January 20, 2017 eClips

State Library eClips

* Oregon’s top budget writers unveil proposal filled with painful cuts
* State might let districts cut 2 1/2 days off school year for snow
* Oregon’s national monument fight is far from over
* Government plan for Klamath wildlife refuges violates law, conservation groups say
* 21,000 reasons to give rent-stabilization policies a chance — Guest Opinion
* Oregon legislators warn of painful cuts in ‘existing resources’ budget
* Minto Island Bridge to open in April, sort of
* Bridge going nowhere fast at Salem’s Riverfront Park — Opinion
* Oregon Democratic leaders release proposed budget that would cut range of public health care and social services
* Pile up of school snow days prompts request for waiver
* A flatter jobs cycle? — Opinion
* Corvallis residents split on joining logging suit
* School district snow days now equal headaches at year’s end
* Rift exposed over ODOT oversight
* Legislature’s budget-writers set shortfall at $1.8 billion
* Clackamas board stays in timber lawsuit
* Why so few Airbnb permits? Could tax avoidance be a reason?
* OTC nixes expected release of draft ODOT review
* Lawmakers’ spending framework includes cuts, no new taxes
* Advocates to change method of counting homeless
* Road improvements will be needed to ease congestion in Bend
* Drug testing bill filed in Salem
* Editorial: Dont let anyone pull a Whitsett — Opinion
* Death Penalty: Prison Superintendent – OPB’s Think Out Loud
* Oregon Education Officials Offer Relief To Snow-Battered Schools
* Why A Small Texas Town Wants Oregons Nuclear Waste
* Oregon Budget Proposal: Program Cuts, No New Taxes
* Federal Approval Of GMO Grass Seed Sparks Outcry
* Oregon Budget Proposal: Program Cuts, No New Taxes
* Oregons hazelnut boom gains momentum
* Reflecting on eight years of progress — Guest Opinion
* Washington Ecology shakes up dairy regulation
* Hansell, Barreto ask wheres the emergency
* Lawmakers to consider air pollution regulations for dairies
* State school board to discussion snow day exemptions
* Wallowa County ranch to adopt new water conservation practices
* Pronghorn deaths blamed on toxic plant
* Education providers, lawmaker tour local preschool programs
* Medford airport has another record year
* Our View: Federal land sell-off is not imminent — Opinion
* Our View: Monument expansion strikes a balance — Opinion
* Guest Opinion: The Affordable Care Act helps in fighting the opiate epidemic — Guest Opinion
* ‘Takings’ case moves to Washington, D.C. venue
* Sprague River closes to all fishing Monday
* H&N View – Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument — Opinion
* National Monument expansion brings potential backlash
* New handgun policy: Much ado about not much — Opinion
* Teen alcohol, tobacco use down
* Highway 99 improvements planned
* Douglas County school districts test for lead in drinking water with results online
* Reedsport seeks millions for flood mitigation
* Seven Feathers to host conference on beaver restoration
* Replace Affordable Care Act with new plan — Guest Opinion
* Feds reject Idaho utility’s bid to negate Oregon fish law

____________________

OREGON’S TOP BUDGET WRITERS UNVEIL PROPOSAL FILLED WITH PAINFUL CUTS (Portland Oregonian)

From teacher layoffs to cutting as many as 355,000 people from Medicaid, Oregon’s top budget-writers painted what they hope is a heart-wrenching scenario Thursday of what would happen if the state had to operate without increased taxes or other revenues the next two years.
_________________________________________

STATE MIGHT LET DISTRICTS CUT 2 1/2 DAYS OFF SCHOOL YEAR FOR SNOW (Portland Oregonian)

To help the many Oregon school districts hit by nine or more snow days, the state is considering letting districts fall 14 hours, or about 2 1/2 days, short of mandated school year requirements.

Districts could be let off the hook for even more time, but they would have to make their case in writing — and get the state Board of Education to vote to approve it.
_________________________________________

OREGON’S NATIONAL MONUMENT FIGHT IS FAR FROM OVER (Portland Oregonian)

After years of planning, campaigning, feuding and finger-pointing, Oregon’s fight over new national monuments seems to be coming to a close – for now.

In his final days in office, President Barack Obama announced a massive expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southern Oregon last Thursday, but a proposal for a monument at eastern Oregon’s Owyhee Canyonlands has run out of time.
_________________________________________

GOVERNMENT PLAN FOR KLAMATH WILDLIFE REFUGES VIOLATES LAW, CONSERVATION GROUPS SAY (Portland Oregonian)

Three conservation groups filed a lawsuit in federal court Tuesday alleging a management plan for five wildlife refuges in Southern Oregon and Northern California doesn’t do enough to restore and protect key habitat for tens of thousands of migrating waterfowl.
_________________________________________

21,000 REASONS TO GIVE RENT-STABILIZATION POLICIES A CHANCE — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

It’s no secret that communities across Oregon are experiencing severe housing shortages and extreme rent increases. Last year, over 21,000 kids in Oregon’s school districts experienced homelessness. That means 21,000 kids worried about where they and their parents would sleep at night, rather than focusing on school. This year, Oregon legislators will have an opportunity to lift the statewide prohibition on rent stabilization, a step that would help keep families in their homes and set children up for success.
_________________________________________

OREGON LEGISLATORS WARN OF PAINFUL CUTS IN ‘EXISTING RESOURCES’ BUDGET (Salem Statesman Journal)

Last month, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown proposed a budget showing what the next two years will look like if lawmakers can agree on new revenue measures.

On Thursday, the Legislatures top budget-writers released a version showing what will happen if they cant.
_________________________________________

MINTO ISLAND BRIDGE TO OPEN IN APRIL, SORT OF (Salem Statesman Journal)

A Salem pedestrian bridge crossing the Willamette River at Riverfront Park is now scheduled to open in April.

Construction setbacks have plagued the project since city councilors approved a design for the Peter Courtney Minto Island bridge in 2010, delays that could cost the lead contractor more than $200,000.

Ed. Note: State Grant Funding.
_________________________________________

BRIDGE GOING NOWHERE FAST AT SALEM’S RIVERFRONT PARK — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Would a home or business owner tolerate a build job that missed its completion date by more than a year?

Salem’s Riverfront Park has been called the community’s living room. The velvety green oasis along the Willamette River provides outdoor opportunities galore and offers scenic spaces that improve livability in our city.

Ed. Note: State Grant Funding.
_________________________________________

OREGON DEMOCRATIC LEADERS RELEASE PROPOSED BUDGET THAT WOULD CUT RANGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL SERVICES (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Plan would downsize but keep open the Junction City psychiatric hospital-

Leading Democratic budget crafters released their proposed 2017-19 state government budget Thursday with a long list of spending curbs, including in public health care, social services, drug treatment and corrections, to fill a projected $1.8 billion hole.
_________________________________________

PILE UP OF SCHOOL SNOW DAYS PROMPTS REQUEST FOR WAIVER (Eugene Register-Guard)

An exceptionally cold, stormy and snowy winter has school districts across Oregon running out of time to instruct their students for the required number of hours this school year.

Snow, freezing rain and bitter cold temperatures prompted districts all over the state to cancel school for several days in December and January.
_________________________________________

A FLATTER JOBS CYCLE? — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Unemployment in Oregon dips to historic lows-

A chart of Oregons unemployment rate during the past 30 years looks like the profile of the Cascades: high peaks and deep valleys. Its great news that the state jobless rate fell to 4.6 percent in December, resulting in an average of 4.9 percent for all of 2016 the lowest since recordkeeping began 40 years ago.
_________________________________________

CORVALLIS RESIDENTS SPLIT ON JOINING LOGGING SUIT (Eugene Register-Guard)

-The class action lawsuit seeks compensation from the state over lost logging revenue-

Residents have sharply divided opinions about whether their county should be involved in a lawsuit against the state.
_________________________________________

SCHOOL DISTRICT SNOW DAYS NOW EQUAL HEADACHES AT YEAR’S END (Portland Tribune)

-The Oregon Department of Education mandates the minimum amount of classroom time that each public school district needs to offer each year.-

Most public school districts in Oregon schedule a day or two each year to account for the possibility of snow no matter how unlikely that outcome is in the Portland area.

Ed. Note: Discusses State Board of Education meeting next week.
_________________________________________

RIFT EXPOSED OVER ODOT OVERSIGHT (Portland Tribune)

-Gov. Brown has written a noncommittal response to the Oregon Transportation Commission.-

In a highly unusual letter, the head of the Oregon Transportation Commission has asked Gov. Kate Brown to personally engage in beefed-up oversight of the Department of Transportation.
_________________________________________

LEGISLATURE’S BUDGET-WRITERS SET SHORTFALL AT $1.8 BILLION (Portland Tribune)

-Lawmakers who sit on the Ways and Means Committee will tour the state in February to ask Oregonians for advice on how to balance the budget.-

The chief budget-writers for the Oregon Legislature say the state’s deficit now sits at $1.8 billion. And cutting programs alone is the wrong way to balance the books.
_________________________________________

CLACKAMAS BOARD STAYS IN TIMBER LAWSUIT (Portland Tribune)

-But county commissioners propose recovery of state forest land, not money, if western Oregon counties prevail against the state.-

Clackamas County commissioners have opted to stay in a lawsuit led by Linn County that seeks to recover up to $1.4 billion from the state in past losses and future proceeds from timber sales on state forests.
_________________________________________

WHY SO FEW AIRBNB PERMITS? COULD TAX AVOIDANCE BE A REASON? (Portland Tribune)

Airbnb offers a ‘quick reference guide’ for prospective Portland hosts on its website, essentially a checklist to get started. It mentions they need to file for a city business license, notify neighbors, file a permit application and get an inspection. Another Airbnb web page notes lodging taxes must be paid to Portland, Multnomah County and the state. It makes no reference to state or federal income taxes on earnings. However, a separate Airbnb handout on taxes encourages hosts to consult a tax professional for reporting their income.
_________________________________________

OTC NIXES EXPECTED RELEASE OF DRAFT ODOT REVIEW (Portland Tribune)

Oregon Transportation Commission heard an update on the schedule for completion and release of the findings.

The Oregon Transportation Commission on Thursday, Jan. 19, nixed a scheduled briefing on draft findings of a management performance audit of the Oregon Department of Transportation.
_________________________________________

LAWMAKERS’ SPENDING FRAMEWORK INCLUDES CUTS, NO NEW TAXES (Portland Tribune)

Joint Ways and Means Committee co-chairs lay groundwork for budget talks in the 2017 session.

The co-chairs of the Legislature’s joint budget-writing committee Thursday presented a spending plan that included cuts in services to reflect the state’s expected $1.8 billion shortfall for the next two-year budget cycle.
_________________________________________

ADVOCATES TO CHANGE METHOD OF COUNTING HOMELESS (Bend Bulletin)

-Central Oregon numbers could grow as a result-

An upcoming count of homeless people is expected to show that their numbers in Central Oregon are higher than previously recorded.

Regional organizers of the federally mandated point in time count, which is scheduled to take place next week, say the likely increase is due to changes in the way the count will be conducted in Central Oregon. The new methodology is an attempt to correct for inaccuracies of past years, which can make homelessness appear to be decreasing when its not.
_________________________________________

ROAD IMPROVEMENTS WILL BE NEEDED TO EASE CONGESTION IN BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-Millions of dollars in improvements are needed to deal with Bends soaring population-

Bend is expected to grow by nearly 35,000 residents over the next decade, which means the city will need to spend millions of dollars expanding streets to meet the demands of new residents and the cars they bring with them.

But the problem is already here in this city of 81,000 people.
_________________________________________

DRUG TESTING BILL FILED IN SALEM (Bend Bulletin)

-Federal law still a hurdle-

A bill meant to prevent employers from using off-the-clock marijuana use as a cause to fire or refuse to hire someone is on the growing list of proposed legislation awaiting lawmakers in Salem.

Backers of Senate Bill 301 say it would override state Supreme Court decisions that say employers need not accommodate workers off-the-job use of marijuana, legal for all adults since July 2015.
_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: DONT LET ANYONE PULL A WHITSETT — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon House Bill 2429 is a tribute to Doug and Gail Whitsett. But its not for the work the married Republicans did to represent their districts in Eastern Oregon. Its for the way the Whitsetts effectively picked their successors.
_________________________________________

DEATH PENALTY: PRISON SUPERINTENDENT – OPB’S THINK OUT LOUD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Frank Thompson is a retired prison superintendent from the Oregon Department of Corrections. Though he oversaw Oregons only two executions in the modern era while on the job, he now opposes the death penalty. He joins us as part of our series of conversations about capital punishment in Oregon.
_________________________________________

OREGON EDUCATION OFFICIALS OFFER RELIEF TO SNOW-BATTERED SCHOOLS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon education officials may relax instructional time requirements for school districts that have lost class time to snow and ice.

Proposed rules would allow districts to count 14 hours of weather-related cancellations as instructional time. Thats similar to what Oregon used to allow, before phasing out allowances for time lost to weather emergencies.
_________________________________________

WHY A SMALL TEXAS TOWN WANTS OREGONS NUCLEAR WASTE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Communities from Oregon to New York may be clamoring to get nuclear waste out of their backyards, but one small town in west Texas is actively vying to store the nations spent nuclear fuel at least for the next century or so.
_________________________________________

OREGON BUDGET PROPOSAL: PROGRAM CUTS, NO NEW TAXES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The chief budget-writers for the Oregon Legislature have released a spending proposal that includes cuts to state programs.

The proposal issued Thursday outlines how lawmakers might bridge an expected budget gap.
_________________________________________

FEDERAL APPROVAL OF GMO GRASS SEED SPARKS OUTCRY (Northwest Public Radio)

-RADIO-

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has deregulated a controversial grass seed that is genetically modified to resist the herbicide called Roundup. The move has sparked outcry from critics who fear the grass could contaminate crops in Oregons billion-dollar grass seed industry.
_________________________________________

OREGON BUDGET PROPOSAL: PROGRAM CUTS, NO NEW TAXES (Northwest Public Radio)

-RADIO-

The chief budget-writers for the Oregon Legislature have released a spending proposal that includes cuts to state programs. The proposal issued Thursday outlines how lawmakers might bridge an expected budget gap.
_________________________________________

OREGONS HAZELNUT BOOM GAINS MOMENTUM (Capital Press)

-Enthusiasm for hazelnuts is high due to healthy prices and the availability of new cultivars resistant to eastern filbert blight.-

The expansion of Oregons hazelnut orchards is gaining momentum, with acreage surging by nearly 64 percent in the past five years, according to an industry analyst.

Farmers planted about 9,200 acres of hazelnuts last year, up from 6,200 acres in 2015 and 4,300 acres in 2014, said Mike McDaniel, principal of Pacific Agricultural Survey, which tracks the industrys growth.
_________________________________________

REFLECTING ON EIGHT YEARS OF PROGRESS — GUEST OPINION (Capital Press)

-It has been an absolute pleasure to work in the Obama administration serving rural Oregonians. Thank you for that opportunity, and I hope our paths cross again.-

When I was asked by the Obama administration to lead the USDA Rural Development in Oregon, I set out on a journey that would lead me to small communities across the state grappling with infrastructure and economic development needs, into the homes of people struggling to make ends meet, and through the doors of businesses just getting off the ground or searching for resources to expand.
_________________________________________

WASHINGTON ECOLOGY SHAKES UP DAIRY REGULATION (Capital Press)

-The Washington Department of Ecologys rules could keep dairies out of court, but the costs for farmers are uncertain.-

New rules issued by the Washington Department of Ecology on Wednesday will change the regulatory landscape for the states 230 dairies with more than 200 cows.

Embracing the rules may shield dairies from government fines or lawsuits by environmental groups, but will mean taking on new obligations with uncertain costs.
_________________________________________

HANSELL, BARRETO ASK WHERES THE EMERGENCY (East Oregonian)

-Proposal asks for 2/3 majority in state House, Senate to declare new laws emergencies-

Two Eastern Oregon lawmakers seek to curtail the legislative practice of new bills going into effect as soon as the governor signs them into law.

State Sen. Bill Hansell of Athena and Rep. Greg Barreto of Cove, both Republicans, said the use of the emergency clause on bills has gotten out of hand, so they are sponsoring Senate Joint Resolution 15 to make it harder to declare an emergency.
_________________________________________

LAWMAKERS TO CONSIDER AIR POLLUTION REGULATIONS FOR DAIRIES (East Oregonian)

-The Oregon Legislature will consider a bill revisiting recommendations made by the Oregon Dairy Air Quality Task Force in 2008.-

Oregon lawmakers may finally be ready to follow through on air quality controls for dairy farms originally put forth by a state task force nearly a decade ago.

Senate Bill 197 would direct the Environmental Quality Commission to adopt a program for regulating air emissions from dairies something the Oregon Dairy Air Quality Task Force recommended to the Department of Agriculture and Department of Environmental Quality back in 2008.

_________________________________________

STATE SCHOOL BOARD TO DISCUSSION SNOW DAY EXEMPTIONS (East Oregonian)

-The Oregon State Board of Education will discuss the possibility of granting flexibility to school districts to still count some snow days toward their requirements for minimum instructional hours.-

The Oregon State Board of Education will discuss the possibility of a temporary exemption to instructional time requirements, in light of the unusual number of snow days for schools around the state.
_________________________________________

WALLOWA COUNTY RANCH TO ADOPT NEW WATER CONSERVATION PRACTICES (East Oregonian)

-Approximately 1 billion gallons of water will be saved through new conservation projects on Wolfe Ranch in Wallowa County.-

A Wallowa County ranch figures to save 1 billion gallons of water annually through a series of conservation projects, such as adding sprinklers and forgoing irrigation during peak summer months.

The Freshwater Trust, an environmental nonprofit with offices in Portland, announced it is working with Wolfe Ranch to upgrade irrigation infrastructure, transfer points of diversion and lease water rights on the farm to benefit endangered salmon in the Lostine River.
_________________________________________

PRONGHORN DEATHS BLAMED ON TOXIC PLANT (Argus Observer)

Just two weeks ago, a group of eight elk died in the Boise foothills after feeding on Japanese yew plants. This week, a herd of 50 pronghorn antelope were found dead in Payette, victims of the same toxic shrub.
_________________________________________

EDUCATION PROVIDERS, LAWMAKER TOUR LOCAL PRESCHOOL PROGRAMS (Argus Observer)

Rep. Cliff Bentz, R-Ontario, joined local early education and early childhood development providers Tuesday to visit two preschool programs in Ontario and Vale.

The first stop for Bentz and company was an Ontario family care program, based out of an Ontario home. The groups second stop was in Vale, where they visited preschoolers in a Preschool Promise classroom.
_________________________________________

MEDFORD AIRPORT HAS ANOTHER RECORD YEAR (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Medford airport capped its third-straight record year with its second-best December ever, finishing 2016 with 822,289 travelers passing through its gates.

“We can’t expect every year to be up like this past year was,” airport Director Bern Case said. “But if we are up a percent or two each year and grow with economy, I will be pleased with that.”
_________________________________________

OUR VIEW: FEDERAL LAND SELL-OFF IS NOT IMMINENT — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Supporters of public lands are alarmed by a change in U.S. House rules that appears to smooth the way to transferring federal land to states to do with as they wish. But both President-elect Donald Trump and his Interior secretary nominee oppose such transfers.

The change, tucked away in a package of rules adopted by the House Jan. 3, bars the Congressional Budget Office from considering the dollar value of federal land that is transferred to other entities. The rule essentially makes such transfers budget-neutral, removing a major obstacle.
_________________________________________

OUR VIEW: MONUMENT EXPANSION STRIKES A BALANCE — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Supporters of a larger Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument got some of what they wanted when President Barack Obama designated 47,624 acres as new monument land. Opponents, including the timber industry and the Jackson County commissioners, were disappointed, but the move is unlikely to bring the negative consequences they fear.
_________________________________________

GUEST OPINION: THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT HELPS IN FIGHTING THE OPIATE EPIDEMIC — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

As the new year begins, Oregon, like much of the country, is facing a public health crisis with opiates pain pills and heroin. Oregon currently leads the nation in abuse of prescription pain pills, and from 2001-2011 admission rates to drug treatment facilities for opiate addiction quadrupled.

Although action is being taken, both at the state and local level, to curb the prescription of opiates, we are still seeing devastating local effects.
_________________________________________

‘TAKINGS’ CASE MOVES TO WASHINGTON, D.C. VENUE (Herald and News)

Klamath Basin irrigators are taking their case to a higher court.

A historic case on the ramifications of a major water shutoff to Klamath Reclamation Project irrigators in 2001 will be heard at trial from local farmers or their attorneys starting Monday, Jan. 30 in Washington, D.C.
_________________________________________

SPRAGUE RIVER CLOSES TO ALL FISHING MONDAY (Herald and News)

The Sprague River will close to all fishing beginning Monday and continue through April 21, according to an Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife news release.

ODFW announced the emergency regulation Thursday in order to protect spawning redband trout from the stress and mortality associated with fishing pressure and handling.
_________________________________________

H&N VIEW – CASCADE-SISKIYOU NATIONAL MONUMENT — OPINION (Herald and News)

There are several things wrong with President Obamas expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument last week. Its major good points are that the 47,624-acre expansion is smaller than the 66,500-acre expansion originally opposed, and it does seem to help preserve parts of a unique ecosystem where two mountain ranges meet.
_________________________________________

NATIONAL MONUMENT EXPANSION BRINGS POTENTIAL BACKLASH (The World)

President Barack Obamas expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument last week has been lauded as a triumph for some and a catastrophe for others, especially the O&C counties who say the expansion will further restrict logging.

Jim Whittington, Bureau of Land Management public affairs officer for the Medford district, said his office has started dealing with the logistics of the 48,000-acre expansion.
_________________________________________

NEW HANDGUN POLICY: MUCH ADO ABOUT NOT MUCH — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Some Republicans in the state Legislature are worked up over a new policy that stops most state employees with licenses to carry concealed handguns from bringing guns to work.

“Outrage,” the GOP thundered in the subject line of an emailed press release last week. The press release itself added, in a somewhat more restrained tone, that Republicans were “disturbed” by a new rule from the Brown administration that “compromises the self-defense rights of Oregonians.”
_________________________________________

TEEN ALCOHOL, TOBACCO USE DOWN (LaGrande Observer)

-Oregon Student Wellness Survey show teen use in county drops significantly-

The numbers are eye popping and reason for schools, parents and youth leaders to celebrate.

The 2016 results of the Oregon Health Authoritys biannual Oregon Student Wellness Survey indicate that alcohol and tobacco use among teenagers in Union County is down way down.
_________________________________________

HIGHWAY 99 IMPROVEMENTS PLANNED (Douglas County News-Review)

Douglas County moved a step closer Wednesday to making about $5.4 million in improvements on Highway 99 south of Winchester Bridge.
_________________________________________

DOUGLAS COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICTS TEST FOR LEAD IN DRINKING WATER WITH RESULTS ONLINE (Douglas County News-Review)

The Oregon Board of Education adopted new rules for lead testing last year in state schools that required a quick response by educators to ensure the health and safety of Oregon students.

The board recommended that all schools test their facilities and provide reports to their communities within five days of receiving the results. Individual school districts posted lead test results on their websites.
_________________________________________

REEDSPORT SEEKS MILLIONS FOR FLOOD MITIGATION (Douglas County News-Review)

Two weather disasters in 2015 opened up millions of dollars in grant funds to Douglas County, and Reedsport is claiming most of that money for flood mitigation.

