Bend Bulletin)

-Project includes installing concrete median barrier, widening highway-

A road construction project that will extend a concrete barrier in the middle of U.S. Highway 97 is scheduled to begin Tuesday south of Bend.

The Oregon Department of Transportation project is in response to head-on crashes that have happened in recent years between north- and southbound traffic.

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STUDENTS REJECT STATE STANDARDIZED TEST (Bend Bulletin)

-At Summit High, 92 percent of juniors opted not to take test-

Sixteen-year-old Canessa Thomas said she didn’t want to miss a week of class to take the Smarter Balanced test. Kyra Kadhim, 17, knew no college admissions officer would look at Smarter Balanced results. Chris Pleasance, 17, had other tests  AP, ACT, SAT, plus finals  to worry about.

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EFFORT TO CAP CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS IN OREGON SPUTTERS AGAIN (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregonians wont be voting this fall on whether to limit campaign finance contributions in state and local races. The Oregon Secretary of States office has rejected wording on a proposed initiative that would have changed the states Constitution to allow that.

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OREGON RENEWS WILDFIRE INSURANCE POLICY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon officials and forestland owners have renewed the states wildfire insurance despite failing to reach the policy’s $50 million deductible last year.

The price of the premium declined by $300,000 to $3.45 million in 2016, according to the Oregon Department of Forestry. Underwriters gave the discount because state did not need to use the policy in 2015, said Sen. Alan Bates, D-Ashland.

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MONTANA, IDAHO, WYOMING WANT TO BE HEARD ON LONGVIEW COAL TERMINAL PERMIT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Dozens of people drove hundreds of miles from Wyoming, Montana and Idaho to Spokane Thursday to weigh in on a proposed coal export terminal. The terminal would sit along the Columbia River in Longview. But the permitting agencies want input from inland cities along the train tracks.

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PORTLAND FINDS LEAD IN WATER AT 2 SCHOOLS, PLANS MORE TESTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Portland is the latest Oregon school district to find lead in its drinking fountains. Officials found lead at Creston K-8 in Southeast and Rose City Park in Northeast.

The district tested 56 fixtures at Creston and found elevated lead levels in six.

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PORTLAND MAPS THE MOST DANGEROUS PLACES TO BE DURING AN EARTHQUAKE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The City of Portland has released a new map showing the most dangerous places to be during an earthquake.

Unreinforced masonry buildings constructed before the 1960s are likely to collapse during a large earthquake.

Portland has 1,800 of them.

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CASCADE LOCKS LEADERS SAY NESTLE FIGHT ISN’T OVER (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

City administrator Gordon Zimmerman is quick with the numbers. Sure, Hood River County voters backed Measure 14-55 by a large margin last week.

But as Zimmerman notes, the stats went the other way in Cascade Locks.

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CLASS OF 2025 (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon set a goal to have graduate 100 percent of students in the class of 2025. OPB has followed a group of students from kindergarten as they start their educational journey toward high school. Third grade is almost over for the Class of 2025. These are some of their stories.

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JUDGES REJECT STEENS MOUNTAIN WIND PROJECT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Ninth District Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of the Oregon Natural Desert Association, and rejected a wind turbine project on Steens Mountain in southeast Oregon.

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LEAD TESTS FOR BULLSEYE GLASS NEIGHBORS COME BACK CLEAN (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Lead test results are in for nearly 200 people who live and work near Bullseye Glass in Southeast Portland. So far, none of them shows lead levels that would require medical care or follow-up.

Multnomah County’s health department provided free screening for 192 children and adults last Friday and Monday.

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PRECISION CASTPARTS PROMISES INDEPENDENT REVIEW OF NEW AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Portland company Precision Castparts met Wednesday night with a group of neighbors concerned about air pollution from the company. Precision Castparts manufactures parts for airplane engines.

Air monitoring data released by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality last week showed higher than normal concentrations of nickel near the companys foundry, but regulators said the nickel was not at a level that causes a risk to public health.

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WHAT’S A PORT WITHOUT CONTAINER SHIPPING? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Port of Portland is a huge operation, with three airports and more than 750 workers on staff. But as of the week of May 22, the port no longer provides one of the iconic services of a commercial marine port: container shipping.

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UNDER PROPOSED FEDERAL RULES, SCHOOLS COULD PAY FOR OPT-OUTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Proposed rules from the U.S. Department of Education lay out specific sanctions against schools that don’t have enough students taking standardized tests.

The new Every Student Succeeds Act shifted some power to states, but it kept aspects that have been controversial in states like Oregon such as a rule that 95 percent of students take standardized tests in certain grades.

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RULING HINDERS OREGON WIND ENERGY PROJECT (Capital Press)

A federal appeals court has dealt a serious blow to an already-struggling wind energy project in Oregon’s Harney County that would give local ranchers an economic boost.

Though the 100-megawatt wind energy project would have been built on private ranchland, the 12-mile transmission line necessary to connect turbines with the power grid would have to cross public property.

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REPORT SAYS GMO’S ARE SAFE FOR PEOPLE, ENVIRONMENT — OPINION (Capital Press)

In what has been touted as the most comprehensive review of genetically modified organisms ever carried out, the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine last week said again that there is no evidence that foods containing GMOs are dangerous to humans or animals, or that the crops hurt the environment.

Good news for farmers and consumers, bad news for opponents who have full faith in science only when science supports their bias.

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LOBBYING, CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS GIVE INTERESTS CLOUT (East Oregonian)

The day after Oregon’s primary election, Gov. Kate Brown stepped up to the podium at the opening of a software company’s new office in northwest Portland.

The company, Vitu, operates an electronic vehicle titling and registration system in California and last year won a state contract to expand into Oregon. That was exciting news for Brown, who joined executives from Vitus parent company Motor Vehicle Software Corporation to celebrate the office opening.

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POLICE SAFER THAN EVER, BUT THE JOB DEMANDS MORE THAN EVER (East Oregonian)

Fleeing suspects shot at police twice in Umatilla County this year, and in both cases officers returned fire and took them down.

Bryan Alberto Corona, 24, now is serving 15 years in prison after pleading guilty to attempted aggravated murder for shooting at state troopers in January near Pendleton. Robert Gage Sregzinski, 19 of St. John, Washington, is in the Umatilla County Jail, Pendleton, awaiting trial on charges of attempted murder and more for a shootout with Milton-Freewater police in April.

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CRP ACRES ON THE DECLINE IN UMATILLA, MORROW COUNTIES (East Oregonian)

The competition is getting fierce for a key farm program that pays growers to set aside less productive land for conservation.

Enrollment in the Farm Service Agency’s Conservation Reserve Program, or CRP, is down across Umatilla and Morrow counties, which should come as no surprise given the shrinking cap for farms nationwide.

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INTEREST IN SNACK FOOD PLAN GROWS (Argus Observer)

Interest in growing pumpkins for seed in the Western Treasure Valley continues to build among farmers who are planning to grow the crop and companies interested in processing the seeds or distributing them as a snack food.

Snack company officials, along with state officials from Oregon and Idaho, recently participated in a site visit in which they met with local farmers about the possibilities of producing pumpkin seeds for snacks, said Kit Kamo, executive director of Snake River Economic Development Alliance.

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CASA PROGRAM A GREAT WAY TO HELP LOCAL FOSTER CHILDREN — OPINION (Argus Observer)

Its easy to feel overwhelmed when thinking about the foster care system.

We know many people who empathize with the children who, through no fault of their own, cant go home. At any given time, an average of 100 to 120 children are in foster care in Malheur County. They’re often scared, sometimes scarred.

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FREE FISHING EVENT SET FOR HYATT LAKE (Medford Mail Tribune)

Oregonians can fish and catch shellfish for free during Free Fishing Weekend Saturday-Sunday, June 4-5.

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COUNTY TOPS OLCC POT LICENSE LIST (Medford Mail Tribune)

-111 producers have applied so far-

Jackson County ranks at the top of the Oregon Liquor Control Commissions list of recreational marijuana grower applications in the state, according to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission.

As of May 24, 111 producers have applied for licenses to grow cannabis in this county.

Josephine County is second highest on the list, with 80 applications to grow recreational marijuana.

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OUR VIEW: WHITEWATER PARK FACES BUREAUCRATIC BOULDERS — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Whitewater enthusiast Steve Kiesling is being realistic about the chances of winning state approval for his proposal to engineer a whitewater course in the Rogue River near Gold Hill. That’s a good thing, given the obstacles in his way  and we’re not talking about rapids.

Bureaucracy can be just as immovable as the boulders Kiesling wants to install in the river, along with removing 300 cubic yards of the riverbed.

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OUR VIEW: DON’T LET THE BANKERS DELAY BLIGHT ORDINANCE — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

If banks had been working diligently to clean up the abandoned houses they own throughout Medford, we’d have a lot more sympathy for the Oregon Bankers Association’s complaints about the City Council’s efforts to get them to do just that.

The City Council should not let an overheated email from a lawyer sidetrack its efforts to crack down on a persistent problem.

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WATER SHUTOFFS START IN UPPER BASIN (Herald and News)

-Klamath Tribes made the call, Wood River could be next-

Irrigators who receive water diversions from Fort Creek are experiencing the seasons first water shutoffs.

According to Oregon Water Resources Department OWRD Watermaster Tyler Martin, OWRD received a letter from the Klamath Tribes calling on their water rights on May 13.

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YOU CAN HELP MONARCH BUTTERFLIES ALONG THEIR JOURNEY (Herald and News)

-Master Gardeners learn butterfly habitat-

If you plant it, they will come.

It only takes a few milkweed plants to attract migrating monarch butterflies, Akimi King, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist, explained to a group of about 50 Master Gardeners last week.

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INPUT SOUGHT ON VOLCANIC LEGACY BYWAY PROJECTS (Herald and News)

The Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway corridor management plan is being revised in 2016 and a series of public meetings are scheduled to discuss project priorities, according to a news release.

The 500 mile byway extends from Crater Lake National Park in Oregon through a chain of volcanoes and geologic formations to Lassen Volcanic National Park and Susanville in northeastern California. The byway was designated as a National Scenic Byway All American Road in Oregon in 1998 and in California in 2002.

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KLAMATH COUNTY EMPLOYMENT SEES UPTICK (Herald and News)

Recent revisions revealed that the employment situation in Klamath County is healthier than initially estimated. Countywide employment totals for the fourth quarter of 2015 were revised up by more than 500 jobs.

Today, employment totals are up by 290 jobs compared to last April.

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AS BOATING SEASON STARTS, COAST GUARD PROMOTES SAFETY (The World)

With Memorial Day just around the corner and signifying the start of its busy season, the U.S. Coast Guard is getting boaters prepared with National Safe Boating Week

Besides the programs already in place, whether it be the boating safety course or the vessel inspections and checks, Petty Officer Ryan Clendenen said the week really is about promoting awareness not only of what can be done to mitigate accidents, but also educating the public about trouble spots.

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SECOND SET OF BRIDGE BEAMS INSTALLED IN EAST FORK MILLICOMA RIVER PROJECT (The World)

Work on the East Fork Millicoma Oxbow Reconnection began early Tuesday morning, the continuation of nearly a decade of work by the Coos Watershed Association.

Workers from West Coast Contractors on Tuesday installed a second set of bridge beams on the downstream bridge, part of a project intended to reconnect more than 16 miles of the East Fork Millicoma in order to make the river more hospitable for Chinook and coho salmon as well as steelhead trout.

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WANT TO BE PART OF MAKING COOS COUNTY A BLUE ZONE? — OPINION (The World)

Did you know that Coos County could become the next Blue Zones community in Oregon? Jordan Carr from the Blue Zones Project Oregon says we can

We know that our county has great needs in regards to health. In 2015, the county ranked 29th out of 34 Oregon counties for overall health outcomes.

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FEDS REJECT REQUEST TO LIFT SNAKE RIVER FALL CHINOOK LISTING (The World)

The first attempt to delist one of the 13 species of Columbia Basin salmon and steelhead protected under the Endangered Species Act has been denied by federal authorities.

The decision made public Thursday by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries cites concerns Snake River fall chinook wouldn’t remain viable without continued protections.

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ASTORIA BRIDGES GET MAKEOVER AND MONUMENT (Daily Astorian)

Conde B. McCullough designed 13 bridges along the Oregon Coast when he was the state bridge engineer from 1919 to 1935.

The oldest among them were the Old Youngs Bay and Lewis and Clark River bridges, built in 1921 and 1924.

On Tuesday, the state Department of Transportation unveiled an interpretive display on the western approach to the Lewis and Clark River celebrating the handcraftsmanship behind the historic bridges and the artwork of future generations who will continue crossing them.

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EDITORIAL: PREVENTING LANDSLIDES SHOULD BE TOP PRIORITY — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

The Willapa Hills and Oregon Coast Range are comparative youngsters when it comes to mountains, having been born something like 40 million years ago, compared to 300 to 500 million years for the superficially similar Appalachian Mountains.

Like all youngsters, our local hills are subject to rapid change  including landslides, a geological equivalent of growth pains.

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STATE EDUCATOR TO VISIT ASTORIA (Daily Astorian)

Salam Noor, deputy superintendent of public instruction under Gov. Kate Brown, will be in Astoria June 2 for a community education forum.

The forum, titled Reimagining Education in Oregon, will have local and state officials discussing topics such as the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, which recently replaced the No Child Left Behind Act and allows Oregon to create a state plan with increased flexibility in assessment, accountability, school improvement and educator effectiveness.

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LINN COUNTY TO CHALLENGE STATE’S PAID SICK LEAVE LAW (Albany Democrat Herald)

Linn County is among several Oregon counties that will file a lawsuit on Friday charging that the state of Oregon’s new sick-leave law is an unfunded government mandate  and that the county therefore is not obliged to follow it.

Roger Nyquist, the chairman of the Linn County Board of Commissioners, said as many as six other Oregon counties would also be plaintiffs in the lawsuit, which will be filed in Linn County Circuit Court. He declined to identify the other counties.

Ed. Note: Other counties possibly identified in another story

See:  Nine counties to challenge Oregon’s paid sick leave law (Eugene Register-Guard)

Nyquist declined to identify the other counties, but they are reported to be Douglas, Jefferson, Malheur, Morrow, Polk, Sherman, Wallowa and Yamhill.

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EDITORIAL: LINN LAWSUIT SHOWS FRUSTRATION WITH STATE — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Linn County officials are expected to take their latest grievance with the state of Oregon to court today, as they file a lawsuit claiming that the states new rules on sick leave represent an unfunded mandate.

The legal action is a sequel of sorts to a suit the county filed earlier this year, claiming that the states management of forest trust lands has cost it and other counties millions of dollars that could have gone to vital government services.

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EDITORIAL: STATE MUST CLARIFY RULES ON ELECTIONEERING — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

At its meeting Wednesday night, the Albany City Council hit the reset button on its efforts to establish a fee to help pay for the treatment of stormwater.

Well have more to say about that work later. But lets talk today about one of the reasons why the council felt obliged to return to square one in this effort, because it revolves around state guidelines about what sort of speech is allowed in issues that at some point might go to voters  and what sort of speech the state considers illegal electioneering.

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PORT OF PORTLAND FACES CHALLENGES, OPPORTUNITIES, DIRECTOR SAYS IN ALBANY VISIT (Albany Democrat Herald)

Although the international container shipping business has been important to the Port of Portland for the last 40 years, changes within the industry  such as huge ships that can carry up to 20,000 containers  pose big questions for the future, the port’s executive director, Bill Wyatt, said Thursday during a visit to Albany.

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LOW FUEL PRICES FAVOR INCREASED HOLIDAY TRAVEL (Albany Democrat Herald)

Mid-valley residents will be able to access all boat ramps on Foster and Green Peter reservoirs as the summer camping and boating season kicks off over Memorial Day weekend.

Amy Echols of the Army Corps of Engineers Portland office said water levels at both reservoirs will provide boating access, even though Green Peter likely will not reach maximum conservation levels this summer.

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STATE BOARD SKEPTICAL OF CITY ACTION IN KINGS CASE (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

The city of Corvallis came in for some pointed questions Thursday regarding its denial of a plan to establish an alignment for the extension of Northwest Kings Boulevard into Timberhill.

A three-member panel of the state Land Use Board of Appeals held 70 minutes of oral arguments in the case Thursday at the State Lands building in Salem.

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CASCADE LOCKS CITY COUNCIL CONTINUING WITH NESTLE PLANS DESPITE PASSAGE OF 14-55 (Hood River News)

Cascade Locks City Council reaffirmed Monday they wont back down from the Nestle deal, despite the passing of a water bottling ban, Measure 14-55, during the primary election last Tuesday.

The measure amends Hood River County’s charter to prohibit large-scale companies like Nestle Waters North America from producing or transporting water from sources within county borders. It widely passed with 69 percent of the vote countywide, but failed by 58 percent in the Cascade Locks precinct.

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DOUGLAS COUNTY UNEMPLOYMENT RATE CONTINUES TO DROP (Douglas County News-Review)

Douglas County’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped from 6.2 percent in March to 6.1 percent in April to remain the lowest rate since 1990, when the seasonally adjusted series began.

Its a very good unemployment rate for Douglas County, Regional Labor Economist Brian Rooney said. That’s significantly down from a year ago.

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SEN. WYDEN VISITS UCC: “STILL SOME HEAVY LIFTING TO DO” (Douglas County News-Review)

After meeting with officials from Umpqua Community College last week, U.S. Senator Ron Wyden said the school still had some heavy lifting to do.

Trauma doesn’t just vanish, the senior U.S. Senator said Friday after he visited with student body and faculty representatives, as well as the interim president, Walter Nolte, and Susan Taylor, executive director of the Umpqua Community College Foundation.

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GRANT TO HELP “REBRAND” DOUGLAS COUNTY (Douglas County News-Review)

Douglas County needs to project a better image, some community leaders say, and that’s why they plan a pro-Roseburg advertising blitz at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials to be held in Eugene this summer.

On Wednesday, the Douglas County Board of Commissioners agreed to a $25,000 grant to assist the ad campaign. The money comes from state funds for economic development, distributed through the Douglas County Industrial Development Board for projects benefitting the county.

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POLICE REPORT SHOWS O’DEA HAD BEEN DRINKING WHEN SHOOTING INCIDENT OCCURRED (Willamette Week)

-Portland police chief told a sheriff’s deputy his friend shot himself, then later apologized to the friend for shooting him. –

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has released police reports describing the April 21 incident in which Portland Police Chief Larry O’Dea accidentally shot one of his friends in the back.

_________________________________________

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on May 27, 2016 OSL eClips

May 26, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips
* How do I rat on someone using studded tires out of season? Commuting Q&A
* Hourly wage needed for Oregon 2-bedroom apartments rose $3 in a year: study
* Oregon marijuana edibles makers launch public campaign: ‘Try 5’
* Committee republicans call for special prosecutor to investigate Cover Oregon
* State bar dismisses complaint from Clatsop County DA against Ammon Bundy’s lawyers
* Kitzhaber, Oracle respond to report critical of Cover Oregon
* Oregon hires nation’s first advocate for LGBT veterans
* Senate OK’s state’s first resilience officer
* Oregon senator got away with breaking state law for years — Opinion
* Emergency expense of $400 too costly for many households
* A mess at Lake Shasta — Opinion
* Oregon should be first trauma-informed state — Guest Opinion
* Oregon renews wildfire insurance policy
* State’s first resiliency officer confirmed, ready to tackle quake preparedness
* Who’s moving to Oregon? Everyone, and it’s driving up housing costs, panel says
* Oregon Legislature approves $7.5 million for Oregon Manufacturing and Innovation Center
* Clackamas County moves toward marijuana tax
* Tourism numbers surge in Central Oregon, rest of state
* Pot-tax collections expected to be higher
* Deschutes County jail passes inspection
* All my teachers were white diversity affects education
* Senate confirms governors new earthquake safety officer
* State parks camping, parking free June 4
* Editorial: Highway 97 gets important improvement — Opinion
* Editorial: Sheriffs Office should get the money it is owed — Opinion
* Traffic Fatalities In The Northwest Rising At Fastest Rate In Country
* Alarm sounded over white top infestation in Malheur County
* Oregon berries come on strong with favorable weather
* Backers, opponents argue pros, cons of coal export facility
* As spending on lobbying increases, transparency remains murky
* Fireworks, exploding targets illegal on federal lands
* Our view: The moon shot — Opinion
* Other views: Obama’s new overtime pay rules change the overall mission — Guest Opinion
* Goodbye, empty nest: Millennials staying longer with parents — Opinion
* Future of dam, bridge in doubt
* Foster parents open hearts and homes to children
* Grant County residents raise concerns at Merkley town hall
* Online program recognized
* School districts keep wary eye on federal order
* WCCF inmates plant to make wildlife impact
* Outback Observation: Graduate Debt — Opinion
* Housing Does Filter– Blog
* Health Insurers Post Financial Losses as Oregon’s Commercial Plans Report Losing Thousands of Members
* Oregon Will Stick with Healthcare.Gov Despite New Charges for Website Use
* CCO’s and Insurers Not Properly Funding Child Abuse Centers Despite Law

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HOW DO I RAT ON SOMEONE USING STUDDED TIRES OUT OF SEASON? COMMUTING Q&A (Portland Oregonian)

Is there a number to call to report people with studded tires still on? It’s 80 degrees out.
_________________________________________

HOURLY WAGE NEEDED FOR OREGON 2-BEDROOM APARTMENTS ROSE $3 IN A YEAR: STUDY (Portland Oregonian)

The amount of money a renter would have to make to afford a two-bedroom apartment in Oregon rose by nearly $3 an hour in a single year, from a $16.61 hourly wage in 2015 to $19.38 now, according to a study published Wednesday.
_________________________________________

OREGON MARIJUANA EDIBLES MAKERS LAUNCH PUBLIC CAMPAIGN: ‘TRY 5’ (Portland Oregonian)

Dave McNicoll has a few words of advice for those planning to try marijuana-infused edibles for the first time: Take a bite, not too much, and wait.
_________________________________________

COMMITTEE REPUBLICANS CALL FOR SPECIAL PROSECUTOR TO INVESTIGATE COVER OREGON (Portland Oregonian)

The Republican majority of a Congressional Committee has found that former Gov. John Kitzhaber and a federal agency bungled development of the Cover Oregon health care website.
_________________________________________

STATE BAR DISMISSES COMPLAINT FROM CLATSOP COUNTY DA AGAINST AMMON BUNDY’S LAWYERS (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon State Bar has decided not to pursue a complaint from Clatsop County District Attorney Josh Marquis against Ammon Bundy’s lawyers.
_________________________________________

KITZHABER, ORACLE RESPOND TO REPORT CRITICAL OF COVER OREGON (Salem Statesman Journal)

Republicans on a U.S. House committee have found former Gov. John Kitzhaber and a federal agency mishandled the creation of Oregon’s health insurance enrollment website, with the Democratic governor’s political advisers making decisions based on his re-election campaign.
_________________________________________

OREGON HIRES NATION’S FIRST ADVOCATE FOR LGBT VETERANS (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs has hired a coordinator for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender veterans a position it says is the first of its kind nationwide.
_________________________________________

SENATE OK’S STATE’S FIRST RESILIENCE OFFICER (Salem Statesman Journal)

Michael Harryman, director of emergency operations for the Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Division for the past four years, was confirmed Wednesday by the state Senate as Oregon’s first State Resilience Officer.
_________________________________________

OREGON SENATOR GOT AWAY WITH BREAKING STATE LAW FOR YEARS — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

An Oregon state senator regularly broke state law with impunity.
_________________________________________

EMERGENCY EXPENSE OF $400 TOO COSTLY FOR MANY HOUSEHOLDS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Shedding light on the precarious economic state of many American families, the Federal Reserve said Wednesday that nearly half of U.S. households reported they would have trouble meeting emergency expenses of just $400.

