April 29, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips
* 100 Oregon companies to be inspected for heavy metal emissions
* Poisonous gas repeatedly found in Hayden Island air tests
* Second bill advances in U.S. Senate to provide houses for Columbia River tribes
* Kate Brown’s new ‘education innovation officer’ is Bethel Superintendent Colt Gill
* How Horizon Air, the airline you didn’t know was based in Portland, is shaping PDX’s future
* DHS licensing director demoted amid foster care scandal
* New mountain bike trail opens at Silver Falls State Park
* Board review of Wash. coal-export terminal to be released
* 13 Salem companies permitted to emit toxic metals
* Bethel Superintendent Colt Gill leaving district to take new education innovation post with state
* Oracle’s bid to kill Oregon lawsuit survives initial challenge
* Lawmakers line up plans to collect billions owed to state
* AARP trains seniors to fight fraud
* Pilot Butte road opens Saturday
* Campaign seeks feedback on future of Oregon schools
* After foster care criticism, DHS director steps down
* Editorial: The damage looms from Initiative 28 — Opinion
* Janet Stevens column: Filling the gap for the homeless — Opinion
* Editorial: Finally, some movement on Mirror Pond — Opinion
* Finances Come First, Following Alzheimer’s Diagnosis
* Jack Roberts Is Fired, Tiny Houses For Homeless & Sex Trafficking Prevention
* Documents: Media Pressure Prompted Suspension Of DOJ Employee Over Twitter Surveillance
* Turnover In Oregon State Government
* Oregon Senator Launches Effort To Expand Vote-By-Mail
* Gov. Brown Names Eugene Superintendent Education Innovation Officer
* Oregon Voters To Choose Future Road For Damascus
* Oregon Voters Sign Up For Major Parties In Droves
* Water outlook in Eastern Oregon continues to improve
* Congress, not president, must fix immigration laws — Opinion
* BLM Resource Management Plan fails Western Oregon — Opinion
* Rep. Smith appointed to transportation package committee
* Trophy trout could win anglers $50
* Its time for the state to show up for women and girls
* Bentz works on transportation plan for 2017
* State officials refute backers’ claims Breidenthal was cleared
* The cannabis lab’s role in public safety — Guest Opinion
* Rare deer still struggle
* National Park visitors bring $15 million to North Coast
* States set summer and fall salmon seasons
* Port backs seafood processor expansion
* Port approves emergency repairs to Pier 2
* Editorial: Forestry has come a long way — Opinion
* Help available for those living with mental health disorders
* OUR VIEW: Will state find a way forward? — Opinion
* Here’s how Oregon ranks in prices for common medical procedures
* Drought should be an ever-present concern, even in wet years
* Portland Affordability in Comparison– Blog
* Oregon High-Tech and Intel– Blog
* COAL: Export ambitions down, but not out

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100 OREGON COMPANIES TO BE INSPECTED FOR HEAVY METAL EMISSIONS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon environmental regulators on Thursday named more than 300 companies that are authorized to emit toxic heavy metals into the air but whose actual emission levels are unknown.
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POISONOUS GAS REPEATEDLY FOUND IN HAYDEN ISLAND AIR TESTS (Portland Oregonian)

Federal air monitoring repeatedly detected a poisonous gas on Hayden Island.
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SECOND BILL ADVANCES IN U.S. SENATE TO PROVIDE HOUSES FOR COLUMBIA RIVER TRIBES (Portland Oregonian)

The U.S. Senate advanced a bill that would provide nearly 50 houses for Columbia River tribal members.
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KATE BROWN’S NEW ‘EDUCATION INNOVATION OFFICER’ IS BETHEL SUPERINTENDENT COLT GILL (Portland Oregonian)

Colt Gill, the superintendent of the Bethel School District near Eugene, is Gov. Kate Brown’s choice to lead the charge on raising Oregon’s stubbornly low graduation rates.
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HOW HORIZON AIR, THE AIRLINE YOU DIDN’T KNOW WAS BASED IN PORTLAND, IS SHAPING PDX’S FUTURE (Portland Oregonian)

Alaska Airlines made waves in April with its $4 billion plan to acquire upscale rival Virgin America. But in Portland.
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DHS LICENSING DIRECTOR DEMOTED AMID FOSTER CARE SCANDAL (Salem Statesman Journal)

The director of licensing and regulatory oversight at the Oregon Department of Human Services is being demoted amid a scandal over agency management of foster care providers.
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NEW MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL OPENS AT SILVER FALLS STATE PARK (Salem Statesman Journal)

Three years ago, Silverton residents Paul Prough and Dewayne Powell had an audacious idea.
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BOARD REVIEW OF WASH. COAL-EXPORT TERMINAL TO BE RELEASED (Salem Statesman Journal)

State and local regulators on Friday are releasing a sweeping review of a coal export terminal proposed along the Columbia River in southwest Washington.

The analysis is expected to study impacts that extend well beyond the facility site in southwest Washington, from global-warming effects of burning the exported coal in Asia to rail impacts as the coal is from the Rockies throughout the state.

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13 SALEM COMPANIES PERMITTED TO EMIT TOXIC METALS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Thirteen Salem companies are on a list of 316 facilities statewide that may emit toxic heavy metals.
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BETHEL SUPERINTENDENT COLT GILL LEAVING DISTRICT TO TAKE NEW EDUCATION INNOVATION POST WITH STATE (Eugene Register-Guard)

Bethel School District Superintendent Colt Gill is heading north to Salem.

Gill, who has served as superintendent of the west Eugene district for nearly 10 years, has been recruited by Oregon Gov. Kate Brown to be the states first education innovation officer. Gills job will be to help increase the number of students completing high school and improve the states dismal graduation rate, Brown said in a statement Thursday.

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ORACLE’S BID TO KILL OREGON LAWSUIT SURVIVES INITIAL CHALLENGE (Portland Tribune)

-Oracle’s claim of $25 million settlement by Gov. Kate Brown has legs, judge rules. –

A long-shot effort by Oracle to kill Oregon’s big-money racketeering lawsuit over the Cover Oregon debacle has survived an initial court challenge, and that may not be great news for Gov. Kate Brown.
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LAWMAKERS LINE UP PLANS TO COLLECT BILLIONS OWED TO STATE (Portland Tribune)

Two months after Oregon lawmakers wrapped up the 2016 legislative session, some are already working to revive a proposal next year that would make it easier to track down debtors who together owe the state more than $3 billion.
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AARP TRAINS SENIORS TO FIGHT FRAUD (Portland Tribune)

-State, federal experts bring tips and advice to a seminar at Mary’s Woods –

Scammers have absolutely no respect for old age.
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PILOT BUTTE ROAD OPENS SATURDAY (Bend Bulletin)

-New hours seek to reduce conflicts between walkers and drivers-

The road to the top of Pilot Butte will open for the season Saturday, but with new hours to limit vehicular traffic in the mornings.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department will open the gate across the road to the top of the butte at 10 a.m. daily this year, two hours later than in past years. Park Manager Chris Gerdes said the later opening is to minimize conflicts between walkers and drivers on the narrow road.

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CAMPAIGN SEEKS FEEDBACK ON FUTURE OF OREGON SCHOOLS (Bend Bulletin)

-Community invited to event May 12 in Bend-

As part of a campaign to promote Oregon schools, parents, students and community members are being asked to share their thoughts at an event 6 p.m. May 12 at Summit High School in Bend.

The event is part of Oregon Rising, a statewide outreach campaign by the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators, Oregon School Boards Association and the Oregon Education Association. The groups hope to survey 10,000 Oregonians on what schools should be like and deliver those responses to lawmakers in 2017.