The city sits at the junction of three rivers the Umpqua River, the Smith River, and the Scholfield River and is a few miles away from the Pacific Ocean. The towns levee protects it from most flooding waters, but not all.
_________________________________________

SEVEN FEATHERS TO HOST CONFERENCE ON BEAVER RESTORATION (Douglas County News-Review)

Oregons official state animal, the beaver, plays an important role in the states wetland ecosystems. Those advocating for the beaver plan to convene next month for a series of presentations focusing on beaver ecology as a crucial part of threatened species recovery.
_________________________________________

REPLACE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT WITH NEW PLAN — GUEST OPINION (Douglas County News-Review)

The incoming Trump administration and the Republican Congress have vowed to replace the Affordable Care Act and replace it with something better. The replacements suggested, such as cross state insurance sales, Medicaid block grants or expanded HSAs seem unlikely to maintain current levels of coverage or control costs. Let me propose a system that would be different and I think, much better than any of the alternatives so far suggested.
_________________________________________

FEDS REJECT IDAHO UTILITY’S BID TO NEGATE OREGON FISH LAW (Idaho Statesman)

Federal authorities on Thursday rejected a request by an Idaho utility to negate an Oregon law requiring fish passage as part of relicensing for a hydroelectric project on the Snake River where it forms the border between Idaho and Oregon.
_________________________________________
State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer
http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon newspapers http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit
http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 20, 2017 eClips

January 19, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* ‘Blockades, mazes and rabbit holes’ for public records at Oregon environmental agency
* Plotkin prevails in SAIF lawsuit, judge orders him reinstated as CEO
* Former Oregon prison manager says Department of Corrections retaliated against him
* Key $1 million transportation audit unready close to deadline
* Oregon university leaders send dire budget message to Gov. Kate Brown
* Feds deregulate controversial GMO grass seed
* Oregon lawmakers introduce bill to protect reproductive health care
* As Smith Rock crowds skyrocket, a new plan will shape parks future
* Oregon’s jobless rate for 2016 matches record low set in boom year of 1995
* Rental program is failing — Opinion
* A success to build upon — Opinion
* Legislature set to release proposed budget Thursday
* Senate leader sees new revenue, transportation top agenda for 2017
* Portland region’s economy fueled by tax dollars
* State job growth doubled U.S. numbers in 2016
* What’s next for the Superfund cleanup?
* Bill expands insurance mandate to cover abortions, other services
* Our Opinion: Saving homeless lives requires more action — Opinion
* Oregon guardsmen join presidential inauguration security
* Editorial: Bill is wrong answer for minimum wage impact on teens — Opinion
* Brainstorming starts for Smith Rock
* U.S. sues collector of student loans
* NW Marijuana Producers Apprehensive Trump’s AG Pick But Some See The Bright Side
* Federal Approval Of GM Grass Seed Sparks Outcry
* Oregon’s CIO – OPB’s Think Out Loud
* Keeping Young People In Klamath Falls – OPB’s Think Out Loud
* Oregon Schools To Homebound Kids: Please Read And Do Math
* APHIS deregulates Roundup Ready creeping bentgrass
* Oregon awards first juniper removal loan
* Ag producers, researchers assess ice and snow damage
* Sen. Hansell hopes to end game of chicken with Real ID bill
* Our view: Build under your own risk — Opinion
* 20-year mining ban in parts of Southwest Oregon
* Testing climate leadership with cap and trade
* Chairwoman of the Oregon Transportation Commission Asks Gov. Kate Brown for Big Changes
* New Taxes Could Fill Medicaid Budget Hole

____________________

‘BLOCKADES, MAZES AND RABBIT HOLES’ FOR PUBLIC RECORDS AT OREGON ENVIRONMENTAL AGENCY (Portland Oregonian)

Transparency is a mess at the agency responsible for policing Oregon’s air and water pollution, a new Portland State University study has found.

After interviewing more than 50 people inside and outside the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, researchers at the university’s Center for Public Service concluded that the agency lags behind its peers and falls short on public disclosure.

_________________________________________

PLOTKIN PREVAILS IN SAIF LAWSUIT, JUDGE ORDERS HIM REINSTATED AS CEO (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s workers comp insurance agency must reinstate the chief executive it improperly fired in 2014, a judge has ruled.

The Tuesday ruling was a stunning victory for fired CEO John Plotkin and an embarrassing setback for SAIF Corp.

Marion County Judge Claudia Burton ruled the agency’s board violated the state’s open meetings law when it considered whether to oust John Plotkin in two private meetings.

_________________________________________

FORMER OREGON PRISON MANAGER SAYS DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS RETALIATED AGAINST HIM (Portland Oregonian)

A former prison administrator alerted the state that he plans to sue the Oregon Department of Corrections for allegedly violating state whistleblower law, saying it retaliated against him when he raised questions about two high-level officials.

A lawyer for John Myrick, former superintendent of Two Rivers Correctional Institution in Umatilla, sent a letter to the Oregon Department of Administrative Services in late December outlining his allegations and his plans to seek damages.

_________________________________________

KEY $1 MILLION TRANSPORTATION AUDIT UNREADY CLOSE TO DEADLINE (Portland Oregonian)

UPDATED: This story has been updated to reflect new information about the readiness of the preliminary findings.

Third-party auditors were expected to reveal their long-awaited assessment of Oregon Department of Transportation management Thursday. But that now seems unlikely because their preliminary findings aren’t ready for public release, a state official said Wednesday.

_________________________________________

OREGON UNIVERSITY LEADERS SEND DIRE BUDGET MESSAGE TO GOV. KATE BROWN (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon higher education leaders stepped up the rhetoric Wednesday, saying Gov. Kate Brown’s recommended budget plan for public universities would “ensure tuition increases that will make a college degree out of reach for many Oregonians.”

_________________________________________

FEDS DEREGULATE CONTROVERSIAL GMO GRASS SEED (Portland Oregonian)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Tuesday deregulated a genetically modified grass that some Oregon farmers and dealers say threatens the state’s grass seed business.

The altered grass escaped earlier field tests and has established in Jefferson and Malheur counties. Genetically modified to be resistant to the popular herbicide Roundup, the grass has defied more than a decade of the efforts by its creator, Scotts Miracle-Gro, to eradicate it.

_________________________________________

OREGON LAWMAKERS INTRODUCE BILL TO PROTECT REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH CARE (Portland Oregonian)

While running for election, Donald Trump, who will be inaugurated Friday, promised to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which was signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010.

Trump hasn’t said exactly what will replace the ACA. In an interview Wednesday, he said, “We’re going to have a plan that’s going to be great for people.” But two Oregon lawmakers aren’t waiting to find out. Instead, they are introducing legislation to protect and expand reproductive healthcare for Oregonians.

_________________________________________

AS SMITH ROCK CROWDS SKYROCKET, A NEW PLAN WILL SHAPE PARKS FUTURE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Smith Rock State Park has seen dramatic changes during the past five years.

The 641-acre park north of Bend has gone from a place known mostly for rock climbing to a bonafide tourist destination on par with Multnomah Falls and the Oregon Coast.

A sharp increase in visitors, which have almost doubled since 2010, has stretched the park to capacity.

_________________________________________

OREGON’S JOBLESS RATE FOR 2016 MATCHES RECORD LOW SET IN BOOM YEAR OF 1995 (Eugene Register-Guard)

With Oregon employers adding nearly 53,000 jobs in 2016, the states annual average unemployment rate last year fell to match the previous record low set in the economic boom of the mid-1990’s, the state Employment Department reported on Thursday.

The states unemployment rate fell to 4.6 percent in December, from 5 percent in November, according to the Employment Department.

_________________________________________

RENTAL PROGRAM IS FAILING — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Landlords have the upper hand in Eugene’s current tight housing market, so it stands to reason that tenants would benefit from having a program with the power to act on complaints about unsafe or substandard rentals. But the numbers don’t support that assumption. The city has had a program with the power to perform inspections and order repairs in rental units since 2004, and hardly anyone uses it.

_________________________________________

A SUCCESS TO BUILD UPON — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Just as the United States reaches a turning point in the politics of abortion, with Republicans in Washington, D.C., planning to replicate state restrictions at the federal level, the nation has reached a milestone: In 2014, the nations abortion rate fell to the lowest level in modern history. Its a success waiting to be claimed by Americans on both sides of the abortion debate.

_________________________________________

LEGISLATURE SET TO RELEASE PROPOSED BUDGET THURSDAY (Portland Tribune)

-Details aren’t known, but likely will seek budget cuts and revenue increases to balance $1.8 billion shortfall.-

Oregon’s biannual budget dance moves into its next stage Thursday.

Every two years, the governor of Oregon presents a proposed budget for the coming two-year period. The co-chairs of the Legislature’s budget-writing body, Ways & Means, then releases their version of the budget.

_________________________________________

SENATE LEADER SEES NEW REVENUE, TRANSPORTATION TOP AGENDA FOR 2017 (Portland Tribune)

Burdick, whose district includes Tigard, is the highest-ranking legislator in Washington County and Southwest Portland. She chairs the Democratic caucus – the majority caucus – in the Senate and, as such, is a leading lieutenant of Senate President Peter Courtney.

Oregon Sen. Ginny Burdick’s demeanor going into the next legislative session can best be described as “cautiously optimistic.”

_________________________________________

PORTLAND REGION’S ECONOMY FUELED BY TAX DOLLARS (Portland Tribune)

-Seven out of 10 of the region’s largest employers are either government agencies or health care systems. Health care also is funded largely by government.-

A table buried in Portland Public Schools’ annual financial report displays some interesting facts about how dependent the region’s employment is on government dollars.

_________________________________________

STATE JOB GROWTH DOUBLED U.S. NUMBERS IN 2016 (Portland Tribune)

-Oregon’s fastest growing industries in 2016 were construction, other services, professional and business services, and health care and social assistance.-

Oregon added about 5,000 jobs in December as the state’s unemployment rate dipped to 4.6 percent, down from 5 percent in November.

State employment officials said Wednesday that during the past year, employment has grown about 2.9 percent, nearly double the U.S. growth rate of 1.5 percent.

_________________________________________

WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE SUPERFUND CLEANUP? (Portland Tribune)

-Over 150 different businesses and governments might be liable for a share of the Portland Harbor cleanup bill. Now comes the hard part – getting them to pay.-

After 17 years of study and research, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has finally approved its cleanup plan for the Portland Harbor Superfund site.

Now comes the hard part  persuading more than 150 businesses and governments responsible for polluting the harbor to pay the estimated $1.05 billion cost of cleaning it up. Those who later purchased polluting properties also are on the hook.

_________________________________________

BILL EXPANDS INSURANCE MANDATE TO COVER ABORTIONS, OTHER SERVICES (Portland Tribune)

-Oregon’s legislation would include coverage of birth control and abortion without copayments and coverage for men, transgender individuals and undocumented immigrants.-

Oregon is joining several other states that are seeking to protect no-cost birth control in case the federal mandate is rolled back as part of a potential repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

_________________________________________

OUR OPINION: SAVING HOMELESS LIVES REQUIRES MORE ACTION — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Yes, we need a long-term plan for creating affordable housing and more permanent, long-term shelters for those who can’t afford that housing. And we need emergency shelters, which housed hundreds of people per night during the peak of the deep freeze. But all of that that still won’t be enough to guarantee that no one ever freezes to death in Portland again.

_________________________________________

OREGON GUARDSMEN JOIN PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURATION SECURITY (Portland Tribune)

-Federal officials expect between 800,000 to 1 million people will gather near the Capitol Friday, Jan. 20, for the inauguration of the 45th president, Donald J. Trump.-

More than four dozen Oregon National Guard members are in Washington, D.C., this week to provide security for the 58th presidential inauguration ceremony.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: BILL IS WRONG ANSWER FOR MINIMUM WAGE IMPACT ON TEENS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Less than a year ago, Oregon’s Democratic leadership forced a big hike in the states minimum wage through the Legislature. Now lawmakers want taxpayers to pick up the tab to address one of its known disadvantages  a disproportionate impact on teen employment.

Oregon Senate Bill 290 asks taxpayers to pay part of the wages of young workers.

_________________________________________

BRAINSTORMING STARTS FOR SMITH ROCK (Bend Bulletin)

-Locals, visitors, state look to shape popular parks future-

They come for the rock climbing, hiking, horseback riding, wildlife viewing and photography  and to catch the light show that makes the rocks glow.

There’s just no place as beautiful as that in the mornings and the evenings, said Elaine Clarke of her neighbor, Smith Rock State Park.

_________________________________________

U.S. SUES COLLECTOR OF STUDENT LOANS (Bend Bulletin)

Navient, the nations largest servicer of student loans, has for years misled borrowers and made serious mistakes at nearly every step of the collections process, illegally driving up loan repayment costs for millions of borrowers, according to lawsuits filed on Wednesday by a federal regulator and two state attorneys general.

Navient handles $300 billion in private and federal loans for some 12 million people  touching about 1 in 4 student loan borrowers.

_________________________________________

NW MARIJUANA PRODUCERS APPREHENSIVE TRUMP’S AG PICK BUT SOME SEE THE BRIGHT SIDE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Donald Trumps nominee for attorney general famously said that good people don’t smoke marijuana.

Ed Note: Discussion of Marijuana future in Oregon.

_________________________________________

FEDERAL APPROVAL OF GM GRASS SEED SPARKS OUTCRY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A decision by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to deregulate a genetically modified grass seed has raised concerns about contamination in Oregon’s billion-dollar grass seed industry.

Genetically modified creeping bentgrass was created by Scotts Miracle-Gro as a product for golf courses. But the grass escaped from its test plots, and has continued to spread across Southeast and Central Oregon  despite eradication efforts.

_________________________________________

OREGON’S CIO – OPB’S THINK OUT LOUD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Alex Pettit has been Oregon’s Chief Information Officer since 2014. We talk with him about his past three years on the job and whats on the horizon for state government information technology.

_________________________________________

KEEPING YOUNG PEOPLE IN KLAMATH FALLS – OPB’S THINK OUT LOUD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Klamath Falls is home to Oregon Institute of Technology OIT, but students at the school often leave town once they graduate. A group of young graduates and professors are trying to make the community more attractive to millennials. We talk to Gaucho Collective co-founder Adam Burwell, GO Possibilities co-founder Eric Tipler, OIT assistant professor of sociology Sophie Nathenson and Jeld Wen accountant Melissa Ceron.

_________________________________________

OREGON SCHOOLS TO HOMEBOUND KIDS: PLEASE READ AND DO MATH (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Portland and Beaverton kids were back to school Wednesday, but farther east, winter storms and chilly temperatures are keeping roadways a mess.

The Hood River County School District was closed Wednesday and so were Corbett District schools  those will stay closed Thursday.

_________________________________________

APHIS DEREGULATES ROUNDUP READY CREEPING BENTGRASS (Capital Press)

-Last month APHIS released a final Environmental Impact Statement that recommended deregulation of the genetically engineered creeping bentgrass because it is unlikely to pose a plant pest risk….-

Environmental groups blasted USDAs Jan. 17 decision to deregulate a genetically engineered creeping bentgrass that has taken root in two Oregon counties.

_________________________________________

OREGON AWARDS FIRST JUNIPER REMOVAL LOAN (Capital Press)

-Advocates have long maintained that removing Western juniper trees improves rangeland and can provide jobs in rural areas.-

A Spray, Ore., landowner was awarded the states first loan under a program intended to jump-start the removal of Western juniper trees.

_________________________________________

AG PRODUCERS, RESEARCHERS ASSESS ICE AND SNOW DAMAGE (Capital Press)

-The snow certainly added to the mountain snowpack and will provide more water for irrigators next summer, but ice and extended cold may have damaged some crops.-

With snow turning to rain in Western Oregon, producers are digging out and checking for damage in a variety of crops.

_________________________________________

SEN. HANSELL HOPES TO END GAME OF CHICKEN WITH REAL ID BILL (East Oregonian)

-Legislators prepare transportation bills for upcoming session-

Oregon’s deadline for complying with the federal Real ID Act is ticking down, and state Sen. Bill Hansell of Athena has proposed a bill to beat that clock.

This is one of my major bills, the Republican and former Umatilla County commissioner said. We cant just keep kicking this can down the road, and we cant ignore it.

_________________________________________

OUR VIEW: BUILD UNDER YOUR OWN RISK — OPINION (East Oregonian)

-A lot of big changes are coming to a small piece of the Columbia Basin.-

The tree farm alongside Interstate 84 that long hypnotized travelers is in the process of being removed and roughly one-third of it renovated into what could become Oregons second-largest dairy. Hale Farms, one of the biggest employers in the region, has sold to a conglomerate out of the Tri-Cities. The region, poised to pounce on new water from the Columbia River, is getting an infusion of new investment. That brings out the deep pockets, venture capitalists and the construction crews.

_________________________________________

20-YEAR MINING BAN IN PARTS OF SOUTHWEST OREGON (The World)

The Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management signed a 20-year mining withdrawal last week on more than 100,000 acres of land in Southwest Oregon, banning mining operations on the acreage.

The areas protected include the North Fork of the Smith River, Rough and Ready Creek, the headwaters of Hunter Creek and the Pistol River, and 17 miles of the Chetco River which are known for their wild salmon and steelhead populations.

_________________________________________

TESTING CLIMATE LEADERSHIP WITH CAP AND TRADE (Oregon Business)

-As an avowed climate change denier moves into the White House, advocates of emissions reductions policies are pinning their hopes even more on the states.-

In Oregon environmental advocates hope a market-based program will help accelerate climate leadership.

Sen. Lee Beyer, D-Springfield, has introduced a cap and trade bill that would repeal the state’s existing emissions goals, and replace them with a new goal for 2025 and caps for 2035 and 2050. In 2050, carbon dioxide emissions would be capped at least 75% below 1990 levels. Companies and plants emitting more than 25,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide a year would be required to buy allowances from the state to cover each metric ton of emissions.

_________________________________________

CHAIRWOMAN OF THE OREGON TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ASKS GOV. KATE BROWN FOR BIG CHANGES (Willamette Week)

-Commission wants more oversight of troubled agency at center of Brown’s agenda.-

The chairwoman of one of the state’s most important commissions has expressed her displeasure with a key state agency reporting to Gov. Kate Brown.

_________________________________________

NEW TAXES COULD FILL MEDICAID BUDGET HOLE (The Lund Report)

-The Oregon Center for Public Policy issued a report today calling upon the Legislature to consider taxes on healthcare practitioners and ambulatory surgical centers.-

The healthcare industry is being called upon to absorb the looming budget hole faced by Oregon lawmakers when they gather in Salem next month.

_________________________________________

OREGON’S UNEMPLOYMENT RATE DROPPED TO 4.6 PERCENT IN DECEMBER (Oregon Employment Department – Research Div)

Oregon’s unemployment rate dropped to 4.6 percent in December, from 5.0 percent in November. The U.S. unemployment rate was 4.7 percent in December, down from 5.3 percent in December 2015. Oregon’s unemployment rate and its decline over the year are comparable with the U.S.

_________________________________________

CITY STANDS AGAINST GOVERNORS OSP CUTS (My Columbia Basin)

The Pendleton City Council is not impressed with Gov. Kate Browns proposals to drastically cut the budget for the Oregon State Police. Browns budget proposes slashing funding to the narcotics division as well as closing down the crime lab in Pendleton.

_________________________________________

State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit: http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 19, 2017 OSL eClips

January 18, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Ice lingers on Portland roads 6 days after snowfall, frustrating residents
* Feds deregulate controversial gmo grass seed
* Portland’s weather inconveniences many, but is much more for families ‘living on the edge’
* IRS letters to uninsured: Get coverage or face fines
* State to review actions prior to Keizer boy’s death
* EPA cites 12 Oregon companies for environmental violations
* Ice storm prompts Oregon to close 45-mile stretch of Interstate 84
* Oregon ocean tragedy underscores need for greater awareness
* With I-5 interchange rebuild nearly done, ODOT trimming back on Lane County transportation projects
* Point-in-Time homeless count pushed back after weather disruption, exhaustion
* No tax reform expected in legislative session
* ‘New goal: Destroy debt waves before they destroy us’ — Guest Opinion
* Area’s biggest employers? Government
* Oregon’s ‘official’ tartan gets a new chance to be official
* Cascade-Siskiyou Monument expansion fosters praise, fear
* Measure would protect birth control coverage
* Outdoor enthusiasts worry about losing access
* Prineville power needs spur meeting with Rep. Greg Walden
* Does Bend’s east-west divide concentrate poverty?
* Editorial: One good and one bad change for Oregon’s kicker — Opinion
* Deschutes County mental health services expanding
* Snow causing a headache for court schedulers
* Older students taking out loans on the rise
* Editorial: Legislature should dump bill to pay super overtime — Opinion
* Tina Kotek’s unproductive muscle-flexing — Opinion
* Editorial: The dirt on Oregon’s proposed state dog — Opinion
* Editorial: Sen. Tim Knopp right to increase hurdle for tax hikes — Opinion
* Hundreds Rally In Portland In Support Of Affordable Care Act
* What’s In Store For Public Lands Under President Trump?
* Rural Healthcare – OPB’s Think Out Loud
* States argue in court for more say over endangered species
* APHIS deregulates Roundup Ready creeping bentgrass
* NOAA finalizes new plan for Columbia River hatcheries
* Toxic plants cost ranchers $300M a year; management key to prevention
* Public lands transfer backers seek convention of states to amend Constitution
* Blueberry farmers face price stress, expert says
* State education department postpones community forum
* Electric co-ops feud over service territory
* Our view: Owyhee Canyonlands monument plan shelved? — Opinion
* Editorial: Rent control for Oregon is a fools bargain — Opinion
* Organization says illegal immigrants hurt state’s economy — Guest Opinion
* Coos Bay School District scores highest on south coast
* Razor clam closure cripples coast tourism
* Crawling with crab
* Port chooses to remain in timber lawsuit
* Linn County makes the rounds on timber suit
* Armory basement closes for lead cleaning
* Editorial: Rulings on terminals benefit coastal communities — Opinion
* Records official needs independence from governor — Opinion
* Graying workforce poses challenges — Opinion
* Think Too Much: Deadlines loom in suit over timber — Opinion
* Opinions split on timber lawsui
* A chance for change on Marys Peak — Opinion
* County talks money woes
* County alarmed over state budget
* Roots and Branches: He never gave up
* Oregon considers oil train safety bill
* Portland Mayor Calls Baby’s Death A Damnation of Our Response to Untreated Mental Illness
* Washington, Oregon Know What They Want From Trump
* First Tax Return for Marijuana Retailers Due Soon
* Columbia River salmon fishing reform clears one hurdle, and Oregon decides Friday
* A father confused liquid nicotine for medicine and gave his 6-year-old a toxic dose
* Financial Reports Show Fewer People Enrolled in CCO’s
* Oregon Medical Practices Join Fledgling ACA-backed Medicare Effort
* Obama’s late land taking riles Oregon — Guest Opinion

____________________

ICE LINGERS ON PORTLAND ROADS 6 DAYS AFTER SNOWFALL, FRUSTRATING RESIDENTS (Portland Oregonian)

Nearly six days since the Portland area last saw snowflakes, some major Portland roads and most other ones remain rutted with ice and packed snow, and transportation officials say the ice is virtually untouchable until a thaw arrives.

Ed. Note: ODOT Policies

_________________________________________

FEDS DEREGULATE CONTROVERSIAL GMO GRASS SEED (Portland Oregonian)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Tuesday deregulated a genetically modified grass that some Oregon farmers and dealers say threatens the state’s grass seed business.

_________________________________________

PORTLAND’S WEATHER INCONVENIENCES MANY, BUT IS MUCH MORE FOR FAMILIES ‘LIVING ON THE EDGE’ (Portland Oregonian)

Snow and ice that closed Portland-area schools for days and kept workers home created an inconvenience for some but pushed others closer to the brink of financial disaster.