In addition, the Fed found that 22 percent of workers were juggling two or more jobs last year, higher than what government jobs data would suggest. And nearly 1 out of 3 Americans said that they have no retirement savings or pension.

_________________________________________

A MESS AT LAKE SHASTA — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Weekend partiers who trashed an island shoreline in Lake Shasta in Northern California, leaving behind belongings emblazoned with the name and logo of the University of Oregon, have drawn national attention to the UO and, by extension, Eugene and the entire state.

Its the kind of attention we could do without.

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OREGON SHOULD BE FIRST TRAUMA-INFORMED STATE — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon needs a positive vision to guide efforts to restructure the economy and communities so we can thrive while restoring the climate. Our vision of success must also address people. A centerpiece of my vision is that Oregon will become the first trauma-informed state in the nation.

This is not a far-fetched idea.

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OREGON RENEWS WILDFIRE INSURANCE POLICY (Portland Tribune)

Oregon officials and forestland owners have renewed the states wildfire insurance despite failing to reach the policy’s $50 million deductible last year.
_________________________________________

STATE’S FIRST RESILIENCY OFFICER CONFIRMED, READY TO TACKLE QUAKE PREPAREDNESS (Portland Tribune)

The Oregon Senate on Wednesday unanimously confirmed Gov. Kate Browns nominee for the states first resiliency officer to develop plans for responding to a major earthquake.
_________________________________________

WHO’S MOVING TO OREGON? EVERYONE, AND IT’S DRIVING UP HOUSING COSTS, PANEL SAYS (Portland Tribune)

A confluence of factors including low supply, high demand, obstructive regulations and lacking infrastructure is driving up housing prices in the state, a panel of state economists and housing experts told a legislative committee Tuesday, May 24.
_________________________________________

OREGON LEGISLATURE APPROVES $7.5 MILLION FOR OREGON MANUFACTURING AND INNOVATION CENTER (Portland Tribune)

The Oregon Legislature announced Wednesday the approval and release of $7.5 million toward the creation of the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center OMIC, a co-located research and development R&D center and training center in Columbia County.
_________________________________________

CLACKAMAS COUNTY MOVES TOWARD MARIJUANA TAX (Portland Tribune)

Clackamas County voters will be asked to approve a 3 percent local tax on retail sales of marijuana for recreational use.
_________________________________________

TOURISM NUMBERS SURGE IN CENTRAL OREGON, REST OF STATE (Bend Bulletin)

-Oregon sees $10.8 billion in tourism spending in 2015-

Tourists spent more money in Oregon in 2015 than in any year prior, and Central Oregons tourism economy has continued to grow along with the states.

The 2015 Oregon Travel Impacts study, the latest annual study commissioned by Travel Oregon, the states tourism agency, showed that visitors to the state generated $10.8 billion last year, up $500 million, or 4.8 percent, from 2014.

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POT-TAX COLLECTIONS EXPECTED TO BE HIGHER (Bend Bulletin)

Sales of recreational marijuana in Oregon yielded $10.5 million in tax revenue in the first three months of the year, according to the Oregon Department of Revenue.

The amount comes close to projections in a recently released report from the Legislative Revenue Office.

The report anticipates the state will collect about $3.7 million in taxes per month on average from recreational marijuana sales, or about $43 million total after expenses in the current two-year budget cycle.

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DESCHUTES COUNTY JAIL PASSES INSPECTION (Bend Bulletin)

-But standards used for inspection are unavailable to the public-

The Deschutes County Sheriffs Office announced Wednesday that it passed the biennial jail inspection conducted by the Oregon State Sheriffs Association with a perfect score.

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ALL MY TEACHERS WERE WHITE DIVERSITY AFFECTS EDUCATION (Bend Bulletin)

-Report shines light on reasons for chronic absenteeism in Oregon schools-

A state report released Wednesday offered a series of recommendations for school districts to combat chronic absenteeism, from increasing teacher diversity to eliminating disciplinary policies that disproportionately affect minority students.

Chronic absenteeism is defined as missing 10 percent or more of the school year.

_________________________________________

SENATE CONFIRMS GOVERNORS NEW EARTHQUAKE SAFETY OFFICER (Bend Bulletin)

-The position was created in the 2015 legislative session, will report to Brown-

The state Senate approved Oregons first officer tasked with helping state agencies prepare for an anticipated major earthquake.

Michael Harryman, an Army veteran and former director of emergency operations at the Oregon Health Authority, was confirmed Wednesday after being recommended by Gov. Kate Brown.
_________________________________________

STATE PARKS CAMPING, PARKING FREE JUNE 4 (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon State Parks will be open to the public for free June 4 in honor of State Parks Day, according to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.
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EDITORIAL: HIGHWAY 97 GETS IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENT — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

If you drove to Bend from Sunriver or other points south this morning, you likely noticed traffic heading toward you had been reduced to one lane. That’s actually good news: When the Oregon Department of Transportation is done, in September, the barrier dividing U.S. Highway 97 will extend all the way to Romaine Village Way on the south end of Bend.
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EDITORIAL: SHERIFFS OFFICE SHOULD GET THE MONEY IT IS OWED — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The federal government owes the Deschutes County Sheriffs Office over $160,000.

That’s money the office spent helping keep the peace in Harney County when militants took over the Interior Department-run wildlife refuge there, and the federal government should pay it back.

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TRAFFIC FATALITIES IN THE NORTHWEST RISING AT FASTEST RATE IN COUNTRY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Traffic accident fatalities are rising at a faster rate in Northwest states than anywhere else in the country according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data. Drug-impaired drivers and distracted drivers appear to be factors involved in the increase.
_________________________________________

ALARM SOUNDED OVER WHITE TOP INFESTATION IN MALHEUR COUNTY (Capital Press)

White top, an invasive weed, has exploded to alarming levels in Malheur County this year.

This is the worst its ever been, said Oregon State University Cropping Systems Extension Agent Bill Buhrig, who has lived in the county for 40 years. Its all over the place.

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OREGON BERRIES COME ON STRONG WITH FAVORABLE WEATHER (Capital Press)

return to moderate weather has blessed Oregon’s early strawberry crop with good size and flavor, growers report, and bodes well for states other signature berries as the summer unfolds.

The quality is really good now, said Matt Unger of Unger Farms west of Portland.

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BACKERS, OPPONENTS ARGUE PROS, CONS OF COAL EXPORT FACILITY (Capital Press)

The Washington Department of Ecology should rethink how much carbon a coal export dock on the Columbia River would add to the worlds emissions, Millennium Bulk Terminals President and CEO Bill Chapman says.

On Tuesday DOE held the first of three public hearings on the potential environmental impacts of exporting coal mined in Montana, Wyoming, Utah and Colorado from a former aluminum plant on Longviews industrialized riverfront.

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AS SPENDING ON LOBBYING INCREASES, TRANSPARENCY REMAINS MURKY (East Oregonian)

Businesses, special interest groups and governments have increasingly invested in lobbying Oregon lawmakers and other state officials over the last nine years. And based on spending data from the state, those groups appear to have concluded lobbying is a good investment: reported annual spending on lobbying increased 15 percent from 2007 to 2015, when adjusted for inflation.
_________________________________________

FIREWORKS, EXPLODING TARGETS ILLEGAL ON FEDERAL LANDS (East Oregonian)

The Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service are reminding forest users that fireworks and exploding targets are prohibited on all BLM-managed public lands and U.S. national forests in Oregon and Washington.

This year there have already been 288 fires that have burned over 1,500 acres.
_________________________________________

OUR VIEW: THE MOON SHOT — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Although many are already arguing about Clinton v. Trump: The Reckoning, another November vote may have an even bigger impact on our lives in Oregon.

Now that enough signatures have been gathered, it looks certain that a significant initiative will come before all Oregonians.

How big could this thing be? It alone would increase the entire state budget by about 25 percent by bringing in about $3 billion per year. Yes, thats billion with a B.

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OTHER VIEWS: OBAMA’S NEW OVERTIME PAY RULES CHANGE THE OVERALL MISSION — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

The Obama administrations new plan to require overtime pay for salaried workers earning up to $47,000 is an understandable but unrealistic reaction to the problem of stagnating wages and a diminishing American middle class. People are working longer hours for comparatively less pay, and something needs to happen to jostle the system back into alignment.

But the tight deadlines to implement the new rules dont match the reality of the American workplace.

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GOODBYE, EMPTY NEST: MILLENNIALS STAYING LONGER WITH PARENTS — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Many of Americas young adults appear to be in no hurry to move out of their old bedrooms.

For the first time on record, living with parents is now the most common arrangement for people ages 18 to 34, an analysis of census data by the Pew Research Center has found.

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FUTURE OF DAM, BRIDGE IN DOUBT (Daily Astorian)

The Warrenton City Commission backed away Tuesday night from a $1.2 million deal to remove the Eighth Street Dam but preserve an emergency access bridge over the Skipanon River.
_________________________________________

FOSTER PARENTS OPEN HEARTS AND HOMES TO CHILDREN (Blue Mountain Eagle)

-Its no secret that parenting is one tough job.-

Most parents would agree that while the intrinsic rewards run high, so do the day in and day out challenges.

Foster parents respond to the calling at an even higher level, willingly and even eagerly opening their hearts and homes to children in need on a temporary basis.

May is National Foster Care Month, launched in 1988 to give recognition and increase awareness.

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GRANT COUNTY RESIDENTS RAISE CONCERNS AT MERKLEY TOWN HALL (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The proposed creation of an Owyhee Canyonlands national monument was a concern shared by many audience members at Sen. Jeff Merkleys town hall meeting Saturday in John Day.

When Merkley asked the 50 or so Grant County residents in attendance if they were concerned about the issue, and more than half the hands shot up.

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ONLINE PROGRAM RECOGNIZED (LaGrande Observer)

For students wishing to complete college degrees online, turning to Eastern Oregon University could be a wise move.

Three independent ranking sources have named the college to their best of lists for the year, according to a EOU press release.

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SCHOOL DISTRICTS KEEP WARY EYE ON FEDERAL ORDER (LaGrande Observer)

-No big changes anticipated at local schools-

The Obama administrations directive mandating that public schools create supportive environments for transgender students will not spur immediate large-scale changes among local school districts.

La Grande School District Superintendent Larry Glaze noted there are many unknowns regarding how the government expects school districts to address transgender-related issues. Glaze said he is waiting to see how things unfold and then respond.
_________________________________________

WCCF INMATES PLANT TO MAKE WILDLIFE IMPACT (Lake County Examiner)

Warner Creek Correctional Facility WCCF inmates were hard at work filling cone-tainers with a mixture of soil and sagebrush seeds, which will help contribute to western wildlife habitat. The project started on Thursday, April 28 near the facilitys greenhouse with a handful of participants putting in work to fill 30,000 units.
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OUTBACK OBSERVATION: GRADUATE DEBT — OPINION (Lake County Examiner)

This week marked a momentous occasion for me. After attentively paying college loans for literally half of my life, my last payment was submitted ending a seemingly endless pile of debt incurred as soon as I left my childhood home. It has been 18 years of living under the shadow of debt for my education, necessitating at times choosing to miss out on life experiences and endure hardships in an effort to stretch every dollar for loan payments.
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HOUSING DOES FILTER— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

Most new construction in recent years has been at the top end of the market. This is partially due to that’s where the numbers pencil out best for developers but also because that’s where the strongest growth in households has been, in the $100,000 per year and over groups. The majority of the population cannot afford new construction today, but this has largely been the case historically as well.
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HEALTH INSURERS POST FINANCIAL LOSSES AS OREGON’S COMMERCIAL PLANS REPORT LOSING THOUSANDS OF MEMBERS (The Lund Report)

Please contact the State Library for access to this premium story from the Lund Report. library.help@state.or.us , 503-378-8800

Though some plans gained membership, overall 91,658 people left the commercial health insurance market in the first three months of 2016 _________________________________________

OREGON WILL STICK WITH HEALTHCARE.GOV DESPITE NEW CHARGES FOR WEBSITE USE (The Lund Report)

An analysis of three proposals from technology vendors who have successfully operated eligibility and enrollment websites for other states showed that these options will cost slightly more than the federal governments website. Meanwhile, the SHOP exchange for small businesses may be put off until 2019.
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CCO’S AND INSURERS NOT PROPERLY FUNDING CHILD ABUSE CENTERS DESPITE LAW (The Lund Report)

Some CCO health plans, including FamilyCare and CareOregon, have set up a global payment for child abuse services similar to the global package for pregnancy.
_________________________________________
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on May 26, 2016 OSL eClips

May 25, 2016 OSL eClips

* Congressional panel finds Kitzhaber mishandled Cover Oregon, seeks criminal investigation
* Oregon’s proposed gross receipts tax: Key findings
* Oregon’s metro areas see ups, downs in monthly unemployment rates
* Recall election to be held against Harney County Judge Steve Grasty: ‘I ask that you stand with me’
* Election doesn’t persuade Cascade Locks to abandon proposed Nestle deal
* Kids fishing event Saturday in Gresham/Mt. Hood Pond
* Panel says state’s transportation needs will cost another $1 billion a year
* Tax on corporate revenue could reshape Oregon business, politics
* State senator faces fine for smoking in Capitol
* Report: Nearly $1B a year needed for transportation
* Salem sells unused water right for $16.2 million
* Lane County needs new courthouse that would be more than double size of existing courthouse, study asserts
* Lane County’s jobless rate continued to fall in April
* Seek consensus on Owyhee — Opinion
* Closing a loophole — Opinion
* Oracle’s Congressional ally calls for criminal investigation of Oregon “interference”
* Multiple factors drive housing costs
* DOJ: no prosecution called for in inmate death
* Brown remains undecided after report on tax hike
* Central Oregon counties add jobs
* Editorial: Pot rules are a good first step — Opinion
* Editorial: Allow sewers in southern Deschutes County — Opinion
* DOJ Report: No Criminal Charges For Jail Deputies In Deschutes Inmate Death
* Death Penalty In Oregon
* Enforcement of Oregon labor laws criticized
* Fire sweeps across Umatilla Depot in E. Oregon
* Oregon commits $8.9 million to dam raising, other projects
* Mistrial declared in Oregon pesticide dispute
* U.S. organic food, fiber sales booming
* Four-day chinook season opens Saturday on Lookingglass Creek
* Malheur will join Linn County in sick leave lawsuit
* Health care fuels Jackson County job growth
* BLM reopens comments on monument transportation plan
* Second set of bridge beams installed in East Fork Millicoma River project
* Feds announce $10 million for wildfire projects in 12 states
* If gambling is a problem, who is responsible? — Guest Opinion
* Asking for simple fairness and compromise — Opinion
* Movement growing to defend against corporate interests — Guest Opinion
* Columbia Chinook season reopens; sturgeon season closes
* Editorial: Shipyard vital to the Lower Columbia — Opinion
* Editorial: The last first drowning — Opinion
* Linn County has more jobs than before the recession
* Benton County has state’s lowest unemployment
* Problems halt timber sales
* Oregon Gets Company in Testing Gas Tax Alternatives
* Jewell: Making landscapes more resilient to fire– Blog
* HERC Revises Guideline for Weaning Off Opioids with More Comprehensive Plan
* FamilyCare Reports Small $495,117 Net Loss, While Other CCOs Remain Profitable
* RAND Corp. Undertakes Analysis of Single-Payer Health System

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CONGRESSIONAL PANEL FINDS KITZHABER MISHANDLED COVER OREGON, SEEKS CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION (Portland Oregonian)

A U.S. House committee has found former Gov. John Kitzhaber and a federal agency mishandled the creation of Oregon’s health insurance enrollment website, _________________________________________

OREGON’S PROPOSED GROSS RECEIPTS TAX: KEY FINDINGS (Portland Oregonian)

The ballot measure currently known as Initiative Petition 28, would create a “gross receipts tax” in Oregon similar to one levied in Washington.

_________________________________________

OREGON’S METRO AREAS SEE UPS, DOWNS IN MONTHLY UNEMPLOYMENT RATES (Portland Oregonian)

Portland’s unemployment rate increased to 4.4 percent in April from 4.2 percent a month earlier, according to a new report from the state Employment Department.

_________________________________________

RECALL ELECTION TO BE HELD AGAINST HARNEY COUNTY JUDGE STEVE GRASTY: ‘I ASK THAT YOU STAND WITH ME’ (Portland Oregonian)

A special recall election against Harney County commissioner Steve Grasty will be held in late June, according to the Oregon Secretary of State’s office.

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ELECTION DOESN’T PERSUADE CASCADE LOCKS TO ABANDON PROPOSED NESTLE DEAL (Portland Oregonian)

Hood River County voters’ overwhelming support of a ballot measure that effectively bans large water-bottling operations hasn’t persuaded the city of Cascade Locks to abandon a proposed deal with Nestle.

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KIDS FISHING EVENT SATURDAY IN GRESHAM/MT. HOOD POND (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will host a youth fishing event Saturday, May 28, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Mt. Hood Pond in Gresham. The pond is on the Mount Hood Community College Campus, 2600 SE Stark St.

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PANEL SAYS STATE’S TRANSPORTATION NEEDS WILL COST ANOTHER $1 BILLION A YEAR (Portland Oregonian)

The attention given over to the Portland area by the state Legislature usually rubs Oregonians who live elsewhere the wrong way.

But when it comes to transportation needs, a state committee found Oregonians everywhere pointed straight at Portland.

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TAX ON CORPORATE REVENUE COULD RESHAPE OREGON BUSINESS, POLITICS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon could be headed for the biggest change in its tax structure in generations with a November ballot measure that would begin taxing many businesses based on sales rather than just profits.

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STATE SENATOR FACES FINE FOR SMOKING IN CAPITOL (Salem Statesman Journal)

State Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, may face a $500 fine for smoking cigarettes inside his Capitol office.

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REPORT: NEARLY $1B A YEAR NEEDED FOR TRANSPORTATION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Nearly $1 billion per year is needed to maintain and improve Oregon’s transportation infrastructure, according to a new report.

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SALEM SELLS UNUSED WATER RIGHT FOR $16.2 MILLION (Salem Statesman Journal)

The city of Salem has agreed to sell part of its water rights on the Willamette River to the fast-growing city of Hillsboro.

If the deal goes through it will earn Salem $16.2 million, which will be used to improve the citys water infrastructure.

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LANE COUNTY NEEDS NEW COURTHOUSE THAT WOULD BE MORE THAN DOUBLE SIZE OF EXISTING COURTHOUSE, STUDY ASSERTS (Eugene Register-Guard)

The new courthouse that Lane County officials want should be 250,000 square feet, an outside consultant has determined, more than double the size of the current 115,000-square-foot downtown facility.

About 60 percent of that suggested increase is because current occupants are operating in less space than they need, the report by the National Center for State Courts, a Virginia-based nonprofit group, determined.

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LANE COUNTY’S JOBLESS RATE CONTINUED TO FALL IN APRIL (Eugene Register-Guard)

Lane County’s unemployment rate continued its downward spiral in April, dropping to a seasonally adjusted figure of 4.7 percent, the lowest rate in 26 years, according to the state Employment Department.

The April rate fell from 4.9 percent in March, continuing a largely uninterrupted trend since the depths of the recession seven years ago, the Employment Department reported.

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SEEK CONSENSUS ON OWYHEE — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The Owyhee canyon country of southern Malheur County is the largest undeveloped and unprotected area in the lower 48 states, and a century from now Americans would be grateful to their ancestors for keeping it that way. But the federal government, which manages nearly all of the Owyhee region on behalf of its citizens, has a long way to go before it can add protections to the areas wild character. Any new protective designation, such as the current proposal for a national monument, should come with local acquiescense, and preferably support, which is now lacking.

_________________________________________

CLOSING A LOOPHOLE — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

A little-known provision of the Affordable Care Act requires drug companies and manufacturers of medical devices to report payments and gifts they make to doctors.

The Physician Payments Sunshine Act was intended to shine a light on possible conflicts of interest that might influence medical treatment, education or research.

_________________________________________

ORACLE’S CONGRESSIONAL ALLY CALLS FOR CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION OF OREGON “INTERFERENCE” (Portland Tribune)

As Oregon and California software giant Oracle battle over who is to blame for the $305 million Cover Oregon website debacle, a Congressional ally of the company is urging that state officials be criminally prosecuted over political “interference” in the project.

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MULTIPLE FACTORS DRIVE HOUSING COSTS (Portland Tribune)

-Lawmakers requested information on cost drivers as they look ahead to 2017 –

A confluence of factors  including low supply, high demand, obstructive regulations and lacking infrastructure  is driving up housing prices in the state, a panel of state economists and housing experts told a legislative committee Tuesday.

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DOJ: NO PROSECUTION CALLED FOR IN INMATE DEATH (Bend Bulletin)

-Insufficient evidence of crime found in Deschutes jail overdose-

A year and a half after Edwin Mays died of a meth overdose in the Deschutes County jail, the Oregon Department of Justice has determined the conduct of jail deputies that night does not warrant criminal prosecution.

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BROWN REMAINS UNDECIDED AFTER REPORT ON TAX HIKE (Bend Bulletin)

-Oregon Legislature could create a smaller tax proposal as an alternative-

After state economists revealed Monday that a proposed tax increase on businesses would cost Oregonians about $600 annually while raising $3 billion a year for the general fund, Gov. Kate Brown is still avoiding taking a position on the matter.

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CENTRAL OREGON COUNTIES ADD JOBS (Bend Bulletin)

-Job growth in Deschutes County has been faster than expected-

Revised numbers from the Oregon Employment Department show that the job growth in Deschutes County has been even faster than expected.

According to a news release from the department, Deschutes County added 5,140 jobs in the 12 months since April 2015.

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EDITORIAL: POT RULES ARE A GOOD FIRST STEP — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Deschutes County commissioners may take the first step toward approval of the rules governing the growing, processing and sales of marijuana in the unincorporated county today. The move would put them on track to adopt county code changes in early June.

Its the right thing to do. Marijuana use, both recreational and medical, is now legal in the state of Oregon and that should mean its also legal to produce the stuff.

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EDITORIAL: ALLOW SEWERS IN SOUTHERN DESCHUTES COUNTY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Clean water can begin at home. That means keeping things like nitrates out of groundwater and out of the Deschutes River.

And thats why the Deschutes County plan to allow sewers in rural parts of southern Deschutes County makes so much sense.

Central Oregon LandWatch recently challenged the countys decision at the state level before the Land Use Board of Appeals. But the countys plan should stand.

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DOJ REPORT: NO CRIMINAL CHARGES FOR JAIL DEPUTIES IN DESCHUTES INMATE DEATH (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Before Edwin Mays died on the floor of the Deschutes County jail in December 2014, he was mocked by corrections officers who debated out loud whether Mays might need medical attention.