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AFTER FOSTER CARE CRITICISM, DHS DIRECTOR STEPS DOWN (Bend Bulletin)

The director of licensing and regulatory oversight at the Oregon Department of Human Services is stepping down amid criticism over how the agency manages foster care providers.

Donna Keddy’s last day as director of the Office of Licensing and Regulatory Oversight is today, The Salem Statesman Journal reported. She will be transferred to Bend as regional manager for vocational rehabilitation in Central and Eastern Oregon.
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EDITORIAL: THE DAMAGE LOOMS FROM INITIATIVE 28 — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Give it some thought, and its easy to understand why Oregon grocers working to privatize liquor sales in the state gave up their most visible effort Wednesday. They and all Oregonians are faced with a much bigger danger, and theyve decided to concentrate their efforts on stopping it.
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JANET STEVENS COLUMN: FILLING THE GAP FOR THE HOMELESS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

About 15 months ago, Volunteer Connect announced the end of Project Connect after eight years. The one-day, one-stop event gave Central Oregons homeless and nearly so access to everything from hairdressers to veterinarians to dentists. Social service agencies were there, as were professionals who could vaccinate children or adults if need be.
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EDITORIAL: FINALLY, SOME MOVEMENT ON MIRROR POND — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

For more than two decades now at least as far back as 1995 Bend city officials and, later, Bend Park & Recreation District officials have worried and studied and tried to decide what to do with Mirror Pond and the Pacific Power dam that creates it. To call the discussion long and drawn out does not do justice to the time spent.

Theres precious little to show for all those hours of discussion. Money has been spent, to be sure. Plans have been created and then quietly set aside.
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FINANCES COME FIRST, FOLLOWING ALZHEIMER’S DIAGNOSIS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

More than 120 people who care for Alzheimers patients held a conference in Wilsonville Wednesday. They learned the first thing families should do when a loved one gets dementia.

Lawyers and caregivers alike said putting someones financial details in order is paramount even before finding a care facility or deciding which family member will look after someone.
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JACK ROBERTS IS FIRED, TINY HOUSES FOR HOMELESS & SEX TRAFFICKING PREVENTION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Lottery director Jack Roberts joins us to discuss what happened and whats next after his sudden termination by Governor Kate Brown.

Andrew Heben spent years researching and even living in places like Dignity Village in Portland to write Tent City Urbanism, a guide for cities wanting to build tiny house communities.

We talk with a formerly trafficked sex worker, LaTasha Curry, about how she was recruited into sex work, how she got out of it, and what shes now doing to help other girls and women escape their pimps and get out of the industry.
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DOCUMENTS: MEDIA PRESSURE PROMPTED SUSPENSION OF DOJ EMPLOYEE OVER TWITTER SURVEILLANCE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Internal documents released by the Oregon Department of Justice show that Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum may have acted to remove an employee at the center of a racial profiling scandal in response to media pressure.
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TURNOVER IN OREGON STATE GOVERNMENT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Since Oregon Gov. Kate Brown took office in February 2015, the heads of several state agencies have resigned, retired or been fired from their positions. This timeline tracks those changes.

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OREGON SENATOR LAUNCHES EFFORT TO EXPAND VOTE-BY-MAIL (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Democratic Senator Ron Wyden has launched a new campaign to expand Oregon-style vote-by-mail nationwide.

He said this year 17 states added new voting restrictions, 126,000 New York voters were purged from rolls and Rhode Island cut its polling stations by two-thirds, There’s no excuse for citizens in Arizona to wait five hours to cast their ballot, he said.
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GOV. BROWN NAMES EUGENE SUPERINTENDENT EDUCATION INNOVATION OFFICER (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Gov. Kate Brown has named a longtime Eugene educator as Oregon’s new Education Innovation Officer.

The governor has given Bethel School District superintendent Colt Gill the job of improving the states dismal graduation rate. Last year, only 74 percent of students graduated high school a rate thats among the worst in the nation.
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OREGON VOTERS TO CHOOSE FUTURE ROAD FOR DAMASCUS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Lets face it, were pretty sure how some of the races on Oregon’s May ballot are going to go.

Perhaps at the top of that list is whats going to happen to Damascus, that small troubled city in Clackamas County. Its about to dissolve. How do we know? The road to end Damascus as a city has been paved for years.
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OREGON VOTERS SIGN UP FOR MAJOR PARTIES IN DROVES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Ballots are going out in the mail this week to Oregon voters in advance of next months primary. And it appears that independent voters are signing up in droves to vote in the Democratic and Republican presidential primaries.

In Oregon, you have to be a registered Democrat to vote in the Democratic primary, or a Republican to vote in the Republican primary. But the fastest growing block of Oregon voters has been those who don’t affiliate with either of those parties.
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WATER OUTLOOK IN EASTERN OREGON CONTINUES TO IMPROVE (Capital Press)

Farmers who depend on the Owyhee Reservoir will receive more irrigation water in 2016 than they have the past two years combined.
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CONGRESS, NOT PRESIDENT, MUST FIX IMMIGRATION LAWS — OPINION (Capital Press)

Earlier this month the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case challenging President Obama’s executive actions regarding illegal immigration.

We believe the court should find against the president.

Late in 2014, the president issued executive orders temporarily lifting the threat of deportation for as many as 5 million illegal immigrants who have been in the country for five years and who have children born in the United States, and to children brought by their parents prior to Jan. 1, 2010.
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BLM RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FAILS WESTERN OREGON — OPINION (Capital Press)

It would be nice if groups could sit at the table with the Bureau of Land Management and hammer out differences over future management of Western Oregon’s O&C forests, as the Capital Press recently suggested.

Unfortunately, thats not how the agency operates these days, especially considering how the BLM developed its proposed Resource Management Plans over the past three years. With the agency proposing to lock up 75 percent of its forest lands from active management, its difficult to see how the BLM is achieving any level of balance.
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REP. SMITH APPOINTED TO TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE COMMITTEE (East Oregonian)

Rep. Greg Smith R-Heppner joins 13 fellow lawmakers on the new Joint Committee on Transportation and Modernization.

Speaker of the House Tina Kotek D-Portland and Senate President Peter Courtney D-Salem announced Wednesday the creation of the committee with the job of creating a transportation package for the 2017 legislative session. The package of bills which lawmakers from both parties have declared a top priority is expected to make investments in repairing, modernizing and expanding transportation infrastructure across Oregon.
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TROPHY TROUT COULD WIN ANGLERS $50 (East Oregonian)

Anglers could be fishing for more than just trophy trout this spring at Phillips Reservoir.

The Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife will stock the reservoir with 4,000 trophy-size rainbows in early May and June. Of those, about 400 of the fish will be marked with tags good for a $50 Visa gift card. The reward is meant to encourage anglers to report tagged trout to ODFW, which helps the agency determine catch rates.

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ITS TIME FOR THE STATE TO SHOW UP FOR WOMEN AND GIRLS (Argus Observer)

-Listen to Her event seeks input from Oregon women-

What are the biggest challenges facing women in Malheur County?

Attendees of the Listen to Her Town Hall, held Thursday night at Four Rivers Cultural Center in Ontario, answered this question and discussed causes and solutions through various interactive activities. The town hall, hosted by the Womens Foundation of Oregon, was one in a string of events being held across the state with the goal of creating the first report on the status of women and girls in Oregon in nearly 20 years, according to information provided at the event.

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BENTZ WORKS ON TRANSPORTATION PLAN FOR 2017 (Argus Observer)

Rep. Cliff Bentz, R-Ontario, is one of 14 lawmakers the Oregon Legislature has selected to spend the next several months crafting a transportation package for the 2017 legislative session.

Traffic congestion and ailing highways, ports and bridges are stressing the states transportation system. After lawmakers failed to pass a transportation funding package in 2015, Gov. Kate Brown says its a top priority next year.