“There are families out there who are living on the edge,” said Judy Alley, executive director of East Portland’s SnowCap, the region’s largest food pantry.

_________________________________________

IRS LETTERS TO UNINSURED: GET COVERAGE OR FACE FINES (Portland Oregonian)

If  you haven’t signed up for health insurance, you may soon be getting a not-too-subtle nudge from the taxman.

The IRS is sending personalized letters to millions of taxpayers who might be uninsured, reminding them that they could be on the hook for hundreds of dollars in fines under the federal health care law if they don’t sign up soon. It’s an unusual role for a revenue-collection agency.

_________________________________________

STATE TO REVIEW ACTIONS PRIOR TO KEIZER BOY’S DEATH (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon agency in charge of child welfare services is opening a review of its actions with a Keizer woman who allegedly killed her 12-year-old son Saturday.

_________________________________________

EPA CITES 12 OREGON COMPANIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL VIOLATIONS (Salem Statesman Journal)

-The violations put public health and the environment at risk, EPA said-

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has cited a dozen Oregon businesses for violating environmental laws.

The enforcement actions, which took place between July and September 2016, resulted in a total of $216,565 in fines.

_________________________________________

ICE STORM PROMPTS OREGON TO CLOSE 45-MILE STRETCH OF INTERSTATE 84 (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon transportation officials shut down a 45-mile section of Interstate 84 on Tuesday as yet another storm pummeled residents who’ve been grappling with record snowfall and an unusually harsh winter in a place more known for its rain.

The closure between Troutdale and Hood River came as an ice storm swept into Northwest Oregon, including parts of Portland, in the early afternoon hours.

_________________________________________

OREGON OCEAN TRAGEDY UNDERSCORES NEED FOR GREATER AWARENESS (Eugene Register-Guard)

One moment, Jayson Thomas was on the Oregon beach with his 3-year-old son. The next, they were gone, swept away by a sneaker wave as his wife looked on.

The man and his boy were but the latest to be lost to a sneaker wave, which are prevalent in the Pacific Northwest. A leading expert says there needs to be greater awareness to prevent future tragedies.

_________________________________________

WITH I-5 INTERCHANGE REBUILD NEARLY DONE, ODOT TRIMMING BACK ON LANE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Lane County faces five years of lean spending of state and federal money on transportation projects, under a draft spending plan from the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The possible meager spell follows years of massive state and federal spending on projects in Lane County, most notably the rebuilding of the Interstate 5/Randy Pap Beltline interchange and the new bridge over the Willamette River. The state this year is wrapping up the I-5 interchange revamp.

_________________________________________

POINT-IN-TIME HOMELESS COUNT PUSHED BACK AFTER WEATHER DISRUPTION, EXHAUSTION (Portland Tribune)

-Count will go from biannual to annual starting this year-

The effort to count all of Multnomah County’s homeless population, a requirement by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development to happen within the last 10 days of January, is being pushed back a month.

Exhaustion and historic weather are the causes for the delay in the Point-in-Time count, which will start on Feb. 22.

_________________________________________

NO TAX REFORM EXPECTED IN LEGISLATIVE SESSION (Portland Tribune)

-Office of Economic Analysis director predicts no alternative to the defeated corporate sales tax will pass upcoming session-

Although Oregon is facing a $1.7 billion budget shortfall over the next two years, state economist Mark McMullen does not expect the Legislature to pass any tax reform measures this session that would raise significant amounts of new revenue.

_________________________________________

‘NEW GOAL: DESTROY DEBT WAVES BEFORE THEY DESTROY US’ — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

-It’s time to take constitutional authority seriously, protecting all Oregonians, Rep. Vic Gilliam says-

The Committee on Ways and Means. Is this the legislative committee responsible for using honest methods for balanced budgeting? Or is it finding “ways” to avoid our impending tsunami wave of debt by making someone else pay the bill through “mean” political skullduggery?

_________________________________________

AREA’S BIGGEST EMPLOYERS? GOVERNMENT (Portland Tribune)

-Majority of the state’s top 10 employers are found in the public sector-

A table buried in Portland Public Schools’ annual financial report displays some interesting facts about how dependent the region’s employment is on government dollars.

_________________________________________

OREGON’S ‘OFFICIAL’ TARTAN GETS A NEW CHANCE TO BE OFFICIAL (Portland Tribune)

-‘A few years ago I was looking it up on line and saw that it had been official recognized by the Scottish Registry of Tartans, but not adopted by the state. Given the rich history of Scottish and Irish immigrants in Oregon, I thought this a travesty.’-

If lawmakers designate an official Oregon tartan this year, Robert MacGregor plans to donate his kilt to the state archives.

_________________________________________

CASCADE-SISKIYOU MONUMENT EXPANSION FOSTERS PRAISE, FEAR (Bend Bulletin)

-Boost for biodiversity prompts concern for ranchers, calls for reversal-

Proponents are cheering President Barack Obama’s expansion of a national monument in Southern Oregon as a step toward further protecting an ecological wonder.

The presidents proclamation has also prompted loud calls for the incoming administration to reverse the expansion.

_________________________________________

MEASURE WOULD PROTECT BIRTH CONTROL COVERAGE (Bend Bulletin)

-Oregon legislators file bill in case of ACA repeal-

A pair of Oregon lawmakers have launched a pre-emptive effort to preserve the requirement that health insurance policies provide free birth control and other services to women in case the Affordable Care Act is repealed.

House Bill 2232, which supporters have dubbed the Reproductive Health Equity Act, would also require health insurers in Oregon to provide annual well-woman visits, pregnancy testing and prenatal services with no out-of-pocket costs to patients. It also would require such coverage for abortions, which would be rare and is not currently part of federal or state law.

_________________________________________

OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS WORRY ABOUT LOSING ACCESS (Bend Bulletin)

-House rule change would make it easier to transfer federal land to states-

A change in U.S. House rules making it easier to transfer millions of acres of federal public lands to states is worrying hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts across the West who fear losing access.

Lawmakers earlier this month passed a rule eliminating a significant budget hurdle and written so broadly that it includes national parks.

_________________________________________

PRINEVILLE POWER NEEDS SPUR MEETING WITH REP. GREG WALDEN (Bend Bulletin)

-Not enough power in Crook County to lure big businesses-

A misunderstanding about how much electricity Prineville had access to has stymied the regions economic development efforts.

Now, Prineville city leaders and electrical utilities are pledging to improve their lines of communication, following a meeting arranged by Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River.

_________________________________________

DOES BEND’S EAST-WEST DIVIDE CONCENTRATE POVERTY? (Bend Bulletin)

-Racial and economic concentration could pose legal problems in the future-

It may not surprise Bend residents that the parkway does more than physically divide their city  it divides residents along social and economic lines as well. For years, east and west have served as a shorthand description for the city.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: ONE GOOD AND ONE BAD CHANGE FOR OREGON’S KICKER — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s kicker law was adopted in 1979 as a means of keeping state spending under control. It has its flaws, but its the right idea.

One bill the 2017 Legislature may deal with improves the kicker law a bit; a second is nothing more than the Legislatures attempt to redistribute income by tinkering with kicker rebates.

_________________________________________

DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES EXPANDING (Bend Bulletin)

-County will be part of federally-funded pilot project-

Deschutes County will open a new behavioral health clinic this spring as part of a federally funded pilot project.

DeAnn Carr, deputy director of behavioral health for the county health department, said the county hopes to serve an additional 1,000 local residents over the course of the two-year pilot project.

_________________________________________

SNOW CAUSING A HEADACHE FOR COURT SCHEDULERS (Bend Bulletin)

-Hundreds of court cases have to be rescheduled following snow closures-

Hundreds of hearings have been rescheduled as Deschutes County Circuit Court officials scramble to assure a defendants right to speedy trial isn’t buried by the snow that shuttered the courts several times this winter.

With several storms so far this winter, the circuit court closed for three full days, and on several other days, either closed early or opened late. The result is trying to reschedule court hearings within a short window  and there is no quick way to do that.

_________________________________________

OLDER STUDENTS TAKING OUT LOANS ON THE RISE (Bend Bulletin)

Most student loan borrowers are young adults, but the number of older Americans with education loans has quadrupled in the last decade. Many of them say that difficulties with loan servicers are adding to their debt-management struggles.

Americans age 60 and older are the fastest-growing group of student loan borrowers, according to a new report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau that examines borrower complaints. There are now about 2.8 million Americans who are 60 or older with at least one student loan.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: LEGISLATURE SHOULD DUMP BILL TO PAY SUPER OVERTIME — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The state of Oregon doesn’t have a big pot of money hidden away somewhere to pay for its climbing expenses. This fact isn’t lost on one of the states largest public employee unions, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. AFSCME, which is worried about the states ability to make ends meet.

_________________________________________

TINA KOTEK’S UNPRODUCTIVE MUSCLE-FLEXING — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

-Newly adopted House rules antagonize Republicans, whose cooperation Democrats need-

During her inaugural address Monday, Gov. Kate Brown reached very deliberately across Oregon’s political divide. She began by quoting one former Republican governor, Tom McCall, and ended by quoting another, Mark Hatfield. Time will tell whether the inclusive sentiment was genuine, but it was at least a nice gesture.

Here’s hoping Rep. Tina Kotek was listening.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: THE DIRT ON OREGON’S PROPOSED STATE DOG — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon has a state beverage milk, a state microbe saccharomyces cerevisiae, aka brewers yeast and a state rock thunder egg. It doesn’t need a state dog, horse or tartan, but if lawmakers have their way this year, were likely to get one of each.

Lawmakers in both chambers have introduced the usual slew of resolutions to honor individuals, memorialize historic events and do such things as draw a legislative session to a close.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: SEN. TIM KNOPP RIGHT TO INCREASE HURDLE FOR TAX HIKES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The 2017 Legislature will feature another battle between those devoted to adding new taxes and regulations and those fighting back.

Sen. Tim Knopp, R-Bend, will be one of those fighting back. One of his first efforts to put on the brakes is Senate Joint Resolution 32, which would make it harder for the Legislature to increase taxes. Knopp has the right idea.

_________________________________________

HUNDREDS RALLY IN PORTLAND IN SUPPORT OF AFFORDABLE CARE ACT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Hundreds of people joined Oregon Democratic lawmakers in Portland on Sunday to rally against the potential loss of President Barack Obama’s health care law.

U.S. Sens. Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, and U.S. Reps. Earl Blumenauer, Kurt Schrader and Suzanne Bonamici took part in the event at a gymnasium in support of the Affordable Care Act.

_________________________________________

WHAT’S IN STORE FOR PUBLIC LANDS UNDER PRESIDENT TRUMP? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Donald Trump will be sworn in Friday. One issue rural America is looking for answers on is public lands: how they’re managed and whether the government should transfer them to states or even sell them off.

President-elect Trump may not be keen on the idea to hand federal land over to states. At least that’s what he told Field and Stream magazine a year ago.

_________________________________________

RURAL HEALTHCARE – OPB’S THINK OUT LOUD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

We talk with Jennifer Lycette, medical director of the CMH/OHSU Cancer Care Center in Astoria, about her essay in the New England Journal of Medicine about the unique challenges of treating people suffering from both cancer and severe mental illness in rural areas.

_________________________________________

STATES ARGUE IN COURT FOR MORE SAY OVER ENDANGERED SPECIES (Capital Press)

-Its the latest skirmish in the federal governments troubled effort to restore the rare wolves to part of their original range under the Endangered Species Act.-

A battle over how to save endangered wolves in the Southwest moves to a federal appeals court Wednesday as judges hear arguments on whether states can block the federal government from reintroducing wildlife within their borders.

_________________________________________

APHIS DEREGULATES ROUNDUP READY CREEPING BENTGRASS (Capital Press)

Last month APHIS released a final Environmental Impact Statement that recommended deregulation of the genetically engineered creeping bentgrass because it is unlikely to pose a plant pest risk….

_________________________________________

NOAA FINALIZES NEW PLAN FOR COLUMBIA RIVER HATCHERIES (Capital Press)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released a final plan Tuesday for operating 62 hatchery programs in the Columbia River Basin while protecting threatened and endangered fish.

The plan calls for reducing hatchery production in some areas while increasing it in areas where hatchery fish don’t pose a risk to threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead.

_________________________________________

TOXIC PLANTS COST RANCHERS $300M A YEAR; MANAGEMENT KEY TO PREVENTION (Capital Press)

-Identifying toxic plants on rangeland is the first step, researchers say.-

Livestock deaths and other expenses related to toxic plants cost Western ranchers more than $300 million annually, researchers say, and the best way to reduce the impact is through better management.

_________________________________________

PUBLIC LANDS TRANSFER BACKERS SEEK CONVENTION OF STATES TO AMEND CONSTITUTION (Capital Press)

-Advocates for forcing the transfer of public lands to Western states say they hope to take up the issue by calling for a convention of states.-

A leader in the effort to force the transfer of Western federal lands to state control believes calling a convention of states to change the U.S. Constitution is the best path forward.

Utah state Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan, said states rights advocates are already laying the groundwork for a convention.

_________________________________________

BLUEBERRY FARMERS FACE PRICE STRESS, EXPERT SAYS (Capital Press)

-Experts say blueberry growers need to improve efficiencies, seek niche markets.-

With global blueberry production climbing, farmers should focus on improving efficiencies rather than hoping for prices to rise, according to an industry expert.

If you’re the lowest-cost producer, you will survive whatever kind of price stress we have in this industry, said John Shelford, strategic adviser to the Naturipe Farms food company, at the Jan. 16 Oregon Blueberry Conference here.

_________________________________________

STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT POSTPONES COMMUNITY FORUM (East Oregonian)

Due to incoming inclement weather, the Oregon Department of Education postponed a Wednesday community education forum at Washington Elementary School in Pendleton.

The forum was supposed to present another opportunity for local citizens to discuss the states education plan and the federal Every Student Succeeds Act with department officials.

_________________________________________

ELECTRIC CO-OPS FEUD OVER SERVICE TERRITORY (East Oregonian)

-The Columbia Basin Electric Cooperative has complained that the Umatilla Electric Cooperative is providing service in its exclusive territory.-

A high-profile wind farm and mega-dairy are at the center of a territorial dispute between two local electric utilities in Umatilla and Morrow counties.

The Columbia Basin Electric Cooperative, based in Heppner, filed a complaint Friday, Jan. 13 with the Oregon Public Utility Commission accusing its neighbor, Hermiston-based Umatilla Electric Cooperative, of encroaching on its exclusive service territory in deals with the proposed Wheatridge Wind Energy Facility and Lost Valley Ranch.

_________________________________________

OUR VIEW: OWYHEE CANYONLANDS MONUMENT PLAN SHELVED? — OPINION (East Oregonian)

-Congress, the affected states and local residents should have more say over national monument designations.-

Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley told OPB Sunday that Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewel told him the proposed Owyhee Canyonlands National Monument in Eastern Oregons Malheur County has been shelved.

Merkley says he doubts President Obama will make the proclamation before leaving office Friday.

That’s encouraging, but at this writing Obama still has time to make the proclamation.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: RENT CONTROL FOR OREGON IS A FOOLS BARGAIN — OPINION (East Oregonian)

-It creates bureaucracy with unintended consequences.-

Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek threw red meat to her Portland constituents by proposing legislation to create rent control. Portland rents have escalated as the city has become one of the nations most desirable locations. Kotek extended her rent control proposal beyond Portlands boundaries, to all Oregon communities.

Rent control is now prohibited in Oregon statute.

_________________________________________

ORGANIZATION SAYS ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS HURT STATE’S ECONOMY — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

Are illegal immigrants an economic boon to our state?

So says Michael Bloombergs Partnership for a New American Economy, whose 2016 study  The Contributions of New Americans in Oregon  was lauded by Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek in her recent call to legalize many so-called undocumented workers.

PNAEs study, however, is riddled with omissions and misrepresentations that mask illegal immigrants harm to Oregonians. Here, lets take a fuller, fairer look at the subject.

_________________________________________

COOS BAY SCHOOL DISTRICT SCORES HIGHEST ON SOUTH COAST (The World)

-State report shows more students are earning college credits from Marshfield High-

The Coos Bay School District ranks above the state average in students taking advantage of college opportunities.

_________________________________________

RAZOR CLAM CLOSURE CRIPPLES COAST TOURISM (Daily Astorian)

-No new toxin since September, but clams slow to clear it from their systems-

The financial fallout from the razor clam closure has racked restaurants, retailers and small businesses around the Long Beach Peninsula.

This is my slowest winter since 2008, Full Circle Caf owner Colleen Smith said. Usually I drop 33 percent in a normal year, this year I dropped 50 percent.

Smith believes the combination of clamming closures, delays in the Dungeness crab season and unusually cold weather have deterred visitors.

_________________________________________

CRAWLING WITH CRAB (Daily Astorian)

-Temporary glut slows processors-

A perfect storm of weather, strong catches and domoic acid worries has led to a glut of crab on the market, overwhelming processors and making it harder for fishermen to find buyers for the high-value crustacean.

_________________________________________

PORT CHOOSES TO REMAIN IN TIMBER LAWSUIT (Daily Astorian)

-Commissioners did not explain their reasons-

The Port of Astoria Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to stay in a class-action timber lawsuit brought by Linn County against the state.

Commissioners did not comment on why they made the decision, which comes a week after the Clatsop County Board of Commissioners voted 3-2 to opt out.

_________________________________________

LINN COUNTY MAKES THE ROUNDS ON TIMBER SUIT (Daily Astorian)

-Representatives from Linn County have been making the rounds of local taxing districts over the $1.4 billion class-action timber lawsuit against the state.-

The Port of Astoria will decide Tuesday whether to take part in the Linn County timber lawsuit after meeting with a lawyer for the plaintiffs.

The Port is one of about 130 taxing districts in Oregon  30 in Clatsop County  named as plaintiffs in the $1.4 billion class-action lawsuit brought by Linn County against the state last year.

_________________________________________

ARMORY BASEMENT CLOSES FOR LEAD CLEANING (Daily Astorian)

-The main floor of the Astoria Armory was safe from lead residue, but the basement is closed for cleaning.-

The Friends of the Astoria Armory have shut down the buildings basement after testers found lead residue in several locations exceeding federal health thresholds.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: RULINGS ON TERMINALS BENEFIT COASTAL COMMUNITIES — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-The West Coast states have been described as the Thin Green Line blocking coal and other carbon fuels-

News since the start of the year has not been good for proponents of fossil-fuel terminals in our region. There are lessons to be learned from this experience.

Early this month, Washington state Public Lands Commissioner Peter Goldmark denied a key lease for the proposed Millennium Bulk Terminals coal export facility in Longview, Washington. This wasn’t necessarily the last nail in the projects coffin, but it further weakened the economic arguments for a plan already on shaky ground.

_________________________________________

RECORDS OFFICIAL NEEDS INDEPENDENCE FROM GOVERNOR — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

One of the interesting sidelights in this year’s legislative session will be the fate of a proposal to create a public records ombudsman. The idea is that the ombudsman’s office would help mediate disputes between state agencies and members of the public requesting public records.

Now, your first question might well be this: Why would such an office be necessary? Don’t public records belong to, well, members of the public? Shouldn’t state agencies consistently be bending over backward to help citizens access those records?

_________________________________________

GRAYING WORKFORCE POSES CHALLENGES — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

A bit of economic analysis from the state of Oregon Employment Department recently caught our eye  and could have some important implications for those people in the mid-valley working to shape tomorrow’s workforce.

Will Summers, the department’s workforce analyst serving Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties, looked at the number of workers who are approaching “retirement age.

_________________________________________

THINK TOO MUCH: DEADLINES LOOM IN SUIT OVER TIMBER — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

With a court deadline looming, counties and other jurisdictions across western Oregon must decide whether to remain as plaintiffs in a controversial and fascinating lawsuit against the Oregon Department of Forestry.

The lawsuit was filed last year by the Linn County Board of Commissioners over the state’s management of forest trust lands.

_________________________________________

OPINIONS SPLIT ON TIMBER LAWSUIT (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Opinions were sharply divided at a town hall meeting at Corvallis High School Tuesday night on whether Benton County should stay in or opt out of a lawsuit seeking $1.4 billion from the state for failing to maximize logging revenues on 650,000 acres of forest trust lands.

_________________________________________

A CHANCE FOR CHANGE ON MARYS PEAK — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

So it turns out that it’s not going to be particularly easy to just pack up and move the communications site atop Marys Peak to another location.

But that doesn’t mean that we should be taking any of the options off the table at this point.

_________________________________________

COUNTY TALKS MONEY WOES (Baker City Herald)

-Major Revenue Sources Either Canceled or Uncertain-

Getting a handle on the county budget while state and federal revenue sources could be slipping from the grasp of the county’s coffers was a main topic of discussion at Wednesdays Baker County Board of Commissioners work session.

Commissioner Mark Bennett began the discussion by saying he would like to have a clear picture of revenue streams for the next two years.

That is challenging with the states budget shortfall of about $1.7 billion for the next biennium along with a $22 billion deficit in its Public Employee Retirement System PERS.

_________________________________________

COUNTY ALARMED OVER STATE BUDGET (The Dalles Chronicle)

-Technical assistance grants not included in Browns proposal-

Wasco County officials are concerned about the proposed budget presented by Oregon Gov. Kate Brown for the 2017-19 biennium, which does not include grants to help local jurisdictions meet statewide land use planning requirements.

Browns proposed 2017-19 budget eliminates funds for technical assistance grants in Oregon’s portions of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, which have previously been provided through the Oregon Department of Land Conservation & Development.

_________________________________________

ROOTS AND BRANCHES: HE NEVER GAVE UP (Hood River News)

The seemingly endless blanket of sparkling white snow on the ground exceeded the top rail of our deck this week, blocking the view of the brilliant white valley below. The rows of pear trees below the house appear to have shrunk. Their trunks are hidden beneath the snow. Only the upper branches can be seen, stretching their crooked fingers upward as if beseeching the skies above to set them free.

Ed Note: Gov. Kate Brown Inauguration & Minoru Yasui Day.

_________________________________________

OREGON CONSIDERS OIL TRAIN SAFETY BILL (Hood River News)

Oregon Senate President Peter Courtney has pitched a bill that would tighten regulations on railroads that transport crude oil and other hazardous materials.

Senate Bill 7 would give Oregon Department of Environmental Quality authority to require oil spill prevention and emergency response plans from railroads with high hazard train routes.

_________________________________________

PORTLAND MAYOR CALLS BABY’S DEATH A DAMNATION OF OUR RESPONSE TO UNTREATED MENTAL ILLNESS (Willamette Week)

-Its not clear where the infants mother is now. –

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler says the death of an infant found at a bus stop last week is “a damnation of our response” to untreated mental illness on the city’s streets.

The baby was found Jan. 9 in freezing temperatures with his homeless mother along Southeast Powell Boulevard. Local officials do not agree whether the infant died of exposure hours after being born outdoors or was stillborn.

_________________________________________

WASHINGTON, OREGON KNOW WHAT THEY WANT FROM TRUMP (KLCC)

There’s a lot the Democratic governors of Washington and Oregon don’t want from President-elect Donald Trump. They’re miles apart on health care, immigration and trade. But it turns out each governor does have a wish list for the new administration.

Oregon and Washington are still relying on a 100-year-old bridge to safely carry tens-of-thousands of cars a day over the Columbia River. The Interstate 5 Bridge between the two states is actually a pair of bridges. The oldest of the two spans turns 100 this year.

_________________________________________

FIRST TAX RETURN FOR MARIJUANA RETAILERS DUE SOON (mycentraloregon.com)

The year is just starting, but for many who sold recreational marijuana in October, November or December, there are already tax obligations they need to fulfill.