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DEATH PENALTY IN OREGON (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

OPBs Kristian Foden-Vencil gives us the latest on the Oregon death penalty moratorium and tells us about where the Gary Haugen case stands.

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ENFORCEMENT OF OREGON LABOR LAWS CRITICIZED (Capital Press)

The enforcement of Oregon’s labor laws for forest workers was criticized by employee advocates and industry representatives alike during a recent legislative hearing.

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FIRE SWEEPS ACROSS UMATILLA DEPOT IN E. OREGON (Capital Press)

A 3,000-acre brush fire swept across the Umatilla Chemical Depot west of Hermiston, Ore., on Monday, closing Interstate 82 to traffic after smoke blocked visibility and caused a wreck that sent four people to the hospital for treatment.

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OREGON COMMITS $8.9 MILLION TO DAM RAISING, OTHER PROJECTS (Capital Press)

A reservoir expansion project in Oregon’s Hood River County has obtained $3 million as part of a bevy of water supply proposals recently funded by state regulators.

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MISTRIAL DECLARED IN OREGON PESTICIDE DISPUTE (Capital Press)

A judge has declared a mistrial in a lawsuit that claims multiple residents of Curry County suffered health problems from off-target pesticide spraying.

Pacific Air Research, an aerial applicator, and landowner Joseph Kaufman were accused of negligence by 15 plaintiffs who sought $4.2 million in damages for physical ailments allegedly caused by herbicides sprayed in 2013.

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U.S. ORGANIC FOOD, FIBER SALES BOOMING (Capital Press)

U.S. organic product sales jumped nearly 11 percent in 2015, setting records along the way.

Total sales of organic food and non-food products reached $43.3 billion, with organic food sales claiming about 92 percent of all receipts at $39.7 billion, according to the Organic Trade Association.

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FOUR-DAY CHINOOK SEASON OPENS SATURDAY ON LOOKINGGLASS CREEK (East Oregonian)

Anglers will have just four days to fish for chinook salmon on Lookingglass Creek beginning Saturday, May 28 through Tuesday, May 31.

The stream will be open from the Moses Creek Lane Bridge up to the confluence of Jarboe Creek. Tim Bailey, district fish biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife in La Grande, said this years salmon run should be relatively small compared to recent years on Lookingglass Creek.

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MALHEUR WILL JOIN LINN COUNTY IN SICK LEAVE LAWSUIT (Argus Observer)

The Malheur County Court has accepted a request from Linn County to join a lawsuit against the state.

The suit is related to the effects of the sick leave law created under Senate Bill 454, which requires all Oregon employers to provide sick leave.

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HEALTH CARE FUELS JACKSON COUNTY JOB GROWTH (Medford Mail Tribune)

Health care, spurred by broader access and a growing population, continues to fuel job expansion in Jackson County.

Bureau of Labor Statistics figures released Tuesday showed that 12,540 people were employed in health care during April, up 550 positions from a year earlier. Overall Jackson County employment grew to 93,757 last month, up from 89,019 a year earlier.

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BLM REOPENS COMMENTS ON MONUMENT TRANSPORTATION PLAN (Medford Mail Tribune)

Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument users will have more chances to speak their mind about federal land managers’ plans to close or decommission from six to 165 miles of old logging roads within the monument to help preserve the land’s biodiversity but retain public access.

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SECOND SET OF BRIDGE BEAMS INSTALLED IN EAST FORK MILLICOMA RIVER PROJECT (The World)

Work on the East Fork Millicoma Oxbow Reconnection began early Tuesday morning, the continuation of nearly a decade of work by the Coos Watershed Association.

Workers from West Coast Contractors on Tuesday installed a second set of bridge beams on the downstream bridge, part of a project intended to reconnect more than 16 miles of the East Fork Millicoma in order to make the river more hospitable for Chinook and coho salmon as well as steelhead trout.

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FEDS ANNOUNCE $10 MILLION FOR WILDFIRE PROJECTS IN 12 STATES (The World)

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell on Tuesday toured a massive wildfire rehabilitation effort in southwest Idaho that’s part of the federal government’s new wildfire strategy and then announced $10 million for projects in 12 states to reduce wildfire threats.

“It’s easy for folks to think we can’t respond quickly, but we can respond quickly,” Jewell told about 30 federal land managers gathered in the small town of Marsing before heading out to an area where a wildfire last year scorched 436 square miles in Idaho and Oregon.

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IF GAMBLING IS A PROBLEM, WHO IS RESPONSIBLE? — GUEST OPINION (The World)

Gov. Kate Brown opposes a plan by the Coquille Indian Tribe to build a casino in Medford.

In her public statement, the governor said she opposes the addition of any more casinos because even a single additional casino is likely to lead to significant efforts to expand gaming across Oregon to the detriment of the public welfare.

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ASKING FOR SIMPLE FAIRNESS AND COMPROMISE — OPINION (The World)

As interest groups continue to pile onto the Bureau of Land Management with their opposition to the resource management plan for Western Oregon, a few issues become clear.

Timber harvests, or the lack thereof, impact everything. Commercial logging interests are obviously impacted. And environmentalists are their well-known antagonists.

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MOVEMENT GROWING TO DEFEND AGAINST CORPORATE INTERESTS — GUEST OPINION (The World)

-“We are going to defend our property rights like any other property owner would. That means defending our rights under the state and federal constitutions.”-

Those following the heroic efforts to stop the proposed Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline might attribute these words to any one of the more than 600 affected landowners along the 234-mile route.

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COLUMBIA CHINOOK SEASON REOPENS; STURGEON SEASON CLOSES (Daily Astorian)

Fishery managers from Oregon and Washington today reopened a Chinook salmon fishery and closed a recreational sturgeon fishery on the Columbia River.

Chinook fishing on the Lower Columbia River will be open Friday through Monday, then reopen again on June 3 and continue through June 15 when the summer Chinook fishing season begins.

According to Tucker Jones, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlifes Columbia River program manager, the joint state action is based on the remaining allowable catch and a projected run size of 180,000 to the river mouth.

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EDITORIAL: SHIPYARD VITAL TO THE LOWER COLUMBIA — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-If DEQ is patient, there is a solution-

Joe Dyer is a remarkable Astorian youve never heard of. A marine architect, Dyer founded the Astoria Marine Construction Co. in 1926. His obituary notes that during World War II he employed some 1,000 people at shipyards in three locations to build minesweepers for the U.S. Navy. That construction continued during the Korean War.

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EDITORIAL: THE LAST FIRST DROWNING — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

The Columbia-Pacific region on Sunday suffered our first beach drowning death of 2016. We must resolve to make it the last.

The scenario was all too familiar. A 12-year-old playing in the surf with a friend, having fun, in too deep and carried away. Visiting Washingtons Pacific County from Warrenton, she wasnt a tourist, but otherwise the tragedy was one that has played out with punishing frequency over the decades.

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LINN COUNTY HAS MORE JOBS THAN BEFORE THE RECESSION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Eight years later, Linn County finally has more jobs than it did before the recession hit.

And with a record-low unemployment rate of 5.7 percent for April, the jobs picture looks bright for Linn County, said Patrick OConnor, regional economist for the Oregon Employment Department.

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BENTON COUNTY HAS STATE’S LOWEST UNEMPLOYMENT (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Benton Countys unemployment rate of 3.4 percent for April, down from 3.5 percent in March, was the lowest in the state, and another sign of a healthy economy for the area, said Patrick OConnor, a regional economist with the Oregon Employment Department.

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PROBLEMS HALT TIMBER SALES (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

A number of timber sales on the Siuslaw National Forest have been put on hold because they failed to adequately protect two sensitive bird species.

According to Forest Supervisor Jerry Ingersoll, the timber sales in question used outdated field survey data or broad-scale computer modeling without supplemental field observations to define buffers around actual or potential nesting sites for marbled murrelets and northern spotted owls, which depend on old growth forest for nesting habitat.

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OREGON GETS COMPANY IN TESTING GAS TAX ALTERNATIVES (Governing)

-As the gas tax brings in less and less revenue, states are watching Oregon and California as they experiment with different ways to charge by mile.-

For a decade, Oregon has been the undisputed leader in pursuing the idea of taxing drivers not on the amount of fuel they buy but on the number of miles they drive. Starting this summer, though, the Beaver State will get some company: California plans to launch a nine-month experiment in July to test out different ways of charging by the mile.

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JEWELL: MAKING LANDSCAPES MORE RESILIENT TO FIRE— BLOG (Spokesman-Review)

U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell says the latest $10 million federal investment into the Wildland Fire Resilient Landscapes Program, which she announced during a visit to Idaho today, will make critical landscapes across the country more resilient to the impacts of wildfire and climate change.

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HERC REVISES GUIDELINE FOR WEANING OFF OPIOIDS WITH MORE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN (The Lund Report)

The Health Evidence Review Commission has revised its guidelines for weaning patients off the long-term use of narcotics to treat back pain on the Oregon Health Plan, delaying the stop-date by a year but requiring a more comprehensive treatment plan for pain management without the use of opiates.

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FAMILYCARE REPORTS SMALL $495,117 NET LOSS, WHILE OTHER CCOS REMAIN PROFITABLE (The Lund Report)

Please contact the State Library for access to this premium story from the Lund Report. library.help@state.or.us, 503-378-8800

-Financial reports reveal inner finances of Oregon’s 16 CCOs through the 2015 calendar year-

Oregon’s 16 community care organizations were largely profitable in 2015, with one exception  FamilyCare  posting a small loss that its more than able to absorb, according to full-year financial statements published by the Oregon Health Authority.

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RAND CORP. UNDERTAKES ANALYSIS OF SINGLE-PAYER HEALTH SYSTEM (The Lund Report)

Proponents applauded the Oregon Health Authority for selecting RAND.

Supporters of a single-payer healthcare system couldnt be more pleased that the RAND Corporation was chosen to conduct an in-depth study on the most feasible way to achieve universal coverage. Its work should be completed by Nov. 1, in time for legislators to debate the merits when they gather in Salem next February.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on May 25, 2016 OSL eClips

May 24, 2016 OSL eClips

* Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will host a budget meeting Thursday in Portland
* Controversial corporate tax hike could raise $3 billion a year, but add some costs for families, state report shows
* Another Oregon standoff? Sheriff warns lawmakers over Owyhee Canyonlands plan
* Oregon on track to collect $43 million in pot taxes this year
* Foster care crisis: Investigation results still months away
* Unions’ corporate tax will act as a sales tax, state says — Opinion
* Environmentalists, please consider rural Oregon — Guest Opinion
* How one ballot measure would transform taxes in Oregon
* Proposed Oregon business tax would be borne by consumers, nonpartisan analysis finds
* Oregon State University: Beware of hidden antibiotics
* A new revenue source? — Opinion
* Oregon’s medical opportunity on Lyme disease ticking by — Guest Opinion
* State business tax plan would raise billions, but could ‘dampen’ employment, growth
* Owyhee Canyonlands supporters, opponents face off in Salem hearings
* Redmond Airport reopening today
* Report details Wests loss of natural lands
* Editorial: Good move toward health cost transparency — Opinion
* Hearing debates Owyhee
* County plan for sewers challenged
* Report outlines pitfalls of proposed tax hike
* Ceremony at Corvallis creek honors lamprey
* Editorial: Oregon should grow economy, not tax rates — Opinion
* Editorial: A bad lesson from Portland schools — Opinion
* Gary Haugen Has A New Execution Date, But Oregon’s Death Penalty Moratorium Remains
* Clean Air Advocates Converge On Oregon Senate Hearing
* Coping with climate change in Eastern Oregon
* Fire sweeps across Umatilla Depot, causes wrecks on I-82
* Department of Energy recommends siting major wind farm in Morrow County
* Invasive white top spreads to rangeland
* Proposed Canyonlands monument dominates talk at town hall
* Got sun?
* Construction season begins on highways
* Medford pans casino study
* Jackson County to FERC: Uphold pipeline denial
* Guest Opinion: BLM’s management plan is insufficient — Guest Opinion
* State asks to amend Skrah indictment after dismissal request
* Development people get a good picture of Klamath County business potential — Opinion
* Blue Zones Project can improve local health
* Support builds for embattled shipyard: Advisory group hopes to relocate Astoria Marine Construction
* Editorial: Congress finally agrees for the good — Opinion
* Editorial: Leave them alone, give them space — Opinion
* Editorial: Gas-tax votes complicate road plans — Opinion
* Editorial: Legislative report triggers fight over tax increase — Opinion
* Editorial: Jury’s still out on motor voters — Opinion
* DEQ hears concerns
* Mysterious motions in the mountains
* OUR VIEW: Staircase worth climbing — Opinion
* Largest solar plant in Oregon active in Bly
* Water bottling ban passes, legal questions remain
* Douglas County’s population hits 107,000, again
* Department of State Lands overstepped in Heard Farms stoppage — Opinion
* ‘Oregon Promise’ helps students go to community college
* DEQ reveals toxics testing plan for The Dalles
* Where people drink the most booze and do the most drugs– Blog

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OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE WILL HOST A BUDGET MEETING THURSDAY IN PORTLAND (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is hoping non-hunters and non-anglers will attend its town hall meeting Thursday on it’s proposed budget.

The meeting was scheduled at the request of conservation groups after mild criticism the department wasn’t reaching out to other constituencies.

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CONTROVERSIAL CORPORATE TAX HIKE COULD RAISE $3 BILLION A YEAR, BUT ADD SOME COSTS FOR FAMILIES, STATE REPORT SHOWS (Portland Oregonian)

A controversial tax plan headed for November’s ballot would raise hundreds of millions of dollars more than initially estimated.

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ANOTHER OREGON STANDOFF? SHERIFF WARNS LAWMAKERS OVER OWYHEE CANYONLANDS PLAN (Portland Oregonian)

Sparks flew Monday during a hearing attended by ranchers and environmentalists in the state Capitol on a proposal to turn 2.5 million acres of canyonlands and desert in southeastern Oregon into a federally protected monument.

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OREGON ON TRACK TO COLLECT $43 MILLION IN POT TAXES THIS YEAR (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon is expected to take in about $43 million in tax revenue from recreational marijuana this year under a revised estimate by state economists.

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FOSTER CARE CRISIS: INVESTIGATION RESULTS STILL MONTHS AWAY (Portland Oregonian)

A review of Oregon’s foster care system is expected to wrap up in August, _________________________________________

UNIONS’ CORPORATE TAX WILL ACT AS A SALES TAX, STATE SAYS — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The public employee unions seeking to boost business taxes by about $6 billion per biennium would like Oregonians to believe that Joe and Jane Taxpayer won’t be affected.

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ENVIRONMENTALISTS, PLEASE CONSIDER RURAL OREGON — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

For decades, the federal Bureau of Land Management has been stuck between the rock of Northwest timber counties and the hard place of environmental advocacy coalitions.

In matters of public debate, the best solution is often somewhere in the moderate middle.

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HOW ONE BALLOT MEASURE WOULD TRANSFORM TAXES IN OREGON (Salem Statesman Journal)

A ballot measure poised to pit labor groups against business interests would increase the tax burden of Oregonians by about $600 per capita annually and raise more than $6 billion in revenue each biennium.

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PROPOSED OREGON BUSINESS TAX WOULD BE BORNE BY CONSUMERS, NONPARTISAN ANALYSIS FINDS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Initiative Petition 28, a proposed major tax increase on big businesses in Oregon, would in practice act largely as a sales or value-added tax paid by consumers, an analysis  by the nonpartisan Legislative Revenue Office has found.

Middle- and even low-income families would pay hundreds of dollars a year in new indirect taxes, passed on through higher retail product prices and utility bills, the report said.

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OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY: BEWARE OF HIDDEN ANTIBIOTICS (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Researchers say the jury is still out on triclosan effects and studies should continue-

Before you dig into that expensively hormone-free chicken dinner, you might want to double check the hand soap that you used while washing up.

If its antibacterial soap, the chances are you lathered up with the widely used and easily absorbed antibiotic called triclosan.

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A NEW REVENUE SOURCE? — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Given the amount of money pouring into state coffers from a tax on newly legalized recreational marijuana, it was only a matter of time before cash-strapped local governments began eyeing this new revenue source.

Cottage Grove is now among the first to take steps toward implementing a local tax on recreational marijuana sales. It wont be the last.

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OREGON’S MEDICAL OPPORTUNITY ON LYME DISEASE TICKING BY — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

There is nothing like the joy and exuberance of rejoining the world after being sequestered in bed with a chronic illness for many years. My gratitude and wonder are tempered only by the sorrow of having lost so much time in this precious cycle we call a life-span. My return to actively parenting my young daughter and being a productive member of society are privileged burdens that I most happily undertake. You see, I am recovering from chronic Lyme disease.

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OREGON’S MEDICAL OPPORTUNITY ON LYME DISEASE TICKING BY (Eugene Register-Guard)

There is nothing like the joy and exuberance of rejoining the world after being sequestered in bed with a chronic illness for many years.

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STATE BUSINESS TAX PLAN WOULD RAISE BILLIONS, BUT COULD ‘DAMPEN’ EMPLOYMENT, GROWTH (Portland Tribune)

A proposed tax on the sales of large businesses would generate more than $6 billion in biennial state revenue starting in 2017-19, but it also would slow income, employment and population growth during the next five years, according to a state analysis of the initiative.

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OWYHEE CANYONLANDS SUPPORTERS, OPPONENTS FACE OFF IN SALEM HEARINGS (Portland Tribune)

Advocates and opponents of a proposed 2.5 million-acre national monument in Eastern Oregon tried to enlist the support of state lawmakers during a recent legislative hearing.

The two sides are mounting competing public relations campaigns to influence the possible designation of the Owyhee Canyonlands National Monument, which will ultimately be decided by President Barack Obama.

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REDMOND AIRPORT REOPENING TODAY (Bend Bulletin)

Commercial air service returns to the Redmond Airport today, bringing to an end a three-week closure to replace the main runway.

Reached Friday, Airport Manager Zachary Bass said private pilots were set to resume flying in and out of Redmond by late Friday afternoon, with scheduled commercial service resuming this morning.

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REPORT DETAILS WESTS LOSS OF NATURAL LANDS (Bend Bulletin)

-Project looks to give big picture, inform discussions-

The American West lost a football field of natural land  including forests, wetlands, deserts and grasslands  every two and a half minutes between 2001 and 2011, according to a new report.

Ed Note: To view Oregon-related information from the project, visit: www.disappearingwest.org/factsheets/oregon

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EDITORIAL: GOOD MOVE TOWARD HEALTH COST TRANSPARENCY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

It sure is nice to know the price of something before you buy it.

Oregon hospitals took a good step toward helping some consumers know what procedures will cost. The Oregonian reported the Oregon Association of Hospitals & Health Systems has added cost estimate pages to its website, OregonHospitalGuide.org.

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HEARING DEBATES OWYHEE (Bend Bulletin)

-Ranchers object to protection proposal-

A proposal to permanently protect the Owyhee Canyonlands in southeast Oregon prompted questions Monday about the adequacy of current rules and whether a new designation might eventually halt grazing in the area.

A state House committee discussed the proposed Owyhee Canyonlands National Conservation Area at a crowded informational hearing in Salem during legislative days.

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COUNTY PLAN FOR SEWERS CHALLENGED (Bend Bulletin)

-Central Oregon LandWatch appeals decision to allow sewers systems in rural southern Deschutes County-

Central Oregon LandWatch is challenging a decision that allows sewer systems in rural parts of southern Deschutes County.

The Bend-based land use watchdog group argues in a recent petition to the Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals that the decision is too vague to address ground contamination concerns in unincorporated areas around La Pine and Sunriver.

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REPORT OUTLINES PITFALLS OF PROPOSED TAX HIKE (Bend Bulletin)

A massive $2.8 billion annual corporate tax hike is likely headed to Oregon voters in November, a move that could create the most aggressive tax climate for big business of any state in the nation.

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CEREMONY AT CORVALLIS CREEK HONORS LAMPREY (Bend Bulletin)

David Harrelson banged a drum Saturday afternoon alongside the trickling Lamprey Creek in a blessing ceremony honoring the creek and the fish it will forever be named after.

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EDITORIAL: OREGON SHOULD GROW ECONOMY, NOT TAX RATES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The biggest proposed tax increase in Oregon history is now a bad idea in new ways. It would cost Oregonians 20,000 jobs in the next five years, raise prices for consumers by about 1 percent and hit the poorest Oregonians harder.

Thats the verdict of the new report from Oregon’s Legislative Revenue Office on Initiative Petition 28. IP 28 is a new minimum tax on C corporations with sales of more than $25 million. They would have to pay a new tax rate of 2.5 percent on sales above $25 million.

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EDITORIAL: A BAD LESSON FROM PORTLAND SCHOOLS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Directors of Portland Public Schools decided last week to effectively ban climate change doubters from the districts curriculum. The problem is too serious, the bans supporters said, to be open to question. Clearly both the school board and those supporting the ban need a lesson in free speech, at least the way its described by John Stuart Mill.

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GARY HAUGEN HAS A NEW EXECUTION DATE, BUT OREGON’S DEATH PENALTY MORATORIUM REMAINS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Its been almost 20 years since anyone was put to death in Oregon  54 if you don’t count death row inmates who gave up their appeals and essentially volunteered to be executed.

In fact, when announcing a moratorium on Oregon’s death penalty in 2011, then-Gov. John Kitzhaber said only those who say they’re ready end up being executed in Oregon.

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CLEAN AIR ADVOCATES CONVERGE ON OREGON SENATE HEARING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Hundreds of people, worried about clean air, converged on Oregon’s Legislature Monday, to speak at a senate hearing.

Last week Gov. Kate Brown issued a cease and desist order to Bullseye Glass, after air monitors identified it as a source of lead emissions.

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COPING WITH CLIMATE CHANGE IN EASTERN OREGON (East Oregonian)

-Umatilla County is feeling the effects of climate change, and has been for years.-

But Jeff Blackwood said there are ways all of us can adapt.

Blackwood is a former supervisor of the Umatilla National Forest and a core member of the Umatilla County Climate Change Focus Group, which held public workshops Saturday in Pendleton at Blue Mountain Community College to discuss climate change and what we can do about it.

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FIRE SWEEPS ACROSS UMATILLA DEPOT, CAUSES WRECKS ON I-82 (East Oregonian)

A large, fast-moving brush fire swept across the Umatilla Chemical Depot west of Hermiston Monday morning, burning two buildings and causing a multi-vehicle wreck on Interstate 82 that injured four people.

Fire departments from around the region responded and worked into the afternoon to knock down the fire, which burned over the top of the hundreds of cement igloos that once held munitions. Two buildings also were destroyed in the blaze.

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DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RECOMMENDS SITING MAJOR WIND FARM IN MORROW COUNTY (East Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Energy has recommended approving the site certificate for a proposed 500-megawatt wind farm in Umatilla and Morrow counties.

Wheatridge Wind Energy LLC wants to build up to 292 turbines between two main project areas, known as Wheatridge East and Wheatridge West.

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INVASIVE WHITE TOP SPREADS TO RANGELAND (Argus Observer)

Just about everyone in Malheur County, and elsewhere in the valley, has probably seen white top, as it is prolific. While it can be controlled, it is appearing in areas where control is very difficult.

White top is an invasive noxious weed that crowds out native species and has no economic value, as it is not a forage.