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STATE OFFICIALS REFUTE BACKERS’ CLAIMS BREIDENTHAL WAS CLEARED (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Investigation into commissioner’s actions is continuing-

The Oregon Secretary of State’s Office is disputing a claim by a local property rights group that Jackson County Commissioner Doug Breidenthal has been cleared of wrongdoing by the Elections Division.

Because we lack authority over a campaign for a national professional organization, we cannot clear Mr. Breidenthal for concerns related to that campaign, Molly Woon, spokeswoman for the Secretary of State’s Office, said in an email.
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THE CANNABIS LAB’S ROLE IN PUBLIC SAFETY — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

Kenevir Research is a natural products laboratory located in White City that currently offers cannabis testing, consulting, and education services to Southern Oregon.

In our time working with cannabis, we have learned that there are a substantial number of people with serious health conditions using cannabis to treat any number of symptoms or ailments.
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RARE DEER STILL STRUGGLE (Daily Astorian)

State and federal wildlife managers have been trying to save the endangered Columbian white-tailed deer since the late 1960s, with mixed results.

A population in southern Oregon has bounced back, and has been removed from the federal Endangered Species List. However, despite extensive efforts to improve their habitat, control predators, and even trap and relocate them, their counterparts on the Lower Columbia River continue to struggle.

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NATIONAL PARK VISITORS BRING $15 MILLION TO NORTH COAST (Daily Astorian)

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park had 270,411 visitors in 2015 who spent $15.4 million in communities around the North Coast, according to a recent report from the National Parks Service.

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park welcomes visitors from across the country and around the world, Superintendent Scott Tucker said. We are delighted to share the story of this place and the experiences it provides.
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STATES SET SUMMER AND FALL SALMON SEASONS (Daily Astorian)

Oregon and Washington state fishery managers have announced the summer and fall salmon seasons for the Columbia River.

Summer Chinook fisheries begin June 16, with a daily bag limit of two hatchery Chinook. The season is expected to remain open through the summer management period, ending on July 31.
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PORT BACKS SEAFOOD PROCESSOR EXPANSION (Daily Astorian)

Amid a packed meeting Wednesday and protests from the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, a divided Port of Astoria Commission approved an amended lease with Da Yang Seafoods that more than doubles the company’s footprint in the Pier 2 fish-processing warehouse.
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PORT APPROVES EMERGENCY REPAIRS TO PIER 2 (Daily Astorian)

The Port of Astoria Commission conditionally approved an emergency expenditure of up to $350,000 to fix the most critical issues on Pier 2.

The state Department of Transportation warned the Port that a structurally deficient portion of the eastern dock skirting the Pier 2 fish-processing warehouse might have to close by July unless significant repairs are made. The state recommended a 3-ton weight limit on the dock.
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EDITORIAL: FORESTRY HAS COME A LONG WAY — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Modern Oregon residents love loggers but don’t love logging. This is one way of interpreting results of a survey conducted by the Oregon Forest Resources Institute, reported in a Capital Press story we published Tuesday.

Oregonians exhibit a fairly sophisticated understanding of the role forestry plays in job creation, open-space preservation, supporting local government operations, and providing other benefits. Fully 68 percent of residents have a favorable view of the forest products industry popularity most politicians and industries would sell their souls for.

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HELP AVAILABLE FOR THOSE LIVING WITH MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS (Albany Democrat Herald)

If it weren’t for a friend spending an entire night talking with him more than 30 years ago, Robert Wilson was intent on committing suicide.

I had it all planned out, the retired 72-year-old Albany man said.

That same friend helped him find a doctor who diagnosed Wilson with bipolar disorder, a condition that causes feelings of extreme highs and lows in a persons brain.

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OUR VIEW: WILL STATE FIND A WAY FORWARD? — OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

The stage appears to be nearly set for Oregon lawmakers to work out a viable plan to fix the states roads.

That is good news.

Gov. Kate Brown renewed her support for just such a plan during a visit to Eugene this week.

The seemingly bad news is any transportation package will mean higher fees for Oregonians. That’s because a transportation package will need money from somewhere, and the likely sources will be a higher gas tax and boosted vehicle and drivers license fees.

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HERE’S HOW OREGON RANKS IN PRICES FOR COMMON MEDICAL PROCEDURES (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon is one of the most expensive states in the country when it comes to medical procedures, according to a study out today from the Health Care Cost Institute in Washington, D.C. and published in the journal Health Affairs.
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DROUGHT SHOULD BE AN EVER-PRESENT CONCERN, EVEN IN WET YEARS (Oregon Business Journal)

The state needs a comprehensive plan for drought periods to prevent issues during drought years, say guest columnists from the University of Arizona and the Oregon Environmental Council.
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PORTLAND AFFORDABILITY IN COMPARISON— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

This morning I am presenting some new research that compares the 100 largest MSAs in the country at the Multifamily NW Apartment Report release. The work covers how cities face tradeoffs between economic strength, quality of life and housing affordability. A city can achieve success on two but not all three dimensions at the same time. This represents what I am calling the Housing Trilemma. In advance of releasing all the material, I want to first focus on just the affordability measures.

When discussing Portland’s housing affordability, the most common way is to point out prices in other major West Coast metropolitan areas.
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OREGON HIGH-TECH AND INTEL— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

High-technology is an integral part of Oregon’s economy. It accounts for roughly 5% of statewide employment but a considerably higher share of overall wages. The sectors average wage is more than twice the statewide average, $103,900 in tech compared to $48,300 for all industries. The sector is particularly productive and drives much of the state GDP figures, which is measured on a value-added basis. When you start with essentially raw materials and end with a semiconductor, the value-added over that process is huge.
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COAL: EXPORT AMBITIONS DOWN, BUT NOT OUT (eenews.net)

Mining industry plans to ship Powder River Basin coal to Asia from Western ports refuse to die, much to the chagrin of opponents from source to sea.

In the span of a few years, coal’s precipitous downturn shredded a web of proposed coal mines, railroad lines and export terminals stretching from the nation’s most productive coal region to the coast of Washington state.
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April 28, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Oregon tech jobs surging, but Intel cuts are ‘setback’
* Tribal nets return to Willamette Falls
* Biologists say it’s too early to call Columbia spring run
* Oregon Lottery boss: Kate Brown fired me after I protected worker claiming harassment
* Sponsors suspend effort to privatize Oregon liquor sales
* Sweet Cakes owners, now backed by George H.W. Bush’s lawyer, file appeal
* Oregonian editorial board, gas stations almost alone in opposing Portland gas tax — Opinion
* Lawmakers picked for creating 2017 transportation package
* DHS licensing director demoted amid foster care scandal
* Attorney General: No investigation of DHS
* OLCC keeps its monopoly — Opinion
* Grocers drop liquor privatization plan to fight corporate tax measure
* Is education the answer for gun crimes?
* City, county and PSU partner on toxic air research
* Portland rent increases slowing – but still highest in the country
* Oregon provides more information about doctors than other states
* Oregon saving big from Medicaid expansion
* 2016 wildfire season expected to be less severe
* Film, panel showcase Deschutes River
* Grazing limits sought for unoccupied bull trout habitat
* Oregon Wheat Commission considers budget, research funding
* Washington, Oregon pass halfway mark in war on gypsy moths
* IMESD hosts CTE expo for Eastern Oregon students
* Malheur County Sheriff requests part-time officer, 3 new vehicles
* Crater Lake superintendent passionate about park
* Rogue River Preserve gets a boost
* Josephine County sheriff warns of ‘fiscal cliff like no other’
* Lava Beds tourism adds $5 million
* Riparian work to begin along Sprague River
* Primary results could be delayed
* DEQ rejects Powers proposal
* Give seals some space
* Cantwell intervenes to help Coast Guard with health care
* OLCC Safe For Another Year As Grocers Abandon Effort to Privatize Liquor Sales
* Lawmakers to spend months on transportation package
* Legislative Work Group in Oregon Grappling With Drug Pricing

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OREGON TECH JOBS SURGING, BUT INTEL CUTS ARE ‘SETBACK’ (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon tech employment grew at its fastest rate in a decade last year, according to a new state report that finds those jobs pay unusually well and have an outsized impact on the economy.