For medical marijuana dispensaries that were selling recreational marijuana products under the temporary early start provisions-which ended December 31-their final returns and tax remittances are due by January 31.

_________________________________________

PHYSICIAN AID IN DYING GAINS ACCEPTANCE IN THE U.S. (New York Times)

Judith Katherine Dunning had been waiting anxiously for California to adopt legislation that would make it legal for her to end her life.

The cancer in her brain was progressing despite several rounds of treatment. At 68, she spent most of her day asleep and needed an aide to help with basic tasks.

_________________________________________

COLUMBIA RIVER SALMON FISHING REFORM CLEARS ONE HURDLE, AND OREGON DECIDES FRIDAY (Seattle Times)

Some of the most far-reaching sport and commercial salmon fishing reforms were approved by the Washington Fish and Wildlife commission to begin this season along the Lower Columbia River.

The nine-member state Fish and Wildlife commission panel  a citizen panel appointed by the governor  voted 7-2 in favor of the policy that includes a four-year transition period with full implementation planned for 2017 with time for modifications.

_________________________________________

A FATHER CONFUSED LIQUID NICOTINE FOR MEDICINE AND GAVE HIS 6-YEAR-OLD A TOXIC DOSE (Washington Post)

The girl’s parents were both smokers. Both of them had been vaping as well.

Her mother had purchased highly concentrated liquid nicotine for the e-cigarettes, diluted it with vegetable glycerin and put it in an empty children’s ibuprofen bottle. In faint, handwritten letters, it was labeled NIC.

_________________________________________

FINANCIAL REPORTS SHOW FEWER PEOPLE ENROLLED IN CCOS (The Lund Report)

Please contact the State Library of access to this premium story from the Lund Report.  library.help@state.or.us , 503-378-8800

HealthShare shows lowest cash-on-hand of Oregon’s 16 coordinated care organizations, FamilyShare reports highest cash-on-hand, in unaudited reports to state

In what could be a sign of Oregon’s improving economy, the number of people obtaining healthcare through Medicaid-funded coordinated care organizations dropped precipitously in the first nine months of 2016, according to financial reports analyzed by The Lund Report.

_________________________________________

OREGON MEDICAL PRACTICES JOIN FLEDGLING ACA-BACKED MEDICARE EFFORT (The Lund Report)

-As US Congress debates dismantling the Affordable Care Act, an program that seeks to strengthen primary care and lower healthcare costs gets under way-

A nationwide effort to strengthen primary care, lower healthcare spending and improve the lives of Medicare patients launched in Oregon this month — just as Republicans in the U.S. Congress vow to gut the Affordable Care Act, which created this fledgling program.

_________________________________________

OBAMA’S LATE LAND TAKING RILES OREGON — GUEST OPINION (naturalresourcereport.com)

AFRC President, Travis Joseph, issued the following statement after the Obama Administrations controversial decision to administratively increase the size of the Cascade Siskiyou National Monument in Southern Oregon, despite major local opposition list below:

Lets be clear. This decision was not about conservation. It was not about collaboration or public involvement. It was not about doing the right thing for the next generation. This top-down, last-minute decision was about serving special interests over the objections of hard-working Oregonians who have cared for these lands for generations.

_________________________________________

NEARLY ONE IN FOUR WORKERS IN OREGON IS 55 OR OLDER— BLOG (Oregon Employment Department – Research Div)

Oregon’s workforce is aging. The number of Oregon jobs held by workers age 55 and over tripled from 1992 to 2015, while the total number of jobs grew by just 42 percent. Workers 55 and over held just 10 percent of the jobs in 1992, increasing their share to 23 percent of all jobs by 2015. Driving this trend is the fact that much of the Baby Boom Generation is now 55 and over, and they are more likely to be in the labor force than previous generations were at this age. Many of these workers are probably planning to retire in the next 10 years, taking their skills and experience with them.

_________________________________________

BARRETO: BUDGET LOOMS FOR LEGISLATURE (My Columbia Basin)

State Rep. Greg Barreto R-Cove says the biggest change facing lawmakers when the session begins Feb. 1 will be balancing the budget for the new biennium. The solution to that, he says, has to come from the Democrats.

_________________________________________

State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit: http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 18, 2017 OSL eClips

January 17, 2017 Weekend Edition

State Library eClips

* Revenue rumble: Republicans and business group set tough terms for tax deal
* Lawmakers to debate hard limits on greenhouse gas emissions in Oregon
* Gillnets on Columbia River: The long-standing debate roars back
* Feds extend for five years Oregon’s healthcare program for poor
* Trans-Pacific Partnership or not, Oregon must advance trade with Asia — Guest Opinion
* Oregon transportation department investigating after MAX train derailment
* David Sarasohn: Phil Knight shouldn’t be on his own in supporting U of O — Opinion
* Reactions to expansion of Cascade-Siskiyou Nat’l Monument — Guest Opinions
* Third bridge gets new life, casts a shadow over community
* Reports: Obama won’t designate Owyhee Canyonlands National Monument
* Hundreds rally for immigrant rights at Oregon State Capitol
* Oregon bans weapons in state workplaces
* Federal government approves continued Oregon Health Plan reforms, but no extra money
* An expanded monument — Opinion
* OTC chair seeks greater oversight of ODOT
* Pro-immigration rally marchers ‘stand united against hateful rhetoric’
* Obama administration approves Oregon Health Plan rule renewal before leaving office
* Deadline looms Jan. 25 for timber lawsuit participation
* Editorial: Sen. Tim Knopp right to increase hurdle for tax hikes — Opinion
* Federal Government Gives Oregon New Health Care Waiver
* Feds Block Mining In 100K Acres of Southwest Oregon
* Timber Group Says Oregon Monument Expansion Is Illegal
* Ag in the Classroom spreads the word
* Worker protection standards highlight seminars
* Timber industry may challenge Cascade-Siskiyou monument expansion
* Governors plan to close mental hospital brings deja vu
* Klavins: Predator poachers must be held responsible — Guest Opinion
* Lawmakers have busy agenda when next session begins
* Commissioners ask Brown to reconsider vet proposal
* Double vision: Plans to upgrade BPA radio network spark debate over Marys Peak
* Local legislator proposes PERS changes
* Where should the Port of Portland go from here?
* Oregon’s 2016 venture activity has mixed results
* Scenes from this week’s kickoff of the 2017 Oregon Legislature – Photos
* Why an Oregon wave energy device is being tested in Colorado
* Gov. Brown says state needs to do more to prep for storms
* Businesses with liquor licenses warned about fake OLCC agents
* Flood threat looms: agencies move snow, prep sandbags
* Merkley: Obama Won’t Designate Owyhee Canyonlands As A National Monument
* Western Dems look to climate to revitalize jobs messages
* Federal Waiver Comes Without New Money
* Red Justice in a Blue State
____________________

REVENUE RUMBLE: REPUBLICANS AND BUSINESS GROUP SET TOUGH TERMS FOR TAX DEAL (Portland Oregonian)

Two weeks before this year’s legislative session, Oregon Republicans and a leading business group have laid down difficult terms for a deal on tax revenue that could save the state from slashing programs by hundreds of millions of dollars.

_________________________________________

LAWMAKERS TO DEBATE HARD LIMITS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS IN OREGON (Portland Oregonian)

Environmental activists are hoping Oregon lawmakers will act this session to put the third and what could be the most important plank of the state’s climate change action plan in place: hard limits on greenhouse emissions and a market-based price to enforce them.

_________________________________________

GILLNETS ON COLUMBIA RIVER: THE LONG-STANDING DEBATE ROARS BACK (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon and Washington’s plans for regulating commercial fishing on the lower Columbia River appear to be drifting apart, like an unmoored boat bobbing away from a dock.

Since 1915, the states have agreed on how to manage the salmon industry on more than 145 shared miles of the river – from the mouth to Bonneville Dam.

_________________________________________

FEDS EXTEND FOR FIVE YEARS OREGON’S HEALTHCARE PROGRAM FOR POOR (Portland Oregonian)

In the final week of the Obama administration, the federal government gave the state permission for what officials claim will be five more years of stability in how health care is delivered to Oregon’s poor.

_________________________________________

TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP OR NOT, OREGON MUST ADVANCE TRADE WITH ASIA — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In early November, we had the honor of being part of a group of business and government leaders on a Portland Business Alliance trade mission to Vietnam. We had a clear mission: Learn how to support existing business relationships and expand job development and education opportunities for both Oregon and Vietnam.

_________________________________________

OREGON TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT INVESTIGATING AFTER MAX TRAIN DERAILMENT (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Department of Transportation is investigating a MAX train derailment near the Rose Quarter that caused in no injuries but disrupted transit throughout the metro area Friday morning.

_________________________________________

DAVID SARASOHN: PHIL KNIGHT SHOULDN’T BE ON HIS OWN IN SUPPORTING U OF O — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The highlight of Oregon higher education in 2016 – especially when you consider the football season – was Nike founder Phil Knight’s 10-year gift of $500 million to the University of Oregon for a science research complex.

_________________________________________

REACTIONS TO EXPANSION OF CASCADE-SISKIYOU NAT’L MONUMENT – GUEST OPINIONS (Salem Statesman Journal)

-Obama expands Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument-

Merkley, Wyden Applaud Expansion of Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

Monument Expansion Violates O&C Act, Undermines Federal Land Management

Trout Unlimited applauds expansion of Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

AFRC Responds to Controversial Cascade Siskiyou National Monument Expansion _________________________________________

THIRD BRIDGE GETS NEW LIFE, CASTS A SHADOW OVER COMMUNITY (Salem Statesman Journal)

A longstanding fight over a contentious – and yet unrealized – third bridge in Oregon’s capital is getting new life.

Loreen Wells, 74, tells her story from the seat of a power chair in a house that’s been hers for four decades. Polio put her in the chair, and the neighbor’s daughter, Nohelani Judkins, works in the next room to help out.

_________________________________________

REPORTS: OBAMA WON’T DESIGNATE OWYHEE CANYONLANDS NATIONAL MONUMENT (Salem Statesman Journal)

The expansion of one national monument in Oregon appears to be enough for President Barack Obama.

The outgoing president used the federal Antiquities Act to expand the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Southern Oregon last week by 48,000 acres.

_________________________________________

HUNDREDS RALLY FOR IMMIGRANT RIGHTS AT OREGON STATE CAPITOL (Salem Statesman Journal)

Roughly 400 people converged at the Oregon State Capitol steps to support immigrant rights Saturday.

The rally, part of a national day of demonstrations against President-Elect Donald Trump’s proposed policies relating to immigration, was comprised of dozens of state-wide organizations in the One Oregon coalition.

_________________________________________

OREGON BANS WEAPONS IN STATE WORKPLACES (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon officials banned state employees from carrying weapons in the workplace unless they’re needed for their jobs, causing consternation Thursday among Republican leaders in the Legislature.

The Oregon Department of Administrative Services said it imposed the ban, which became effective on Jan. 6, in hopes of “providing a safe and secure environment for employees and visitors.”

_________________________________________

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT APPROVES CONTINUED OREGON HEALTH PLAN REFORMS, BUT NO EXTRA MONEY (Eugene Register-Guard)

The federal government has approved Oregon’s request to continue innovating the Oregon Health Plan for the next five years, but its not giving any extra money to further advance the reforms, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced Friday.

_________________________________________

AN EXPANDED MONUMENT — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Obama ensures designations purpose is fulfilled-

As the clock ticks down on President Obamas time in office, concern began to grow that he would overlook a proposal to enlarge the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Southern Oregon. The monument is small, remote and already in existence, having been designated by President Clinton in 2000. It would have been easy to focus on other matters, including additional monument designations.

_________________________________________

OTC CHAIR SEEKS GREATER OVERSIGHT OF ODOT (Portland Tribune)

In a letter to the governor, Oregon Transportation Commission Chairwoman Tammy Baney asked for independent staff person, involvement in ODOT director’s performance review.

In a highly unusual letter, the head of the Oregon Transportation Commission has asked Gov. Kate Brown to personally engage in beefed-up oversight of the Department of Transportation.

_________________________________________

PRO-IMMIGRATION RALLY MARCHERS ‘STAND UNITED AGAINST HATEFUL RHETORIC’ (Portland Tribune)

Rally and march at the Oregon Capitol in Salem opposed President-elect Donald Trump’s positions on immigration.

About 1,000 demonstrators marched around the Oregon Capitol Saturday, Jan. 14, in a show of protest against President-elect Donald Trump’s positions on immigration.

_________________________________________

OBAMA ADMINISTRATION APPROVES OREGON HEALTH PLAN RULE RENEWAL BEFORE LEAVING OFFICE (Portland Tribune)

Federal health officials Friday renewed the exemption letting Oregon pursue its own Medicaid reforms. But the nod won’t include $1.25 billion the state initially hoped for.

The outgoing Obama administration has renewed federal approval of the Oregon Health Plan.

_________________________________________

DEADLINE LOOMS JAN. 25 FOR TIMBER LAWSUIT PARTICIPATION (Portland Tribune)

Washington, Clackamas among the 15 counties in a group seeking $1.4 billion from the state in past losses and future proceeds.

Commissioners in Washington and Clackamas counties may soon get caught up in the political tug-of-war over state forests between advocates of timber production and supporters of outdoor recreation and environmental protection.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: SEN. TIM KNOPP RIGHT TO INCREASE HURDLE FOR TAX HIKES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The 2017 Legislature will feature another battle between those devoted to adding new taxes and regulations and those fighting back.

Sen. Tim Knopp, R-Bend, will be one of those fighting back. One of his first efforts to put on the brakes is Senate Joint Resolution 32, which would make it harder for the Legislature to increase taxes. Knopp has the right idea.

_________________________________________

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT GIVES OREGON NEW HEALTH CARE WAIVER (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon has been granted a new waiver from the federal government to continue transforming its health care system.

Back in 2012, Oregon was given a five year waiver and almost $2 billion to improve health care and reduce rising costs.

_________________________________________

FEDS BLOCK MINING IN 100K ACRES OF SOUTHWEST OREGON (Jefferson Public Radio)

Opponents of proposed mining projects in the Klamath Mountains in the southwest corner of Oregon are praising a federal order withdrawing more than 100-thousand acres in the area from mining activity.

_________________________________________

TIMBER GROUP SAYS OREGON MONUMENT EXPANSION IS ILLEGAL (Northwest Public Radio)

The timber industry may go to court to try to reverse President Obama’s expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southern Oregon.

The presidents decision to nearly double the size of the national monument was praised by environmentalists and Oregon’s two senators.

_________________________________________

AG IN THE CLASSROOM SPREADS THE WORD (Capital Press)

-In addition to educating kids and families on Ag in the Classroom, Jessica Jansen hopes to enlist more members of the ag community to share their knowledge with school-age kids.-

Jessica Jansen fell in love with agriculture during her high school FFA years. Its broad range of disciplines led her to earn degrees in agricultural sciences and communications at Oregon State University

_________________________________________

WORKER PROTECTION STANDARDS HIGHLIGHT SEMINARS (Capital Press)

-A full line-up of seminars awaits attendees of this years Northwest Ag Show.-

New federal Worker Protection Standards for pesticide application training are in effect and will be a major topic for this years seminars at the Northwest Ag Show.

The Environmental Protection Agency regulations require those who train farmworkers and pesticide handlers to hold a certified applicator license or complete an EPA-approved Train the Trainer course.

_________________________________________

TIMBER INDUSTRY MAY CHALLENGE CASCADE-SISKIYOU MONUMENT EXPANSION (Capital Press)

-Travis Joseph, president of the Portland-based American Forest Resource Council, said Friday the expansion improperly included several thousand acres of federal land that Congress has prioritized for logging.-

The timber industry thinks it may able to reverse President Barack Obamas expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Southern Oregon.

The presidents decision to add 48,000 acres to the 65,000-acre national monument was praised by environmentalists and Oregon’s two senators, Democrats Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley.

_________________________________________

GOVERNORS PLAN TO CLOSE MENTAL HOSPITAL BRINGS DEJA VU (East Oregonian)

When Gov. Kate Brown released her $20.8 billion budget for the next biennium, one item on the chopping block shocked some eastside Oregonians.

There, on page 60, was something that caused jaws to drop  the proposed closure of the state mental health hospital in Junction City. To understand the consternation, one must go back to 2014. That year, Pendleton lost the Blue Mountain Recovery Center, one of three state mental health facilities in the Oregon State Hospital system, shut down along with the Portland campus.

_________________________________________

KLAVINS: PREDATOR POACHERS MUST BE HELD RESPONSIBLE — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

Appreciation for native wildlife is something nearly all Americans share. Wildlife bring value and belong to all of us  not just those of us lucky enough to live near our states big wild places or those who shoot them with cameras rather than rifles.

Some animals challenge us, but poaching is a crime against us all. Recent efforts to address the problem are welcome, but show just how far we have to go.

_________________________________________

LAWMAKERS HAVE BUSY AGENDA WHEN NEXT SESSION BEGINS (The World)

The Oregon State Legislature convenes on Feb. 1, and lawmakers will have their work cut out for them.

With 17 bills pre-filed pertaining the state’s Public Employees Retirement System, the multi-billion-dollar financial liability to the state is likely to take up a considerable amount of lawmakers’ time.

_________________________________________

COMMISSIONERS ASK BROWN TO RECONSIDER VET PROPOSAL (Albany Democrat Herald)

Linn County Commissioner John Lindsey and seven other commissioners from around the state are asking Gov. Kate Brown to reconsider her plan to cut $10 million from the proposed state budget for veterans programs.

The commissioners, members of the Veterans Steering Committee of the Association of Oregon Counties, say the proposal flies in the face of Ballot Measure 96, which was passed by Oregon voters in November.

_________________________________________

DOUBLE VISION: PLANS TO UPGRADE BPA RADIO NETWORK SPARK DEBATE OVER MARYS PEAK (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Marys Peak has seen a lot of changes since tectonic forces raised it from the ocean floor 30 million years ago, but a decision-making process launched this fall could have a major impact on the mountains future.

Located 15 miles west of Corvallis and standing 4,097 feet above sea level, its the highest point in the Oregon Coast Range. With charming wildflower meadows, towering stands of noble fir and views that stretch from the Cascades to the Pacific, the peak is a major outdoor recreation destination. It also has ecological significance, with a unique assemblage of plants, animals and insects.

_________________________________________

LOCAL LEGISLATOR PROPOSES PERS CHANGES (Douglas County News-Review)

Shortly after entering his legislative office Monday, Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, wasted no time in introducing a bill battling the controversial state pension system.

Kruse and Sen. Tim Knopp, R-Bend, introduced two bills limiting public employee pension benefits. Kruse hopes their proposed changes will help the state save money, particularly as it faces a $1.7 billion budget deficit and $22 billion of unfunded pension liability.

_________________________________________

WHERE SHOULD THE PORT OF PORTLAND GO FROM HERE? (OregonBusiness)

Click through to read five opinions from business and environmental leaders on the post-Bill Wyatt era.

_________________________________________

OREGON’S 2016 VENTURE ACTIVITY HAS MIXED RESULTS (Oregon Business Journal)

Depending on the data you want to look at, venture capital investment activity in Oregon last year was either starkly down or in-line with 2015.

Dueling reports are out this week from the National Venture Capital Association and Pitchbook, and CB Insights and PricewaterhouseCoopers examining investment activity nationwide. On a national level, the two reports trend the same way: Both deal volume and deal amounts fell.

_________________________________________

SCENES FROM THIS WEEK’S KICKOFF OF THE 2017 OREGON LEGISLATURE – PHOTOS (Oregon Business Journal)

This week’s snow storm may have grabbed most of the headlines, but there was also a pretty big event that kicked off the week before the flakes began to fall: the swearing in of Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and the opening of the 2017 session of the Oregon Legislature.

_________________________________________

WHY AN OREGON WAVE ENERGY DEVICE IS BEING TESTED IN COLORADO (Oregon Business Journal)

Wave energy technology born in ocean-facing Oregon is undergoing validation testing in landlocked Colorado.

It sounds incongruous, but the testing at the National Wind Technology Center in Boulder reflects the design and scale of the generator developed by Corvallis-based Columbia Power Technologies for the company’s StingRAY wave energy converter.

_________________________________________

GOV. BROWN SAYS STATE NEEDS TO DO MORE TO PREP FOR STORMS (KATU)

Gov. Kate Brown praised plow truck drivers for their tireless work in clearing snow from state highways, while saying the state needs to do more to prepare for future storms.

“We obviously needed more assistance within the city of Portland and Seattle came down to help,” said Brown.

_________________________________________

BUSINESSES WITH LIQUOR LICENSES WARNED ABOUT FAKE OLCC AGENTS (KPTV)

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission is warning businesses about fake OLCC agents showing up and demanding access to files.

OLCC has received multiple reports from businesses with liquor licenses who have been called or visited by someone claiming to be an OLCC agent.

_________________________________________

FLOOD THREAT LOOMS: AGENCIES MOVE SNOW, PREP SANDBAGS (KTVZ Bend)

-Tips to avoid trouble; info hotline moves to 211-

With so much snow accumulating in Central Oregon due to the recent storms, and a forecast of rain and warmer temperatures, regional officials, including ODOT, warned everyone Friday to be prepared for potential flooding in coming days.

_________________________________________

MERKLEY: OBAMA WON’T DESIGNATE OWYHEE CANYONLANDS AS A NATIONAL MONUMENT (KUOW)

Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley says he does not believe President Obama will designate the Owyhee Canyonlands as a national monument before leaving office on Friday.

Merkley said Interior Secretary Sally Jewel told him a monument designation for the eastern Oregon lands has been shelved.

_________________________________________

WESTERN DEMS LOOK TO CLIMATE TO REVITALIZE JOBS MESSAGES (The Hill)

Western states run by Democrats are aiming to use government responses to climate change as the basis for a new economic pitch to show voters the party can manage a transitioning economy.

State leaders are plotting aggressive new measures to tackle carbon emissions and promote renewable energy, in the face of an incoming administration that takes a skeptical view of climate change.

_________________________________________

FEDERAL WAIVER COMES WITHOUT NEW MONEY (The Lund Report)

-But state officials are optimistic about continuing their healthcare reform efforts.-

There’s excitement by Governor Kate Brown and other officials after the federal government approved Oregon’s Medicaid waiver for another five years. But that doesnt mean Oregon’s home free.

_________________________________________

RED JUSTICE IN A BLUE STATE (Slate.com)

-Oregon has one of the worst criminal justice systems in the country. These prosecutors are largely to blame.-

Here’s a riddle: What state incarcerates a higher percentage of its black population than Alabama, Florida, and Louisiana?

I’ll bet you didn’t guess Oregon.

_________________________________________

State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit: http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 17, 2017 Weekend Edition

January 17, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Oregon’s new concealed handgun policy raises Republican hackles
* Transportation officials: Avoid travel if freezing rain arrives
* Proposal to transfer federal land to states worries outdoor enthusiasts
* Portland needs better than a strategy of ‘let it melt’: Editorial Agenda 2017 — Opinion
* Genetically modified pest — Opinion
* Anti-terrorism bill more threatening than ever — Guest Opinion
* What’s next for the Superfund cleanup?
* Officials reviewing winter storm strategies
* Landlords not tenants are responsible for clearing snow from roofs
* Cascade-Siskiyou Monument expansion fosters praise, fear
* Prineville power needs spur meeting with Rep. Greg Walden
* Small companies have big retirement problem
* Editorial: Require warrant for cellphone monitoring — Opinion
* Editorial: Monument designation should be up to Congress — Opinion
* Icy Weather Expected Tuesday Morning, Followed By Posssible Flooding
* Community Health Workers To Help Mentally Ill In Oregon, Washington Find Housing
* Transgender Oregonians Hurry To Update Documents Before Trump Takes Office
* Merkley: Owyhee Canyonland monument designation unlikely
* Editorial: Rent control for Oregon is a fools bargain — Opinion
* BLM allocates timber payment funds
* OUR VIEW: Browns speech a mixed bag — Opinion

____________________

OREGON’S NEW CONCEALED HANDGUN POLICY RAISES REPUBLICAN HACKLES (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon Republicans are criticizing a new policy that forbids most state employees with licenses to carry concealed handguns from bringing guns to work, except for state police and others whose jobs require it.
_________________________________________

TRANSPORTATION OFFICIALS: AVOID TRAVEL IF FREEZING RAIN ARRIVES (Portland Oregonian)

With many Portland-area roads still frozen over from last week’s storm, freezing rain in the forecast for Tuesday could result in even slicker roads.