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PROPOSED CANYONLANDS MONUMENT DOMINATES TALK AT TOWN HALL (Argus Observer)

.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., said he has carried the message to Congress that the majority of people in Malheur County do not want a national monument, but that does not mean the conversation is not happening.

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GOT SUN? (Argus Observer)

-Area solar farms get ready to soak up rays-

With one solar farm projected to be up and running by July, crews are working quickly on solar power installations around Malheur County.

There are about 150 people working on six sites, according to Justin Kylstad, assistant project manager for Swinerton Renewable Energy.

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CONSTRUCTION SEASON BEGINS ON HIGHWAYS (Argus Observer)

The summer construction season is underway and motorists driving on U.S. Highway 20 in the local area will be seeing construction work over the next few weeks as crews add rumble strips.

The project will be from Cairo Junction to Harper, Tom Strandberg, Oregon Department of Transportation Region 5 spokesperson, said. Work will include lane closures, flaggers and delays of up to 20 minutes at times, he said.

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MEDFORD PANS CASINO STUDY (Medford Mail Tribune)

Medford officials have criticized a federal Coquille Indian Tribe casino study for failing to adequately address crime, transportation, economic impacts and alternative locations and for opening the door to more tribal gaming in Oregon.

Establishing this precedent would make it more likely that the tribe and other similarly situated tribes will pursue such developments in the future, according to a May 9 letter to the Bureau of Indian Affairs written by City Attorney Lori Cooper.

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JACKSON COUNTY TO FERC: UPHOLD PIPELINE DENIAL (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Jackson County Board of Commissioners has sent a letter to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission asking it to stand firm in its decision to block a 232-mile natural gas pipeline that would have crossed through Southern Oregon.

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GUEST OPINION: BLM’S MANAGEMENT PLAN IS INSUFFICIENT — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

We Oregonians love our public lands. We also love clean air and safe communities and we expect the federal government to keep its promises.

The recent proposal by the Bureau of Land Management for managing local lands into the foreseeable future doesnt promote the Oregon we love. It does not ensure clean air, it takes away our access to vital county services like jails and sheriffs deputies, and it breaks the promise the federal government made with the people under the O&C Act.

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STATE ASKS TO AMEND SKRAH INDICTMENT AFTER DISMISSAL REQUEST (Herald and News)

Prosecutors have asked to amend the indictment of Klamath County Sheriff Frank Skrah after the defense argued the indictment should be dismissed because of failure to follow procedure.

In a motion filed Friday, the state insisted the nine-count misdemeanor indictment against Skrah was filed appropriately but asked to amend the document to more directly address concerns raised by Skrahs attorney, Rosalind Lee.

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DEVELOPMENT PEOPLE GET A GOOD PICTURE OF KLAMATH COUNTY BUSINESS POTENTIAL — OPINION (Herald and News)

Site selectors are people whose job is to help businesses find sites to operate in. Several were in Klamath Falls last week looking at what Klamath County has to offer. They attended a conference organized by the Klamath County Economic Development Association.

Klamath County does have a lot to offer, including some recent forward steps  or at least managing to dodge a couple of bullets. It also has enough drawbacks no interstate highway, a deterioration of the timber industry, a slow recovery from the recession to have made efforts to build the economy difficult.

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BLUE ZONES PROJECT CAN IMPROVE LOCAL HEALTH (The World)

Coos County ranks among near the bottom in a number of critical health categories, but there is a push to change that with the Blue Zones Project.

Blue Zones Project statewide manager Jordan Carr gave a presentation during the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce’s Wednesday Business Connection luncheon to tout the benefits and results of “taking the pledge.”

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SUPPORT BUILDS FOR EMBATTLED SHIPYARD: ADVISORY GROUP HOPES TO RELOCATE ASTORIA MARINE CONSTRUCTION (Daily Astorian) \

The advisory group overseeing the cleanup of Astoria Marine Construction Co.s contaminated shipyard has asked the state to support a public-private partnership to relocate the business.

Denise Lfman, director of the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce and chairwoman of the advisory group, wrote a letter to Robert Williams, the cleanup project manager for the state Department of Environmental Quality.

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EDITORIAL: CONGRESS FINALLY AGREES FOR THE GOOD — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Nowadays, it is surprising to learn Congress has agreed to anything more than taking another vacation. Forthcoming chemical safety legislation borders on being an amazing accomplishment.

Federal lawmakers last week unveiled compromise laws that will provide the industry with greater certainty while empowering the Environmental Protection Agency to obtain more information about a chemical before approving its use.

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EDITORIAL: LEAVE THEM ALONE, GIVE THEM SPACE — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-Rarely are animal babies actually abandoned-

Last weeks sad and irritating news that a newborn bison calf had to be euthanized in Yellowstone National Park after well-meaning tourists placed it their vehicle, leading to it being rejected by its herd, is a good reminder of our own baby animal issues. Young wildlife  including pups, fawns, bear cubs and birds  are best left alone.

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EDITORIAL: GAS-TAX VOTES COMPLICATE ROAD PLANS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The news was mixed across Oregon in the election for local proposals to raise gasoline taxes, and its a good bet that the results were closely examined by that committee of legislators charged with crafting a transportation package for next years Legislature.

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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATIVE REPORT TRIGGERS FIGHT OVER TAX INCREASE — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

The fighting officially has started on Initiative Petition 28, the proposed gross receipts tax on businesses with more than $25 million in Oregon sales  and you can be sure that the battle will roll all the way to Election Day in November.

The battle heated up on Monday, when the Legislative Revenue Office released a nonpartisan analysis of the measure’s potential effects.

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EDITORIAL: JURY’S STILL OUT ON MOTOR VOTERS — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Despite what we argued in an editorial last week, it may be too early to conclude definitively that the states motor-voter registration system had little or no impact on the primary election.

Certainly, the overall numbers from Tuesdays election were impressive: Officials expect that final tallies will show that 1.2 million Oregonians cast ballots in the election. If that expectation holds, this will be only the second primary election in state history with more than 1 million ballots turned in.

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DEQ HEARS CONCERNS (The Dalles Chronicle)

Pete Shepherd, interim director of the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, said one of the most important things hes learned in his more than 23 years of public service is the importance of listening to people speak from their heart in the place where they live.

He got plenty of that Tuesday evening as around 120 people packed into the Columbia Gorge Community College lecture hall to discuss a Mutual Agreement and Order between DEQ and Amerities Westthe railroad tie plant in The Dalles.

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MYSTERIOUS MOTIONS IN THE MOUNTAINS (LaGrande Observer)

-A doctoral student at the University of Oregon is using an array of seismometers to try to figure out why the Wallowa Mountains are rising, and what causes local earthquakes-

Matthew Morriss wants to know whats going on under our feet.

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OUR VIEW: STAIRCASE WORTH CLIMBING — OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

The effort to renovate the grand staircase at Eastern Oregon University is one of those ideas that carry a lot of merit and should be pursued with vigor by those who support the effort.

However, the $3.2 million project is one that would be better financed through donations and grants and not state funds.

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LARGEST SOLAR PLANT IN OREGON ACTIVE IN BLY (Lake County Examiner)

Bly is now solar-central in Oregon, as the newest and largest solar plant in the state is now generating power at an astounding 6.8 megawatts per year.

Comprised of 21,964 sun-tracking solar panels located on a former 40-acre Weyerhauser industrial site that closed in 1984, the facility is operated by NextEra Energy Resources, LLC through an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary. The vast solar array began construction last year as the largest solar project in scale to be built in the state to date.

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WATER BOTTLING BAN PASSES, LEGAL QUESTIONS REMAIN (Hood River News)

Measure 14-55, which blocks large-scale bottling companies like Nestl from tapping into county water sources, sailed through the May 17 Primary Election with 69 percent of votes.

#Water Protection Measure amends the Hood River County charter to prohibit any company from producing or transporting 1,000 or more gallons of bottled water per day. That includes all water labeled and marketed as water in plastic and glass bottles, jugs, or similar containers.

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DOUGLAS COUNTY’S POPULATION HITS 107,000, AGAIN (Douglas County News-Review)

Douglas County’s population has again climbed above the 107,000 mark for the first time since 2012, according to new estimates released by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The U.S. Census Bureau released its population estimates Thursday that estimated the county’s population as of July to be 107,685, adding an additional 687 residents compared to 2014.

Roseburg grew at a slightly faster rate during the year, adding 155 residents in 2015 for a total estimated population of 22,114.

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DEPARTMENT OF STATE LANDS OVERSTEPPED IN HEARD FARMS STOPPAGE — OPINION (Douglas County News-Review)

Theres an old saying that goes something like Its a dirty job, but someones gotta do it.

Few businesses get the meaning of that maxim quite like Heard Farms, a quasi-farm that sows fertilizer from human waste. For nearly 20 years, it has stepped up to treat and manage the sewage of 17 cities and towns in Oregon. Flushing the toilet is not magic, and the operation there in Wilbur understands that better than most.

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‘OREGON PROMISE’ HELPS STUDENTS GO TO COMMUNITY COLLEGE (KGW)

Community college has always been a good first step for students who did not want the pressure or commitment or cost of a four-year school.

Personally, I think for myself Im just not ready for that, said Fiona Lett-Alago, a senior at Lincoln High School.

Now the deal is even better.

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DEQ REVEALS TOXICS TESTING PLAN FOR THE DALLES (KGW)

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality announced a plan to monitor toxics in The Dalles but residents say officials are still not doing enough to address health concerns.

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WHERE PEOPLE DRINK THE MOST BOOZE AND DO THE MOST DRUGS— BLOG (Washington Post)

Americans in different parts of the country are known to vary significantly in their consumption of particular foods  be it spicy chili, cream-cheese covered bagels or collard greens. Recent federal government data shows that the country is equally diverse in its consumption of intoxicating substances.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on May 24, 2016 OSL eClips

May 23, 2016 Weekend eClips Edition

State Library eClips

* State finds nickel in air near Precision Castparts above health benchmarks
* Corporate tax initiative likely to dominate November ballot
* ‘Something needs to be done’: Parents say they want justice for baby’s bruises
* Oregon’s flawed new science standards — Guest Opinion
* Horsetail Falls hiking death a grim reminder of outdoor dangers
* Harney County voters overwhelmingly supported candidates opposed to Malheur occupation
* Obamacare is a Band-Aid on a big health-insurance wound — Guest Opinion
* Avakian’s primary win shows price of leaders’ silence: Editorial — Opinion
* Getting the lead out: Editorial — Opinion
* GMO crop ban bounced: Editorial — Opinion
* Salem is Oregon’s second-largest city. Maybe
* National monuments not needed in Marion, Malheur counties — Guest Opinion
* No place like home
* Cottage Grove may be among the first Oregon cities to impose local marijuana tax
* Oregon engineering board reduces fine against former Eugene traffic engineer over unlicensed work
* A tidal wave of drugs — Opinion
* A forests worth cant be calculated by the value of its logs — Guest Opinion
* DEQ finds toxic metals in air near Precision Castparts
* Governor tells Bullseye Glass to stop using hazardous pollutants
* Japan can’t get enough PDX
* Unions submitting signatures for large corporate tax hike
* Debate over proposed Owyhee protections continues
* Number of working youth falling in Central Oregon, elsewhere
* New OT rules force tough choices
* Editorial: Central Oregon needs Congressional help to save water — Opinion
* Editorial: Make good on promise along the Columbia — Opinion
* Lead Poisoning
* Curbing The Cannabis Industry’s Growing Power Consumption
* Thousands Of Cormorants Abandon Their Nests On The Columbia River
* 3 Things To Know About Bullseye Glass And DEQ Dispute
* Bullseye: DEQ Prefers To Close Us Down
* Envisioning Oregon’s Transportation Future
* High temperatures melt Butter Creek
* Other views: California considers drug sentencing reform — Guest Opinion
* Rewards offered for illegal fish-stocking
* Guest Opinion: A freeway in our backyard — Guest Opinion
* Banks balk at attempt by Medford to fight blight
* Guest Opinion: Southern Oregon’s history deserves taxpayer support — Guest Opinion
* Oregon lawmakers should take cue from Floridas government open records Sunshine Law — Guest Opinion
* Gov. Brown touts Oregon job surge, welcomes new software firm at New York Building — Blog
* Vermont passes Oregon for No. 3 spot in latest cleantech ranking — Blog
* Bullseye Glass cutting employee hours after governor’s cease order
* Merkley: Lawmakers reach deal on toxic chemicals reform
* Portland Chrome Plating Company Cited For Air Pollution Violations
* Filmmaker Lauds Oregon’s Health Information Exchange Efforts, Encourages Statewide Adoption

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STATE FINDS NICKEL IN AIR NEAR PRECISION CASTPARTS ABOVE HEALTH BENCHMARKS (Portland Oregonian)

State regulators have found three cancer-causing heavy metals at levels above state health benchmarks near Precision Castparts, a manufacturing plant in Southeast Portland. None pose any immediate health risks, regulators said.

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CORPORATE TAX INITIATIVE LIKELY TO DOMINATE NOVEMBER BALLOT (Portland Oregonian)

What had been shaping up as one of Oregon’s most tumultuous November ballots  with measures on emotional social issues colliding with a hot presidential race  will instead be dominated by a single fight over raising corporate taxes.

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‘SOMETHING NEEDS TO BE DONE’: PARENTS SAY THEY WANT JUSTICE FOR BABY’S BRUISES (Portland Oregonian)

A Sherwood couple say they came home from a date night a couple of months ago to find their 1-year-old son, Jacob, screaming and the babysitter asleep on the couch. The next morning, they awoke to find him covered in bruises.

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OREGON’S FLAWED NEW SCIENCE STANDARDS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The Next Generation Science Standards NGSS juggernaut has arrived in Oregon in the wake of the Common Core “New science standards coming to Oregon,” May 11 and have “not faced as much pushback.”

Maybe they should.

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HORSETAIL FALLS HIKING DEATH A GRIM REMINDER OF OUTDOOR DANGERS (Portland Oregonian)

It was a beautiful Sunday in the Columbia River Gorge, sunny with clear skies. The family did what any might do on such a day: Take a hike in the hills.

They picked a short jaunt on the Horsetail Falls trail, which is billed as family friendly with its moderate climbs, gorge views and waterfall access. But at some point, a 3-year-old fell down a hill and went over a cliff, and his mother lost her life in a frantic bid to save him.

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HARNEY COUNTY VOTERS OVERWHELMINGLY SUPPORTED CANDIDATES OPPOSED TO MALHEUR OCCUPATION (Portland Oregonian)

For all the claims Ammon Bundy and the rest of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge occupiers made about liberating land from the clutches of government tyranny and for the people, it appears Harney County voters didn’t quite agree.

During Tuesday’s primary elections, none of the occupation’s local supporters managed to make it into office or even into November’s general contest.

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OBAMACARE IS A BAND-AID ON A BIG HEALTH-INSURANCE WOUND — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Letter writer Ward Nelson “Health insurance doomsday,” May 14, in commenting on a previous letter, nicely summarizes the sorry state of our private corporate health insurance system post-Affordable Care Act. Too many people are still uncovered, or can’t afford to use the coverage that they are mandated to buy because of outrageous  and rising  premiums, copays and deductibles.

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AVAKIAN’S PRIMARY WIN SHOWS PRICE OF LEADERS’ SILENCE: EDITORIAL — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Many Oregonians may be feeling heartburn over Brad Avakian’s win in Tuesday’s Democratic primary for secretary of state, with good reason. But while a crowded field of candidates, negative advertising and an effective appeal to uninformed voters helped propel him to his win, political and civic leaders should consider the part their own silence played as well.

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GETTING THE LEAD OUT: EDITORIAL — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The call by Gov. Kate Brown late Thursday for a Portland glassmaker to temporarily halt the uncontained burning of certain compounds because high levels of lead were found in the air at a nearby day care center was spot-on. The decision by Multnomah County health officials to visit the day care center and offer free lead screenings in children was what government is supposed to do: look out for the public’s safety.

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GMO CROP BAN BOUNCED: EDITORIAL — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In the fall of 2013, then-Gov. John Kitzhaber signed a handful of bills included in a so-called “grand bargain” to reduce the cost of the state’s public pension system. One of them, Senate Bill 863, prohibited local bans on the use or production of genetically engineered seeds. The state Supreme Court later took a cleaver to the pension reforms, but the seed bill survived. This week, it paid dividends.

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SALEM IS OREGON’S SECOND-LARGEST CITY. MAYBE (Salem Statesman Journal)

For years, Salem and Eugene have been neck-and-neck in the race to be Oregon’s second-largest city.

When the most recent population data was released this week, it appeared that Salem had finally grabbed the title.

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NATIONAL MONUMENTS NOT NEEDED IN MARION, MALHEUR COUNTIES — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Big corporations and special-interest groups are lobbying President Barack Obama to use his executive powers to declare new national monuments across the nation.

One company has turned the political campaign into a full-fledged corporate marketing stunt to help sell products. But for those of us who live, work and play on Oregons public lands, this issue isn’t about marketing. Its about our way of life.

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NO PLACE LIKE HOME (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Formerly homeless Eugene student survives and thrives-

Drinking a glass of water before bedtime wasn’t an option for 17-year-old Adriann Bechtle this past winter.

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COTTAGE GROVE MAY BE AMONG THE FIRST OREGON CITIES TO IMPOSE LOCAL MARIJUANA TAX (Eugene Register-Guard)

Cottage Grove leaders may put a local recreational marijuana sales tax before voters in November.

The Cottage Grove City Council plans to vote Monday night on whether to ask city voters to approve a 3 percent tax on recreational marijuana sales within the city.

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OREGON ENGINEERING BOARD REDUCES FINE AGAINST FORMER EUGENE TRAFFIC ENGINEER OVER UNLICENSED WORK (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Tom Larsen has applied to get new P.E. license from state-

A state regulatory board will drastically cut its fine against the city of Eugene’s former traffic engineer, if he meets certain conditions, and it may let him resume engineering work.

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A TIDAL WAVE OF DRUGS — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon is awash in opioids, with the second-highest rate of prescriptions in the country and a skyrocketing death rate from opioids. The death rate in Oregon from these drugs  which include Vicodin, OxyContin and Percocet  surpasses any other type of drug poisoning, including alcohol, methamphetamines, heroin and cocaine.

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A FORESTS WORTH CANT BE CALCULATED BY THE VALUE OF ITS LOGS — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

I am concerned about the recent decision of counties to join a class action suit against the state of Oregon to increase clearcutting of public forests held in trust by the state. This, in addition to the decimation of privately owned forests in Oregon, is just too much.

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DEQ FINDS TOXIC METALS IN AIR NEAR PRECISION CASTPARTS (Portland Tribune)

Castparts Corps plants in Southeast Portland and Milwaukie showed unhealthy levels of hexavalent chromium, nickel and arsenic.

The data, released Friday by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Health Authority, are the first results from a 35-day monitoring effort near Southeast 45th Avenue and Harney Drive, just northwest of the twin Precision Castparts plants.

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GOVERNOR TELLS BULLSEYE GLASS TO STOP USING HAZARDOUS POLLUTANTS (Portland Tribune)

Gov. Kate Brown issued a cease-and-desist order Thursday to require Bullseye Glass in Southeast Portland to stop using several hazardous air pollutants, including lead, following air monitoring results at a day care near the company that showed an immediate, short-term health risk from lead levels that were four times above the 24-hour benchmark.

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JAPAN CAN’T GET ENOUGH PDX (Portland Tribune)

PDC sends hip Oregon companies to Tokyo to push the brand.

The Portland Development Commission has headed off to Japan on a repeat trade mission to big-up Portland companies.

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UNIONS SUBMITTING SIGNATURES FOR LARGE CORPORATE TAX HIKE (Bend Bulletin)

A proposal for the largest corporate tax hike in Oregon history that could pump a whopping $2.5 billion in additional funds into state coffers each year is now just one step away from getting inked onto the November ballot.

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DEBATE OVER PROPOSED OWYHEE PROTECTIONS CONTINUES (Bend Bulletin)

The nearly 2.6 million acres proposed as the Owyhee Canyonlands National Conservation Area in southeast Oregon hosts some of the most valuable, unprotected roadless lands in the West, according to a new report that notes a significant opportunity to conserve those resources.

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NUMBER OF WORKING YOUTH FALLING IN CENTRAL OREGON, ELSEWHERE (Bend Bulletin)

-Decline means some lack writing, communication, other soft skills-

Carlee Stiltner, 23, a banking specialist at Summit Bank in Bend, knows well the complaints about her generation.

Were lazy, or on our phones all the time; were not good at communicating, she said Wednesday. I would agree with that, actually.

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NEW OT RULES FORCE TOUGH CHOICES (Bend Bulletin)

The governments new rules requiring overtime pay for millions of workers have small business owners facing some hard choices.

The regulations being issued by the Labor Department Wednesday would double to $913 a week from $455  the threshold under which salaried workers must be paid overtime. In terms of annual pay, the threshold rises to $47,476 from $23,660. The rules take effect Dec. 1.

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EDITORIAL: CENTRAL OREGON NEEDS CONGRESSIONAL HELP TO SAVE WATER — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Central Oregon farmers should not be allowed to become an endangered species.

If the Endangered Species Act is going to require big or small changes in how irrigation districts take water from the Deschutes Basin, Congress needs to provide the money to protect the farmers from being threatened.

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EDITORIAL: MAKE GOOD ON PROMISE ALONG THE COLUMBIA — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Longtime travelers through the Columbia River Gorge are no doubt familiar with the small community of Celilo, an Indian fishing village a few miles east of The Dalles. Until recently, it was home to some of the worst housing in Oregon, a small community of 14 homes that housed 100 or so people.

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LEAD POISONING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Multnomah County health officials Perry Cabot and Jae Douglas tell us how to identify the health effects of lead poisoning after news that high levels of lead have been found near Bullseye Glass in Portland.

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CURBING THE CANNABIS INDUSTRY’S GROWING POWER CONSUMPTION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Marijuana cultivation is estimated to use one percent of Americas electricity output. Thats enough juice to power 1.7 million average homes.

And as more states make the drug legal in some form, that power consumption is expected to soar. Northwest energy officials project cannabis grows will suck up three percent of the regions power by 2035.

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THOUSANDS OF CORMORANTS ABANDON THEIR NESTS ON THE COLUMBIA RIVER (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Officials say thousands of cormorants abandoned their nests last weekend on an island in the Columbia River and they don’t know why. Reports indicate as many as 16,000 adult birds in the colony left their eggs behind to be eaten by predators including eagles, seagulls and crows.

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3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT BULLSEYE GLASS AND DEQ DISPUTE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

OPB has been reporting on Oregon Department of Environmental Quality’s cease-and-desist order to Bullseye Glass on production with nine metals  basically taking out 80 percent of the company’s production, according to Bullseye. This follows the revelation that a children’s daycare center near Bullseyes production plant showed hazardous levels of lead earlier in the month.

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BULLSEYE: DEQ PREFERS TO CLOSE US DOWN (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Bullseye Glass responded Friday night to the cease and desist order that has brought production nearly to a standstill. Air monitoring showed unsafe lead levels at a childrens daycare near Bullseyes production plant on the same day the company was recorded using high amounts of lead in its glass.

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ENVISIONING OREGON’S TRANSPORTATION FUTURE (Jefferson Public Radio)

Roads and bridges wear out over time, and have to be replaced.