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TRIBAL NETS RETURN TO WILLAMETTE FALLS (Portland Oregonian)

Tribal dip-netting for salmon and steelhead will resume this year at Willamette Falls.

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BIOLOGISTS SAY IT’S TOO EARLY TO CALL COLUMBIA SPRING RUN (Portland Oregonian)

Internet armchair fish biologists are more worried about the 2016 upriver spring chinook run than the real fish scientists.

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OREGON LOTTERY BOSS: KATE BROWN FIRED ME AFTER I PROTECTED WORKER CLAIMING HARASSMENT (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon Lottery Director Jack Roberts, fired Tuesday by Gov. Kate Brown, _________________________________________

SPONSORS SUSPEND EFFORT TO PRIVATIZE OREGON LIQUOR SALES (Portland Oregonian)

Sponsors of a push to privatize liquor sales in Oregon have called off their attempt to get the measure on the November ballot.

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SWEET CAKES OWNERS, NOW BACKED BY GEORGE H.W. BUSH’S LAWYER, FILE APPEAL (Portland Oregonian)

The Gresham bakers who made national headlines after refusing to bake a cake for a same-sex wedding are fighting back against Oregon regulators.

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OREGONIAN EDITORIAL BOARD, GAS STATIONS ALMOST ALONE IN OPPOSING PORTLAND GAS TAX — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregonian/OregonLive editorial board’s opposition to Portland’s proposed gas tax is misplaced. The city can’t continue to wait to address its crumbling and unsafe streets.

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LAWMAKERS PICKED FOR CREATING 2017 TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Legislature has picked the 14 lawmakers who will spend the next several months crafting a transportation package for the 2017 legislative session.

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DHS LICENSING DIRECTOR DEMOTED AMID FOSTER CARE SCANDAL (Salem Statesman Journal)

The director of licensing and regulatory oversight at the Oregon Department of Human Services is being demoted amid a scandal over agency management of foster care providers.

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ATTORNEY GENERAL: NO INVESTIGATION OF DHS (Salem Statesman Journal)

The state Department of Justice is not investigating the Oregon Department of Human Services, according to Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum.

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OLCC KEEPS ITS MONOPOLY — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Retail marijuana shops are popping up all over Oregon, but Oregonians still have to buy their liquor from the state. In that respect, prohibition has been abolished more thoroughly for pot than for distilled spirits. Thats how it will stay, at least for a while, now that a campaign backed by the grocery industry has abandoned its efforts to place a liquor privatization measure on the November ballot. Oregon will keep its liquor monopoly, a remnant of ratification of the 21st Amendment 83 years ago.

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GROCERS DROP LIQUOR PRIVATIZATION PLAN TO FIGHT CORPORATE TAX MEASURE (Portland Tribune)

A grocers coalition says it plans to withdraw an initiative to privatize liquor sales in Oregon so the group can focus resources on defeating a corporate sales tax proposed for the November ballot.

Oregonians for Competition, led by the Northwest Grocery Association and Distilled Spirits Council, suspended Wednesday, April 27, collection of signatures in support of Initiative Petition 71. The measure would end state sale and distribution of distilled spirits and allow grocery stores to sell the products alongside beer and wine.

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IS EDUCATION THE ANSWER FOR GUN CRIMES? (Portland Tribune)

When he was 18 years old and growing up in Northeast Portland, a friend handed Nathaniel Williams a handgun for protection. Williams says he was not affiliated with any gangs, though he knew gang members, and he had never held a gun before. During the Fourth of July weekend he did what hed seen others do  he shot the gun in the air.

As Williams, now 41, tells it, he was arrested, spent two days in jail, and was persuaded to plead guilty to a felony with a two-year probation sentence he has had reason to regret.

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CITY, COUNTY AND PSU PARTNER ON TOXIC AIR RESEARCH (Portland Tribune)

Responding to public concerns about potentially dangerous metals found in Portland’s air, leaders from the city, Multnomah County and Portland State University have launched a research project to learn more about their sources and distribution patterns.

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PORTLAND RENT INCREASES SLOWING – BUT STILL HIGHEST IN THE COUNTRY (Portland Tribune)

Portland rent increases are slowing as more new apartment buildings are completed. But the increases are still the highest in the country, according to the biannual Apartment Report released by Multifamily NW on Tuesday.

The report says rent increases dropped from 13 percent over the past year, the highest in the country then. They increased at an annualized rate of 10.7 percent in the first quarter of 2016.

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OREGON PROVIDES MORE INFORMATION ABOUT DOCTORS THAN OTHER STATES (Bend Bulletin)

-Hospital discipline and convictions still kept from consumers-

Medical licensing agencies in each state decide how much to reveal about disciplinary action against doctors, and a new rating of medical boards websites finds that Oregon is more transparent than most.

Ranked No. 11, Oregon provides excellent search capabilities and disclosure about disciplinary actions and malpractice payments, according to Consumer Reports. The ratings are coupled with an investigative cover story in the magazines May edition.

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OREGON SAVING BIG FROM MEDICAID EXPANSION (Bend Bulletin)

-Well over $275 million in savings, revenue-

By expanding its Medicaid program, a new report finds Oregon saved money and gained new revenue that amounted to roughly $275 million in 2014 and 2015.

There’s a big caveat there, though: the analysis only accounted for about 13 percent of those covered under the states expansion. The actual savings are far greater.

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2016 WILDFIRE SEASON EXPECTED TO BE LESS SEVERE (Bend Bulletin)

The upcoming wildfire season across the U.S. isnt expected to be as bad as last years infernos, when a record 15,800 square miles burned, the nations top wildland firefighting official said Wednesday.

But parts of the nation should expect a rough season after a warm, dry winter or because of long-term drought, U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell said.

Southern California, other parts of the Southwest, Alaska and Montana are all vulnerable, he said.

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FILM, PANEL SHOWCASE DESCHUTES RIVER (Bend Bulletin)

-Event encourages public participation-

Scott Nelson completed his first film about the Deschutes River in 2012, a pretty little nine-minute version, set to music, that showcased the waterways beauty.

Nelsons next version of the film in 2014 started exploring the rivers problems. His latest version  showing Monday at the Tower Theatre  zooms in a little closer on the challenges the river faces and the efforts by stakeholders to address them.

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GRAZING LIMITS SOUGHT FOR UNOCCUPIED BULL TROUT HABITAT (Capital Press)

Environmentalists want to limit cattle grazing along Oregons Sprague and Sycan rivers to protect bull trout habitat that the threatened species doesn’t actually occupy.

Despite the fish’s absence, environmentalists have asked a federal judge to invalidate grazing plans for 10 federal land allotments because livestock unlawfully degrade its critical habitat.

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OREGON WHEAT COMMISSION CONSIDERS BUDGET, RESEARCH FUNDING (Capital Press)

Decreasing wheat acreage over the past couple years poses some complications for the Oregon Wheat Commission as it puts together its 2016-17 budget.

Meeting at Oregon State University’s Hyslop Farm on April 25, commission members approved a proposed budget that attempts to balance research funding requests with crop assessment projections. The commission will adopt a final budget before the start of the fiscal year July 1.