Ice could also bring down tree limbs and power lines, blocking roads and public transportation. An early December storm similarly started with snow and followed up with freezing rain, causing widespread traffic and transit delays.
_________________________________________

PROPOSAL TO TRANSFER FEDERAL LAND TO STATES WORRIES OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS (Portland Oregonian)

A change in U.S. House rules making it easier to transfer millions of acres of federal public lands to states is worrying hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts across the West who fear losing access.

Lawmakers earlier this month passed a rule eliminating a significant budget hurdle and written so broadly that it includes national parks.
_________________________________________

PORTLAND NEEDS BETTER THAN A STRATEGY OF ‘LET IT MELT’: EDITORIAL AGENDA 2017 — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In Seattle, the transportation department aims “to achieve bare and wet pavement on specified streets within twelve hours after a significant lull in the storm,” according to that city’s winter-weather site.
_________________________________________

GENETICALLY MODIFIED PEST — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

ou have to say this for Scotts Miracle-Gro, the mega lawn and garden company: It managed to unite Oregon farmers, grass seed dealers, environmentalists, scientists and regulators groups that are rarely unanimous on anything.

Scotts did this by, first, partnering with Monsanto to develop a genetically modified grass seed that is resistant to herbicide, specifically the widely used multipurpose Roundup. It turned out this also made the grass impervious to darned near everything else, with the possible exception of neutron bombs.
_________________________________________

ANTI-TERRORISM BILL MORE THREATENING THAN EVER — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Five years ago, President Obama signed a bill into law that expanded the federal governments ability to fight terrorism around the world and inside the United States a worthy cause. But this same legislation is now a threat to Americans basic civil liberties. How can this be?
_________________________________________

WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE SUPERFUND CLEANUP? (Portland Tribune)

-Over 150 different businesses and governments might be liable for a share of the Portland Harbor cleanup bill. Now comes the hard part – getting them to pay.-

After 17 years of study and research, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has finally approved its cleanup plan for the Portland Harbor Superfund site.
_________________________________________

OFFICIALS REVIEWING WINTER STORM STRATEGIES (Portland Tribune)

-Regional leaders have promised changes to better handle such storms in the past, with mixed results. The last one to shut down the Portland region hit in December 2008, just as Sam Adams was about to become mayor.-

Although the last traces of the most recent snow storm are finally melting away, memories of lengthy traffic jams, disrupted transit service, and impassible residential streets are still fresh. Local leaders and transportation officials say they already have changed the way they respond to such severe winter events, however, and are considering additional changes in the future.
_________________________________________

LANDLORDS NOT TENANTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR CLEARING SNOW FROM ROOFS (Bend Bulletin)

-In Bend, many residents are shoveling roofs-

Dozens of Bend property owners scrambled to clear snow off roofs after several buildings collapsed across town last week.

But some property owners didnt take action, leaving some Bend tenants wondering what to do when snow piles up dangerously on roofs and what steps to take when landlords dont help.
_________________________________________

CASCADE-SISKIYOU MONUMENT EXPANSION FOSTERS PRAISE, FEAR (Bend Bulletin)

-Boost for biodiversity prompts concern for ranchers, calls for reversal –

Proponents are cheering President Barack Obamas expansion of a national monument in Southern Oregon as a step toward further protecting an ecological wonder.

The presidents proclamation has also prompted loud calls for the incoming administration to reverse the expansion.
_________________________________________

PRINEVILLE POWER NEEDS SPUR MEETING WITH REP. GREG WALDEN (Bend Bulletin)

-Not enough power in Crook County to lure big businesses-

A misunderstanding about how much electricity Prineville had access to has stymied the regions economic development efforts.

Now, Prineville city leaders and electrical utilities are pledging to improve their lines of communication, following a meeting arranged by Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River.
_________________________________________

SMALL COMPANIES HAVE BIG RETIREMENT PROBLEM (Bend Bulletin)

Thinking about taking a job at a small company? Dont expect a good retirement plan.

At companies with fewer than 50 workers, not even half the employees have access to a 401k or pension, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. At companies with 500 workers or more, 90 percent of employees have access to a retirement plan.
_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: REQUIRE WARRANT FOR CELLPHONE MONITORING — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

People take their cellphones everywhere with them. That can come in handy for the police when they want to track criminals.

Technology called Stingrays, or more generically cell site simulators, can be used to track a persons cellphone. The privacy laws in Oregon have some needed catching up to do on this technology.
_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: MONUMENT DESIGNATION SHOULD BE UP TO CONGRESS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Late last week, President Barack Obama nearly doubled the size of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument with the stroke of a pen. Fortunately, he did nothing about the proposed Owyhee monument in far eastern Oregon, and its status remains unchanged.

Though the privilege to create national monuments belongs to the president, that can and should be changed. Locking up public land, whether for wilderness or a national monument, should be done at the behest of both houses of Congress, not by presidential fiat.
_________________________________________

ICY WEATHER EXPECTED TUESDAY MORNING, FOLLOWED BY POSSSIBLE FLOODING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Winter weather may get a little icier across the region before warming up Tuesday.

The National Weather Service in Portland issued an ice storm warning for the greater Portland metro area, the Columbia River Gorge, the Hood River and Wind River valleys as well as most valleys within the Gifford Pinchot National Forest early Tuesday. The warning calls for freezing rain Tuesday and Wednesday for most areas below 1500 feet east of the Coast Range.
_________________________________________

COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKERS TO HELP MENTALLY ILL IN OREGON, WASHINGTON FIND HOUSING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Earlier this winter, Kaiser Permanente and several other local health care providers got together to build 380 new housing units in the Portland area.

The trouble is, many homeless people suffer from severe mental illnesses or have addiction issues and are reluctant to move in. They dont trust the system.
_________________________________________

TRANSGENDER OREGONIANS HURRY TO UPDATE DOCUMENTS BEFORE TRUMP TAKES OFFICE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Alexander Clarke-Ritter sits facing his attorney in a conference room on the 34th floor of the U.S. Bank Tower in downtown Portland. On the table between them sits a small stack of personal documents.

Oregon and Washington have been leaders in providing new rights to LGBTQ men and women. Now advocates in the Pacific Northwest are encouraging transgender men and women to update their federal documents before the Trump administration takes over.
_________________________________________

MERKLEY: OWYHEE CANYONLAND MONUMENT DESIGNATION UNLIKELY (Capital Press)

-Southeast Oregon residents bitterly oppose designation of a national monument, saying it would cut off grazing and other activity.-

Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley said hes been told there are no plans to designate an Owyhee Canyonlands national monument in the remaining days of the Obama administration.
_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: RENT CONTROL FOR OREGON IS A FOOLS BARGAIN — OPINION (East Oregonian)

-It creates bureaucracy with unintended consequences.-

Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek threw red meat to her Portland constituents by proposing legislation to create rent control. Portland rents have escalated as the city has become one of the nations most desirable locations. Kotek extended her rent control proposal beyond Portlands boundaries, to all Oregon communities.
_________________________________________

BLM ALLOCATES TIMBER PAYMENT FUNDS (The World)

The Bureau of Land Management has distributed more than $19 million to 18 counties, including Douglas, in western Oregon.
_________________________________________

OUR VIEW: BROWNS SPEECH A MIXED BAG — OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

Voters secured the opportunity to hear from Oregons newly elected governor last week regarding some of her goals for the future. While there was a general feeling of optimism around her words there didnt appear to be a lot of substance.

At least not regarding some of the key problems the state now faces.
_________________________________________
State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer
http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit
http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 17, 2017 OSL eClips

January 13, 2017 OSL eClips

* House Democrats need Republicans for solutions to Oregon’s problems — Opinion
* Pay gap between college grads, everyone else at a record
* Clatsop County withdraws from $1.4 billion lawsuit over logging harvests
* Obama administration blocks mining on 100,000 acres in Southern Oregon
* Pacific Seafood fined for polluting Yaquina Bay
* UO student files $3 million lawsuit over delayed meningitis diagnosis during 2015 outbreak
* Flu continues to spread across Lane County with hundreds of confirmed cases
* Oregon bans state employees from bringing weapons into workplaces
* State bans weapons in the workplace
* Elizabeth Woody to read poetry at Marylhurst
* State government at the starting gate
* Snow threatens five more Bend-La Pine buildings
* Oregon lawmakers ask for clemency
* Obama Announces Cascade-Siskiyou Monument Expansion
* Opponents Call Foul On Mega-Dairy Construction
* OHSU Stops New Hires Ahead Of Potential Obamacare Cuts
* Ranchers dread effects of Cascade-Siskiyou monument expansion
____________________

HOUSE DEMOCRATS NEED REPUBLICANS FOR SOLUTIONS TO OREGON’S PROBLEMS — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Democratic legislators in the lopsided House of Representatives don’t need Republican votes to get what they want this session.

_________________________________________

PAY GAP BETWEEN COLLEGE GRADS, EVERYONE ELSE AT A RECORD (Portland Oregonian)

Americans with no more than a high school diploma have fallen so far behind college graduates in their economic lives that the earnings gap between college grads and everyone else has reached its widest point on record.

_________________________________________

CLATSOP COUNTY WITHDRAWS FROM $1.4 BILLION LAWSUIT OVER LOGGING HARVESTS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s Clatsop County has dropped out of a class-action lawsuit involving more than a dozen counties seeking $1.4 billion from the state over logging harvests on state-managed lands.

_________________________________________

OBAMA ADMINISTRATION BLOCKS MINING ON 100,000 ACRES IN SOUTHERN OREGON (Salem Statesman Journal)

A long-running effort to block mining in the watersheds of several iconic rivers in southwest Oregon scored a major victory Thursday.

_________________________________________

PACIFIC SEAFOOD FINED FOR POLLUTING YAQUINA BAY (Salem Statesman Journal)

State environmental regulators have fined Pacific Seafood, doing business as Pacific Shrimp Company, $1,540 for violating its wastewater discharge permit at its seafood processing facility at 617 SW Bay Boulevard in Newport.

_________________________________________

UO STUDENT FILES $3 MILLION LAWSUIT OVER DELAYED MENINGITIS DIAGNOSIS DURING 2015 OUTBREAK (Eugene Register-Guard)

A University of Oregon student who was hospitalized for two weeks with meningococcal disease in 2015 has sued medical providers for $3 million for negligence for allegedly failing to properly diagnose her illness.

_________________________________________

FLU CONTINUES TO SPREAD ACROSS LANE COUNTY WITH HUNDREDS OF CONFIRMED CASES (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Officials pinpoint 15 specific outbreaks, many in Eugene and Springfield-

If youre missing another day of work with a hacking cough, fever and body aches, youre far from alone.

_________________________________________

OREGON BANS STATE EMPLOYEES FROM BRINGING WEAPONS INTO WORKPLACES (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon officials banned state employees from carrying weapons in the workplace unless they’re needed for their jobs, causing consternation Thursday among Republican leaders in the Legislature.

_________________________________________

STATE BANS WEAPONS IN THE WORKPLACE (Portland Tribune)

-The new HR policy narrows a preexisting policy that bans weapons in most state agency buildings.-

The state has adopted a new policy that prohibits state employees from having weapons in their workplace as a condition of employment, narrowing a preexisting policy that banned weapons in most state agency buildings.

_________________________________________

ELIZABETH WOODY TO READ POETRY AT MARYLHURST (Portland Tribune)

-Elizabeth Woody, Oregon’s eighth poet laureate, will read her poetry Jan. 20 at Marylhurst University.-

Everyone is invited to attend an evening with poet Elizabeth Woody, hosted by the Marylhurst Writers Club on Jan. 20 at Marylhurst University.

_________________________________________

STATE GOVERNMENT AT THE STARTING GATE (Portland Tribune)

-We take a look at the leaders, the issues, and the challenges facing Oregon in 2017.-

Everyone is sworn in. Now, the Oregon Legislature and statewide officeholders get ready to tackle a budget deficit, much-needed transportation repairs and a vastly altered political landscape in Washington, D.C.

_________________________________________

SNOW THREATENS FIVE MORE BEND-LA PINE BUILDINGS (Bend Bulletin)

The gym at Highland Magnet at Kenwood School was damaged beyond saving _________________________________________

OREGON LAWMAKERS ASK FOR CLEMENCY (Bend Bulletin)

-Wyden, Merkley, Blumenauer ask Obama to review Oregon prison sentences-

Some of Oregon’s most influential voices have asked President Barack Obama to extend leniency toward nonviolent offenders serving long prison sentences in the state of Oregon.

_________________________________________

OBAMA ANNOUNCES CASCADE-SISKIYOU MONUMENT EXPANSION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

President Obama on Thursday announced an anticipated expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southern Oregon.

_________________________________________

OPPONENTS CALL FOUL ON MEGA-DAIRY CONSTRUCTION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

While it remains unclear whether state agencies will sign off on a controversial 30,000-cow dairy farm in Morrow County, that hasn’t stopped construction from moving quickly ahead.

_________________________________________

OHSU STOPS NEW HIRES AHEAD OF POTENTIAL OBAMACARE CUTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The president of Oregon Health And Science University isn’t waiting to see what Republicans do with the Affordable Care Act.

_________________________________________

RANCHERS DREAD EFFECTS OF CASCADE-SISKIYOU MONUMENT EXPANSION (Capital Press)

Cattle groups reacted with dread at the expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Oregon and California, which they fear will gradually eradicate ranching in the area.

_________________________________________

State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit: http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 13, 2017 OSL eClips

January 12, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Heavy snow starts to damage roofs in Oregon
* Gov. Kate Brown declares state of emergency in Oregon due to snow
* Oregon schools must make up lost school days — or get a waiver
* Explosives considered for removing dangerous ice floe in far-eastern Oregon
* Feds take a stand for insurers over vulnerable patients — Guest Opinion
* Those who call for transparency should be transparent themselves — Guest Opinion
* Karen Lee Batts, whose death signals a cold reality — Opinion
* History revealed during renovation of rail station
* As snow melts in Salem, emergency declared statewide
* Public pension debate returns to Oregon Legislature
* Rescue dogs, border collies nominated for Oregon state dog
* Expanded monument could benefit economy — Guest Opinion
* Senate leader sees new revenue, transportation top agenda for 2017
* Inclusionary housing policy has skeptics
* Commuters fume, but politicos ignore I-5 bridge
* Brown, Wheeler declare state of emergencies because of winter storm
* Two proposals take aim at reducing PERS liabilities
* EPA grants help replace diesel-spewing trucks, school buses in Oregon
* Crook County emergency request granted by the state for a price
* Hop convention coming to Bend
* Editorial: Gov. Kate Brown and Legislature neglect PERS — Opinion
* Editorial: Poor fixes for affordable housing problem — Opinion
* Gov. Kate Brown Declares State Of Emergency
* AFBF optimistic despite challenging politics, economy landscape
* Grants available through State Historic Preservation Office
* Pendleton on board with Boutique
* Opponents call foul on mega-dairy construction
* Water official: Snowpack is looking pretty good
* Old Camp White building goes on historic register
* Medical pot grows denied
* Klamath County to receive $450,000 in federal funds
* USDA gearing up for agriculture census
* Wave energy earns praise, not certain — Guest Opinion
* USDA grants fuel ongoing forest projects
* Bonamici reintroduces tsunami bill
* College weighs timber lawsuit
* Dam will not be used for mitigation
* Editorial: Crab season isn’t ill fated, but needs attention — Opinion
* Editorial: Its time for public records reform — Opinion
* Putting the brakes on predatory towing — Opinion
* H&V woos angry neighbors
* Wyden objects to Forest Service decision
* Student Success
* Let locals manage campsites — Opinion
* BLM to pay $4.7M in timber payments to Douglas County
* Editorial: Homeless, not hopeless — Opinion

____________________

HEAVY SNOW STARTS TO DAMAGE ROOFS IN OREGON (Portland Oregonian)

Heavy snow starts to damage roofs in Oregon _________________________________________

GOV. KATE BROWN DECLARES STATE OF EMERGENCY IN OREGON DUE TO SNOW (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown has declared a state of emergency in Oregon due to severe winter storm conditions.

_________________________________________

OREGON SCHOOLS MUST MAKE UP LOST SCHOOL DAYS — OR GET A WAIVER (Portland Oregonian)

Given the spate of snow days they’ve called in December and January, Oregon schools are almost certain to have to tack more days onto the school year, which could mean eating into planned breaks, extending classes well into June, or both.

_________________________________________

EXPLOSIVES CONSIDERED FOR REMOVING DANGEROUS ICE FLOE IN FAR-EASTERN OREGON (Portland Oregonian)

Officials in Oregon’s far-east Malheur County are asking the National Guard to consider using explosives to blast away a mile-long ice floe blocking parts of the Snake River, according to an emergency proclamation obtained by The Oregonian/OregonLive.

_________________________________________

FEDS TAKE A STAND FOR INSURERS OVER VULNERABLE PATIENTS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Big insurance company CEOs must love Andy Slavitt. Why wouldn’t they? After all, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services CMS, under Slavitt’s leadership, is providing a legal loophole that will free America’s big health insurance companies from having to cover America’s sickest and most expensive patients.

_________________________________________

THOSE WHO CALL FOR TRANSPARENCY SHOULD BE TRANSPARENT THEMSELVES — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregonian/OregonLive recently published a column by someone named Adam Andrzejewski – an out-of-state, right wing activist who is using false information in an effort to smear our state leaders for his own political purposes “In Oregon, the battle against transparency is bipartisan,” Oct. 30.

_________________________________________

KAREN LEE BATTS, WHOSE DEATH SIGNALS A COLD REALITY — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

There seems nothing crueler than dying alone in the cold in a dank parking garage. But that’s what happened last Saturday in downtown Portland, where Karen Batts, homeless at 52, succumbed to hypothermia only blocks away from a warming shelter. She was the third of four people in Portland this winter to die from the cold.

_________________________________________

HISTORY REVEALED DURING RENOVATION OF RAIL STATION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Robert Melbo is not one to be derailed, even when faced with the daunting task of correcting history.

After months of research on Salem’s historic train station, including the nearly renovated baggage depot, he has uncovered some significant inaccuracies.

_________________________________________

AS SNOW MELTS IN SALEM, EMERGENCY DECLARED STATEWIDE (Salem Statesman Journal)

While the Portland Metro area got covered with up to a foot of snow, the Mid-Willamette Valley got a mixture of snow and rain as a weather system made its way through Oregon this week.

_________________________________________

PUBLIC PENSION DEBATE RETURNS TO OREGON LEGISLATURE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Sen. Tim Knopp, R-Bend, and Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, teed up what could be the most contentious debate of the upcoming legislative session by introducing two bills to make money-saving changes to Oregon’s public employee retirement system.

_________________________________________

RESCUE DOGS, BORDER COLLIES NOMINATED FOR OREGON STATE DOG (Salem Statesman Journal)

Two resolutions in the Oregon State Legislature are proposing two different candidates for Oregon’s top dog.

_________________________________________

EXPANDED MONUMENT COULD BENEFIT ECONOMY — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

First the Hudsons Bay Co. came for the fur. Then miners arrived looking for gold, followed by timber barons drawn by trees. Throughout our history, we Oregonians have taken wealth from nature.

But times change, and so does the definition of wealth. In todays dollars, what is the value of fur, gold and logs compared to clean water, fresh air, intact ecosystems or a stable climate?

_________________________________________

SENATE LEADER SEES NEW REVENUE, TRANSPORTATION TOP AGENDA FOR 2017 (Portland Tribune)

-Ginny Burdick, whose district includes Tigard, is Washington County’s highest ranking lawmaker.-

Oregon Sen. Ginny Burdick’s demeanor going into the next legislative session can best be described as “cautiously optimistic.”

_________________________________________

INCLUSIONARY HOUSING POLICY HAS SKEPTICS (Portland Tribune)

Although every state but Texas has long allowed local inclusionary housing or zoning policies, some developers said Portland’s policy is much broader than those in other cities, which have exemptions intended to accommodate different kinds of projects at various locations.

_________________________________________

COMMUTERS FUME, BUT POLITICOS IGNORE I-5 BRIDGE (Portland Tribune)

-Governors of Oregon and Washington don’t even plan to talk about replacing the aging bridge between the two states.-

Although the 2017 Washington Legislature began on Monday and Oregon lawmakers are scheduled to convene in Salem on Feb. 1, one mutual project not on either agenda is replacing the Interstate 5 bridge between the two states. In fact, media representatives for the governors in both states recently told KOIN 6 News they don’t even plan to discuss it.

_________________________________________

BROWN, WHEELER DECLARE STATE OF EMERGENCIES BECAUSE OF WINTER STORM (Portland Tribune)

Declarations authorize deployment and use of the Oregon Department of Transportation, the Oregon State Police, and the Oregon National Guard to Oregon to support local communities needing assistance.

_________________________________________

TWO PROPOSALS TAKE AIM AT REDUCING PERS LIABILITIES (Portland Tribune)

-Legislators are mulling ways to reduce the public retirement system’s unfunded mandate.-

Two proposals take aim at reducing PERS liabilities. As lawmakers head into the 2017 legislative session, at least two proposed bills plan to address oft-tread territory: the state’s pension system.

_________________________________________

EPA GRANTS HELP REPLACE DIESEL-SPEWING TRUCKS, SCHOOL BUSES IN OREGON (Portland Tribune)

-Funds will help replace 10 freight trucks in Portland and 10 school buses-

EPA grants help replace diesel-spewing trucks, school buses in Oregon _________________________________________

CROOK COUNTY EMERGENCY REQUEST GRANTED BY THE STATE FOR A PRICE (Bend Bulletin)

-County declines offer; stranded rural residents look to neighbors for help –

State officials rejected Crook County’s emergency request for money and manpower to help dig stranded people out of snowed-in rural neighborhoods after concluding Wednesday that the county hadn’t used all of its resources.

_________________________________________

HOP CONVENTION COMING TO BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-500 attendees expected for three-day event-

Andrew Bloo will be present, he said, when the 61st annual American Hop Convention opens for the first time in Bend next week at the Riverhouse on the Deschutes.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: GOV. KATE BROWN AND LEGISLATURE NEGLECT PERS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Gov. Kate Brown gave her inaugural address this week. Oregonians should be used to her approach by now. Another speech, another turn of her back to the $22 billion unfunded liability of the states pension fund.

Brown has a plate full of challenges.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: POOR FIXES FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROBLEM — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The affordable housing crunch exists pretty much statewide.

Yet a statewide problem does not necessarily need a statewide solution, no matter what Democrats in Salem seem to think. From the governor on down, theyve proposed a series of so-called fixes to the housing crunch that would, in fact, serve only to make it worse.

_________________________________________

GOV. KATE BROWN DECLARES STATE OF EMERGENCY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has declared a state of emergency due to severe winter storm conditions.