But entire transportation systems–roads, rails, air–require attention to keep up with demands of travelers and shippers.

In Oregon, the Governor’s Transportation Vision Panel paid that attention, in a comprehensive look at the state’s transport needs.

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HIGH TEMPERATURES MELT BUTTER CREEK (East Oregonian)

With near-average snowpack and precipitation early in the year, Lowell Saylor figured he would get a decent amount of irrigation water out of Butter Creek this spring.

By April, his optimism began to dry as fast as the creek itself.

Temperatures in Hermiston averaged 5 degrees above normal for the month, while the area received less than half an inch of rain

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OTHER VIEWS: CALIFORNIA CONSIDERS DRUG SENTENCING REFORM — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

Once upon a time, California lawmakers imagined that tougher penalties and longer jail sentences for drug offenders would stem the drug trade.

This approach led to our statewide three-year sentencing enhancement for drug offenders who have prior convictions for possession with the intent to sell, drug sales, or similar offenses.

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REWARDS OFFERED FOR ILLEGAL FISH-STOCKING (Medford Mail Tribune)

Angler groups seeing red over the rampant introduction of non-native fish into Southern Oregon waterways are hoping a little green will curb the practice and perhaps lead to someone getting caught in the act.

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GUEST OPINION: A FREEWAY IN OUR BACKYARD — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

It seems the Oregon Department of Transportation  affectionately known by the locals as ODOT  has in mind a game of tac-tac-toe for the residents of East Medford.

Beginning at the northern end will be the O of the roundabout, and at the southern end the X that is the newly completed exit 24 interchange for Interstate 5. Those of us in the highest 3 percent homeowners’ tax bracket will soon rue the day that each of us neglected to ask about the master plan for the area before we bought homes in this location.

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BANKS BALK AT ATTEMPT BY MEDFORD TO FIGHT BLIGHT (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Councilor says association has come in ‘hot and heavy’ on the issue-

A proposal to crack down on derelict houses in the city of Medford has met opposition from the Oregon Bankers Association.

It seems to me that whoever is working on this in the Medford city government either totally misread our communication and concern, or is really out to stick it to the lending and real estate industries in that community, stated Kenneth Sherman, a Salem lawyer representing the Bankers Association, in an email to the city.

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GUEST OPINION: SOUTHERN OREGON’S HISTORY DESERVES TAXPAYER SUPPORT — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

History is always with us, and lately it is playing a role in some of Southern Oregon’s most exciting projects.

The Southern Oregon Land Conservancy recently received a million-dollar grant toward purchase of the historic Ruhl property on the Rogue River that includes a historic 1920s-era lodge. In Medford the Holly Theatre renovation, supported by more than a million dollars of state and private donations, is ramping up to revitalize Medfords largest movie palace for public performances.

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OREGON LAWMAKERS SHOULD TAKE CUE FROM FLORIDAS GOVERNMENT OPEN RECORDS SUNSHINE LAW — GUEST OPINION (Tillamook County Pioneer)

In elementary school, Franklin Weekley was diagnosed as mentally retarded. He was slow to learn, but quick to act out on impulse. Teachers at his rural school were unequipped to get a handle on him. Weekley ended up spending much of his time at home. Unsupervised, he would often get in trouble.

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GOV. BROWN TOUTS OREGON JOB SURGE, WELCOMES NEW SOFTWARE FIRM AT NEW YORK BUILDING — BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

The day after voters overwhelmingly crowned her the Democratic candidate for governor in the November election, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown made a pitstop to welcome a California technology company to its new home in Northwest Portland.

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VERMONT PASSES OREGON FOR NO. 3 SPOT IN LATEST CLEANTECH RANKING — BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon has lost its No. 3 spot in a national renewable energy ranking, falling to fourth place.

With nearly 70 percent of the states power generation derived from renewable sources from wind and solar to hydropower and biomass  the state is fourth in the nation for clean energy production.

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BULLSEYE GLASS CUTTING EMPLOYEE HOURS AFTER GOVERNOR’S CEASE ORDER (KGW)

Bullseye Glass announced over the weekend that it has been forced to cut back employee hours after Gov. Kate Brown ordered the company to cease its use of several hazardous air pollutants.

The cutbacks are equivalent to laying off more than 15 employees, according to Bullseye Vice President Jim Jones.

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MERKLEY: LAWMAKERS REACH DEAL ON TOXIC CHEMICALS REFORM (KTVZ Bend)

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., and a bipartisan group of congressional leaders  announced Friday an agreement on the first major reform of toxic chemicals regulation in decades.

Merkley said the agreement puts Congress on the cusp of finally passing historic legislation to reform the nations broken chemical safety law.

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PORTLAND CHROME PLATING COMPANY CITED FOR AIR POLLUTION VIOLATIONS (KUOW)

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has cited a Portland chrome plating company for three violations of air pollution rules.

The announcement of the violations comes as officials search for the source of hexavalent chromium detected in air monitors near the Bullseye Glass facility in Southeast Portland.

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FILMMAKER LAUDS OREGONS HEALTH INFORMATION EXCHANGE EFFORTS, ENCOURAGES STATEWIDE ADOPTION (The Lund Report)

A screening of Dr. Kevin Johnson of Vanderbilt Universitys documentary, No Matter Where: The Quest to Use Technology to Connect Healthcare, hosted by the Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology at Oregon Health & Science University, showcases barriers, hard-won successes on the journey to build and use electronic highways for healthcare information.

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State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

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newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on May 23, 2016 Weekend eClips Edition

May 23, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Medford voters to decide city ban on growing pot outdoors
* State’s clampdown on lead in Portland’s air a significant turnaround
* Trees more than a crop for Sweet Home logger, tree farmer
* Former prison watchdog files DOC retaliation suit
* Corporate taxes, roads, foster care top legislative agenda
* Oregon governor contradicts spirit of open meetings — Opinion
* A few observations about Oregon voters — Opinion
* Rogue River whitewater park still on course
* Editorial: Gas-tax votes complicate road plans — Opinion
* ‘Special master’ appointed to sift through Kitzhaber emails
* Charlie Hales Learned of Accidental Shooting Involving Police Chief Nearly A Month Ago

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MEDFORD VOTERS TO DECIDE CITY BAN ON GROWING POT OUTDOORS (Portland Oregonian)

Medford voters will decide whether city residents can grow marijuana outdoors.

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STATE’S CLAMPDOWN ON LEAD IN PORTLAND’S AIR A SIGNIFICANT TURNAROUND (Portland Oregonian)

After Gov. Kate Brown issued an unprecedented order Thursday requiring Southeast Portland’s Bullseye Glass to stop burning toxic metals in unfiltered furnaces, state officials said the decision was based on a crucial new piece of data  a one-day spike in airborne lead detected at a daycare center.

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TREES MORE THAN A CROP FOR SWEET HOME LOGGER, TREE FARMER (Salem Statesman Journal)

Robin Miller has spent virtually all of his adult life working around trees.

For many years, he harvested them as a logger, providing building materials for thousands of homes across North America. And for the last 40 years, he’s grown them, nurturing thousands of Douglas fir and Valley Ponderosa pine trees  many of them as seedlings planted with his own hands  on a 107-acre hillside between Holley and Crawfordsville.

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FORMER PRISON WATCHDOG FILES DOC RETALIATION SUIT (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon’s former prisons watchdog has filed a $3 million suit against the state Department of Corrections and its director, saying he was fired in retaliation for raising ethical concerns.

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CORPORATE TAXES, ROADS, FOSTER CARE TOP LEGISLATIVE AGENDA (Salem Statesman Journal)

Corporate taxes, child welfare and transportation will be issues to watch as the Legislature convenes for committee meetings this week at the Capitol.

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OREGON GOVERNOR CONTRADICTS SPIRIT OF OPEN MEETINGS — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Few state functions generate as much interest, or cost so much money, as transportation. Keeping deliberations about transportation policies and priorities open to public scrutiny ought to be a top priority for all who truly care about government transparency.

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A FEW OBSERVATIONS ABOUT OREGON VOTERS — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

A few personal observations before we move on from last weeks Oregon election.

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ROGUE RIVER WHITEWATER PARK STILL ON COURSE (Medford Mail Tribune) http://www.mailtribune.com/article/20160523/NEWS/160529845

Steve Kiesling is discovering there is a reason no one has built an Olympic-style whitewater park  such as the one he envisions for the Rogue River  in a stream with wild salmon in it.

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EDITORIAL: GAS-TAX VOTES COMPLICATE ROAD PLANS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The news was mixed across Oregon in the election for local proposals to raise gasoline taxes, and its a good bet that the results were closely examined by that committee of legislators charged with crafting a transportation package for next years Legislature.

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‘SPECIAL MASTER’ APPOINTED TO SIFT THROUGH KITZHABER EMAILS (Oregon Business Journal)

The judge in Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum’s lawsuit against Oracle America has appointed a special master to review emails from former Gov. John Kitzhaber.

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CHARLIE HALES LEARNED OF ACCIDENTAL SHOOTING INVOLVING POLICE CHIEF NEARLY A MONTH AGO (Willamette Week)

Accidental shootings happen often in Oregon and are frequently reported by local authorities. Not, apparently, when it involves the chief of the Portland Police Bureau.

Chief Larry O’Dea accidentally shot a friend on a Harney County hunting trip on April 21. No mention was made for 29 days, until WW broke the story on May 20. Even so, officials have released little information, other than telling The Oregonian that the unnamed victim had to be flown to a hospital.

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WHERE DENTISTS ARE SCARCE, AMERICAN INDIANS FORGE A PATH TO BETTER CARE (New York Times)

Going to the dentist evokes a special anxiety for Verne McLeod. He grew up on the Swinomish Indian reservation here in northwest Washington State in the 1950s and vividly remembers the dentist who visited periodically. The doctor worked from a trailer, and did not bother with painkillers.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on May 23, 2016 OSL eClips

May 20, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips
* Gov. Kate Brown directs cease and desist order to Bullseye Glass
* Recall petition against Harney County Judge Steve Grasty validated
* Celilo’s success might be path forward for Columbia River tribal housing — but it wasn’t easy
* Gresham-Barlow School District agrees to pay transgender teacher, add gender-neutral bathrooms after complaint
* Oregon standoff: State police request $2.5 million in reimbursement
* Do opponents of transgender-bathroom rules feel bullied into silence? — Guest Opinion
* Three more days of chinook fishing on Columbia River opens Friday
* U.S. Census Bureau: Eugenes population passed 163,000 last year, but trails Salem
* Our Oregon surpasses signature milestone to put corporate sales tax on ballot
* Governor tells Bullseye Glass to stop using hazardous pollutants
* Census: Portland, Hillsboro growing fast
* Lawmakers will hear impact of proposed tax measure
* Senate bill could fund Central Oregon water projects
* Impact of new tuition grant? At COCC, its TBD
* Editorial: A welcome boost for organic growers — Opinion
* Janet Stevens column: Help save the Oregon Constitution — Opinion
* Need in-home care? New service handles logistics
* Oregon Hospitals To Provide Costs For Procedures
* Toxic Lead Levels At Portland Daycare Leads To Cease And Desist For Bullseye Glass
* Oregon Lawmakers Consider Funding Request To Deal With Costs Of Refuge Occupation
* NW E-Cycle Programs Tested By Electronic Waste Exports
* Maritime rule may slow ports
* Yogi Berra and the Endangered Species Act — Opinion
* Animal health top concern for farmers, veterinarians — Guest Opinion
* Scam Jam educates Pendleton seniors on how to avoid fraud
* Tourism jobs in Oregon grow by the thousands
* Spring storms boost storage in Owyhee Reservoir
* Oregon’s transportation system must be ready for the Big One, Vision Panel urges
* Our View: Harney County voters set an example — Opinion
* Police, fire crews may not be able to respond after Cascadia
* Port hopes for disaster relief funds and grants
* Spring Chinook fishery reopens Friday
* Editorial: GMOs are not the villain or panacea some believed — Opinion
* Column: Why its getting harder to learn what the public thinks — Guest Opinion
* Column: Obamas opioid-addiction proposal is right step — Guest Opinion
* Editorial: Jury’s still out on motor voters — Opinion
* Oregon picks partner to study single-payer health care, other system models– Blog
* Readers: Oregon needs more renewable energy incentives– Blog
* Willamette Valley Beer Production– Blog
* Gov. Kate Brown Orders Bullseye Glass To Cease Using Hazardous Substances
* Representative Earl Blumenauer Says the Opioid Crisis is Helping Him Get Medical Marijuana for Veterans
* Oregon lawmakers promise to investigate why so few sex offenders listed publicly
* Wyden, Merkley busy, from TSA lines to spotted frog habitat, veterans
* CDC: 157 Pregnant Women in the U. S. Have Tested Positive for Zika
* Oregon Ban on Commercial Water Bottling Could Leave Industry High and Dry
* Cannabis Changes the Game of Real Estate

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GOV. KATE BROWN DIRECTS CEASE AND DESIST ORDER TO BULLSEYE GLASS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has directed the state Department of Environmental Quality to issue a cease and desist order against Southeast Portland’s Bullseye Glass.
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RECALL PETITION AGAINST HARNEY COUNTY JUDGE STEVE GRASTY VALIDATED (Portland Oregonian)

A recall petition filed against Harney County commissioner Steve Grasty has been validated, according to the Oregon Secretary of State’s Office.
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CELILO’S SUCCESS MIGHT BE PATH FORWARD FOR COLUMBIA RIVER TRIBAL HOUSING — BUT IT WASN’T EASY (Portland Oregonian)

Karen Jim Whitford’s mother watched from a hillside as an entire village and their family home got wiped out by water.

It was 1957. Whitford was 5 years old when the federal government closed the gates of The Dalles Dam, flooding 9,000 years of life at Celilo Village along the Columbia River.
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GRESHAM-BARLOW SCHOOL DISTRICT AGREES TO PAY TRANSGENDER TEACHER, ADD GENDER-NEUTRAL BATHROOMS AFTER COMPLAINT (Portland Oregonian)

The Gresham-Barlow School District has agreed to pay $60,000 and make sweeping changes across its nearly two dozen campuses after a transgender elementary school teacher complained of more than a year of harassment from coworkers.
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OREGON STANDOFF: STATE POLICE REQUEST $2.5 MILLION IN REIMBURSEMENT (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon State Police are seeking nearly $2.5 million in reimbursement for responding to the 41-day armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.
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DO OPPONENTS OF TRANSGENDER-BATHROOM RULES FEEL BULLIED INTO SILENCE? — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

On May 6, The Oregonian ran an article about Oregon’s new policy on transgender students using school facilities and playing sports. Within 24 hours, the online version of the article elicited more than 1,000 comments; at last check, the number had risen to 2,200. And yet, to date, only two letters to the editor have appeared in the print version of The Oregonian, neither of which took issue with the “sweeping protections.”
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THREE MORE DAYS OF CHINOOK FISHING ON COLUMBIA RIVER OPENS FRIDAY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Anglers will get another three days of chinook salmon fishing on the Columbia River starting Friday, under rules adopted Thursday during a joint state hearing of fish and wildlife officials from Oregon and Washington.
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U.S. CENSUS BUREAU: EUGENES POPULATION PASSED 163,000 LAST YEAR, BUT TRAILS SALEM (Eugene Register-Guard)

Eugene’s population rose by 2,840 between July 1, 2014, and July 1, 2015, to a total of 163,460 residents, according to U.S. Census Bureau population estimates released Thursday.
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OUR OREGON SURPASSES SIGNATURE MILESTONE TO PUT CORPORATE SALES TAX ON BALLOT (Portland Tribune)

-Union-backed group passes 88,184 needed to qualify for vote-

The union-backed Our Oregon has surpassed the threshold for signatures required to place a corporate sales tax measure on Novembers ballot.

The campaign has collected 125,000 signatures and plans to submit the last batch to the Oregon secretary of states office Friday, May 20, for verification, said Our Oregon spokeswoman Katherine Driessen.

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GOVERNOR TELLS BULLSEYE GLASS TO STOP USING HAZARDOUS POLLUTANTS (Portland Tribune)

Gov. Kate Brown issued a cease-and-desist order Thursday to require Bullseye Glass in Southeast Portland to stop using several hazardous air pollutants, including lead, following air monitoring results at a day care near the company that showed an immediate, short-term health risk from lead levels that were four times above the 24-hour benchmark.

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CENSUS: PORTLAND, HILLSBORO GROWING FAST (Portland Tribune)

Portland is now the 26th largest city in the country, according to new figure released by the U.S. Census Bureau.
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LAWMAKERS WILL HEAR IMPACT OF PROPOSED TAX MEASURE (Bend Bulletin)

-If passed by voters in November, measure would tax big businesses-

A long-awaited study of the potential effects the largest tax increase in Oregon history could have on the economy is set to be released Monday morning as lawmakers head to Salem for three days of hearings.

For months, state economists in the nonpartisan Legislative Revenue Office have put figures through complex modeling to predict what impact a sales tax on big businesses might have on employment, revenue and other economic factors.
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SENATE BILL COULD FUND CENTRAL OREGON WATER PROJECTS (Bend Bulletin)

-Money would go for conservation, spotted frog habitat work-

A U.S. Senate bill could help pay for Central Oregon water-related projects that aim to conserve water and improve habitat for the Oregon spotted frog.

The Senate Appropriations Committee unanimously voted the Senate agriculture appropriations bill out of committee Thursday with a bipartisan 30-0 vote, sending the measure to the Senate for a full vote. The bill would later need to merge with a version from the House to become law.

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IMPACT OF NEW TUITION GRANT? AT COCC, ITS TBD (Bend Bulletin)

-This is the first year for Oregon Promise-

It could be good great, even for enrollment, but officials at Central Oregon Community College will have to wait until the fall to see the impact of a new grant program that covers tuition for recent high school graduates.
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EDITORIAL: A WELCOME BOOST FOR ORGANIC GROWERS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s organic food industry, both growers and handlers, got a boost in the most recent federal farm bill, and there’s still time to take advantage of it.
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JANET STEVENS COLUMN: HELP SAVE THE OREGON CONSTITUTION — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

There’s nothing new about inviting the general public to help raise funds for a worthy cause Joseph Pulitzer did just that when, in 1884, the American Committee for the Statue of Liberty received the statue but could not afford a pedestal to put it on. In an article published in The World newspaper in March 1885, Pulitzer asked ordinary Americans to contribute to the cause, and by August citizens had responded with more than $100,000.
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NEED IN-HOME CARE? NEW SERVICE HANDLES LOGISTICS (Bend Bulletin)

-Homecare Choice Program first of its kind in country-

When it comes to hiring an in-home caregiver, some people prefer to go it alone rather than enlist the help of an agency. That way, they control who shows up at their door.

There are trade-offs, however. It may mean putting an ad on Craigslist and forgoing a background check. It may mean the caregiver wont have access to workmans compensation. And what about taxes?

The Oregon Home Care Commission, a group of nine governor appointees, has just launched a tool it claims is the first of its kind nationwide for anyone looking to hire an in-home caregiver.
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OREGON HOSPITALS TO PROVIDE COSTS FOR PROCEDURES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon hospitals have joined together to say they’ll provide patients with an estimate for services within three business days.

Getting a hospital estimate may not seem like a big deal. But hospital prices are notoriously hard to pin down, and they vary widely.
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TOXIC LEAD LEVELS AT PORTLAND DAYCARE LEADS TO CEASE AND DESIST FOR BULLSEYE GLASS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown issued a cease and desist order Thursday against Bullseye Glass Co. in Portland.

The move comes after the Department of Environmental Quality found toxic levels of lead in air monitors near a daycare facility.
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OREGON LAWMAKERS CONSIDER FUNDING REQUEST TO DEAL WITH COSTS OF REFUGE OCCUPATION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon lawmakers are considering a request to spend about $2.5 million to cover the costs of dealing with the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. A legislative budget panel will take up the proposal Monday.
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NW E-CYCLE PROGRAMS TESTED BY ELECTRONIC WASTE EXPORTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

When Washington state inspectors visited the Seattle recycling operation Total Reclaim in March, they found several problems with its handling of hazardous waste. They missed the biggest one.

They discovered an improperly labeled trash can full of shop towels. They noted Total Reclaims failure to check a box on a form identifying itself as a recycler of dangerous waste. They found open buckets full of oil.
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MARITIME RULE MAY SLOW PORTS (Capital Press)

Slowdowns could plague West Coast seaports again depending on how terminal operators, ocean carriers and shippers handle a new maritime rule, the head of the Agriculture Transportation Coalition says.

So far several East Coast terminal operators are following a U.S. Coast Guard declaration and weighing containers with cargo to take the onus off shippers exporters and importers but the West Coast is not following that lead so far, said Peter Friedmann, AgTC executive director in Washington, D.C.

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YOGI BERRA AND THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT — OPINION (Capital Press)

Yogi Berra said it best. Its like deja vu all over again.

For the fifth time, a federal judge has ruled that NOAA Fisheries and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers did not meet the requirements of the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act in coming up with a plan to help threatened and endangered fish that spawn in the Columbia and Snake rivers.

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ANIMAL HEALTH TOP CONCERN FOR FARMERS, VETERINARIANS — GUEST OPINION (Capital Press)

A few weeks ago I attended a college reunion. It was fun and refreshing to see friends from years ago.

Although I returned home feeling fine, apparently the stress of traveling combined with being around a new group of people was too much for my immune system. A few days later, I was sick. Luckily it was a viral infection and I quickly recovered, but not all illness clears up without medication.

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SCAM JAM EDUCATES PENDLETON SENIORS ON HOW TO AVOID FRAUD (East Oregonian)

When it comes to avoiding scams and fraud, education and awareness are key.

Thats why the Oregon Department of Justice sponsors Scam Jam events across the state to teach residents primarily seniors how to recognize scammers, and ways they can protect themselves.

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TOURISM JOBS IN OREGON GROW BY THE THOUSANDS (Argus Observer)

Tourism is big business in Oregon and it continues to build.

That was one of the takeaways from the Tourism Town Hall held at the Four Rivers Cultural Center in Ontario Wednesday. The event was hosted by Travel Oregon, the lead agency in promoting tourism statewide.

Among its functions, Travel Oregon is operating nine welcome centers, which provide tourists information, around the state, including the one at the rest area just inside Oregon on Interstate 84.
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SPRING STORMS BOOST STORAGE IN OWYHEE RESERVOIR (Argus Observer)

Spring snow storms and recent rains over the Owyhee River watershed have boosted storage of irrigation water in Owyhee Reservoir, even though irrigation water has been flowing to growers under the Owyhee Project for more than a month.
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OREGON’S TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM MUST BE READY FOR THE BIG ONE, VISION PANEL URGES (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Oregon’s transportation system must be ready for the Big One, Vision Panel urges-

A statewide panel charged with assessing Oregon’s future transportation needs found the ability to handle a Cascadia subduction zone earthquake a top priority across the state.

The Governor’s Transportation Vision Panel released its final report this week outlining needs and challenges facing the state in coming decades.
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OUR VIEW: HARNEY COUNTY VOTERS SET AN EXAMPLE — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

More than half of eligible Jackson County voters 54.4 percent cast ballots on Tuesday. That’s a respectable showing, but the good folks of Harney County put us to shame.