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WASHINGTON, OREGON PASS HALFWAY MARK IN WAR ON GYPSY MOTHS (Capital Press)

The Washington State Department of Agriculture’s spring offensive against gypsy moths passed the halfway point Tuesday, with a second pesticide application over a densely populated Seattle neighborhood.

Meanwhile, the Oregon Department of Agriculture made the second of three passes over Portland.

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IMESD HOSTS CTE EXPO FOR EASTERN OREGON STUDENTS (East Oregonian)

Career technical education has become a buzzword in teaching circles, as local districts expand their focus outside academics to include vocational training and professional skill development.

Continuing with that trend, the InterMountain Education Service District hosted its first STEP Tech Expo at the Pendleton Convention Center Wednesday, inviting 125 high school students from across Eastern Oregon to get hands-on experience with local professionals.

STEP stands for Student Technology Expanded Programs and is one CTE-focused project covered by a $198,000 state grant.

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MALHEUR COUNTY SHERIFF REQUESTS PART-TIME OFFICER, 3 NEW VEHICLES (Argus Observer)

The Sheriffs Office takes up much of the Malheur County budget because of the number of services it provides. Sheriff Brian Wolfe said Tuesday he would like to increase those services by adding to his departments involvement in county code enforcement.

Editorial Note:  State content is near end of story, regarding Idaho residents crossing into Oregon for gun permits.

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CRATER LAKE SUPERINTENDENT PASSIONATE ABOUT PARK (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Superintendent shows his passion for park-

When Craig Ackerman was a second grade student in Wheeling, West Virginia, he saw a magazine article showing snow piled two stories high at Crater Lake National Park.

He’d never seen anything like it, and one day, he hoped he would.

So Crater Lake became a dream destination for Ackerman. It’s a dream that came true in a big way when he became superintendent of Crater Lake National Park eight years ago.

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ROGUE RIVER PRESERVE GETS A BOOST (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board signed off on a $1.3 million grant for a proposed reserve along the Rogue-

Plans to buy and preserve a 352-acre ranch along the upper Rogue River leaped closer to reality this week when the group behind the purchase secured an Oregon Lottery grant covering more than half the purchase price.

The Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board signed off Wednesday on a $1,385,255 grant requested by the Southern Oregon Land Conservancy to help buy the MacArthur Ranch and turn it into the Rogue River Preserve.

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JOSEPHINE COUNTY SHERIFF WARNS OF ‘FISCAL CLIFF LIKE NO OTHER’ (Medford Mail Tribune)

Josephine County Sheriff Dave Daniel gave a glimpse into the operations of his pared-down department Tuesday, in a presentation before the county Budget Committee, and he reluctantly warned about a “fiscal cliff like no other” coming next year if funding issues aren’t solved.

He also said calls for service were up, as are permits issued for carrying concealed weapons.

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LAVA BEDS TOURISM ADDS $5 MILLION (Herald and News)

Lava Beds National Monument and the Tule Lake Unit attracted 115,000-plus visitors in 2015 who spent more than $4.5 million in communities near the parks. When combined with the nearly 70 jobs, the cumulative benefit to the local economy totaled about $5 million.

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RIPARIAN WORK TO BEGIN ALONG SPRAGUE RIVER (Herald and News)

Nearly 2,500 riparian shrubs will be planted on the Klamath Lake Land Trusts Sprague River property beginning Monday.

This is something the staff and board have been working on for years and we are excited to see all of our hard work come to fruition, Megan Nichols, Land Trust executive director said in a news release. Its exciting to know youre going to make a difference for the community and for wildlife in an area that is so ecologically unique and special.

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PRIMARY RESULTS COULD BE DELAYED (Herald and News)

-Write-ins may cause hand-counting of ballots-

Due to the high interest in write-in candidates this primary election, results for the state senate and house seats from Klamath County likely wont be known for three weeks after Election Day.

That’s because write-ins have to be hand counted, and the districts cover more than one county. So the totals may not be known until all the counties report.

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DEQ REJECTS POWERS PROPOSAL (The World)

-DEQ, Powers plan meeting to discuss sewer situation-

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality rejected the City of Powers proposal to use federal funding to rehabilitate its wastewater treatment plant in lieu of building a new facility.

“Based on our knowledge of the city’s collection system and treatment plant and recommendations from two engineering studies completed by the city in 2009 and 2013, we cannot support this proposal,” wrote Keith Anderson, DEQ western region administrator. “The treatment plant, which was constructed in 1962, no longer meets DEQ wastewater treatment design requirements.”

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GIVE SEALS SOME SPACE (The World)

Its that time of year again: Seal pups are appearing on beaches along the Oregon coast and beachgoers are asked to stifle their desire to assist these animals in some way, and instead give them space. For those familiar with the exquisite cuteness of a newborn pup, the advice can be hard to swallow. But its for the best, for people and wildlife alike.

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CANTWELL INTERVENES TO HELP COAST GUARD WITH HEALTH CARE (Daily Astorian)

Due to a change in the status of a U.S. Coast Guard Sector Columbia River medical and dental clinic, local Coast Guard families are sometimes being forced to travel hundreds of miles to get health care.

During a recent meeting at Station Cape Disappointment, Coast Guard personnel told U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell that some people who are eligible for Coast Guard benefits are driving as much as six hours or more round trip to access health care at military treatment facilities with the capacity to serve their health care needs, according to a press release last week.

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OLCC SAFE FOR ANOTHER YEAR AS GROCERS ABANDON EFFORT TO PRIVATIZE LIQUOR SALES (Willamette Week)

-Campaign abandons effort with $2.5 million unspent.-

The campaign to allow grocers to sell hard liquor, currently the province of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, has halted its efforts.

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LAWMAKERS TO SPEND MONTHS ON TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE (KOIN)

-Group will work to revamp ailing highways, ports and bridges-

The Oregon Legislature has picked the 14 lawmakers who will spend the next several months crafting a transportation package for the 2017 legislative session.

Traffic congestion and ailing highways, ports and bridges are stressing the states transportation system. After lawmakers failed to pass a transportation funding package in 2015, Gov. Kate Brown says its a top priority next year.

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LEGISLATIVE WORK GROUP IN OREGON GRAPPLING WITH DRUG PRICING (Bloomberg BNA)

The death in the Oregon House of Representative of a drug-pricing transparency bill has led to the birth of a legislative work group with the ambitious goal of seeking revolutionary solutions at the state level to the national conundrum of high drug prices.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on April 28, 2016 OSL eClips

April 27, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Clues emerge in mysterious voters’ pamphlet targeting Oregon House speaker
* Kate Brown fires Oregon Lottery director over ‘management problems’
* Portland homes’ annual price increases lead nation again
* More state bar complaints filed against Ammon Bundy’s lawyer, critical of social media crowdsourcing
* Hanford may have another underground tank leaking radioactive waste, DOE says
* California ponders how to get rid of dead whale on beach Oregon pro tip: Don’t blow it up
* 2 inmates at large after walking away from work crews in Salem
* Millennials are now America’s largest living generation
* Oregon ranks high on preparedness index
* Gov. Brown fires Oregon Lottery director
* Roberts: Ouster at Oregon Lottery follows COO dispute
* Oregon is 10th state to complete mission
* Trial underway for man accused of killing inmate
* Gov. Brown ousts Jack Roberts as executive director of Oregon Lottery
* Governments struggle to enforce wage laws
* Education groups team up to sponsor Oregon Rising meetings
* This state has made it easy to vote so do it — Guest Opinion
* Gov. Brown urges new transportation package for 2017
* Roberts surprised as governor abruptly replaces lottery director
* ‘Whitewater Park’ proposed at Willamette Falls in Oregon City
* Private ownership of Mirror Pond dam could be at stake in talks
* Police form coalition to stop traffickers, raise awareness
* Vancouver Port, Tesoro-Savage Sign Amended Lease For Oil Terminal
* Miners sue over sage grouse land lockup
* H-2A delays cause worker shortages in 20 states
* Bill would help state find debtors bank accounts
* Travel Oregon likes it here. Others might too.
* Inmate dies at TRCI
* Hospital, physicians donate $2 million to SWOCC health building fund
* State pulls offensive lottery ads
* Plucked from the river: Biologists study young salmon for wetlands restoration
* Oregon LNG asks Port to let them go
* Squaw names replaced
* Partnership receives restoration grant
* Boost city project rank
* Lakeview Post Office finds support from senators
* Voting Counts — Opinion
* Puff Factory to break ground in Odell
* BPA expects normal water year for dam operations
* ODFW to host town hall meetings, including one in Tillamook, on proposed 2017-2019 budget
* Wallowa Lake bike path hits setback
* A look at Intel’s job cuts beyond Oregon
* Short-term health insurance grows in popularity in Oregon and U.S.
* Fossil-Fuel Terminals Falter Across the Pacific Northwest
* Educators Seek Guidance On The Future Of Oregon Schools
* Oregon State Treasurer says new phone scam targets college students
* Oregon regulators set ambitious timeline for clean energy programs