_________________________________________

AFBF OPTIMISTIC DESPITE CHALLENGING POLITICS, ECONOMY LANDSCAPE (Capital Press)

-Farm Bureau wraps up annual convention on optimistic note despite changing political, economic landscape-

Zippy Duvall was fighting a cold and sore throat all during the American Farm Bureau Federations annual convention here, but the Georgian had enough voice left Tuesday to say he was feeling good about things.

Duvall, the Farm Bureau president, said the voting delegates gave him a clear vision of what they want in the coming year, including guidance to hit regulatory reform real hard.

_________________________________________

GRANTS AVAILABLE THROUGH STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE (East Oregonian)

-A variety of grants for preserving historic buildings, cemeteries and museums are open for applications.-

Thousands of dollars in state grants are up for grabs for qualifying historic and Main Street projects.

The State Historic Preservation Office is offering up to $20,000 matching grants for buildings on the National Register of Historic Places. The register lists 42 sites in Umatilla County, ranging from Weston School to portions of Pendletons and Echos downtowns.

_________________________________________

PENDLETON ON BOARD WITH BOUTIQUE (East Oregonian) -Pendleton holds ribbon cutting for city’s new air service provider-

It might have been one of the biggest welcoming parties for a commercial flight in Pendleton airport history.

A few dozen local officials and members of the public crammed into the former Transportation Security Administration screening room to greet the mid-afternoon flight on Wednesday.

_________________________________________

OPPONENTS CALL FOUL ON MEGA-DAIRY CONSTRUCTION (East Oregonian)

-A coalition of health and environmental groups are asking the state to investigate construction of an as yet permitted mega-dairy.-

While it remains unclear whether state agencies will sign off on a controversial 30,000-cow dairy farm in Morrow County, that hasn’t stopped construction from moving quickly ahead.

The question now is whether Lost Valley Ranch broke the law by breaking ground well before it secured the necessary permits.

_________________________________________

WATER OFFICIAL: SNOWPACK IS LOOKING PRETTY GOOD (Argus Observer)

It is no secret the water year has gotten off to a good start, but the first water supply outlook reports from the Natural Resource Conservation Service in Oregon and Idaho confirm that.

Based on information from automated weather data collection sites, or SNOTEL network, both the Owyhee and Malheur basins are above 100 percent of normal for the amount of water measured in the snowpack.

_________________________________________

OLD CAMP WHITE BUILDING GOES ON HISTORIC REGISTER (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Camp White Station Hospital Administration Building is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

White City’s first individually listed National Register property is the 154th in Jackson County.

Local historian and author George Kramer was approached by the Department of Veterans Affairs to nominate Building 200 for listing and happily championed the cause.

_________________________________________

MEDICAL POT GROWS DENIED (Medford Mail Tribune)

Pot growers are crying foul because Jackson County so far is refusing to grandfather in existing medical marijuana grows on rural-residential land.

A spring 2016 change to state law made medical marijuana grows illegal on rural-residential land in the county. Recreational marijuana grows were already illegal on the land zoned for country living.

_________________________________________

KLAMATH COUNTY TO RECEIVE $450,000 IN FEDERAL FUNDS (Herald and News)

Klamath County will receive roughly $450,000 in federal funds to compensate for property tax not paid on federal land, which officials said is more than was expected but still less than they should receive.

The Bureau of Land Management announced Tuesday they were prepared to disburse $19 million to 18 counties in Oregon, including Klamath.

_________________________________________

USDA GEARING UP FOR AGRICULTURE CENSUS (Herald and News)

The nations most ambitious and important agricultural survey will go out to farm operators in December.

Right now, we are building our lists, says Dave Losh, Oregons state statistician with the U.S. Department of Agricultures National Agricultural Statistics Service USDA-NASS. We know that list is incomplete because people are coming into agriculture and leaving it all the time. Thats why we are currently doing what we can to make our list the most complete it can be prior to mailing out the census survey at the end of the year.

_________________________________________

WAVE ENERGY EARNS PRAISE, NOT CERTAIN — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

Making electricity from the oceans always undulating waves has been a dream for decades. The European Marine Energy Centre lists 256 companies and other entities working on various wave power concepts.

Wave-energy converter machines run the gamut of human ingenuity. They depend on varying levels of complexity  its possible to conceive of some being relatively straightforward to maintain, while others seem unlikely to survive for long.

_________________________________________

USDA GRANTS FUEL ONGOING FOREST PROJECTS (Herald and News)

Two recent grant approvals through the U.S. Department of Agriculture will aid in Klamath County forest health, totaling more than $3 million in funding awarded to the U.S. Forest Service USFS and National Resource Conservation Services NRCS.

The grants apply to two collaborative projects between USFS and NRCS focused on the Fremont-Winema National Forest and Deschutes National Forest, one of which is already underway.

_________________________________________

BONAMICI REINTRODUCES TSUNAMI BILL (Daily Astorian)

-The congresswomans tsunami bill is once again moving through Congress.-

U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici on Tuesday reintroduced the Tsunami Warning, Education, and Research Act.

The legislation would strengthen tsunami detection and warning systems, improve response and resiliency and better protect communities vulnerable to a tsunami.

_________________________________________

COLLEGE WEIGHS TIMBER LAWSUIT (Daily Astorian)

-Clatsop Community College will decide later this month on whether to be a plaintiff in the timber lawsuit against the state.-

Clatsop Community Colleges board of directors met in executive session Tuesday with lawyers representing Linn County in the $1.4 billion class action timber lawsuit against the state. The college will hold a special meeting Jan. 24 to decide whether the school should remain involved.

_________________________________________

DAM WILL NOT BE USED FOR MITIGATION (Daily Astorian)

Mayor Mark Kujala and Commissioner Rick Newton said Tuesday night that the Eighth Street Dam would be used for flood control, not as wetlands mitigation for a future development project, if the city takes control.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: CRAB SEASON ISN’T ILL FATED, BUT NEEDS ATTENTION — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-Todays crabbers and fishermen have to be smart and rational to survive  literally and economically.-

Some may wonder if the 2017 Dungeness crab season is ill-fated: First delayed by weeks to make certain crab were free of domoic acid toxin, delayed again after processors proposed lowering the price paid to crabbers, and then it started with a capsizing that could have cost five lives except for quick intervention by the Ballad.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: ITS TIME FOR PUBLIC RECORDS REFORM — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

If Oregonians have a shared self-image, its that we may see inside our state and local governments. These days that expectation is often thwarted, if not challenged.

We on the Lower Columbia River got an education in how a misguided governor could assume a proprietary attitude toward his office. At the close of Gov. John Kitzhabers third term, he unilaterally moved to ban gillnet fishing on the Columbia. It was an opaque process that defied logical, scientific explanation.

_________________________________________

PUTTING THE BRAKES ON PREDATORY TOWING — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Albany Mayor Sharon Konopa and a state legislator are exploring ways to rein in predatory towing practices on the part of companies, often from out of town, that travel to Albany under the cover of darkness and tow away vehicles for various and sundry parking violations.

Konopa and the legislator, Sen. Chuck Riley of Hillsboro, are on the right track. Riley says he plans to introduce a bill in this year’s legislative session to place additional restrictions on how these towing companies do business.

_________________________________________

H&V WOOS ANGRY NEIGHBORS (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

After enduring months of negative comments in a bruising series of public meetings, Hollingsworth & Vose is hoping to win over critics of its south Corvallis glass fiber plant by aggressively reducing the amount of particulates and other pollutants coming out of its stacks.

_________________________________________

WYDEN OBJECTS TO FOREST SERVICE DECISION (Baker City Herald)

-Agency wants to hire Utah firm to manage campgrounds-

Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden is urging a U.S. Forest Service official to reverse the agencys December decision to hire a Utah company rather than a Baker County nonprofit to operate several campgrounds and rental cabins in the Anthony Lakes and Phillips Reservoir areas.

The Baker County Development Corporation, which owns and runs the Anthony Lakes Mountain Resort ski area, was one of three groups that applied for a five-year permit to run the campgrounds, which are open during the summer.

_________________________________________

STUDENT SUCCESS (Baker City Herald)

-State Deputy Superintendent Of Public Instruction Visits Baker City-

Fifty-seven people, including a handful of parents, braved single-digit temperatures Wednesday night to share their thoughts about Oregon education with the states deputy superintendent of public instruction.

Salam Noor traveled to Baker City with Meg Boyd, strategic communications specialist.

_________________________________________

LET LOCALS MANAGE CAMPSITES — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

Were not so provincial as to insist that a local outfit always is best-suited to doing a job.

But in the case of managing several campgrounds and rental cabins on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, proximity ought to count for something.

So should a proven ability to oversee a recreation business thats more complicated than a campground or a cabin.

_________________________________________

BLM TO PAY $4.7M IN TIMBER PAYMENTS TO DOUGLAS COUNTY (Douglas County News-Review)

The Bureau of Land Management plans to distribute about $19 million from timber sales to the 18 western Oregon counties covered under the 1937 Oregon and California O&C Lands and the Coos Bay Wagon Road Acts, the agency announced Tuesday.

As far as the BLMs concerned, were happy to be able to provide these payments to the counties from the harvest activities that have occurred this past year, Roseburg District BLM spokesperson Cheyne Rossbach said.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: HOMELESS, NOT HOPELESS — OPINION (Douglas County News-Review)

The Oregon Department of Education released the number of homeless students for the 2015-2016 school year in late 2016 and an astonishing 21,352 are considered homeless in the state of Oregon.

Douglas County was home to 472 students who were living in a residence considered not fixed, regular and/or adequate by the federal government.

_________________________________________

State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit: http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 12, 2017 OSL eClips

January 11, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips
* Oregon senator introduces legislation to ban Sharia law
* Venture capital activity down sharply in Oregon, nationally
* Oregon mega-dairy construction raises questions about legality
* Oregon snowpack above normal; more wintry weather forecast
* The value of vaccine — Opinion
* One-fifth of Oregon legislators will be new in 2017 session
* My View: Time for Portland Harbor renaissance — Guest Opinion
* Central Oregon snowpack looking good
* Wolves in Oregon are not native, agriculture groups contend
* State comes through with housing funds
* Rural residents in Crook County snowed in and low on supplies
* Layoffs coming to Prineville data center
* Railroad sues to force approval of track expansion along gorge
* Editorial: Legislature should stop meddling in Oregon business — Opinion
* Editorial: Bill would penalize companies for fighting in court over taxes — Opinion
* Editorial: Data behind vacancy rate is weak — Opinion
* Northwest Mumps Outbreak Puzzles Health Officials
* Oregon Lawmakers Will Try Again On Oil Train Safety Bill
* New Oregon Coalition Forms To Try To Control Prescription Drug Costs
* Final Superfund Cleanup Plan – OPB Think Out Loud
* Cold weather may help farmers battle destructive bugs
* WSDA director: We have a plan for wheat woes
* Researchers find jointed goatgrass resistant to Beyond herbicide
* Our view: Research helps better understand grazing near streams — Opinion
* Local transportation projects total $50 million
* Our View: The dilemma of meth psychosis — Opinion
* Our View: Bipartisanship is easier said than done — Opinion
* Don’t give up public land — Guest Opinion
* Forestland on Elk River preserved for public access
* Congressional delegation urges Trump to fund Hanford work
* Time to pay the piper — Opinion
* Debate spills over the dams
* Judge to allow expert witness in sick leave lawsuit
* First Loan From New Fund Will Support Eastern Oregon Mills, Create Jobs
* Obamacare repeal in Oregon: Huge job losses, more charity care
* City Club of Portland – Video and Research Links
* We Used a New App to Compare Portland’s Health Risks Against Three Other Western Cities
* Oregon officials optimistic FEMA will provide storm reimbursement

____________________

OREGON SENATOR INTRODUCES LEGISLATION TO BAN SHARIA LAW (Portland Oregonian)

A Salem-area Republican has introduced legislation that would ban Oregon courts from considering Sharia law, the set of religious customs followed by some Muslims, when issuing rulings.
_________________________________________

VENTURE CAPITAL ACTIVITY DOWN SHARPLY IN OREGON, NATIONALLY (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon startup activity fell sharply last year, even as the state’s tech sector and broader economy continued their rapid expansion.
_________________________________________

OREGON MEGA-DAIRY CONSTRUCTION RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT LEGALITY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Is a controversial mega-dairy proposed for Oregon’s eastern Columbia Gorge breaking the law by proceeding with construction before getting any water quality permits or even registering as a business?
_________________________________________

OREGON SNOWPACK ABOVE NORMAL; MORE WINTRY WEATHER FORECAST (Eugene Register-Guard)

Unless it melts too quickly, mountain snows will provide water through summer

_________________________________________

THE VALUE OF VACCINE — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Immunization has tamed the influenza monster-

The facts are bad enough: Eight elderly Lane County residents have died from influenza in less than a month. Thirteen influenza outbreaks have been reported in the past 30 days, most of them involving 40 to 60 people, although one outbreak, in the Florence school system, includes nearly 800. PeaceHealth alone treated 146 patients with confirmed influenza in one week at its Eugene, Springfield, Cottage Grove and Florence hospitals, Register-Guard reporter Elon Glucklich found.

_________________________________________

ONE-FIFTH OF OREGON LEGISLATORS WILL BE NEW IN 2017 SESSION (Portland Tribune)

-Group could help shape policy on revenue, transportation, affordable housing, PERS reform-

When the Oregon legislative session kicks off in February, more than one-fifth of legislators will be new, including one who represents parts of Yamhill and Washington counties.
_________________________________________

MY VIEW: TIME FOR PORTLAND HARBOR RENAISSANCE — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

There’s little doubt that cleanup of the contaminated sediment and upland properties will bring clear and significant benefits to the Portland area. The economic opportunity that awaits the region when the river is transformed back to the crown jewel that it once was cannot be overstated. Even during the cleanup, with careful planning and execution, there will be opportunities for job training and local employment to benefit communities disproportionately affected by the river’s poor condition.
_________________________________________

CENTRAL OREGON SNOWPACK LOOKING GOOD (Bend Bulletin)

-Early snapshot of snow, water levels show promise for Oregon-

Drivers and parents may be cursing Central Oregon’s heavy recent snowfall by now, but federal and state officials call it a good start of the season for snowpack and water supply.

Theyre hoping it continues, at least in the mountains.

_________________________________________

WOLVES IN OREGON ARE NOT NATIVE, AGRICULTURE GROUPS CONTEND (Bend Bulletin)

-Conservation groups discount debunked argument-

Oregon had to remove the gray wolf from the states endangered species list because that protection only applies to native species and Oregon’s wolves originally came from Canada, cattle and farm groups argued in a court filing this week.

_________________________________________

STATE COMES THROUGH WITH HOUSING FUNDS (Bend Bulletin)

-LIFT program boosts 90-unit build-

Housing Works, the public housing authority for Central Oregon, plans to build 90 apartment and townhome units for low-income households in Sisters and La Pine.

Oregon Housing and Community Services awarded the housing authority $3.6 million in state funding to underwrite construction, which also relies on low-income housing tax credits. The total cost to build the two projects comes to about $14.5 million. The state share is part of the Local Innovation and Fast Track Housing Program.

_________________________________________

RURAL RESIDENTS IN CROOK COUNTY SNOWED IN AND LOW ON SUPPLIES (Bend Bulletin)

-County declares emergency to ask state for help-

Some residents in Crook County’s rural neighborhoods are snowed in and running low on food and heat, and while private citizens use their own snowmobiles to help stranded neighbors, county officials have requested help from the state to dig them out.

Crook County Court members signed off on declaring a local emergency Tuesday, asking the state for money, equipment and manpower to help plow rural roads that the county doesnt maintain.
_________________________________________

LAYOFFS COMING TO PRINEVILLE DATA CENTER (Bend Bulletin)

-Facebook shifting security contractors-

The contractor responsible for providing security at Facebook’s data centers in Prineville will be laying off 85 employees at the end of the month, as the internet giant switches security companies.

Lee Weinstein, president of Weinstein PR, which represents Facebook, wrote in an email that Facebook is changing security providers at all of its U.S. data centers, including those in Prineville.

_________________________________________

RAILROAD SUES TO FORCE APPROVAL OF TRACK EXPANSION ALONG GORGE (Bend Bulletin)

Union Pacific on Tuesday asked a federal judge to reject local rules that threaten to derail its plans to add a second main track along the Columbia River Gorge where a crude oil train derailed last June.

The railroad filed the lawsuit in federal court in Portland against Wasco County and the Columbia River Gorge Commission.

Omaha, Nebraska-based Union Pacific says federal laws govern railroads, so local restrictions like the ones Wasco County approved don’t apply to the project.
_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: LEGISLATURE SHOULD STOP MEDDLING IN OREGON BUSINESS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The Oregon Legislature must not have many public-sector problems to solve. You know, like addressing a $1.7 billion budget shortfall of controlling PERS costs. How else to explain the eagerness of some lawmakers to further micromanage private businesses?
_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: BILL WOULD PENALIZE COMPANIES FOR FIGHTING IN COURT OVER TAXES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The Oregon Legislature should hang a sign on the front door of the Capitol: Home of messed-up legislation.

The latest example comes in the contorted tale behind new draft legislation. In this tale, Rep. Phil Barnhart, D-Eugene, chairman of the House Revenue Committee, seems to see himself as the hero and Comcast as the villain. The true villain is legislative ineptitude and a thirst for revenge. And heroes? Well, good luck finding one.
_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: DATA BEHIND VACANCY RATE IS WEAK — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

You’ve heard it dozens of times: The rental vacancy rate in Bend is around 1 percent and has been less than 2 percent since 2012.

Its been referenced in city of Bend reports, cited by city officials and quoted in news stories in The Bulletin, The Oregonian and elsewhere.

But it turns out, as Bulletin reporter Stephen Hamway reported Sunday, its not well-supported. It might be right, but the underlying information doesnt even come close to proving it.
_________________________________________

NORTHWEST MUMPS OUTBREAK PUZZLES HEALTH OFFICIALS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Health officials in Washington state said there have been 151 cases of mumps have been reported statewide since the end of October. Only 46 were reported in the four years prior. Mumps has also been reported in Oregon this year.
_________________________________________

OREGON LAWMAKERS WILL TRY AGAIN ON OIL TRAIN SAFETY BILL (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Senate President Peter Courtney introduced a bill Tuesday that would increase regulations for railroads carrying crude oil and other hazardous materials through the state.
_________________________________________

NEW OREGON COALITION FORMS TO TRY TO CONTROL PRESCRIPTION DRUG COSTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

An Epipen is a lifesaving device used to treat allergic reactions.
_________________________________________

FINAL SUPERFUND CLEANUP PLAN – OPB THINK OUT LOUD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Environmental Protection Agency has released its final plan for cleaning up the polluted 10-mile stretch of the Willamette river known as the Portland Harbor Superfund site. We get the context and the latest details from Earthfix reporter Cassandra Profita.
_________________________________________

COLD WEATHER MAY HELP FARMERS BATTLE DESTRUCTIVE BUGS (Capital Press)

-Freezing temperatures warm the hearts of pest specialists, because the cold may reduce the number of pests that eat berries and other crops.-

Your frozen fingertips may not appreciate it, but the extended cold snap gripping the Pacific Northwest through the first week of January may actually do some good.

_________________________________________

WSDA DIRECTOR: WE HAVE A PLAN FOR WHEAT WOES (Capital Press)

-Washington State Department of Agriculture director describes what state is doing about the wheat industry’s falling numbers problem-

Washingtons agriculture Director Derek Sandison outlined for lawmakers Tuesday his plan to help the states export-dependent wheat farmers meet a key international benchmark for quality, though none of the measures appear to be quick or easy.

_________________________________________

RESEARCHERS FIND JOINTED GOATGRASS RESISTANT TO BEYOND HERBICIDE (Capital Press)

-Researchers have found jointed goatgrass resistant to Beyond herbicide in Eastern Washington.-

Jointed goatgrass resistant to Beyond herbicide has been found in Eastern Washington, according to researchers.

BASFs Clearfield technology allows farmers to use imidazolinone herbicides, marketed under the Beyond trade name, to combat weeds such as jointed goatgrass.

_________________________________________

OUR VIEW: RESEARCH HELPS BETTER UNDERSTAND GRAZING NEAR STREAMS — OPINION (East Oregonian)

-Now we know that cattle probably don’t cause as much damage to streams and riparian areas as popularly thought.-

Environmental groups say cattle grazing on public rangeland trample and erode streambanks and pollute water.

But a five-year study of cattle grazing conducted by Oregon State University shows cattle spend only 1 to 2.5 percent of their time in streams or buffer areas. And rather than ranging up and down the length of steams in allotments, cattle used only 10 to 25 percent of the available stream area.
_________________________________________

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS TOTAL $50 MILLION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Nearly $50 million worth of transportation projects in Jackson and Josephine counties will be reviewed by a regional panel Tuesday.

Rogue Valley Area Commission on Transportation will take comment on 21 improvement projects ticketed for 2018-21, including a pair of $7-million-plus enhancements and a game-changing roundabout tying Highway 140 and Foothill Road together.
_________________________________________

OUR VIEW: THE DILEMMA OF METH PSYCHOSIS — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Drug addiction costs society dearly, from crime committed by addicts seeking to support their habits to child neglect and abandonment to lost productivity. But one aspect of chronic methamphetamine use is making an impact on violent crime statistics, and posing a dilemma for the criminal justice system.
_________________________________________

OUR VIEW: BIPARTISANSHIP IS EASIER SAID THAN DONE — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Oregon’s Democratic Gov. Kate Brown invoked iconic Republican leaders Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall in her inaugural address Monday, pledging, in McCall’s words, “to work not in partisanship, but in partnership.” But Republican leaders weren’t buying it, and Brown must be prepared to offer more than platitudes if she hopes to win their cooperation.
_________________________________________

DON’T GIVE UP PUBLIC LAND — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Republican Party platform has supported liquidation of federal land by giving it away, and on the opening day of the new Congress, the House of Representatives began paving the way to do just that.

Buried in a package of House rule changes on Jan. 3, an obscure provision banned the Congressional Budget Office from considering lost federal revenue if public land is transferred to other entities. In other words, Congress and we taxpayers are blocked from knowing the values of what we would lose.
_________________________________________

FORESTLAND ON ELK RIVER PRESERVED FOR PUBLIC ACCESS (The World)

A 210-acre parcel of land on the Elk River near Humbug Mountain has been preserved and is now open to the public after a recent purchase by the U.S. Forest Service from the Wild Rivers Land Trust.

The Bear Creek Natural Area, formerly known as the McGribble Tract, now serves as a conservation area for steelhead and other coastal fish species.
_________________________________________

CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION URGES TRUMP TO FUND HANFORD WORK (The World) h

The entire congressional delegation from Washington is asking President-elect Donald Trump to make environmental cleanup of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation a priority.

Hanford for years made plutonium for nuclear weapons, and now is engaged in a multi-decade cleanup of the resulting waste at a cost of some $2 billion per year.
_________________________________________

TIME TO PAY THE PIPER — OPINION (The World)

If there was one telling quote from Saturdays legislative town hall in Florence held by Oregon Sen. Arnie Roblan and Rep. Caddy McKeown, it was when Sen. Roblan suggested to constituents a permanent solution to the public employee retirement system.

“Everyone has to keep praying that those of us in tier one die soon,” he said.
_________________________________________

DEBATE SPILLS OVER THE DAMS (Daily Astorian)

-Locals got their chance to comment on the future of dams-

Supporters of the removal of four dams on the Snake River rallied at Astorias Suomi Hall Monday before attending the last of 16 public scoping meetings organized by federal agencies to gather public comment on the future operation of the Columbia and Snake Rivers hydroelectric dam system.