It’s true there are 126,881 registered voters in Jackson County, while Harney County boasts only 4,371. But 3,152 of them voted on Tuesday. That’s a 72.1 percent turnout the best in the state.
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POLICE, FIRE CREWS MAY NOT BE ABLE TO RESPOND AFTER CASCADIA (Daily Astorian)

Immediately after a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake, emergency responders, including Astorias, will likely be as paralyzed as everyone else.

The city may not be able to respond at all, City Councilor Drew Herzig said.

Residents and visitors unlucky enough to be on the North Coast when the big one hits should plan to take care of themselves, he said.

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PORT HOPES FOR DISASTER RELIEF FUNDS AND GRANTS (Daily Astorian)

The Port of Astoria’s budget for the fiscal year that starts in July will largely depend on federal disaster relief and infrastructure grants.

The Port is proposing a nearly $16 million budget, including a nearly $5 million runway repaving project at the Astoria Regional Airport and $1.5 million in financing for new stormwater treatment.

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SPRING CHINOOK FISHERY REOPENS FRIDAY (Daily Astorian)

Anglers can catch and keep spring Chinook salmon Friday through Sunday on a section of the Lower Columbia River under a three-day extension approved Wednesday by fishery managers from Washington state and Oregon.

Although the latest projection of returning upriver spring Chinook is down slightly from the preseason forecast, representatives from both states agreed it is still strong enough to allow at least one more opening and perhaps more in the lower river this year.

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EDITORIAL: GMOS ARE NOT THE VILLAIN OR PANACEA SOME BELIEVED — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

The controversy over genetically modified organisms will make an interesting chapter in some future historians cultural analysis of our time. Rarely have so many worried so much about so little.

That is the underlying message of a omnibus study released this week by Americas pre-eminent National Academy of Sciences. The academy found GMOs largely seed crops designed to survive weed and insect sprays, or imbued with other theoretically useful traits aren’t risky to eat.

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COLUMN: WHY ITS GETTING HARDER TO LEARN WHAT THE PUBLIC THINKS — GUEST OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Opinion research has helped government with planning and policymaking for decades.

But the shifting technological landscape, along with changing demographics and lifestyles, are challenging conventional opinion-research techniques, making it more difficult to learn what the public thinks.

Government officials need to become aware of these changes and their impacts on research methodologies, validity, statistical relatability, cost and project timelines.

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COLUMN: OBAMAS OPIOID-ADDICTION PROPOSAL IS RIGHT STEP — GUEST OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Recently, President Obama outlined an ambitious $1 billion plan to fight the nations opioid epidemic. The sizable budget allocated to the plan would increase the access to substance abuse treatment programs to those who would otherwise find paying for and locating suitable treatment beyond their means.
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EDITORIAL: JURY’S STILL OUT ON MOTOR VOTERS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Despite what we argued in an editorial earlier this week, it may be too early to conclude definitively that the states motor-voter registration system had little or no impact on Tuesdays primary election.

Certainly, the overall numbers from Tuesdays election were impressive: Officials expect that final tallies will show that 1.2 million Oregonians cast ballots in the election. If that expectation holds, this will be only the second primary election in state history with more than 1 million ballots turned in.

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OREGON PICKS PARTNER TO STUDY SINGLE-PAYER HEALTH CARE, OTHER SYSTEM MODELS— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

The Oregon Health Authority has selected RAND Corp. to conduct an independent study of different ways of configuring Oregon’s health care system, including a single-payer model.

If negotiations are successful, OHA intends to award a contract to RAND, the highest-ranked proposer, according to a memo from a procurement and contract specialist at the Department of Human Services.
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READERS: OREGON NEEDS MORE RENEWABLE ENERGY INCENTIVES— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon is a national leader in renewable energy, but many in the clean power industry say it could do better.

Oregon passed landmark legislation in March, doubling the clean energy required in the electricity Pacific Power and Portland General Electric provide to customers in the state while also killing off coal from the power supply.

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WILLAMETTE VALLEY BEER PRODUCTION— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

Its American Craft Beer week right now so I thought Id show a few graphs of beer production in the Willamette Valley. The data comes from OLCC reports which show only beer produced and sold in Oregon. Out-of-state sales/distributions from Oregon breweries are excluded. This has an impact on the largest brewery trends, but hardly any for the majority of the states breweries.
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GOV. KATE BROWN ORDERS BULLSEYE GLASS TO CEASE USING HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES (Willamette Week)

Move comes after air quality indicators signal immediate danger.

Gov. Kate Brown today ordered Portland’s Bulleye Glass co. to immediately stop using several of the substances it uses to produce colored glass at 3722 SE 21st Ave.
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REPRESENTATIVE EARL BLUMENAUER SAYS THE OPIOID CRISIS IS HELPING HIM GET MEDICAL MARIJUANA FOR VETERANS (Willamette Week)

Thanks to Oregonians, veterans are one step closer to getting prescribed medical marijuana by their actual doctors.

And now for some happy news.
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OREGON LAWMAKERS PROMISE TO INVESTIGATE WHY SO FEW SEX OFFENDERS LISTED PUBLICLY (KATU)

Oregon has the second highest number of registered sex offenders per capita in the United States, according to national statistics.

But as KATU’s On Your Side Investigators showed you on Wednesday, the state’s public sex offender registry website only lists two percent of Oregon’s registered offenders.
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WYDEN, MERKLEY BUSY, FROM TSA LINES TO SPOTTED FROG HABITAT, VETERANS (KTVZ Bend)

-Topics include homeless veterans, letting VA doctors discuss medical marijuana-

Sens. Jeff Merkley issued a trio of news releases Thursday about developments on several issues, from seeking more funding for airport TSA agents to helping with spotted frog habitat in Central Oregon and various programs to help veterans, including with medical marijuana.
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CDC: 157 PREGNANT WOMEN IN THE U. S. HAVE TESTED POSITIVE FOR ZIKA (National Public Radio)

Over 150 pregnant women in the United States appear to have been infected with Zika virus. That’s in addition to more than 120 women affected by Zika in U. S. territories, mainly Puerto Rico.

Those are the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, which has been keeping track of all pregnant women in the U. S. and its territories who have lab tests suggestive of Zika virus infections.
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OREGON BAN ON COMMERCIAL WATER BOTTLING COULD LEAVE INDUSTRY HIGH AND DRY (Wall Street Journal)

-County introduces nations first such sanction, as opposition grows in California and Montana-

The bottled water industry, thirsty for new sources as demand grows, is coming up dry in some places as communities around the country push back against bottling plants, citing drought concerns and environmental impacts.
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CANNABIS CHANGES THE GAME OF REAL ESTATE (Eugene Weekly) \

Local businesses worry the cannabis industry is edging them out.

While Oregon may still be the new kid on the legalization block, the two states that beat us to the punch, Washington and Colorado, might have a lesson or two to teach us about whats to come.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on May 20, 2016 OSL eClips

May 19, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips
* Oregon primary ballots on pace for record: more than 1.2 million
* Oregon hospitals will give consumers quick estimates on procedure costs
* Oregon’s anemic higher education funding — Guest Opinion
* Controversial neck-and-neck race for Legislature may head for recount
* Vertical housing subsidy doesn’t focus on affordability, and that’s OK — Opinion
* Josephine County GMO ban struck down because it conflicts with Oregon law
* Klamath and Grant county voters reject efforts to overturn local pot bans
* State orders boaters parked on Willamette River to move or be moved
* Portland is the 26th largest city in the U.S., new census figures show
* Kuebler on-ramp closure extended
* Severe wildfire season is the new normal, officials say
* Cleanup underway at former dry cleaners in downtown Eugene
* Barely one out of every two Lane County voters filled out their ballots
* Damascus voters say yes to disincorporation
* Big primary matchups? Big voter turnout? Meh, not so much
* Grant County government phones, internet back
* Bend’s population hits 87,104
* OHSU expert: U.S. culture encourages pregnancy cravings
* Election results in Central Oregon mirror state as a whole
* Experts discuss future for Redmond Airport
* Rule would give salaried workers overtime
* Editorial: Congress needs to help O&C counties — Opinion
* Column: You’re going to need a license for that job — Guest Opinion
* Column: More focus needed on medical mistakes — Guest Opinion
* Are African-Americans Really Leaving Portland?
* NW Dungeness Crab Fishery Could Be A Carbon-Emissions Casualty
* Oregon School Districts Miss Out On $9.45M In State Money
* Port Of Portland’s Terminal 6 Loses Its Last Container Service
* Klamath, Grant Counties Say ‘No’ To Recreational Marijuana Businesses
* EPA water quantity report worries farm groups
* State offers up to $750 rebate for organic certification costs
* Right to farm law questioned in Oregon pesticide dispute
* Vote totals top 1.2 million, set new primary record
* Drug court a path for second chances
* Transportation committee coming to Hermiston
* Our view: Crash the party by welcoming more voters — Opinion
* Hoopa plan suit to increase Klamath flows
* Port sets development, financial goals for coming year
* Port aims to untangle knot of heavy debts
* As I See It: Research suggests tablets in K-12 improve learning outcomes — Guest Opinion
* Timber execs: Innovation and rebounding economy good signs for industry
* What’s in Oregon’s air? New infographic maps it out
* Oregon settlement points to emergency alert device issues
* Millennials Now Rival Boomers As A Political Force, But Will They Actually Vote?
* Health Insurers Post Financial Losses as Oregon’s Commercial Plans Report Losing Thousands of Members
* CCOS Very Profitable in 2015

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OREGON PRIMARY BALLOTS ON PACE FOR RECORD: MORE THAN 1.2 MILLION (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon is on pace to eclipse its 2008 record for turnout in a primary election, with officials expecting to count more than 1.2 million ballots by the time Tuesday’s dust settles.

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OREGON HOSPITALS WILL GIVE CONSUMERS QUICK ESTIMATES ON PROCEDURE COSTS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon hospitals took a step toward price transparency on Wednesday, promising to provide cost estimates for scheduled procedures within three days.

The initiative aims to give uninsured patients and those who are out-of-network a better idea of what a procedure will cost.

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OREGON’S ANEMIC HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

As one of the advocates for creating separate governing boards for Oregon’s universities, I was pleased to note the apparent success The Oregonian/OregonLive reported about the initial operation of these boards. The article also noted that the Legislature had allocated a “record $665 million in general state support … for the 2015-17 biennium.”

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CONTROVERSIAL NECK-AND-NECK RACE FOR LEGISLATURE MAY HEAD FOR RECOUNT (Portland Oregonian)

A neck-and-neck primary race for a seat in the Oregon House of Representatives may be headed for an automatic recount.

Partial returns as of 11:31 a.m. Wednesday show that Roberta Phillip-Robbins’ lead over opponent Tawna Sanchez has shrunk to a mere 16 votes in the Democratic primary for House District 43, which encompasses a swath of North and Northeast Portland.

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VERTICAL HOUSING SUBSIDY DOESN’T FOCUS ON AFFORDABILITY, AND THAT’S OK — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

A number of mixed-use projects in Portland’s suburbs and elsewhere enjoy hefty property tax breaks, yet their owners are under no obligation to make any residential units affordable to low-income people. Observers, including some neighbors, have questioned the use of public subsidies for such projects, especially given the high price of housing in the Portland area.

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JOSEPHINE COUNTY GMO BAN STRUCK DOWN BECAUSE IT CONFLICTS WITH OREGON LAW (Portland Oregonian)

A Josephine County judge said Monday that a ban on growing genetically modified crops is invalid. The ruling clears up the legal limbo county officials have lived with for that last two years.

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KLAMATH AND GRANT COUNTY VOTERS REJECT EFFORTS TO OVERTURN LOCAL POT BANS (Portland Oregonian)

Ilo and Melissa Ferroggiaro, longtime medical marijuana growers who planned to enter the recreational market, took a decisive step after Klamath County voters  refused to overturn a pot ban: The couple put their home on the market.

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STATE ORDERS BOATERS PARKED ON WILLAMETTE RIVER TO MOVE OR BE MOVED (Portland Oregonian)

Rix Miles Chapman estimates that he’s paid landlords enough in rent throughout his life to equal the full mortgage on a house or the price of a mid-sized apartment building.

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PORTLAND IS THE 26TH LARGEST CITY IN THE U.S., NEW CENSUS FIGURES SHOW (Portland Oregonian)

Portland is moving on up.

The city is now the 26th largest in the country, according new estimates released by the U. S. Census Bureau Wednesday night. Between July 2014 and July 2015, Portland’s population increased 1.9 percent, or by 11,889 people, enough to rise two positions in the national population estimate rankings.

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KUEBLER ON-RAMP CLOSURE EXTENDED (Salem Statesman Journal)

Inclement weather caused the southbound Kuebler Boulevard on-ramp at Interstate 5 to have an additional five days tacked on to its closure, officials said.

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SEVERE WILDFIRE SEASON IS THE NEW NORMAL, OFFICIALS SAY (Salem Statesman Journal)

This year should bring a “normal” wildfire season in most of the U.S., Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said Tuesday.

The problem, Vilsack said, is that the new normal wildfire season is longer and includes tens of thousands of fires burning millions of acres of forest and destroying thousands of homes.

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CLEANUP UNDERWAY AT FORMER DRY CLEANERS IN DOWNTOWN EUGENE (Eugene Register-Guard)

The government-funded cleanup of a prime piece of property in downtown Eugene is finally beginning.

After years of planning by the state Department of Environmental Quality and searches for money by Lane County government, an excavator Monday cracked the concrete covering the former site of McAyeals Wardrobe Cleaners along Olive Street.

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BARELY ONE OUT OF EVERY TWO LANE COUNTY VOTERS FILLED OUT THEIR BALLOTS (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Unaffiliated voters largely tossed their ballots, data show-

For all the hoopla surrounding this primary election, barely half of Lane County registered voters bothered to fill out and return their ballots, election data show.

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DAMASCUS VOTERS SAY YES TO DISINCORPORATION (Portland Tribune)

-Judge denies request for injunction from Damascus Councilor Jim De Young-

After 12 contentious years as a city, voters in Damascus have approved a measure to disincorporate 2,570 66 percent to 1,268 32 percent, according to returns released by Clackamas County at 7:30 a.m. today.

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BIG PRIMARY MATCHUPS? BIG VOTER TURNOUT? MEH, NOT SO MUCH (Portland Tribune)

More than a million Oregonians cast ballots in Tuesdays primary, meeting expectations set early this week by election officials that a record number of voters would participate.

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GRANT COUNTY GOVERNMENT PHONES, INTERNET BACK (Bend Bulletin)

The Oregon Secretary of State’s office reported that as of almost noon Tuesday, the Grant County’s government phone lines and internet were running again.

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BEND’S POPULATION HITS 87,104 (Bend Bulletin)

-New Census Bureau population estimates have cities in the region growing faster than most others in Oregon-

The populations of Bend and other Central Oregon cities are continuing to outpace growth in most other cities around the state.

The U.S. Census Bureau released population estimates today that place Bend as the seventh-fastest growing city in Oregon. The city’s population as of July was estimated to be 87,014, a 3.4 percent increase from 2014.

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OHSU EXPERT: U.S. CULTURE ENCOURAGES PREGNANCY CRAVINGS (Bend Bulletin)

-Pregnancy can spur body image issues, food anxiety-

Carrots topped with peanut butter and pickles.

Hot Cheetos and Dr. Pepper.

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ELECTION RESULTS IN CENTRAL OREGON MIRROR STATE AS A WHOLE (Bend Bulletin)

-Regional political divides have faded since the 80s, expert says-

Central Oregon election results for state races closely mirrored what happened statewide, according to the unofficial numbers from Tuesdays primary.

Straight down the ballot, the results for both Republican and Democrat races statewide and in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties came in largely the same as far as which candidates took what place, and also in regard to vote percentage  give or take a few variations. Jim Moore, director of the Tom McCall Center for Policy Innovation at Pacific University, said the parallel comes as no surprise.

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EXPERTS DISCUSS FUTURE FOR REDMOND AIRPORT (Bend Bulletin)

-Larger jets with first-class service may fly out of Redmond-

As Central Oregon continues to grow, Redmond Airport will most likely continue to grow with it.

But whether that will involve more destinations, larger aircraft, more frequent flights or all of the above remains an open question, according to the assembled panel at the Redmond Economic Development Inc. annual luncheon.

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RULE WOULD GIVE SALARIED WORKERS OVERTIME (Bend Bulletin)

-Federal regulation would make millions eligible for overtime-

The Obama administration, in a far-reaching effort to improve the lot of workers that has ignited criticism from business groups, announced Tuesday that it was making millions more employees eligible for overtime pay.

Under the regulation issued by the Labor Department today, most salaried workers earning as much as $47,476 a year must receive time-and-a-half overtime pay when they work more than 40 hours during a week. The previous cutoff for overtime pay, set in 2004, was $23,660.

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EDITORIAL: CONGRESS NEEDS TO HELP O&C COUNTIES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The Bureau of Land Management says its new plan to manage forests in mostly Western Oregon will create a sustainable yield of timber, help wildlife and protect watersheds.

But the federal government has made a long, slow walk away from the initial commitments made for the so-called O&C lands.

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COLUMN: YOU’RE GOING TO NEED A LICENSE FOR THAT JOB — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

When my mother retired from selling real estate, she toyed with the idea that she  a talented cook who had long made her own croissants  might make a little money on the side by selling homemade baked goods. Its the sort of business that people have started from time immemorial, letting them share what they love with someone willing to pay for it. A quick investigation, however, revealed that the thing was impossible.

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COLUMN: MORE FOCUS NEEDED ON MEDICAL MISTAKES — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

First, do no harm. Doctors get that. They embrace it. Its nevertheless the conclusion of a major study that medical mistakes kill at least 250,000 Americans a year, trailing only heart disease and cancer as a threat to human life. Heres an overly hushed horror that needs massive attention, and scurrying loudly to the scene are John Hopkins University and a professor there, Martin Makary.

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ARE AFRICAN-AMERICANS REALLY LEAVING PORTLAND? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

According to a recent L.A. Times op-ed, African-Americans are leaving Portland at a high rate  11.5 percent from 2010 to 2014. This is part of a wider trend of African-Americans leaving West Coast liberal hubs, where restrictive planning regulation is inhibiting growth, said Aaron Renn of conservative think tank The Manhattan Institute.

OPB Think Out Loud coverage: African American Exodus

According to a new article, Portland lost 11 percent of its African American population over a recent four-year period. We talk to PSU urban studies professor Lisa Bates about why that might be.

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NW DUNGENESS CRAB FISHERY COULD BE A CARBON-EMISSIONS CASUALTY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Increased carbon emissions are putting Puget Sound Dungeness crabs at risk, according to new research from the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle.

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OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICTS MISS OUT ON $9.45M IN STATE MONEY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

More than half the school bonds on Oregon’s ballot passed Tuesday night. But because a number of bond measures failed, the results create a ripple effect when it comes to the state matching funds.

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PORT OF PORTLAND’S TERMINAL 6 LOSES ITS LAST CONTAINER SERVICE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The last of Portland’s anemic container service will end Saturday.

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KLAMATH, GRANT COUNTIES SAY ‘NO’ TO RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA BUSINESSES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Voters in a conservative eastern Oregon county just said no on Tuesday to an effort to allow marijuana cultivation and sales.

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EPA WATER QUANTITY REPORT WORRIES FARM GROUPS (Capital Press)

Agriculture groups are nervous that a technical report released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will be used to justify new federal controls over water usage.

The EPA claims its report  Protecting Aquatic Life from Effects of Hydrologic Alteration  is meant to provide state regulators with technical support about the impact of water management on the health of rivers and streams.

However, farm groups worry its intended to make the case for expanding the Clean Water Acts scope beyond regulating water quality to include water quantity as well.

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STATE OFFERS UP TO $750 REBATE FOR ORGANIC CERTIFICATION COSTS (Capital Press)

With demand for organic products continuing to accelerate, the Oregon Department of Agriculture is stepping in to help growers, processors and handlers meet the cost of USDA certification this year.

The department will reimburse up to 75 percent of certification expenses  up to $750  incurred between Oct. 1, 2015, and Sept. 30, 2016.

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RIGHT TO FARM LAW QUESTIONED IN OREGON PESTICIDE DISPUTE (Capital Press)

Questions about the constitutionality of Oregon’s right to farm law, which shields growers from some lawsuits, have been resurrected in a pesticide dispute in Curry County.

Nuisance and trespass complaints against Oregon’s farmers and foresters are barred under the law, which has been challenged in court several times.

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VOTE TOTALS TOP 1.2 MILLION, SET NEW PRIMARY RECORD (East Oregonian)

More than a million Oregonians cast ballots in Tuesdays primary, meeting expectations set early this week by election officials that a record number of voters would participate.

However, the turnout rate was lower than in the presidential primary eight years ago and it was unclear what impact the states new automatic voter registration system had on the election results. Oregon has several hundred thousand more registered voters than eight years ago.

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DRUG COURT A PATH FOR SECOND CHANCES (East Oregonian)

For 10 years, the Umatilla County Drug Court has helped turn fear of failure into second chances.

I wasn’t sure what I was going to do, but I was afraid. I was afraid of losing my family, of going to jail, afraid that I couldn’t stay clean, Christine Massingale, of Hermiston, said. Drug court saved my life. It really did.

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TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE COMING TO HERMISTON (East Oregonian)

The state legislatures Joint Committee on Transportation Preservation and Modernization will be able to see some of Eastern Oregon’s transportation needs firsthand when it holds one of its meetings in Hermiston this summer.

The committee is tasked with developing a comprehensive package of bills for the 2017 legislative session that will address transportation infrastructure needs  including highways, railways, bridges and ports  across Oregon.

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OUR VIEW: CRASH THE PARTY BY WELCOMING MORE VOTERS — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Oregonians voted yesterday  or at least the government counted our votes yesterday.

Thanks to vote by mail, many of us returned our ballot far in advance. Its pretty fantastic that 96 percent or so of those votes can therefore be counted within 15 minutes of polls closing. That sure makes it nice for journalists scrambling to make deadline for the next days paper.

But the real proof in the pudding is voter turnout, and Oregon did better than most this primary season.

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HOOPA PLAN SUIT TO INCREASE KLAMATH FLOWS (Herald and News)

The Hoopa Valley Tribe plans to file a lawsuit to net increased flows in the Klamath River.

The tribe announced Wednesday it has filed a 60-day notice of intent to sue the Bureau of Reclamation and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration NOAA for violating the Endangered Species Act ESA.

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PORT SETS DEVELOPMENT, FINANCIAL GOALS FOR COMING YEAR (Daily Astorian)

The Port of Astoria Commission voted Tuesday to focus on developing North Tongue Point, improving dredging, expelling sea lions from the East End Mooring Basin and repairing its docks, fixing crumbling piers and further improving the agencys finances as priorities for the coming fiscal year and beyond.

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PORT AIMS TO UNTANGLE KNOT OF HEAVY DEBTS (Daily Astorian)

The Port of Astoria, the agency tasked with maintaining a public infrastructure for local businesses and citizens, is getting it from all sides.

Crumbling docks, storm damage and toughening environmental requirements have the agency needing millions of dollars to fix its problems. Executive Director Jim Knight is looking at all different avenues to find the funds.