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CLUES EMERGE IN MYSTERIOUS VOTERS’ PAMPHLET TARGETING OREGON HOUSE SPEAKER (Portland Oregonian)

For days, longshot Oregon House candidate Sharon Nasset has denied any role in a knockoff voters’ guide that spread mysteriously through parts of North and Northeast Portland.

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KATE BROWN FIRES OREGON LOTTERY DIRECTOR OVER ‘MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS’ (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown abruptly fired Oregon Lottery Director Jack Roberts on Tuesday, adding to a list of state agency leaders who’ve moved on since Brown took office last year.

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PORTLAND HOMES’ ANNUAL PRICE INCREASES LEAD NATION AGAIN (Portland Oregonian)

Yet again, the Portland-area real estate market posted the country’s largest annual gains in home values February  the fifth consecutive month it did so and the fourth straight outright, according to the monthly Standard & Poor’s Case-Shiller home price index, released Tuesday.

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MORE STATE BAR COMPLAINTS FILED AGAINST AMMON BUNDY’S LAWYER, CRITICAL OF SOCIAL MEDIA CROWDSOURCING (Portland Oregonian)

Ammon Bundy’s lawyers are facing new state bar complaints that raise ethical concerns about their firm’s outreach on social media to gather evidence in defense of their client in the federal conspiracy case stemming from the armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife refuge.

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HANFORD MAY HAVE ANOTHER UNDERGROUND TANK LEAKING RADIOACTIVE WASTE, DOE SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

Officials for the Hanford Nuclear Reservation are trying to determine whether a second giant underground tank containing radioactive waste from the production of plutonium for nuclear weapons is leaking, the U.S. Department of Energy revealed on Tuesday.

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CALIFORNIA PONDERS HOW TO GET RID OF DEAD WHALE ON BEACH OREGON PRO TIP: DON’T BLOW IT UP (Portland Oregonian)

The massive carcass of a whale was rotting Tuesday at a popular California surfing spot while authorities were deciding whether to tow it out to sea or cut it into pieces and load it onto trucks.

Meanwhile, crowds braved the overpowering stench to pose for photos in front of the adult gray whale that’s about 40 feet long and weighs up to 60,000 pounds

Ed Note: Story includes YouTube video of 1970 KATU Paul Linnman’s Report _________________________________________

2 INMATES AT LARGE AFTER WALKING AWAY FROM WORK CREWS IN SALEM (Portland Oregonian)

Two minimum-security inmates walked away from separate work crews in Salem on Tuesday, officials said.

Officials noticed Justin Carnes and William McGinnis, both 30, were missing from their respective work crews around noon, the Oregon Department of Corrections said in a news release.

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MILLENNIALS ARE NOW AMERICA’S LARGEST LIVING GENERATION (Portland Oregonian)

Millennials are now the United States’ largest living generation, according to the Pew Research Center.

At roughly 75.4 million people, the Millennial generation has now outpaced Baby Boomers, the Pew Research Center reported. The center’s analysis utilized recently released U.S. Census Bureau population estimates.

Millennials are defined in the report as those between the ages of 18 and 34 in 2015, although the center noted that no chronological stopping point has been set. The youngest were born in 1997 and the oldest in 1981.

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OREGON RANKS HIGH ON PREPAREDNESS INDEX (Salem Statesman Journal)

A new index released Monday ranks Oregon among the 10 best states across the nation for emergency preparedness in the area of incident and information management.

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GOV. BROWN FIRES OREGON LOTTERY DIRECTOR (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown fired Oregon Lottery Director Jack Roberts on Tuesday, citing “time for a leadership change” in a press statement.

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ROBERTS: OUSTER AT OREGON LOTTERY FOLLOWS COO DISPUTE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon Lottery Director Jack Roberts was fired by Gov. Kate Brown on Tuesday over what the governor’s office called “management problems.”

Roberts, a Republican and former gubernatorial candidate, has had the lottery job since 2013.

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OREGON IS 10TH STATE TO COMPLETE MISSION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon was home to 710 service members who were killed or missing in action during the Vietnam War.

They grew up on our farms and in our cities. They graduated from our high schools and attended our colleges. They served in every branch of the military and made the ultimate sacrifice for our country.

Their names have been etched on the polished black granite panels of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial since it was unveiled in 1982, but now we have faces to go with each and every one.

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TRIAL UNDERWAY FOR MAN ACCUSED OF KILLING INMATE (Salem Statesman Journal)

The trial of a convicted murderer from Minnesota accused of killing his cellmate at the Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem in 2013 is underway at Marion County Circuit Court following an indictment made in late 2015.

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GOV. BROWN OUSTS JACK ROBERTS AS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF OREGON LOTTERY (Eugene Register-Guard)

Gov. Kate Brown fired Jack Roberts from his post as executive director of the Oregon Lottery on Tuesday because of an apparent disagreement over his handling of a staff dispute.

I am grateful for Jacks years of service to the Oregon Lottery, but it is time for a leadership change, Brown said in a brief prepared statement.

A termination letter sent to Roberts by Browns chief of staff, Kristen Leonard, did not elaborate on the reasons for the move.

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GOVERNMENTS STRUGGLE TO ENFORCE WAGE LAWS (Eugene Register-Guard)

States and cities whose lawmakers proudly passed living wage laws are finding it difficult to make sure employers actually pay their workers accordingly.

Seattle and San Francisco, and the states of Oregon, California and New York are phasing in wage increases that will grow to $15 an hour or more.

Evidence of compliance is plain to see in the hours-worked total on most pay stubs, but state and federal laws don’t require employers to routinely provide this crucial detail to the government. Without this data, wage enforcers who are empowered to investigate generally wait until a worker complains.

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EDUCATION GROUPS TEAM UP TO SPONSOR OREGON RISING MEETINGS (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Next session will be Wednesday at Sheldon High School-

A community meeting slated for Wednesday evening will give Lane County residents a chance to express their thoughts on public education in Oregon.

No, its not a school board meeting.

The Oregon School Boards Association, the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators and the Oregon Education Association teachers union have teamed up to create Oregon Rising  a public outreach effort that aims to get a better sense of what Oregonians want for their children and their schools.

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THIS STATE HAS MADE IT EASY TO VOTE SO DO IT — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon voters, it is time to pay attention to candidates not running for president. While laws in other states are meant to dissuade residents from voting, many Oregonians will snub the privilege despite the states efforts to encourage voter participation. With vote-by-mail and the recently implemented Motor Voter Law, Oregon has one of the most progressive, easy-to-access voting systems in the nation.