_________________________________________

JUDGE TO ALLOW EXPERT WITNESS IN SICK LEAVE LAWSUIT (Albany Democrat Herald)

The state of Oregon will have the opportunity to use an expert witness to research the financial records of counties involved in a lawsuit challenging the states paid sick leave law, Linn County Circuit Court Judge Daniel Murphy has ruled.

In December, Murphy ruled in favor of eight counties seeking a summary judgment that paid sick leave is an unfunded mandate and a new program.
_________________________________________

FIRST LOAN FROM NEW FUND WILL SUPPORT EASTERN OREGON MILLS, CREATE JOBS (OregonBusiness)

The Western Juniper Industry Fund WJIF was established by the Oregon Legislature in 2015 to provide economic assistance to wood processors in Central and Eastern Oregon in order to speed the harvesting and processing of Western Juniper.
_________________________________________

OBAMACARE REPEAL IN OREGON: HUGE JOB LOSSES, MORE CHARITY CARE (Oregon Business Journal)

Affordable Care Act repeal could cost Oregon 45,000 public and private sector jobs in 2019, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

The lost jobs would come as a result of the loss of premium tax credits and the potential retraction of the Medicaid expansion. All told, 550,000 Oregonians either receive subsidies or gained Medicaid coverage under the ACA.
_________________________________________

CITY CLUB OF PORTLAND – VIDEO AND RESEARCH LINKS (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

Last Friday, January 6th, 2016, Mark was the guest for the City Club of Portlands Friday Forum. The event was titled Recovery for some? Oregon Economic Review & Forecast.

OSL ed. note – Mark McMullen, Director of Oregon’s Office of Economic Analysis _________________________________________

WE USED A NEW APP TO COMPARE PORTLAND’S HEALTH RISKS AGAINST THREE OTHER WESTERN CITIES (Willamette Week)

-The results from Upstream Reports? Not great news.-

People moving into a neighborhood tend to ask the same questions. Is it friendly? How are the schools? Is there much crime?

Upstream Research wants to help people add some new criteria: Will the local air hurt my health? How’s the water? Can you get cancer here?
_________________________________________

OREGON OFFICIALS OPTIMISTIC FEMA WILL PROVIDE STORM REIMBURSEMENT (KVAL)

After meeting with FEMA officials Tuesday, the Oregon Office of Emergency Management feels confident they will receive reimbursement for the December, 2016 ice storm.
_________________________________________
State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit: http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 11, 2017 OSL eClips

January 10, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Pension reforms back on the table for 2017 legislative session
* 7 transportation bills proposed in the 2017 Oregon Legislature.
* Let’s preserve our state’s common ground: outside — Guest Opinion
* Sen. Peter Courtney wants community colleges and universities to merge – if they want to
* Killer algae blooms linked to El Nino, Oregon State researchers find
* Big change: Medical marijuana dispensaries no longer selling rec pot
* Gov. Kate Brown talks gun-control, pensions, budget and more
* Kate Brown sworn in for first elected term
* Teresa Alonso Leon blazes path for future leaders
* Organizational Days kicks off at the Capitol
* Lane County may seek state money to buy Eugene’s City Hall block
* Unity needs a purpose — Opinion
* Gratitude to many — Opinion
* House convenes, disagrees over committee appointments
* Counties pressured to exit $1.4 billion forest lawsuit
* Brown wants state to ‘move forward’ in spirit of bipartisanship
* Oregon gets C- in nationwide education report
* Before Bend expands, it needs money for roads, sewers
* Plan for housing on mine near Terrebonne could return
* Deschutes River Woods group seeks stricter rules for dirt removal
* Taking the measure of Bend rental vacancies
* Editorial: Use audits to improve state programs — Opinion
* Oregon Gov. Kate Brown Takes Oath And Calls For Tax, Pension Reform
* Gov. Kate Brown Signals Strong Push For Transportation Funding Package
* Oregon Lawmakers Gather In Salem To Take The Oath Of Office
* Kate Brown Takes Office & Death Penalty: Murder Victim’s Mother – Think Out Loud
* Ag labor shortages defy easy fixes
* Environmental groups want work halted on Snake River dams
* Industry to air concerns about herbicide-resistant weeds
* Environmentalists win $60,000 for blocking motorized juniper removal
* U.S. had near record heat, costly weather disasters in 2016
* Flu widespread in Oregon, expected to get worse
* Water outlook looking good as snow keeps falling
* Our view: Brown sets priorities in inaugural speech
* Invasive plants taking over Gearhart dunes
* Study documents tree species decline due to climate warming
* Oregon dispensary sales shrink as fewer products reach shelves
* Home Business Coast River Business Journal Online course provides safety training for young Oregon workers
* Editorial: County, others should opt out of timber lawsuit — Opinion
* Local soldiers deploy for desert warfare training
* Foster child respite care program launched here
* Legislative pay won’t deepen budget woes — Opinion
* Climate cycles drive shellfish toxins
* Gov. Kate Brown’s Inaugural Speech Pledges Pork for Rural Oregon But No Plan on PERS
* For the Poorest and Sickest, Librarians Often Play Doctor
* CCO Surveys Show Member Satisfaction, Access to Care
* CCOs Ranked: Members Rate Jackson Care Connect Best Medicaid Plan

____________________

PENSION REFORMS BACK ON THE TABLE FOR 2017 LEGISLATIVE SESSION (Portland Oregonian)

Sen. Tim Knopp, R-Bend, and Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, teed up what could be the most contentious debate of the upcoming legislative session by introducing two bills to make money-saving changes to Oregon’s public employee retirement system.

_________________________________________

7 TRANSPORTATION BILLS PROPOSED IN THE 2017 OREGON LEGISLATURE. (Portland Oregonian)

7 transportation bills proposed in the 2017 Oregon Legislature.

_________________________________________

LET’S PRESERVE OUR STATE’S COMMON GROUND: OUTSIDE — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Over the past year, “us” and “them” became more entrenched and widespread. Politically, _________________________________________

SEN. PETER COURTNEY WANTS COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES TO MERGE – IF THEY WANT TO (Portland Oregonian)

Senate President Peter Courtney introduced a controversial bill Monday that would allow Oregon community colleges and public universities to voluntarily merge, a proposal that nobody in higher education circles was clamoring for but Courtney said could potentially mean big savings for cash-strapped students.

_________________________________________

KILLER ALGAE BLOOMS LINKED TO EL NINO, OREGON STATE RESEARCHERS FIND (Portland Oregonian)

Researchers from Oregon State University have found a strong link between the circulation of warm water in the Pacific Ocean and the devastating toxic algae blooms that have wreaked havoc on wildlife and shellfisheries along the west coast in recent years.

_________________________________________

BIG CHANGE: MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARIES NO LONGER SELLING REC POT (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon this month passed the latest marijuana milestone: the end of recreational sales at medical marijuana dispensaries.

_________________________________________

GOV. KATE BROWN TALKS GUN-CONTROL, PENSIONS, BUDGET AND MORE (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown on Monday held her first press conference of 2017, taking questions on a wide range of topics including gun control, education, transportation and Oregon’s public employee retirement system.

_________________________________________

KATE BROWN SWORN IN FOR FIRST ELECTED TERM (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown was sworn in for her first elected term Monday.

_________________________________________

TERESA ALONSO LEON BLAZES PATH FOR FUTURE LEADERS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Only minutes after she had been sworn in as a state Representative in the Oregon Legislature, Teresa Alonso Leon had a special guest.

_________________________________________

ORGANIZATIONAL DAYS KICKS OFF AT THE CAPITOL (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Legislature meets today to swear in members, adopt rules and read bills.

_________________________________________

LANE COUNTY MAY SEEK STATE MONEY TO BUY EUGENE’S CITY HALL BLOCK (Eugene Register-Guard)

-County commissioners are looking at $8 million that Tillamook County didn’t use after it abandoned its own courthouse project-

Last month, the Tillamook County commissioners pulled the plug on their proposal for a new courthouse annex, because of a lack of money.

_________________________________________

UNITY NEEDS A PURPOSE — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Gov. Brown opens door to Republican ideas-

Unity is a common theme of inaugural addresses. What the speaker often means is that everyone ought to fall in line behind the person being inaugurated. The word unity is used as a substitute for obedience. Only winners, after all, get to deliver inaugurals. A person taking the oath of office can claim vindication in victory, and ask that vanquished opponents accept their mandate.

_________________________________________

GRATITUDE TO MANY — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Storm and its aftermath test workers mettle-

As the snow-covered ice blanketing much of Lane County slowly melts, spare a thought  and some gratitude  for the people performing the jobs needed to keep the area functioning.

_________________________________________

HOUSE CONVENES, DISAGREES OVER COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS (Portland Tribune)

-The 60 members of the house, including 14 new state representatives, took the oath of office Monday morning.-

In the year’s first meeting of the Oregon House of Representatives Monday, members of both parties acknowledged the legislative session’s imminent hurdles and called for communication across party lines, despite a disagreement over Oregon House rules regarding committee assignments.

_________________________________________

COUNTIES PRESSURED TO EXIT $1.4 BILLION FOREST LAWSUIT (Portland Tribune)

-Environmental groups press case that forests have value beyond their timber.-

Fifteen Oregon counties must soon decide whether to opt out of a class action lawsuit seeking $1.4 billion for allegedly insufficient logging in state forests.

_________________________________________

BROWN WANTS STATE TO ‘MOVE FORWARD’ IN SPIRIT OF BIPARTISANSHIP (Portland Tribune)

-Oregon’s 38th governor tells lawmakers she wants to tackle graduation rates, transportation funding and gun loopholes as top legislative priorities.-

Gov. Kate Brown was sworn in for the first time as elected governor Monday, Jan. 9, after serving in the position for nearly two years.

_________________________________________

OREGON GETS C- IN NATIONWIDE EDUCATION REPORT (Bend Bulletin)

The national average was a C

Education in Oregon received a grade of C-minus from data collected in a recent nationwide report.

Factors including students chance for success, K-12 achievement and school finance contributed to Oregon’s overall grade of 70.4 out of 100 points.

Oregon fell 40th, just behind North Carolina, in a ranking of the 50 states and District of Columbia.

_________________________________________

BEFORE BEND EXPANDS, IT NEEDS MONEY FOR ROADS, SEWERS (Bend Bulletin)

-City councilors must make a plan to pay for new development-

Last month, the state gave Bend permission to expand outward by 2,380 acres  space that’s desperately needed in a city facing a severe housing shortage. There’s only one problem  nothing can be built there until the city finds a way to pay for new sewers, waterlines and roads.

_________________________________________

PLAN FOR HOUSING ON MINE NEAR TERREBONNE COULD RETURN (Bend Bulletin)

-Developer must complete environmental review for proposal to go forward-

Controversial plans for a subdivision to be built on a potentially hazardous former mining site near Terrebonne were withdrawn by the developer last summer, but a new proposal could come up for county approval again this year.

_________________________________________

DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS GROUP SEEKS STRICTER RULES FOR DIRT REMOVAL (Bend Bulletin)

-Residents want a permit requirement to take more than necessary for homebuilding-

Worried about the prospect of a rock quarry opening nearby, a coalition of Deschutes River Woods residents wants Deschutes County to require a permit to remove more earth than needed for building on residential properties. The group will make its case to the county planning commission Thursday.

_________________________________________

TAKING THE MEASURE OF BEND RENTAL VACANCIES (Bend Bulletin)

-COROA survey stands alone, with gaps-

Its hard to spend much time looking for a home or apartment for rent in Bend without hearing about the city’s vacancy rate, but there’s more to the persistently low figure than meets the eye.

Spurred by thousands of new arrivals and a shortage of multifamily housing, the vacancy rate for units in Bend and throughout Central Oregon has stayed below 2 percent since 2012, according to the annual rental survey produced by the Central Oregon Rental Owners Association.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: USE AUDITS TO IMPROVE STATE PROGRAMS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Dennis Richardson, Oregon’s first Republican statewide office holder in years already is making news. He hopes to expand the secretary of states auditing role, something thats sure to draw attention to the office and the man who fills it.

_________________________________________

OREGON GOV. KATE BROWN TAKES OATH AND CALLS FOR TAX, PENSION REFORM (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown took the oath of office Monday and delivered her State of the State address.

_________________________________________

GOV. KATE BROWN SIGNALS STRONG PUSH FOR TRANSPORTATION FUNDING PACKAGE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown signaled Monday that shell make a strong push toward getting a transportation funding package through the state legislature.

_________________________________________

OREGON LAWMAKERS GATHER IN SALEM TO TAKE THE OATH OF OFFICE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Members of the 2017 Oregon legislature gathered in Salem Monday to take the oath of office.

_________________________________________

KATE BROWN TAKES OFFICE & DEATH PENALTY: MURDER VICTIM’S MOTHER – THINK OUT LOUD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Governor Kate Brown is inaugurated and delivers an inaugural speech, which doubles as a State of the State address. We talk to OPB reporter Jeff Mapes.

For the next installment in our series on capital punishment in Oregon, Mary Elledge joins us to share her perspective on the death penalty. Elledges son Rob was murdered 30 years ago, and she has served as the chapter leader for the Portland-area chapter of Parents of Murdered Children.

_________________________________________

AG LABOR SHORTAGES DEFY EASY FIXES (Capital Press)

-At the annual American Farm Bureau Federation convention, Washington vegetable growers ask why immigration reform has to be so complicated.-

Washington state vegetable farmers Burr and Rosella Mosby shifted in their seats and furrowed their brows as they listened to a panel discuss immigration issues during a session at the American Farm Bureau Federations annual convention.

_________________________________________

ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS WANT WORK HALTED ON SNAKE RIVER DAMS (Capital Press)

-Kevin Lewis of Idaho Rivers United says suspending the infrastructure work is needed to ensure a level playing field while agencies consider potential removal.-

Environmental groups are asking a federal court to halt 11 infrastructure projects on four lower Snake River dams in Washington state that could ultimately be removed if a pending review determines the dams need to come out to help salmon.

_________________________________________

INDUSTRY TO AIR CONCERNS ABOUT HERBICIDE-RESISTANT WEEDS (Capital Press)

-The Pacific Northwest agricultural industry will discuss herbicide resistance developing in weeds at a Jan. 24 listening session in Pasco, Wash.-

Concerns about the increasing number of cases of herbicide-resistant weeds have prompted the industry to hold seven listening sessions across the country to look for answers.

_________________________________________

ENVIRONMENTALISTS WIN $60,000 FOR BLOCKING MOTORIZED JUNIPER REMOVAL (Capital Press)

-Judge finds groups efforts to block BLM actions as reasonable, and demand for fees justified.-

An environmentalist group has won more than $60,000 in attorney fees for blocking juniper removal with motorized vehicles on 80,000 acres in Eastern Oregon.

_________________________________________

U.S. HAD NEAR RECORD HEAT, COSTLY WEATHER DISASTERS IN 2016 (Capital Press)

-The average temperature last year in the Lower 48 states was 54.9 degrees, nearly 3 degrees above the 20th Century average of 52.-

With steamy nights, sticky days and torrential downpours, last year went down as one of the warmest and wildest weather years on record in the United States.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Monday that 2016 was the second hottest year in the U.S. as Alaska warmed dramatically and nighttime temperatures set a record.

_________________________________________

FLU WIDESPREAD IN OREGON, EXPECTED TO GET WORSE (East Oregonian)

-Getting flu shot lowers misery quotient, helps protect more vulnerable people-

You might want to get that flu shot.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that Oregon is one of eight states where flu is considered widespread. Flu Bites, Oregons public health flu tracker, shows a steep spike in cases over the last two weeks in December. Lane Countys Health and Human Services reported seven deaths in the Eugene-Springfield area, all elderly.

_________________________________________

WATER OUTLOOK LOOKING GOOD AS SNOW KEEPS FALLING (East Oregonian)

-The Natural Resource Conservation Service has issued its Jan. 1 streamflow forecast for Oregon basins.-

Water supplies for farms and fish could be well above average across the Umatilla, Walla Walla and Willow Creek basins this summer if winter continues its cold and snowy ways.

The Natural Resource Conservation Service published its Oregon Basin Outlook Report for Jan. 1, and signs point to a strong water year ahead  assuming Mother Nature cooperates.

_________________________________________

OUR VIEW: BROWN SETS PRIORITIES IN INAUGURAL SPEECH (East Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown outlined three priorities in her inaugural speech Monday, which  if she and the 2017 Legislature achieve them  could dramatically improve Oregon:

Create more and better jobs in rural Oregon.

Expand health insurance so all Oregon children are covered.

Improve Oregon’s dismal rate of high school graduation.

_________________________________________

INVASIVE PLANTS TAKING OVER GEARHART DUNES (Daily Astorian)

-Safety, fire and invasive species among panelists concerns-

Residents have seen vegetation on Gearhart dunes west of Ocean Avenue and south of E Street multiply over the last two decades. The city now grapples with whether to address the noxious weeds, shore pine trees and other species covering the dunes with a management plan or continue to let the vegetation grow in the city park area.

_________________________________________

STUDY DOCUMENTS TREE SPECIES DECLINE DUE TO CLIMATE WARMING (Daily Astorian)

-A casualty of global warming-

A type of tree that thrives in soggy soil from Alaska to Northern California and is valued for its commercial and cultural uses could become a noticeable casualty of climate warming over the next 50 years, an independent study has concluded.

Yellow cedar, named for its distinctive yellow wood, already is under consideration for federal listing as a threatened or endangered species.

_________________________________________

OREGON DISPENSARY SALES SHRINK AS FEWER PRODUCTS REACH SHELVES (Daily Astorian)

Oregon marijuana dispensaries have been reeling since October, when increased testing standards became required by at certified labs. The result has been an immense backlog of extracts and edibles being delayed in distribution and dispensaries around Clatsop County have been directly impacted by the bottleneck.

_________________________________________

HOME BUSINESS COAST RIVER BUSINESS JOURNAL ONLINE COURSE PROVIDES SAFETY TRAINING FOR YOUNG OREGON WORKERS (Daily Astorian)

Young workers across Oregon have a new tool to stay safe while on the job: online safety awareness training.

Created by the nonprofit Oregon Young Employee Safety Coalition, the interactive training program  accessible by smartphone and tablet  covers everything from finding and controlling hazards, and young worker rights and responsibilities to how to speak up for safety and how to prepare for emergencies at work.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: COUNTY, OTHERS SHOULD OPT OUT OF TIMBER LAWSUIT — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-We believe the best course for the county and other entities is to opt out.-

Clatsop County commissioners face a tough, potentially divisive meeting Wednesday when they are scheduled to decide whether to stay in or exit a $1.4 billion class-action timber-management lawsuit against the state.

_________________________________________

LOCAL SOLDIERS DEPLOY FOR DESERT WARFARE TRAINING (Albany Democrat Herald)

Eighty-five soldiers from the 224th Engineer Company in Albany will spend 21 days at the National Training Center in the Mojave Desert. The soldiers drew their weapons, gas masks and rucks and boarded a charter bus in Albany Monday morning.

_________________________________________

FOSTER CHILD RESPITE CARE PROGRAM LAUNCHED HERE (Albany Democrat Herald)

Morrison Child & Family Services based in Portland plans to expand its Planned and Crisis Respite Care for foster care children into Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties.

Shaun Matthias, a recruiter for Morrison, said the program matches families that are willing to take foster children with behavioral issues for a day or a weekend, to allow foster families some respite time.

_________________________________________

LEGISLATIVE PAY WON’T DEEPEN BUDGET WOES — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

A pair of legislators from central Oregon recently made a bit of news when they said they would not accept the pay raises for legislators that were included in Gov. Kate Brown’s proposed budget.

_________________________________________

CLIMATE CYCLES DRIVE SHELLFISH TOXINS (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

A new study by Oregon State University researchers and others could help predict the spikes in toxic algae that have led to periodic closures of shellfish harvests on the West Coast.

The study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, finds a strong connection between warm ocean conditions caused by two major climatic cycles  El Nino and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, or PDO  and periodic increases in domoic acid in shellfish.

_________________________________________

GOV. KATE BROWN’S INAUGURAL SPEECH PLEDGES PORK FOR RURAL OREGONBUT NO PLAN ON PERS (Willamette Week)

-Oregon’s 38th governor details a legislative agenda that almost makes up in brevity what it lacks in ambition.-

Gov. Kate Brown, sworn in today as Oregon’s 38th governor, gave her inaugural speech to a joint session of the Legislature today and offered a mish-mash of ideassome specific, some vague, but few bold or surprising.

_________________________________________

FOR THE POOREST AND SICKEST, LIBRARIANS OFTEN PLAY DOCTOR (Governing)

-Libraries are frequently forced to deal with people’s health problems. That’s why some are adding medical professionals to their staff.-

I’m always surprised by how many health questions I get, said Renee Pokorny, branch supervisor at the Philadelphia Free Library.

It’s no surprise that she’s surprised. According to a 2015 Pew Research Center study, 73 percent of people who visit a public library in America go looking for answers about their health.

_________________________________________

CCO SURVEYS SHOW MEMBER SATISFACTION, ACCESS TO CARE (The Lund Report)

Please contact the State Library of access to this premium story from the Lund Report.  library.help@state.or.us , 503-378-8800

-In-depth look at Western Oregon Advanced Health shows CCO lagging statewide averages, while Willamette Valley Community Health performs better than most CCOs on many metrics-

In this sixth story of a seven-part Lund Report examination of Oregon’s coordinated care organizations, we are looking at two smaller CCOs whose members report very different experiences.

_________________________________________

CCOS RANKED: MEMBERS RATE JACKSON CARE CONNECT BEST MEDICAID PLAN (The Lund Report)

Please contact the State Library of access to this premium story from the Lund Report.  library.help@state.or.us , 503-378-8800

-An analysis by The Lund Report of thousands of responses to 29 questions about doctors, administrators, access to specialty services and other aspects of care yields insight into CCO member experiences-

Members of Jackson Care Connect are happier with their healthcare than any other CCO in the state. At Umpqua Health Alliance, CCO members are far less satisfied.