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AS I SEE IT: RESEARCH SUGGESTS TABLETS IN K-12 IMPROVE LEARNING OUTCOMES — GUEST OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

There has been a lot of discussion recently about the use of tablets iPads in K-12 instruction in Corvallis and the need for evidence that they would help in student learning. I thought it might be useful to look at what research to date shows us.

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TIMBER EXECS: INNOVATION AND REBOUNDING ECONOMY GOOD SIGNS FOR INDUSTRY (Douglas County News-Review)

The promise of more homes being built across the country and a new wood product being hailed as a game-changer, has local timber companies excited for the days ahead.

Toby Luther, president and CEO of the Roseburg-based forestry company Lone Rock Resources, spoke to dozens of local business leaders Monday as part of the annual state of the timber and wood products industry. In his speech, Luther expressed hope the beleaguered industry could ride innovation and a rebounding economy back to prosperity.

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WHAT’S IN OREGON’S AIR? NEW INFOGRAPHIC MAPS IT OUT (Oregon Business Journal)

Heart disease. Asthma. Lung cancer. IQ loss.

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OREGON SETTLEMENT POINTS TO EMERGENCY ALERT DEVICE ISSUES (KTVZ Bend)

-Some don’t have vital features for 911 contact, so be sure to check-

The Oregon Department of Justice recently reached a settlement with “Alert911,” a business name of  of ConnectAmerica.com, which sells a device that can contact 9-1-1 during an emergency.

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MILLENNIALS NOW RIVAL BOOMERS AS A POLITICAL FORCE, BUT WILL THEY ACTUALLY VOTE? (National Public Radio)

Millennials are now as large of a political force as Baby Boomers according to an analysis of U.S. census data from the Pew Research Center, which defines millennials as people between the ages of 18-35. Both generations are roughly 31 percent of the overall electorate.

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HEALTH INSURERS POST FINANCIAL LOSSES AS OREGON’S COMMERCIAL PLANS REPORT LOSING THOUSANDS OF MEMBERS (The Lund Report)

Please contact the State Library for access to this premium story from the Lund Report. library.help@state.or.us, 503-378-8800

More than 90,000 Oregonians left traditional health insurance plans in the first three months of 2016, a further sign of the continuing turmoil the Affordable Care Act has introduced to the industry.

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CCOS VERY PROFITABLE IN 2015 (The Lund Report)

When all the figures were tallied by the Oregon Health Authority, the 16 CCOs earned a combined profit of $137 million last year.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on May 19, 2016 OSL eClips

May 18, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Primary Election 2016
* 36 years ago, Mount St. Helens erupted, has helped scientists since
* Fired University of Oregon professor sues, claims racial discrimination and retaliation
* Anti-Nestle ballot measure: Bid to block Cascade Locks water plant succeeds
* Portland voters approve 4-year gas tax, highest in state
* Philip Morris’ appeal of $25 million award to Oregon family rejected by Supreme Court
* Academies of Science finds GMOs not harmful to human health
* Primary Election 2016
* Oregon unemployment rate stays at a low 4.5 percent
* Primary Election 2016
* Oregon job growth stays strong in April
* Federal judge dismisses lawsuit seeking drivers licenses for illegal immigrants in Oregon
* State opposes some DNA testing in Gable murder appeal
* Birth rate declines as population rises
* Damascus voting to disincorporate city
* Portland rent increases slow as apartment supply increases
* Area population growth could be larger than Metro expected
* Clackamas County judge won’t rule on disincorporation lawsuit until after election
* My View: Why Portland is a great place for owning an electric car — Guest Opinion
* Avakian, Richardson win party nods for secretary of state
* Brown will face Pierce in general election
* Bend businesses react to proposed climate rules
* State transportation panel releases report
* Drug tests a barrier to re-entering job market
* Grant County government phones, internet back
* Hood River County Voters Approve Water Bottling Ban
* Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Holds Steady
* 10 Takeaways From Oregon’s Primary
* USDA expects normal, but significant fire season
* Avakian, Richardson win secretary of state nominations
* Pendleton City Council lifts EOCI work crew ban
* Agency offers chance to weigh in on fuel break project
* Voters say no to recreational pot shops
* Tragic opioid epidemic comes with an unexpected side effect — Guest Opinion
* More tribes added to land program, but money running out
* Editorial: Congress fails to fix wildfire issue
* John Day biomass collaborative awarded USDA funding
* Federal pollution penalty may impact coastal communities
* The Atlantic Says Portland’s Gentrification is Your Fault
* Oregonians Are Nearly Twice as Likely to Die From Alcoholic Liver Disease As People From Other States
* Oregon jobless rate holds steady in April
* Can Portland Avoid Repeating San Francisco’s Mistakes?
* Common Cause Agitates for Elections Reform as Money Flows to Politicians — Opinion

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PRIMARY ELECTION 2016 (Portland Oregonian)

Click this link for election results covered by The Oregonian.

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36 YEARS AGO, MOUNT ST. HELENS ERUPTED, HAS HELPED SCIENTISTS SINCE (Portland Oregonian)

For weeks in spring 1980, Mount St. Helens’ northern flank rose about 5 feet a day as magma pushed the ground higher.

Then on May 18, the ground shook violently as much of the volcano’s northern side collapsed in a massive landslide, causing an eruption that spewed ash almost 80,000 feet into the air.

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FIRED UNIVERSITY OF OREGON PROFESSOR SUES, CLAIMS RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AND RETALIATION (Portland Oregonian)

The University of Oregon says it fired a full professor last year “for the safety of our students.”

But now the professor, Donald Michael Pavel, 56, has filed a federal civil rights suit against the university and eight administrators and faculty members alleging racial discrimination, retaliation for speech and a lack of due process.

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ANTI-NESTLE BALLOT MEASURE: BID TO BLOCK CASCADE LOCKS WATER PLANT SUCCEEDS (Portland Oregonian)

Hood River County voters have said yes to a measure that would effectively block Nestl Waters’ plan to bottle water in Cascade Locks by banning large water bottling operations in the county.

Partial returns Tuesday showed the measure winning with 68 percent of the vote.

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PORTLAND VOTERS APPROVE 4-YEAR GAS TAX, HIGHEST IN STATE (Portland Oregonian)

Portland voters narrowly approved a temporary 10-cent-a-gallon tax on gasoline within city limits, creating the highest local gas tax in the state.

The measure, which sunsets after four years, passed 51.6 percent to 48.4 percent, according to partial returns Tuesday.

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PHILIP MORRIS’ APPEAL OF $25 MILLION AWARD TO OREGON FAMILY REJECTED BY SUPREME COURT (Portland Oregonian)

The Supreme Court has rejected Philip Morris USA’s appeal of a $25 million punitive damages award to the family of a dead smoker in Oregon.

The justices Monday are leaving in place a state appeals court ruling that likened the cigarette-maker’s role in smoker Michelle Schwarz’s death to manslaughter under Oregon law, had the case been pursued in criminal court.

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ACADEMIES OF SCIENCE FINDS GMO’S NOT HARMFUL TO HUMAN HEALTH (Salem Statesman Journal)

Genetically engineered crops are safe for humans and animals to eat and have not caused increases in cancer, obesity, gastrointestinal illnesses, kidney disease, autism or allergies, an exhaustive report from the National Academies of Science released Tuesday found.

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PRIMARY ELECTION 2016 (Salem Statesman Journal)

Click this link for election results covered by The Statesman-Journal _________________________________________

OREGON UNEMPLOYMENT RATE STAYS AT A LOW 4.5 PERCENT (Salem Statesman Journal)

The state Employment Department says Oregon added more than 5,000 jobs in April, keeping its jobless rate at 4.5 percent.

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PRIMARY ELECTION 2016 (Eugene Register-Guard)

Click this link for election results covered by The Register-Guard _________________________________________

OREGON JOB GROWTH STAYS STRONG IN APRIL (Eugene Register-Guard)

The number of Oregon jobs grew by 5,700 in April, following a revised gain of 3,800 in March, according to the state Employment Department.

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FEDERAL JUDGE DISMISSES LAWSUIT SEEKING DRIVERS LICENSES FOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS IN OREGON (Eugene Register-Guard)

A judge in U.S. District Court in Eugene has dismissed a lawsuit seeking to give illegal immigrants in Oregon access to short-term drivers licenses.

The suit, filed on behalf of five unnamed illegal immigrants from Mexico, sought to restore a 2013 law, passed by the Oregon Legislature as Senate Bill 833, creating those new licenses. That law was overturned after it was referred to Oregon voters as Measure 88 in November 2014 and soundly defeated.

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STATE OPPOSES SOME DNA TESTING IN GABLE MURDER APPEAL (Portland Tribune)

DNA testing is the latest contested issue in Oregon’s most controversial murder case, the 1989 killing of state Correction Department Director Michael Franke.

Public defenders for the man convicted of killing him, petty Salem criminal Frank Gable, have asked to retest Franke’s glass and two articles of clothing for additional evidence as part of their appeal of his life-without-parole sentence.

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BIRTH RATE DECLINES AS POPULATION RISES (Portland Tribune)

Oregon’s population is growing, but not because women are having babies. In fact, the stork has yet to deliver the states expected baby bounce recovery from the Great Recession, demographers say.

According to Oregon Health Authority records, births peaked in Oregon in 2007-08 but then dropped to a 10-year low in 2012 because of the recession. Last year, total births increased to 46,092, still 7 percent below the high mark of seven years ago.

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DAMASCUS VOTING TO DISINCORPORATE CITY (Portland Tribune)

After 12 contentious years as a city, voters in Damascus are approving a measure to disincorprate 2,037 68 percent to 890 30 percent in partial, early returns from Clackamas County.

If passed, the city’s assets, employees and functions will revert to Clackamas County in 60 days. The city incorporated in 2004 as a way to plan its own future after it was brought inside the urban growth boundary. But years of squabbles and discord meant little was accomplished.

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PORTLAND RENT INCREASES SLOW AS APARTMENT SUPPLY INCREASES (Portland Tribune)

Portland’s skyrocketing rent increases have slowed, according to one organization that tracks apartment costs.

The most recent report from the ABODO online apartment resource says rent only went up 2 percent in Portland between April and May  dropping the city below the 10 cities with the highest increases for the first time in recent memory.

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AREA POPULATION GROWTH COULD BE LARGER THAN METRO EXPECTED (Portland Tribune)

Just a few months after the Metro Council voted against expanding the urban growth boundary, new population estimates suggest the region is growing faster than it predicted.

Last November, the council unanimously agreed the population of the seven-county region would range between 2.33 million and 2.35 million people in 2015.

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CLACKAMAS COUNTY JUDGE WON’T RULE ON DISINCORPORATION LAWSUIT UNTIL AFTER ELECTION (Portland Tribune)

The future of Damascus once again hangs in the balance as a Clackamas County Circuit Court Judge isnt expected to issue a ruling until a day after the election on a request to halt todays disincorporation vote.

Damascus City Councilor Jim De Young filed a lawsuit May 4 against the city of Damascus, Clackamas County, the state of Oregon and Gov. Kate Brown arguing that Measure 93, which puts disincorporation on today’s ballot, is unconstitutional.

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MY VIEW: WHY PORTLAND IS A GREAT PLACE FOR OWNING AN ELECTRIC CAR — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

In Portland, solar-powered parking meters, green buildings and eco-roofs abound. But we’ve got yet one more reason to brag about our city’s environmental leadership: Its easy to get around in an emission-free electric vehicle.

In fact, in 2015, ChargePoint ranked Portland as one of the Top 10 cities for electric vehicles. And recent legislation makes it even more attractive for electric vehicle drivers and the industry that serves them.

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AVAKIAN, RICHARDSON WIN PARTY NODS FOR SECRETARY OF STATE (Bend Bulletin)

Democratic voters appeared ready to decide the secretary of states office should be not be confined to its traditional roles of running elections and auditing state agencies, picking Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian as their nominee for secretary of state.

Avakian was leading Tuesday night in the most hotly contested primary election for Oregon office this year, which pitted three heavyweight Democrats against one another.

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BROWN WILL FACE PIERCE IN GENERAL ELECTION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon Democrats are ready for Kate Brown to remain governor, handing her a sweeping endorsement and picking her over mostly nominal rivals in the primary election Tuesday night.

Brown was the favored candidate of Democratic voters and the partys key allies, including public unions and environmental groups. The win comes after Brown supported and signed sweeping policy bills on the workers benefits, the climate and minimum wage.

Shell face Salem oncologist Bud Pierce in November, as Republican voters gave Pierce an upset win over Republican Allen Alley.

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BEND BUSINESSES REACT TO PROPOSED CLIMATE RULES (Bend Bulletin)

-Some fear city ordinance could drive companies out of Bend-

A proposed ordinance that would change how the city of Bend handles greenhouse gas emissions has sent ripples through the city’s business community.

It’s ridiculous, and it’s bad policy, Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development for Central Oregon, said during Tuesdays Bend Economic Development Advisory Board meeting.

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STATE TRANSPORTATION PANEL RELEASES REPORT (Bend Bulletin)

-Panel appointed by governors office presents funding options for investing in road and bridge infrastructure-

A state advisory panel released a final report Tuesday on Oregon’s transportation system and recommended priorities over the next few decades, including increasing capacity for freight truck traffic through Central Oregon and supporting transit services for the growing population.

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DRUG TESTS A BARRIER TO RE-ENTERING JOB MARKET (Bend Bulletin)

A few years back, heavy-equipment manufacturer JCB held a job fair in the glass foyer of its sprawling headquarters near here, but when a throng of prospective employees learned the next step would be drug testing, an alarming thing happened: About half of them left.

That story still circulates within the business community of this historic port city. But the problem has gotten worse.

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GRANT COUNTY GOVERNMENT PHONES, INTERNET BACK (Bend Bulletin)

The Oregon Secretary of State’s office reported that as of almost noon Tuesday, the Grant County’s government phone lines and internet were running again.

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HOOD RIVER COUNTY VOTERS APPROVE WATER BOTTLING BAN (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Hood River County voters have approved a ban on commercial water bottling, blocking a $50 million bottling plant Nestle wants to build in the Columbia River Gorge.

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OREGON’S UNEMPLOYMENT RATE HOLDS STEADY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon’s unemployment rate held steady at 4.5 percent in April. But more jobs were added to payrolls in that same span.

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10 TAKEAWAYS FROM OREGON’S PRIMARY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Tuesday nights Oregon primary answered many political questions going forward in the state. Aside from politics, measures on gas taxes, marijuana sales and environmental issues were voted on and decided. With so many races, measures and percentages to sort through, here are 10 key takeaways from Oregon’s primary.

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USDA EXPECTS NORMAL, BUT SIGNIFICANT FIRE SEASON (Capital Press)

While a normal wildfire season is expected in most of the country, that new normal is far worse than it used to be and will still mean thousands of fires and hundreds of thousands of charred acres, particularly in California.

The wildland fire environment has profoundly changed, with the fire season lasting longer and fires burning hotter and larger and claiming more ground, USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack said during a conference call with the press on Tuesday.

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AVAKIAN, RICHARDSON WIN SECRETARY OF STATE NOMINATIONS (East Oregonian)

Oregon Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian appears to have won the Democratic primary for Oregon secretary of state.

As of 10:15 p.m., Avakian had 39 percent of the vote leading state Rep. Val Hoyle, D-Eugene, who had 33 percent and state Sen. Richard Devlin, D-Tualatin, with 27 percent, according to unofficial vote totals. The Associated Press called the race for Avakian.

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PENDLETON CITY COUNCIL LIFTS EOCI WORK CREW BAN (East Oregonian)

Pendleton City Council repealed a nearly 30-year-old ban on Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution inmates working inside city limits.

While Mayor Phillip Houk said previous attempts to overturn the ban filled the council chambers with public opposition, everyone who testified Tuesday night urged the council to lift it.

It was a different world then, Houk said.

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AGENCY OFFERS CHANCE TO WEIGH IN ON FUEL BREAK PROJECT (Argus Observer)

In an effort to help control future blazes in the area, the Bureau of Land Management is planning a network of fuel breaks in the area burned by the Soda Fire, which scorched about 280,000 acres of land in Idaho and east-central Malheur County in 2015.

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VOTERS SAY NO TO RECREATIONAL POT SHOPS (Herald and News)

The votes are tallied and the majority of people who cast a ballot in Klamath County for the Tuesday election have rejected Measure 18-105.

As of presstime, 57.97 percent of the voters rejected the measure while 42.03 percent of the voters said yes.

The measure would have overturned a Klamath County ordinance that bans recreational and medical marijuana shops in Klamath County.

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TRAGIC OPIOID EPIDEMIC COMES WITH AN UNEXPECTED SIDE EFFECT — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

Americas opioid epidemic has had far-reaching and generally devastating consequences.

Now, the impact is being seen in organ donations.

Coinciding with a rise in drug-related deaths, the number of organ donors who died of drug overdoses has sharply increased in recent years  a silver lining to what is absolutely a tragedy, Alexandra K. Glazier, president of the New England Organ Bank, recently told U.S. News & World Report.

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MORE TRIBES ADDED TO LAND PROGRAM, BUT MONEY RUNNING OUT (The World)

Dozens of American Indian communities on Tuesday joined an initiative to return millions of acres of reservation land to the control of tribal governments as U.S. officials warned the $1.9 billion program will run out of money before the task is completed.

A total of 63 reservations in 16 states in the West and Midwest were added to the Interior Department’s “Land Buyback Program,” bringing the total number involved to 105.

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EDITORIAL: CONGRESS FAILS TO FIX WILDFIRE ISSUE (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

The U.S. Forest Services top officials met this week in Washington to take a look at prospects for this years wildfire season.

You might recall that 2015s wildfires roared through a record-breaking year  and, frankly, these are the sorts of records that you hope don’t get broken.

For example: Last year, wildfires burned a record 15,800 square miles nationwide. Seven Forest Service firefighters died.

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JOHN DAY BIOMASS COLLABORATIVE AWARDED USDA FUNDING (Blue Mountain Eagle)

U.S. Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon is applauding the U.S. Department of Agricultures decision to award a groundbreaking project with funding to continue its innovative work using wood waste for renewable energy.

The Oregon Torrefaction Project will convert forest wastes to a low-carbon product that can be used to heat and power homes and businesses. Processing in John Day will create access to rural jobs and reduce transportation costs.

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FEDERAL POLLUTION PENALTY MAY IMPACT COASTAL COMMUNITIES (Tillamook Headlight Herald)

The state of Oregon has lost $1.2 million in grant money this year because of the inability to target and control coastal pollution from logging, agriculture and other sources.

It may lose more funding if the state doesn’t create an approved pollution control plan the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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THE ATLANTIC SAYS PORTLAND’S GENTRIFICATION IS YOUR FAULT (Willamette Week)

– The magazine weighs in and asks: “Can Portland Avoid Repeating San Franciscos Mistakes?”-

The Atlantic has weighed in on the reasons Portland is suffering double-digit rent increases and found what we already know: Newcomers are arriving in droves.

But the magazine also concludes we’re all to blame in some respectsthat the city that “prides itself on progressivism” hasn’t had in place the “traditional tools” to create affordable housing.

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OREGONIANS ARE NEARLY TWICE AS LIKELY TO DIE FROM ALCOHOLIC LIVER DISEASE AS PEOPLE FROM OTHER STATES (Willamette Week)

-It could be worse. You could live in Washington.-

We Oregonians looooove our bars. We love our craft beers, our local wines and our artisanal spirits. If it’s not Beer Week in Portland, it’s Whiskey Weekend.

But maybe we love our alcohol too much.

A new map on the PBS News Hour site, produced by Stateline using 2014 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shows “types of deaths whose rates are higher than the national norm” for each state.

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OREGON JOBLESS RATE HOLDS STEADY IN APRIL (KTVZ Bend)

Oregon’s payroll employment grew by 5,700 in April, following a revised gain of 3,800 in March, the state Employment Department reported.

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CAN PORTLAND AVOID REPEATING SAN FRANCISCO’S MISTAKES? (The Atlantic)

-The city is facing a housing crisis, but despite its progressive reputation, its done little to ensure affordability for longtime residents.-

This city that prides itself on being different has been experiencing a problem all too common of late. It used to be unique, people say, a utopia where people could get tattoos and ride their bikes everywhere and just be weird. Portland was so affordable, as the slogan went, that young people went there to retire.

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COMMON CAUSE AGITATES FOR ELECTIONS REFORM AS MONEY FLOWS TO POLITICIANS — OPINION (The Lund Report)

In Salem, the people who testify and lobby for policy directions or money from the government are members of groups that have spent thousands in the off-season, financing the campaigns of the politicians on the other side of the dais. The average citizen may or may not have their own voice, but seldom will it be heard if it goes counter to those who have put money in the game.

Their voices are not heard, and they feel that their donors have a bigger voice than they do, said Daniel Lewkow, the political director for Common Cause Oregon, which is seeking to reform the elections process in Oregon.

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May 17, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Oregon on track to surpass million-voter mark for 2nd time in history
* BLM proposal for western Oregon lands draws objections
* Umpqua Community College awarded federal grant for recovery from mass shooting
* Why pro-salmon ruling on dams could be bad for the environment OPINION — Guest Opinion
* Report: Oregon’s marijuana market is a job-creator
* Supreme Court upholds $25M Oregon tobacco damages award
* Use it or lose it — Opinion
* Hood River voters to decide fate of water production
* Lane County voter turnout projected to exceed 60 percent
* Federal judge dismisses lawsuit seeking drivers licenses for illegal immigrants in Oregon
* My View: Let’s have national vote by mail — Guest Opinion
* Judge strikes down Josephine County’s GMO ban
* Group plans water quality lawsuit
* County approves rural enterprise zone for parts of Sunriver
* Klamath County ballot box broken into
* State sets medical marijuana meetings
* BLM plan to manage 2.5M acres draws fire
* Editorial: Voters were finagled in Klamath race — Opinion
* The Occupation Effect
* Video: The Kitzhaber Effect – His Resignation’s Impact On Elections
* Judge strikes down GMO ban in Oregons Josephine County
* Relentless winds cause headaches for Treasure Valley growers
* U.S. lamb regains access to Taiwan
* Department of Revenue closes Pendleton office
* Spray season arrives with fewer planes in the skies
* Jackson County officials predict 50 percent voter turnout in Tuesday’s primary
* Medical marijuana growers in Jackson County fly under radar
* AP: Feds taking comments on fire break plan in Idaho, Oregon
* Our View: Oregon’s experiment with automatic registration — Opinion
* Mark L. Hopkins: The key to education is still the teacher — Guest Opinion
* Robert Samuelson: Let us praise GDP — Guest Opinion
* Voter turnout up in Klamath County
* Want a presidential primary in Oregon that can have more impact? Move it up — Opinion
* Legislation offers hope dealing with climate change — Guest Opinion
* Divided KID board needs to find a way to pull itself together — Opinion
* Opposition groups file protest against BLM resource management plan
* ODE published 15-page memo on transgender students
* Funnel clouds not rare, but can turn into tornados
* Editorial: Finding help for troubled students — Opinion
* Editorial: ‘Motor voters’ won’t shake up primary election — Opinion
* A Glass Half Full: Effects Of Drought Continue To Plague Baker County
* Pikeminnow fishery opens
* Child welfare draws lawsuit
* DEQ to test air quality in The Dalles
* Amerities public meeting May 17
* The Dalles Air Coalition wants Hope [Arkansas]
* Residents meet fire officials and timber managers
* Deer Creek Bridge finds new home
* No increase of fees slated for ODFW
* MY VOICE: Voters responsibility at polls — Guest Opinion
* USDA announces Parkdale Sanitary District funding
* Travel Oregon and local leaders to promote Douglas County’s bicycle tourism
* ODFW: leave young wildlife in the wild
* Feeding birds human food can cause harm
* Twentysomethings content to stay in Roseburg
* We can help the homeless — Opinion
* Congressional report casts shadow over state attempt to recoup Cover Oregon money– Blog
* Little Earthquakes Shake Mount Hood
* Swarm of small quakes hits Mount Hood
* The Failed Promise of Legal Pot
* Oregon’s automatic voter registration blazes trail on voting access
* Automatic Voter Registration in Oregon Is Revolutionizing American Democracy

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OREGON ON TRACK TO SURPASS MILLION-VOTER MARK FOR 2ND TIME IN HISTORY (Portland Oregonian)

Oregonians are on track to cast more than 1 million votes in a primary election for only the second time in state history, Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins said Monday.