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GOV. BROWN URGES NEW TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE FOR 2017 (Eugene Register-Guard)

-It would likely be paid for by higher gas taxes and vehicle fees-

Gov. Kate Brown reiterated her call for state lawmakers to pass a major transportation funding package in 2017 during a visit to Eugene and Springfield Monday morning.

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ROBERTS SURPRISED AS GOVERNOR ABRUPTLY REPLACES LOTTERY DIRECTOR (Portland Tribune)

Gov. Kate Brown abruptly fired Oregon Lottery Director Jack Roberts on Tuesday and replaced him with an administrator from the Department of Administrative Services.

I am grateful for Jack’s years of service to the Oregon Lottery, but it is time for a leadership change, Brown said in a statement.

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‘WHITEWATER PARK’ PROPOSED AT WILLAMETTE FALLS IN OREGON CITY (Portland Tribune)

Oregon City is in the midst of pivoting from the past to the future, Kristin Dahl told a large gathering of attendees at the April 19 meeting of the Oregon City Business Alliance. The group came together to hear Sam Drevo and others speak about the proposal Oregon City Whitewater Park: An Opportunity for Tourism and Economic Growth.

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PRIVATE OWNERSHIP OF MIRROR POND DAM COULD BE AT STAKE IN TALKS (Bend Bulletin)

-Idea raised that prominent Bend businessmen may want to acquire dam-

A partnership organized in 2013 to purchase the land beneath Mirror Pond has been meeting with Pacific Power, the company that owns the more than 100-year-old dam holding back the Deschutes River.

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POLICE FORM COALITION TO STOP TRAFFICKERS, RAISE AWARENESS (Bend Bulletin)

When David Romeil Cobbs was arrested April 8 on suspicion of promoting prostitution and human trafficking, it wasnt the Californians first time visiting Bend.

He spent late February here, where he had met an 18-year-old woman while walking down NE Third Street near a strip club, according to an April 18 search warrant affidavit.

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VANCOUVER PORT, TESORO-SAVAGE SIGN AMENDED LEASE FOR OIL TERMINAL (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Port of Vancouver commissioners signed an amended lease Tuesday with the backers of an oil terminal at the port.

If built, the Vancouver Energy Project could be the nations largest oil-by-rail terminal in the country. The project is a joint venture between Tesoro Corp. and Savage Companies. It would move crude oil from the Bakken region of North Dakota to ports along the West Coast.

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MINERS SUE OVER SAGE GROUSE LAND LOCKUP (Capital Press)

The American Exploration & Mining Association, in Spokane, has filed a lawsuit in federal district court in Washington, D.C., challenging federal restrictions on mineral exploration and development in Western states.

Allegedly to protect sage grouse, federal agencies have restricted mineral exploration and development on more than 10 million acres of federal land in California, Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Utah and Wyoming.

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H-2A DELAYS CAUSE WORKER SHORTAGES IN 20 STATES (Capital Press)

Federal agency delays in processing visas for foreign guestworkers who tend and harvest Americas food crops are fast approaching crisis proportions, all but guaranteeing crops will rot in fields this year, the American Farm Bureau Federation says.

Delays are causing worker shortages in more than 20 states, Zippy Duvall, AFBF president, said in an April 21 press release.

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BILL WOULD HELP STATE FIND DEBTORS BANK ACCOUNTS (East Oregonian)

Two months after Oregon lawmakers wrapped up the 2016 legislative session, some are already working to revive a proposal next year that would make it easier to track down debtors who together owe the state more than $3 billion.

A bill that would have forced banks to help the state locate the accounts of people who are delinquent on taxes and other debt died in early March. Now, state Rep. Kathleen Taylor, D-Milwaukie, is working with banks to bring the bill back in 2017.

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TRAVEL OREGON LIKES IT HERE. OTHERS MIGHT TOO. (East Oregonian)

-Oregon’s tourism industry shined a spotlight on Pendleton over the past week.-

Travel Oregon held the Governors Conference on Tourism at the Wildhorse Resort & Casino, wrapping up the week-long expo on Tuesday.

The last tourism conference to be held in Pendleton was 11 years ago, and although the organization wanted to come back, the conference had outgrown the venues Pendleton had to offer.

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INMATE DIES AT TRCI (East Oregonian)

An inmate at Two Rivers Correctional Institution died unexpectedly Monday morning.

Avis Woodrum, 60, was being treated in TRCIs Health Services Unit when he was pronounced deceased at 8:53 a.m. Monday.

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HOSPITAL, PHYSICIANS DONATE $2 MILLION TO SWOCC HEALTH BUILDING FUND (The World)

Bay Area Hospital and the physicians of the Southwest Oregon Independent Practice Association, better known locally as DOCS, have pledged to donate a total of $2 million toward Southwestern Oregon Community College proposed Health & Science Technology Building.

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STATE PULLS OFFENSIVE LOTTERY ADS (The World)

The Coquille Indian Tribe’s objection to the state’s offensive lottery advertising campaign has not fallen on deaf ears.

The Oregon Lottery, in conjunction with Gov. Kate Brown’s office, has pulled the “Lewis and Clark” advertising campaign after the tribe spoke out at their insensitive and hypocritical nature last week.

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PLUCKED FROM THE RIVER: BIOLOGISTS STUDY YOUNG SALMON FOR WETLANDS RESTORATION (Daily Astorian)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to know how wetland restoration efforts are benefiting juvenile salmon as they feed in the mouth of the Columbia River on their way to the Pacific Ocean.

Trying to answer that question are multiple field teams working under the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

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OREGON LNG ASKS PORT TO LET THEM GO (Daily Astorian)

Oregon LNG sent a notice to the Port of Astoria last week seeking to terminate its sublease of land on the Skipanon Peninsula.

The Port leases more than 90 acres of filled and submerged lands on the peninsula from the Department of State Lands, subleasing it to Oregon LNG.

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SQUAW NAMES REPLACED (Blue Mountain Eagle)

Thirteen natural features in Grant County have been re-named, replacing squaw titles for new monikers proposed by the Grant County Court and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

The U.S. Board on Geographic Names approved the new names April 14. The list includes eight creeks, one spring, three meadows and one rock.

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PARTNERSHIP RECEIVES RESTORATION GRANT (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The John Day Basin Partnership has been awarded $149,613 from the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board.

The grant was one of eight totaling $937,369 provided to local organizations statewide to support partnerships and plans that improve native fish and wildlife habitat.

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BOOST CITY PROJECT RANK (The Dalles Chronicle)

Dave Anderson, director of The Dalles Public Works Department, believes community members can help boost the city’s chances of obtaining a state grant to replace an aging water line.

The city is currently ranked 23 out of 37 applicants seeking funds for infrastructure improvements.

Anderson said the Dog River line is more than 100 years old, made of wood and leaking about 1 million gallons of water a day in full flow conditions.

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LAKEVIEW POST OFFICE FINDS SUPPORT FROM SENATORS (Lake County Examiner)

Oregon Senators Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden and Congressman Greg Walden called on the U.S. Postal Service USPS to maintain the property of its postal facility in Lakeview so that it doesnt detract from the downtown revival efforts of the community. In a letter to the Portland District Manager of the USPS, the leaders asked for the Lakeview Post Office to be painted and maintained so that it no longer creates an eyesore in downtown Lakeview.

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VOTING COUNTS — OPINION (Lake County Examiner)

Joseph Stalin famously said, The people who cast the votes decide nothing, the people who count the votes decide everything. Voting is a civic duty, so why has it become so difficult? For the past 16 years elections have been plagued by long waiting lines, broken voting machines, voters erroneously removed from rolls and thousands prevented from voting through voter ID laws falsely justified under often-discussed but rarely if ever attempted voter fraud.