_________________________________________

State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit: http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 10, 2016 OSL eClips

January 09, 2017 eClips Weekend Edition

State Library eClips

* Oregon throws lifeline to districts worst at helping students learning English
* Oregon lawmakers craft bill targeting Comcast’s unpaid taxes
* Oregon lawmakers’ multimillion-dollar transportation dream meets reality: how to pay for it?
* Lead found on Oregon armory floor where loophole lets kids play
* Final Portland Superfund plan: $1.05 billion cleanup over 13 years
* Willamette Superfund cleanup plan is finished, now it’s time to get to work — Guest Opinion
* Hazelnuts from McMinnville farm stand linked to salmonella
* Backers of Longview coal terminal insist project will go forward despite state denial of sublease
* Federal judge dismisses Idaho governor’s lawsuit challenging sage grouse protections
* Jeanne Atkins: What I learned as secretary of state — Guest Opinion
* Many lives of Jordan Cove may have come to an end — Guest Opinion
* Portland’s work on homelessness is failing — Guest Opinion
* Budget, transportation funding top issues for legislature
* Salem, Oregon hospitals see surge in ER visits
* Salmonella linked to hazelnuts from McMinnville farm
* Snow across Oregon causes crashes, closures
* Districts debate adding days to current school year
* Public damage from last months ice storm tops $9.4 million, estimates show
* Concealed gun permit filings climb
* Read sworn in as treasurer
* Roadside stand hazelnuts linked to salmonellosis
* Richardson presses for audits of ‘controversial’ topics
* State economist: No tax reform from 2017 Oregon Legislature
* EPA bows to public pressure, adopts more rigorous cleanup plan for Portland Harbor Superfund site
* Port sues Monsanto for PCB contamination in rivers, slough
* Former Oregon Legislator Points Finger at Congress for $18K Annual Insurance Bill
* Council to consider federal, state legislative agendas Thursday
* Paid cash to delay retirement: How much would it take? — Guest Opinion
* Editorial: New regulations for ranchers take some important steps — Opinion
* Full employment in Bend and its challenges
* A lot of pot was bought in 2016
* Commentary: Another U.S. baby boom may be needed to prevent economic decline — Guest Opinion
* West Coast Crabbers Strike Ends After 11 Days
* Kate Brown To Take Oath, Deliver Inaugural Address Monday
* Flu Season Kicks Into Gear In Oregon
* West Coast Lawmakers Seek Ban On Offshore Drilling
* Idaho irrigators oppose Oregon endangered fish reintroduction effort
* Other views: Improving health care in Oregon — Guest Opinion
* Making records law work — Opinion
* State budget takes center stage
* State seeking rivers to include in waterways program
* The case for hospital rate setting commissions
* The Worst of Portland’s Housing Crunch May Be Over
* Walden backs moves to cut ‘costly, overreaching’ federal rules
* NeighborImpact’s food recovery program gets DEQ grant
* She Became A Citizen Five Years Ago. Now She’s A State Lawmaker
* A Fragile Year: Portland Art Glass Maker Uroboros’ Founder On Selling His Business
* After Flint, are schools being more vigilant about tainted water?
* Hayden Criticizes Bureaucratic Hurdles to Get Dental Care for Poor Women
* Brown’s Effort to Cover Immigrant Children May Depend on Healthcare Industry
* Its Time for Lower Prescription Drug Prices in Oregon
* Former Oregon Legislator Points Finger at Congress for $18K Annual Insurance Bill

____________________

OREGON THROWS LIFELINE TO DISTRICTS WORST AT HELPING STUDENTS LEARNING ENGLISH (Portland Oregonian)

A huge share of students who need to learn English as a second language are let down by Oregon’s public schools.

Three-fourths of those students aren’t proficient in math, 60 percent can’t read well by the end of middle school and one third never graduate from high school, according to the most recent graduation and test results, from 2015 and 2016.

_________________________________________

OREGON LAWMAKERS CRAFT BILL TARGETING COMCAST’S UNPAID TAXES (Portland Oregonian)

Comcast has spent years fighting its Oregon property taxes in court, in the process amassing a tax bill that could be well over $100 million.

As the legal fight enters its eighth year the bill remains unpaid, Oregon lawmakers are preparing legislation that would charge interest on large, deferred corporate tax bills.

_________________________________________

OREGON LAWMAKERS’ MULTIMILLION-DOLLAR TRANSPORTATION DREAM MEETS REALITY: HOW TO PAY FOR IT? (Portland Oregonian)

Weeks before lawmakers return to the Capitol for what’s shaping up as a difficult 2017 session, one of their signature goals is facing serious challenges.

A special committee that toured the state for months to craft plans for shoring up Oregon’s transportation system has yet to agree on what a multimillion-dollar proposal should look like.

_________________________________________

LEAD FOUND ON OREGON ARMORY FLOOR WHERE LOOPHOLE LETS KIDS PLAY (Portland Oregonian)

A new inspection has found lead on the floor of the old Oregon National Guard armory in Ontario, in a room where young children continue to attend tumbling classes despite a halt in events at contaminated Guard buildings nationwide.

_________________________________________

FINAL PORTLAND SUPERFUND PLAN: $1.05 BILLION CLEANUP OVER 13 YEARS (Portland Oregonian)

At long last, federal officials released the final plan to clean up thousands of acres of contaminated soil and toxic materials along a 10-mile stretch of the Willamette River in Portland.

A $746 million draft plan unveiled last June prompted outcry from conservation groups and neighborhood associations that the federal government wasn’t going far enough to remove dangerous materials from the river and address decades of industrial pollution.

_________________________________________

WILLAMETTE SUPERFUND CLEANUP PLAN IS FINISHED, NOW IT’S TIME TO GET TO WORK — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

On Friday, 16 years after Portland Harbor was first listed as a federal Superfund site, the Environmental Protection Agency released its “record of decision.” In essence, it’s the cleanup plan for a 10-mile stretch of the Willamette River that extends from the Fremont Bridge almost to the Columbia River. Over many decades, this portion of river was polluted by toxic chemicals, which remain today on the river bottom as well much of the riverbank.

_________________________________________

HAZELNUTS FROM MCMINNVILLE FARM STAND LINKED TO SALMONELLA (Portland Oregonian)

People with hazelnuts from the Schmidt Farm and Nursery farm stand in McMinnville should get rid of them because the nuts have been linked to salmonellosis with five people, the Oregon Health Authority said Friday.

The five became ill with a specific strain of Salmonella Typhimurium between Oct. 15 and Dec. 13, the health authority said in a news release.

_________________________________________

BACKERS OF LONGVIEW COAL TERMINAL INSIST PROJECT WILL GO FORWARD DESPITE STATE DENIAL OF SUBLEASE (Portland Oregonian)

Backers of a proposed coal export terminal west of Longview are at loggerheads with Washington’s outgoing commissioner of public lands after he rejected a request to sublease state-owned land along the Columbia River necessary for a loading dock.

The aquatic lands are currently leased to a subsidiary of Alcoa, Northwest Alloys, which previously operated an aluminum smelter at the site.

_________________________________________

FEDERAL JUDGE DISMISSES IDAHO GOVERNOR’S LAWSUIT CHALLENGING SAGE GROUSE PROTECTIONS (Portland Oregonian)

A judge has rejected Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s lawsuit contending the Obama administration acted illegally by imposing federal land-use restrictions intended to protect the sage grouse in Idaho and southwestern Montana.

_________________________________________

JEANNE ATKINS: WHAT I LEARNED AS SECRETARY OF STATE — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

When Gov. Kate Brown first took office in February 2015, I had just retired and was looking forward to reading books and traveling.  I offered my congratulations but also, rather casually, offered to help in any way I could.

I ended up serving 22 months as the head of a 200-employee agency, with a bonus opportunity to serve as chief elections officer during the most contentious presidential race in history.

_________________________________________

MANY LIVES OF JORDAN COVE MAY HAVE COME TO AN END — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Liquefied Natural Gas LNG facilities, like cats, are known to have many lives. They also have a tendency to land on their feet after a fall. The announcement last week that the proposal for Jordan Cove’s LNG export terminal will be altered and resubmitted to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FERC is a case in point. The Jordan Cove proposal has survived many regulatory and market setbacks in its thirteen-year life. However, the question remains: Can it survive a dour market and more efficient competitors?

_________________________________________

PORTLAND’S WORK ON HOMELESSNESS IS FAILING — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

On Jan. 2, just two days after Mayor Ted Wheeler was sworn in, a homeless man named Mark Elliot Johnson died of hypothermia on East Burnside and 99th Avenue. This will be the first of many homeless people who die in Portland this year – 88 died in 2015.

What we are doing as a city to address homelessness is not working, and it is actually harming people’s efforts to give and get help.

_________________________________________

BUDGET, TRANSPORTATION FUNDING TOP ISSUES FOR LEGISLATURE (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Legislature will meet Monday to swear in newly elected members, adopt rules, and officially read bills  lots of bills.

The Senate has set a record for the number of presession-filed bills, with 738 this year.

_________________________________________

SALEM, OREGON HOSPITALS SEE SURGE IN ER VISITS (Salem Statesman Journal) With flu season gaining steam and the state’s population continuing to grow, hospitals across Oregon are facing surges in emergency room and hospital visits.

At the Salem Health emergency department  the busiest ER in the state  patient visits are up by over 20 percent in the past week, said the hospital’s Chief Nursing Officer, Sarah Horn.

_________________________________________

SALMONELLA LINKED TO HAZELNUTS FROM MCMINNVILLE FARM (Salem Statesman Journal)

Hazelnuts sold from a roadside farm stand in McMinnville have been identified as the source of a salmonella outbreak.

Oregon health officials are urging anyone who bought hazelnuts from Schmidt Farm and Nursery, at 13940 SW Hwy 18, to throw them away.

_________________________________________

SNOW ACROSS OREGON CAUSES CRASHES, CLOSURES (Salem Statesman Journal)

Roadways were blanketed with snow, businesses closed their doors, and some drivers spun out of control Saturday as a winter storm made its way through northwest Oregon.

Roughly three inches of snow and a third of an inch of ice activated a storm warning for the Central Willamette Valley Saturday going into Sunday, but drivers still hit the roads, causing multiple crashes on Interstate 5.

_________________________________________

DISTRICTS DEBATE ADDING DAYS TO CURRENT SCHOOL YEAR (Salem Statesman Journal)

Students and teachers shouldn’t start counting down the days until summer vacation  at least, not yet.

With multiple snow days and delays in the past few weeks, and the potential for more to come, districts have already used some of their extra instructional hours and may have to add days to meet state requirements.

_________________________________________

PUBLIC DAMAGE FROM LAST MONTHS ICE STORM TOPS $9.4 MILLION, ESTIMATES SHOW (Eugene Register-Guard)

Local public agencies and utilities reported more than $9.4 million in damage, labor costs and other expenses from last months devastating ice storm, according to preliminary estimates.

The damage is the most incurred from bad weather in recent memory, Lane County Emergency Manager Linda Cook said.

_________________________________________

CONCEALED GUN PERMIT FILINGS CLIMB (Eugene Register-Guard)

Danette Olsen, a records officer with the Lane County Sheriffs Office, says concealed handgun license applicants offer her a variety of reasons for wanting a permit allowing them to legally carry a hidden pistol in public.

_________________________________________

READ SWORN IN AS TREASURER (Portland Tribune)

He served as a state representative from Beaverton since 2007.

Tobias Read of Beaverton was sworn in today as Oregon’s new treasurer.

He replaces Ted Wheeler, who has been elected mayor of Portland.

_________________________________________

ROADSIDE STAND HAZELNUTS LINKED TO SALMONELLOSIS (Portland Tribune)

State said anyone who bought nuts sold by Schmidt Farm and Nursery at the stand on Highway 18 near McMinnville should discard them.

The Oregon Health Authority is warning that hazelnuts sold at a roadside stand on Highway 18 near McMinnville could be linked to recent cases of salmonellosis.

_________________________________________

RICHARDSON PRESSES FOR AUDITS OF ‘CONTROVERSIAL’ TOPICS (Portland Tribune)

Republican’s audit choices could get more scrutiny from Democrats who control most offices.

Secretary of State Dennis Richardson said this week he wants his office to pursue audits on controversial topics.

_________________________________________

STATE ECONOMIST: NO TAX REFORM FROM 2017 OREGON LEGISLATURE (Portland Tribune)

Office of Economic Analysis Director Mark McMullen predicts no alternative to the defeated corporate sales tax will pass the upcoming session.

Although Oregon is facing a $1.7 billion budget shortfall over the next two years, state economist Mark McMullen does not expect the 2017 Oregon Legislature to pass any tax reform measures that would raise significant amounts of new revenue.

_________________________________________

EPA BOWS TO PUBLIC PRESSURE, ADOPTS MORE RIGOROUS CLEANUP PLAN FOR PORTLAND HARBOR SUPERFUND SITE (Portland Tribune)

-Agency’s official Record of Decision is released, requiring cleanup that will take 13 years, cost more than $1 billion-

Responding to overwhelming public sentiment from Portland residents, the EPA on Friday afternoon released a final cleanup order for the Portland Harbor Superfund site that is significantly more aggressive than the draft plan it proposed in June.

_________________________________________

PORT SUES MONSANTO FOR PCB CONTAMINATION IN RIVERS, SLOUGH (Portland Tribune)

-Local agency is the 10th public entity in the West to sue the company for PCB contamination. Monsanto says the lawsuit ‘lacks merit and conflicts with the ongoing Portland Harbor case.’-

The Port of Portland is suing Monsanto Co. and companies Solutia Inc. and Pharmacia LLC for PCB contamination of the Willamette River, the Columbia River and McBride Slough.

Attorneys representing the port filed the 29-page lawsuit Wednesday, Jan. 4, in U.S. District Court.

_________________________________________

FORMER OREGON LEGISLATOR POINTS FINGER AT CONGRESS FOR $18K ANNUAL INSURANCE BILL (Portland Tribune)

-Chip Shields cites Republican-backed cuts to federal risk corridor program in criticism of high marketplace premiums-

A former Oregon state senator who was a vocal advocate of health insurance reform before leaving the Senate last year says his own family faces premiums of over $18,000 per year  and hes blaming Republicans in Congress who, unable to repeal the Affordable Care Act during Barack Obamas administration, slashed funding for a critical part of that law.

_________________________________________

COUNCIL TO CONSIDER FEDERAL, STATE LEGISLATIVE AGENDAS THURSDAY (Portland Tribune)

-Rent control, just-cause evictions, sanctuary city protections, funding requests among proposed priorities-

The City Council will consider adopting its priorities for the new sessions of Congress and the Oregon Legislature on Thursday.

_________________________________________

PAID CASH TO DELAY RETIREMENT: HOW MUCH WOULD IT TAKE? — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

One reason Olivia Mitchell wants to save Social Security is to avoid the reduction in benefits she expects from the ailing program just when she wants to retire.

But Mitchell spends a lot more time worrying about retirement professionally, as an economist at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Social Security as a program is facing insolvency and will not be able to pay the full promised benefits in about 16 years from now, she said. It concerns me that nobody’s really talking seriously about fixing it.

_________________________________________

EDITORIAL: NEW REGULATIONS FOR RANCHERS TAKE SOME IMPORTANT STEPS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Starting Jan. 1, the federal Food and Drug Administration tightened the rules about using antibiotics on feed animals. When the Oregon Legislature convenes Feb. 1, it will consider a state measure that would further tighten rules governing antibiotic use.

The changes could help combat the growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bugs, but there are legitimate concerns from ranchers.

_________________________________________

FULL EMPLOYMENT IN BEND AND ITS CHALLENGES (Bend Bulletin)

-High employment brings higher wages, risk of inflation-

Almost two years into Bends economic expansion, the rate of job growth has yet to slow down. As a result, the unemployment rate in Bend has slid below the natural rate of unemployment in the city, an economic condition known as full employment.

I think, with a straight face, were probably at full employment, said Damon Runberg, regional economist with the Oregon Employment Department.

_________________________________________

A LOT OF POT WAS BOUGHT IN 2016 (Bend Bulletin)

While some activists are planning to give away marijuana on Inauguration Day, other entrepreneurs are taking a different approach: making a ton of money from it.

According to Governing.com, 29 states and the District of Columbia have or will soon have laws legalizing marijuana in some form. Use of recreational marijuana is legal in eight states.

As its popularity has grown, so have profits.

_________________________________________

COMMENTARY: ANOTHER U.S. BABY BOOM MAY BE NEEDED TO PREVENT ECONOMIC DECLINE — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Shortly before Christmas, the U.S. Census Bureau put some coal in the nations holiday stocking. It released data highlighting a worrisome trend: The population grew a subdued 0.7 percent, the lowest rate of growth since the Great Depression years of 1936 and 1937. Declines in the birth rate and the slowing pace of immigration are to blame.

Ask an economist why this matters and youll get a welter of contradictory answers. But if you sift through the historical data on the subject, its hard to deny that the demographic slowdown, should it continue, likely puts a damper on future economic growth.

_________________________________________

WEST COAST CRABBERS STRIKE ENDS AFTER 11 DAYS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

An 11-day strike by thousands of West Coast crab fishermen has ended after a successful negotiation of prices with seafood processors.

The agreement reached late Friday will restart the sputtering season for much-sought-after Dungeness crabs in Northern California, Oregon and Washington.

_________________________________________

KATE BROWN TO TAKE OATH, DELIVER INAUGURAL ADDRESS MONDAY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown will take the oath of office and deliver an inaugural address Monday.

Brown, a Democrat, became governor when John Kitzhaber resigned in February 2015. She was elected in November to serve the remaining two years of Kitzhabers term.

_________________________________________

FLU SEASON KICKS INTO GEAR IN OREGON (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Flu season appears to be taking hold in Oregon.

The number of outbreaks around Portland climbed from four a couple of weeks ago to 13 last week.

 

Tri-County health officer doctor Paul Lewis said hospitalizations are increasing.

_________________________________________

WEST COAST LAWMAKERS SEEK BAN ON OFFSHORE DRILLING (Jefferson Public Radio)

West Coast lawmakers are seeking a permanent ban on offshore drilling along the coast of Washington, Oregon and California. Democrat-sponsored bills have been introduced into both the Senate and House of Representatives.

There have been no oil and gas lease sales off the West Coast since 1984. But as the Trump administration prepares to take office, concerns are growing that could change.

_________________________________________

IDAHO IRRIGATORS OPPOSE OREGON ENDANGERED FISH REINTRODUCTION EFFORT (Capital Press)

-Irrigators in Idaho are fighting an effort by the State of Oregon to reintroduce endangered steelhead trout and chinook salmon to the Snake River above Hells Canyon.-

Idaho irrigators fear theyll be hurt financially if the State of Oregon prevails in a legal battle to force the reintroduction of endangered fish to the Snake River upstream of the Hells Canyon Complex of dams.

_________________________________________

OTHER VIEWS: IMPROVING HEALTH CARE IN OREGON — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

Oregon got both some good news and a pat on the back when the federal government recently announced the state is one of a handful chosen for a pilot program to provide better behavioral health care in areas that are currently under-served.

The two-year Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic project is part of a bigger effort to coordinate behavioral health care with other health care. It aims to improve access to high-quality care for people with mental health and substance abuse issues in both rural and urban areas through community clinics  and make this part of their overall health care.

_________________________________________

MAKING RECORDS LAW WORK — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown wants to hire a state employee who would mediate cases involving requests that the state release public records.

This is a good idea.

Alas, its also one that shouldn’t be necessary.

We applaud Browns proposal because we favor any effort to make it more likely that the public will have timely access to the records they are legally entitled to view and to possess.

_________________________________________

STATE BUDGET TAKES CENTER STAGE (The Dalles Chronicle)

In October, Rep. John Huffman, R-The Dalles, expressed concern that state officials would divert general fund dollars from veterans programs if Measure 96 was approved by voters on Nov. 8.

He said that concern became reality when Gov. Kate Brown proposed a $10 million cut in regular funding for veteran services in her 2017-19 budget plan.

_________________________________________

STATE SEEKING RIVERS TO INCLUDE IN WATERWAYS PROGRAM (Douglas County News-Review)

The public has a chance to add its favorite Oregon rivers to the State Scenic Waterways program.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department invites the public to help prioritize river segments for an ongoing study of candidates for the program, which protects a lake or rivers natural resources, scenic values and recreation.

_________________________________________

THE CASE FOR HOSPITAL RATE SETTING COMMISSIONS (OregonBusiness)

-City Club State of Reform panelists make the case for setting hospital rates to control costs and improve quality.-

The fate of health care reform is one of many uncertainties emerging in the wake of a Donald Trump presidency. A forum at the Portland City Club forum this morning filled the Multnomah Athletic Club ballroom. The speakers, former Gov. John Kitzhaber and Maryland governor Martin OMalley, were part of the draw.

_________________________________________

THE WORST OF PORTLAND’S HOUSING CRUNCH MAY BE OVER (Willamette Week)

-State economist says developers are producing more units in response to higher prices and consumers finally have more money to spend.-

Josh Lehner is not given to flights of fancy or wild speculation.

A state economist who writes a blog when he’s not crunching numbers, Lehner  declared this week with the caveats characteristic of his professionthat the worst of Portland’s housing crisis may be over.

_________________________________________

WALDEN BACKS MOVES TO CUT ‘COSTLY, OVERREACHING’ FEDERAL RULES (KTVZ Bend)

-‘Unelected bureaucrats have to follow the law’-

Saying he is committed to growing the economy and protecting small businesses in Oregon, Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., said Thursday he supported bills passed by the House this week to rein in costly, burdensome and overreaching federal regulations.

_________________________________________

NEIGHBORIMPACT’S FOOD RECOVERY PROGRAM GETS DEQ GRANT (KTVZ Bend)

Late last month, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality announced a Materials Management Projects grant award of $50,000 to NeighborImpact’s Food Bank, specifically the food recovery program.

The food recovery program recovers produce, dairy products, bread and meat from 18 grocery partners, transporting the food in refrigerated trucks to NeighborImpact’s warehouse for distribution to 42 emergency food sites, i.e. partner agencies, in Central Oregon.

_________________________________________

SHE BECAME A CITIZEN FIVE YEARS AGO. NOW SHE’S A STATE LAWMAKER (KUOW)

This year’s state legislature will be among the most diverse in Oregon history. Among the new crop of lawmakers is Teresa Alonso Leon, who immigrated from Mexico as a child and became a U.S. citizen just five years ago.

_________________________________________

A FRAGILE YEAR: PORTLAND ART GLASS MAKER UROBOROS’ FOUNDER ON SELLING HIS BUSINESS (KUOW)

2016 was the year one modest Forest Service research project turned the Northwests storied art glass industry upside down.

Samples taken near two Portland art glass factories were shown to carry dangerously high concentrations of heavy metals. These companies make supplies for glass artists all over the world, from stained glass church windows to fancy light fixtures in big hotels  even most the blown glass holiday ornaments you might have had hanging around the house last month.

_________________________________________

AFTER FLINT, ARE SCHOOLS BEING MORE VIGILANT ABOUT TAINTED WATER? (Christian Science Monitor)

-A number of schools and states have taken fresh steps to test for lead in water at schools. But parental pressure is still crucial to further action.-

From Oregon to Maine, the Flint, Mich., water crisis is leading to action in the nations schools.

Massachusetts expects to complete testing of about 930 schools by January and is making results available online.

Chicago Public Schools plans to test all its facilities and post the results online.

_________________________________________

HAYDEN CRITICIZES BUREAUCRATIC HURDLES TO GET DENTAL CARE FOR POOR WOMEN (The Lund Report)

The ranking Republican on the House Health Committee has grown impatient with the Health Authority’s protracted response to his queries about poor dental care access for women who receive Medicaid because of pregnancy. This may be the only time these women can afford to see a dentist, and fix oral health problems that are critical for the health of their babies.

_________________________________________

BROWN’S EFFORT TO COVER IMMIGRANT CHILDREN MAY DEPEND ON HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY (The Lund Report)

-Studies show that children with health insurance do better in school, are more likely to graduate high school and attend college, but nearly 18,000 Oregon children do not have access to healthcare because of their immigration status.-

Gov. Kate Brown has proposed an agenda for the 2017 session that’s high on difficult cuts, but also perhaps surprisingly has a heavy lift for a big wish — spending $57 million to expand healthcare coverage to all of Oregon’s children, even those without legal permission to live in the United States.

_________________________________________

ITS TIME FOR LOWER PRESCRIPTION DRUG PRICES IN OREGON (The Lund Report)

-New coalition calls for state lawmakers to take action-

An Oregon coalition launched today wants immediate relief from pharmaceutical industry price gouging. Oregonians for Affordable Drug Prices Now is calling on state lawmakers to hold drug companies accountable and ensure people have access to the medicines they need at affordable prices.

_________________________________________

FORMER OREGON LEGISLATOR POINTS FINGER AT CONGRESS FOR $18K ANNUAL INSURANCE BILL (The Lund Report)

-Chip Shields cites Republican-backed cuts to federal risk corridor program in criticism of high marketplace premiums-

A former Oregon state senator who was a vocal advocate of health insurance reform before leaving the Senate last year says his own family faces premiums of over $18,000 per year  and hes blaming Republicans in Congress who, unable to repeal the Affordable Care Act during Barack Obama’s administration, slashed funding for a critical part of that law.

_________________________________________

State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit: http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 09, 2017 eClips Weekend Edition