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BLM PROPOSAL FOR WESTERN OREGON LANDS DRAWS OBJECTIONS (Portland Oregonian)

A draft federal proposal to manage 2.5 million acres of land in western Oregon has some conservation and fishing groups as well as an Indian tribe filing protests against it.

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UMPQUA COMMUNITY COLLEGE AWARDED FEDERAL GRANT FOR RECOVERY FROM MASS SHOOTING (Portland Oregonian)

Umpqua Community College will receive more than $500,000 in federal money to aid in recovery from the state’s deadliest mass shooting, Oregon lawmakers announced Monday.

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WHY PRO-SALMON RULING ON DAMS COULD BE BAD FOR THE ENVIRONMENT OPINION — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

This month, U.S. District Judge Michael H. Simon ordered the government to once again overhaul its strategy for operating the Northwest’s eight federal hydropower dams in a manner that lessens their impact on salmon. So-called fish advocates cheered, largely because Simon’s ruling suggests that helping salmon recover may require further study of removing four dams on the Lower Snake River in Washington.

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REPORT: OREGON’S MARIJUANA MARKET IS A JOB-CREATOR (Salem Statesman Journal)

Legalization of marijuana in Oregon has created at least 2,165 jobs and will add more as the market matures, a new report suggests.

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SUPREME COURT UPHOLDS $25M OREGON TOBACCO DAMAGES AWARD (Salem Statesman Journal)

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday upheld an Oregon Court of Appeals ruling that tobacco company Philip Morris must pay $25 million in punitive damages to the family of an Oregon woman who died from smoking-related disease.

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USE IT OR LOSE IT — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

We Americans take an awful lot for granted. Electricity, clean water, working sewage systems, a telephone system.  But, jeepers, do we get upset if one of those things is unavailable to us. We go nuts in a matter of hours when the power is down.

Well, what if voting became suddenly unavailable to us? How precious would it then become? How hard would we fight to get it back?

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HOOD RIVER VOTERS TO DECIDE FATE OF WATER PRODUCTION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon’s scenic Columbia River Gorge is the stage for one of the hottest disputes in Oregon’s Tuesday primary  a proposal by Nestle to build a bottled water plant in Cascade Locks, using water from a mountain spring.

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LANE COUNTY VOTER TURNOUT PROJECTED TO EXCEED 60 PERCENT (Eugene Register-Guard)

As of Monday afternoon, just under 39 percent of Lane County registered voters had cast their ballots in the Tuesday primary. But that percentage is expected to exceed 60 percent by 8 p.m. Tuesday, the deadline for turning in ballots, said county Clerk Cheryl Betschart.

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FEDERAL JUDGE DISMISSES LAWSUIT SEEKING DRIVERS LICENSES FOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS IN OREGON (Eugene Register-Guard)

A judge in U.S. District Court in Eugene has dismissed a lawsuit seeking to give illegal immigrants in Oregon access to short-term drivers licenses.

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MY VIEW: LET’S HAVE NATIONAL VOTE BY MAIL — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Fifty-one years ago, President Johnson urged Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act. And in the face of implacable opposition from Southern states, Johnson clearly laid out the stakes: Every American citizen must have an equal right to vote. There is no reason which can excuse the denial of that right. There is no duty which weighs more heavily on us than the duty we have to ensure that right.

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JUDGE STRIKES DOWN JOSEPHINE COUNTY’S GMO BAN (Portland Tribune)

A prohibition against genetically engineered crops in Oregons Josephine County has been struck down by a judge who ruled the ordinance is pre-empted by state law.

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GROUP PLANS WATER QUALITY LAWSUIT (Bend Bulletin)

-The group blames dam for poor water quality, gave notice of its intent to sue-

An environmental nonprofit plans to sue Portland General Electric, saying the way the utility has operated its dam and facilities on the Deschutes River has led to violations of water quality standards.

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COUNTY APPROVES RURAL ENTERPRISE ZONE FOR PARTS OF SUNRIVER (Bend Bulletin)

-Zone allows for property tax breaks in exchange for business investments and hiring of employees-

Deschutes County commissioners adopted a resolution Monday that expands a rural enterprise zone to include Sunriver locations in an attempt to lure businesses through tax incentives. The expanded zone would include the Sunriver Business Park and the Spring River Plaza. Both the county and the city of La Pine have to approve the zone expansion.

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KLAMATH COUNTY BALLOT BOX BROKEN INTO (Bend Bulletin)

-Sheriffs Office finds ballots in nearby dumpster-

Someone broke into a ballot drop box in Klamath County and apparently threw the mail-in ballots into a nearby dumpster over the weekend, according to the countys clerk.

The Klamath County Sheriffs Office is investigating after around 240 ballots were taken from a box near the Klamath Basin Senior Center. The recovered ballots can still be counted, Klamath County Clerk Linda Smith said.

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STATE SETS MEDICAL MARIJUANA MEETINGS (Bend Bulletin)

-Officials to explain reporting system for medical pot businesses-

The Oregon Medical Marijuana Program is scheduling public meetings around the state to explain its new online reporting system for medical marijuana businesses.

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BLM PLAN TO MANAGE 2.5M ACRES DRAWS FIRE

Conservation and fishing groups and the Coquille tribe announced Monday they have filed protests against a draft federal proposal to manage 2.5 million acres of land in western Oregon  a plan that would allow logging to increase by more than a third and for trees to be felled closer to streams.

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EDITORIAL: VOTERS WERE FINAGLED IN KLAMATH RACE — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Dennis Linthicum doesnt get it. Having been set up for what could be a free pass to the Republican nomination for Oregon Senate District 28, he cannot understand why a pair of the states top Republicans are supporting a write-in challenge to his nomination.

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THE OCCUPATION EFFECT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

OPB reporter Amanda Peacher informs us about significant elections in Harney County and elsewhere that are being affected by the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife refuge earlier this year.

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VIDEO: THE KITZHABER EFFECT – HIS RESIGNATION’S IMPACT ON ELECTIONS  (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber resigned just over a year ago. That decision has shaped this weeks election in interesting ways. OPBs senior political reporter Jeff Mapes maps out some of the cause and effects of his resignation.

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JUDGE STRIKES DOWN GMO BAN IN OREGON’S JOSEPHINE COUNTY (Capital Press)

The prohibition against genetically engineered crops in Oregon’s Josephine County has been struck down by a judge who ruled the ordinance is pre-empted by state law.

Voters in the county approved the ban on genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, in 2014 even though state lawmakers disallowed local governments from regulating the crops the prior year.

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RELENTLESS WINDS CAUSE HEADACHES FOR TREASURE VALLEY GROWERS (Capital Press)

Persistent winds for more than a month have created headaches for Treasure Valley growers in Idaho and Oregon, making it a struggle for them to spray their crops and keep the ground wet.

The stinking wind blows every day, said Nyssa, Ore., grower Paul Skeen, who said the winds have resulted in poor onion stands in some fields.

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U.S. LAMB REGAINS ACCESS TO TAIWAN (Capital Press)

U.S. lamb and lamb products should soon be making their way to Taiwanese markets after 13 years of denied access.

Lambs long hiatus from Taiwan and other key markets began with the December 2003 discovery of the first U.S. case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

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DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE CLOSES PENDLETON OFFICE (East Oregonian)

Spokesman Bob Estabrook said the department decided to shutter the office because it couldn’t offer an adequate level of service with only one employee. He declined to name the employee who retired.

In addition to offering general services like tax payment, Estabrook said the Pendleton employee worked on identifying people who needed to file taxes and notifying the department.

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SPRAY SEASON ARRIVES WITH FEWER PLANES IN THE SKIES (Argus Observer)

The time to spray farm fields for pests and weeds is upon us; even so, area residents are likely to see fewer aerial applicator planes, also known as crop dusters, in the skies.

Fewer than 10 percent of pesticide products used locally are being applied by plane, estimates Oregon State University extension office agent Bill Buhrig. Most of it is vastly done with ground rigs, he said.

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JACKSON COUNTY OFFICIALS PREDICT 50 PERCENT VOTER TURNOUT IN TUESDAY’S PRIMARY (Medford Mail Tribune)

Record voter registration numbers in Jackson County for this primary election may not mean a record voter turnout.

“It’s going to be a little lower than I thought at first”, said Jackson County Clerk Chris Walker.

Out of the 128,619 registered voters  more than any previous election  Walker predicts that about 50 percent will actually vote by the time ballots are due at 8 p.m. Tuesday, which is better than the 40 percent turnout typically seen in non-presidential election years.

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MEDICAL MARIJUANA GROWERS IN JACKSON COUNTY FLY UNDER RADAR (Medford Mail Tribune)

Only a handful of medical marijuana growers have applied for Jackson County permits to keep growing on rural residential land  even though growers without permits face fines of up to $10,000 and orders to remove their plants.

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AP: FEDS TAKING COMMENTS ON FIRE BREAK PLAN IN IDAHO, OREGON (Medford Mail Tribune)

Federal officials are taking public comments on a plan to build about 400 miles of fire breaks in southwest Idaho and southeast Oregon following last year’s massive wildfire in the area.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management says some of the fire breaks that follow road corridors have already been built on an emergency basis.

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OUR VIEW: OREGON’S EXPERIMENT WITH AUTOMATIC REGISTRATION — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

While some states have taken steps to make it more difficult to vote, Oregon has instituted the nation’s first automatic voter registration system. Today’s primary election is the first test of that new system.

Oregon voters already enjoy the only all-vote-by-mail system in the country, and registering is hardly an onerous process. But in an attempt to make it even easier, lawmakers enacted the “Motor Voter” system that links the state Elections Division with the Department of Motor Vehicles.

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MARK L. HOPKINS: THE KEY TO EDUCATION IS STILL THE TEACHER — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Their names stand out in my mind and they still mean a great deal to me. They were the teachers who taught the first eight grades in a rural community school in southern Missouri when I was a boy half a century ago.

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ROBERT SAMUELSON: LET US PRAISE GDP — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

It’s time to cut the GDP some slack. Overhauling the GDP  as some critics would  threatens to politicize one of our most useful economic indicators. It could be twisted to advance or retard political agendas. This is a bad idea.

First, some background.

GDP stands for “gross domestic product,” and it’s our standard measure of economic growth.

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VOTER TURNOUT UP IN KLAMATH COUNTY (Herald and News)

Officials believe the vandalism of a ballot box in Klamath Falls during the weekend was not politically motivated and was more than likely a crime of opportunity.

Klamath County Clerk Linda Smith said damage to a ballot box outside the Klamath Basin Senior Citizens Center was an isolated incident and happened nowhere else in the county  or elsewhere in Oregon  during that time. As of Monday, the ballot box was back in service.

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WANT A PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY IN OREGON THAT CAN HAVE MORE IMPACT? MOVE IT UP — OPINION (Herald and News)

Only a few weeks ago, 2016 was looking like a year when Oregon’s presidential primary election would mean something major. There were contested races for the Republican and Democratic parties presidential nominations.

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LEGISLATION OFFERS HOPE DEALING WITH CLIMATE CHANGE — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

On May 6, the Herald and News reported, Climate change could alter Crater Lakes clarity, study finds.

That article really concerned me because I currently work as a seasonal park ranger at Crater Lake National Park. I have worked there for the past 24 years. I write this guest opinion as a private citizen, not as a National Park Service employee.

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DIVIDED KID BOARD NEEDS TO FIND A WAY TO PULL ITSELF TOGETHER — OPINION (Herald and News)

We hope Hollie Cannons comments to the Klamath Irrigation District board and general membership last week get the attention they deserve.

The district is in turmoil, with a bitter 3-2 split on the five-member board over the employment of outside lawyers to deal with water-related issues, including removal of four dams on the Klamath River.

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OPPOSITION GROUPS FILE PROTEST AGAINST BLM RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN (The World)

Opposition to the Bureau of Land Management’s resource management plan for Western Oregon keeps coming out of the woodwork.

Earthjustice and the Western Environmental Law Center filed a 173-page formal protest Monday on behalf of 22 conservation and fishing groups, stating the RMP “marks yet another attempt to circumvent the ecosystem management standards of the Northwest Forest Plan.”

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ODE PUBLISHED 15-PAGE MEMO ON TRANSGENDER STUDENTS (The World)

-Students get to use private facilities and play sports that match chosen gender-

The Oregon Department of Education published a 15-page document guiding schools on how to create a safe and supportive environment for transgender students. This makes Oregon one out of a handful of states to come out with this kind of memo, giving transgender students at any age the opportunity to decide their gender without discrimination.

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FUNNEL CLOUDS NOT RARE, BUT CAN TURN INTO TORNADOS (Albany Democrat Herald)

Funnel clouds like the one spotted near Albany on Sunday afternoon aren’t that unusual in Oregon, as the National Weather Service gets a number of reports of such wild weather every year, said Gerald Macke, meteorologist technician.

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EDITORIAL: FINDING HELP FOR TROUBLED STUDENTS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The proposed 2016-17 budget for the Greater Albany Public Schools district takes an important first step toward finding additional help for young students struggling with emotional and behavioral problems.

But more work needs to be done, in particular to make sure that teachers have as many tools as possible for dealing with these problems when they occur in the classroom.

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EDITORIAL: ‘MOTOR VOTERS’ WON’T SHAKE UP PRIMARY ELECTION — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Today’s election in Oregon is the first one since the states new motor-voter registration system has added more than 50,000 new voters to the rolls.

But the primary election isn’t likely to give us much in the way of clues on whether this new mass of voters will have any substantial political impact. We’ll have to wait until the November general election, and it will be interesting to see if theres a candidate or issue on the ballot that engages voters who thus far don’t seem enthused about politics.

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A GLASS HALF FULL: EFFECTS OF DROUGHT CONTINUE TO PLAGUE BAKER COUNTY (Baker City Herald)

-Phillips Reservoir wont fill for the fourth straight year-

Four months ago, when the snow lay deep and a storm arrived every couple days copious with moisture, Mark Ward was cautiously optimistic about the water supply for his family’s Baker Valley farm.

Turns out he was wise to temper his enthusiasm.

I guess that’s how quick things can change, Ward said last week.

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PIKEMINNOW FISHERY OPENS (The Dalles Chronicle)

The northern pikeminnow bounty fishery got underway in a big way this year, with 7,523 fish caught in The Dalles area during the first full week of fishing, according to data provided by the Bonneville Power Administration. In the John Day Dam area, 823 fish were caught in the same time period.

The catch was double the highest weekly catch reported in those areas during the entire 2015 season, which ran from May through October.

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CHILD WELFARE DRAWS LAWSUIT (The Dalles Chronicle)

Two former child welfare workers in The Dalles filed a wrongful termination suit saying they were fired after alleging children were put at risk and even harmed by willful violations of state law.

Shandie Johnson and Tammarra Ferguson worked for the Oregon Department of Human Services for 11 and six years, respectively before being fired last year. They are seeking $919,333 for lost wages and non-economic damages

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DEQ TO TEST AIR QUALITY IN THE DALLES (The Dalles Chronicle)

This is the second of three stories centered on the controversy over odor and emissions at Amerities West in The Dalles.

Air monitors, used to measure naphthalene levels, will arrive to The Dalles by the end of the month, confirmed Brian Boling, a laboratory manager for the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality.

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AMERITIES PUBLIC MEETING MAY 17 (The Dalles Chronicle)

-This is the first of three stories about controversy involving emissions and odors from Amerities West in The Dalles-

Jeff Thompson, plant manager of Amerities West in The Dalles, said a mutual agreement order, signed last month to implement odor-reducing strategies, was done to ease concerns.

But among at least 30 citizens who gathered downtown last Friday holding signs, one of which read Amerities please be a good neighbor, it hasn’t.

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THE DALLES AIR COALITION WANTS HOPE [ARKANSAS] (The Dalles Chronicle)

This is the conclusion of a three-part series exploring the controversy over odor and emissions at Amerities West:

When Amerities South, located in Hope, Ark., had its grand opening in 2011, Warren Nelson, director of Amerities Holdings, told the Hope Star This land is clean and will be kept clean.

A group of The Dalles residents concerned about creosote air pollution wants to know why the same cant be said of the tie plant in their town.

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RESIDENTS MEET FIRE OFFICIALS AND TIMBER MANAGERS (LaGrande Observer)

The remote reaches of northern Wallowa County may be a great place to get away from it all, but when fire strikes, Troy and the surrounding ranch and forest land suffer from a lack of accessibility.

Last August, several fires started by lightning in Washingtons Tucannon Wilderness grew together and burned south into the Wenaha Wilderness. By Aug. 20 the Grizzly Bear Complex blaze threatened Troy, burning two homes and a dozen outbuildings.

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DEER CREEK BRIDGE FINDS NEW HOME (LaGrande Observer)

-Historic bridge in Minam reunited with its sister bridge at Homeland Project grounds in Wallowa-

Years in the planning, a bridge crossing an unnamed creek in Minam was moved to its new home Wednesday night, where it will span the Wallowa River from the Nez Perce Homeland Project to the city of Wallowa.

The aging bridge was earmarked for replacement several years ago, but because of its historic nature, Ken Patterson of the Oregon Department of Transportation said the state had to find a new home for it before replacing the span with one that meets current regulations.

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NO INCREASE OF FEES SLATED FOR ODFW (LaGrande Observer)

-New budget should be adopted by June 9-

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said things are in an upswing after the last biennium had the agency almost depleted.

That was the message delivered by Curt Melcher, director of ODFW out of Salem, at a town hall meeting at Island City City Hall on Thursday night. Melcher said ODFW had, at its worst, been at $1.67 in their state account that pays for their employees payroll.

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MY VOICE: VOTERS RESPONSIBILITY AT POLLS — GUEST OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

-Oregon voters should think about helping manufacturing when casting their ballot-

Voters are going to the polls this year with economic worries uppermost in their minds. Although the headline unemployment rate has fallen to 5 percent, the labor force participation rate remains near historic lows, indicating that many people who might work are not doing so. Discouraged workers have given up looking for work, and middle-class jobs with benefits are scarce. One issue ties these troubles together  manufacturing.

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USDA ANNOUNCES PARKDALE SANITARY DISTRICT FUNDING (Hood River News)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture USDA celebrated Earth Day by announcing the funding of projects that will improve rural water quality and safety in 33 states across the country, including Oregon, announced State Director Vicki Walker.

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TRAVEL OREGON AND LOCAL LEADERS TO PROMOTE DOUGLAS COUNTYS BICYCLE TOURISM (Douglas County News-Review)

Umpqua Valley community leaders met together last week for the biannual Douglas County Chambers & Cities Summit in Elkton, where they learned about the upcoming Bicycle Tourism Studio Project through Travel Oregon.

A tourism studio is a set of interactive meetings meant to bring people together to learn how to develop their county’s tourism potential. Douglas County’s application was recently approved and the date of the studio is to be determined.

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ODFW: LEAVE YOUNG WILDLIFE IN THE WILD (Douglas County News-Review)

As newborn animals are starting to learn their way in the wild, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon State Police remind the public to give them space and leave them alone.

Taking young animals out of the wild and keeping them in captivity without a permit is harmful to them and is also against state law OAR 635-044-0015. OSP cited seven people for this offense last year.

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FEEDING BIRDS HUMAN FOOD CAN CAUSE HARM (Douglas County News-Review)

As families flock to the duck pond to watch the gathering of goslings and other waterfowl this spring, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife officials are reminding the public to not feed the wildlife food that is meant for humans.

There is a problem with feeding ducks and geese at Stewart Park duck pond and other local parks in Douglas County, said Bill Cannaday, ODFW wildlife habitat biologist for the Umpqua Watershed District Office.

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TWENTYSOMETHINGS CONTENT TO STAY IN ROSEBURG (Douglas County News-Review)

Megan Swearingen, a cardiac sonographer at the Shaw Heart Center in Roseburg, has the education, training and experience to get a job in her profession in a bigger city like Portland, but the 26-year-old likes the Douglas County area and at least for now has no intention of moving to a bigger city.

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WE CAN HELP THE HOMELESS — OPINION (Douglas County News-Review)

Recently, a group of community leaders convened for The News-Reviews first Community Editorial Board. Members of this group debate the issues facing the county and suggest solutions for moving forward.

Last week, we threw out for discussion one of the most distressing and persistent problems our community faces  the growing numbers of homeless people in Roseburg.

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CONGRESSIONAL REPORT CASTS SHADOW OVER STATE ATTEMPT TO RECOUP COVER OREGON MONEY— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

A U.S. Congressional report out last week provides further evidence that Oregon would likely need to return any money recouped in the Cover Oregon litigation to the federal government, an Oracle America executive says.

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LITTLE EARTHQUAKES SHAKE MOUNT HOOD (Willamette Week)

It seems like just last week that we reported that swarms of earthquakes were “recharging” Mount St. Helens because it was.  But now, it appears, the swarms are getting closer.

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SWARM OF SMALL QUAKES HITS MOUNT HOOD (KGW)

A swarm of small earthquakes has been detected on Mount Hood, about 10 miles southeast of Government Camp.

The first was about 6:40 p.m. Sunday and continued to about 7:30 Monday morning. The quakes were between magnitude 1.5 and 2.2. They were shallow, one to five kilometers in depth.

There is no cause for alarm, said Ian Madin with the Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries.

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THE FAILED PROMISE OF LEGAL POT (The Atlantic)

-New laws on marijuana were supposed to boost tax revenues and free up cops to go after real criminals. But underground sales and arrests are still thriving.-

Its just after four o’clock on a hot Seattle afternoon, and Thomas Terry is standing in the parking lot of a Jack in the Box. Known for fights that end with police sirens and sometimes ambulances, its a spot some locals half-jokingly call Stab in the Box, but today the scene is quiet.

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OREGON’S AUTOMATIC VOTER REGISTRATION BLAZES TRAIL ON VOTING ACCESS (msnbc)

Last year, a new law that automatically registers voters when they come in contact with the DMV made Oregon a pioneer in expanding access to the polls. Since then, three other states, including California, have passed similar measures. Now, with the Oregon primary to be held Tuesday, the numbers confirm the states law has so far been a rousing success.

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AUTOMATIC VOTER REGISTRATION IN OREGON IS REVOLUTIONIZING AMERICAN DEMOCRACY (The Nation)

Oregon’s presidential primary is tomorrow, but the bigger story is how many new voters there are in the state.

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