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PUFF FACTORY TO BREAK GROUND IN ODELL (Hood River News)

Puff Factory is coming to Odell.

Construction begins on the 29,500-square-foot fruit puff production and shipping plant Saturday, May 7, with a groundbreaking ceremony at 3030 Lower Mill Drive. Company representatives hope the factory will be up and running by late fall.

A startup business, Puff Factory aims to transform fruit from northwest orchards into packaged, healthy snacks through a patented freeze drying process. The finished puffs will source a nascent brand, Know Your Fruit.

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BPA EXPECTS NORMAL WATER YEAR FOR DAM OPERATIONS (Hood River News)

The Bonneville Power Administration is looking at a normal water year after putting in place dry-year operations in 2015. Record-setting precipitation in December and a wet March have helped boost this year’s water supply forecast.

The April 19 water supply forecast for January through July is 105.7 million acre-feet, or 104 percent of normal. The report is produced by the Northwest River Forecast Center, based on water volume measured at The Dalles Dam.

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ODFW TO HOST TOWN HALL MEETINGS, INCLUDING ONE IN TILLAMOOK, ON PROPOSED 2017-2019 BUDGET (Tillamook County Pioneer)

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is hosting a series of town hall meetings around the state this month to gather public input on the agency’s proposed 2017-2019 budget.

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WALLOWA LAKE BIKE PATH HITS SETBACK (Wallowa.com)

A proposed $1.6 million bike path from College Street in Joseph to the county park at the foot of Wallowa Lake will be delayed for a year after Native American tribes with cultural resources in the area expressed concerns. The National Park Service and Oregon State Parks, which hold jurisdiction over the Old Chief Joseph grave site and Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site, respectively, also expressed reservations about the path route.

Construction of the 0.75-mile path was slated to begin this spring, with completion expected in August or September _________________________________________

A LOOK AT INTEL’S JOB CUTS BEYOND OREGON (Oregon Business Journal)

With the Portland area, and Hillsboro in particular, rocked by Intel Corp.’s decision to lay off 784 local workers, it’s worth noting that Oregon isn’t alone in feeling the pain.

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SHORT-TERM HEALTH INSURANCE GROWS IN POPULARITY IN OREGON AND U.S. (Oregon Business Journal)

Sales of short-term health insurance, a cheaper alternative to plans sold under the Affordable Care Act, are booming, according to the Wall Street Journal.

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FOSSIL-FUEL TERMINALS FALTER ACROSS THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST (Willamette Week)

-Coal and natural gas haven’t found friendly ports in Oregon and Washington.-

Two years ago, the Pacific Northwest looked like a surefire shipping hub for fossil fuels.

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EDUCATORS SEEK GUIDANCE ON THE FUTURE OF OREGON SCHOOLS (KLCC)

School leaders want to hear from all Oregonians about their hopes and dreams for education in the state. Wednesday, Eugene 4J, Bethel and Springfield schools are holding a community meeting as part of Oregon Rising.

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OREGON STATE TREASURER SAYS NEW PHONE SCAM TARGETS COLLEGE STUDENTS (KVAL)

The Oregon State Treasury warns Oregon college students of a newly reported telephone scam.

State Treasurer Ted Wheeler says a threatening impersonator has been calling college students and claiming to be from the Oregon 529 Network at the State Treasury.

Victims reported the scam calls in Corvallis, Eugene, and Salem. Officials say at least one person reportedly paid $1,000 in gift cards.

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OREGON REGULATORS SET AMBITIOUS TIMELINE FOR CLEAN ENERGY PROGRAMS (Utility Dive)

The Oregon Public Utility Commission has released a broad timeline of energy issues it will tackle over the next couple of years, expecting demand response issues to be taken up between 2017 and 2018 and a rulemaking on solar capacity standards to finish later this year, according to a blog post from an energy law firm on the site Lexology.

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State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on April 27, 2016 OSL eClips

April 26, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips
* Oregon limits amount of bass people should eat, due to high mercury levels in water
* Intel will lay off 784 in Oregon this week
* Kasich campaign fails to get him included in Oregon’s voters pamphlet
* Gov. Brown urges new transportation package for 2017
* Engineered timber could be a boon to the Oregon wood products industry
* Portland payroll tax would give PSU a boost — Guest Opinion
* Business quiet on minimum wage rules
* Low supply creates housing gridlock
* Primary election registration deadline is midnight Tuesday
* Wildfire rehab effort going well so far
* State education leaders visit Redmond
* Critics question Eastern Promise program
* Why Is The State Of Oregon Conducting Intelligence Work?
* Environmental groups sue over bull trout recovery plan
* Study: Fewer farmworkers migrate, aggravating labor shortage
* Little interest from energy companies in state land
* Speaker series highlights Oregon’s Chinese history
* Most new voters wont have say in presidential primary
* Medford may look for ways to curb nuisance wild turkeys
* Since You Asked: New Oregon drivers get a free pass to vote
* Group alleges county violated election laws
* Oregon no longer an environmental leader
* Dire tsunami risk prompts Wyden stopover
* Clatsop Care Center to relocate some residents
* Housing shortage tied to vacation rentals
* Editorial: Good news, bad news on fish stocks — Opinion
* Editorial: Cash-only pot business is worrisome — Opinion
* Four consequences of a $15 minimum wage
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OREGON LIMITS AMOUNT OF BASS PEOPLE SHOULD EAT, DUE TO HIGH MERCURY LEVELS IN WATER (Portland Oregonian)

Bass lovers in Oregon should be limiting how many fish they eat, due to high levels of mercury found in many state waterways.

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INTEL WILL LAY OFF 784 IN OREGON THIS WEEK (Portland Oregonian)

Intel put a number to its Oregon layoffs Tuesday, notifying the state that it will issue layoff notices to 784 employees in Hillsboro and Aloha by Friday.

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KASICH CAMPAIGN FAILS TO GET HIM INCLUDED IN OREGON’S VOTERS PAMPHLET (Eugene Register-Guard)

John Kasich, one of only three still-standing GOP presidential candidates, isnt featured in Oregons voters pamphlet for the May primary election  an embarrassing blunder for any major campaign.

The state said the Kasich campaign failed to submit information by the March 10 deadline.

Its up to candidates to get their photos and statements into the pamphlet, which is one of the most cost-effective political advertising tools in the state. Each Oregon household  roughly 1.5 million in total  gets a free copy of the pamphlet. Presidential candidates pay $3,500 to put their half-page statement in the pamphlet, or else submit 500 supporters signatures and get their statement included for free.

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GOV. BROWN URGES NEW TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE FOR 2017 (Eugene Register-Guard)

Gov. Kate Brown reiterated her call for state lawmakers to pass a major transportation funding package in 2017 during a visit to Eugene and Springfield Monday morning.

The package would likely be paid for by a combination of higher gas taxes and vehicle registration and driver license fees.

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ENGINEERED TIMBER COULD BE A BOON TO THE OREGON WOOD PRODUCTS INDUSTRY (Eugene Register-Guard)

Solid as steel. Sturdy as concrete.

Cross-laminated timber carries these claims and hopes for boosting Oregon’s wood products industry.

The engineered wood product is made by gluing together layers of boards, such as 2-by-4s, 2-by-6s and 2-by-8s. The resulting panels can be used in place of steel or concrete in the construction of buildings.

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PORTLAND PAYROLL TAX WOULD GIVE PSU A BOOST — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon’s public universities attract eager minds who want top-notch educations and access to our states fantastic natural surroundings. Whether you’re drawn to Portland, Eugene or elsewhere, there’s a fit for everyone.

But as attractive as Oregon’s institutions of higher learning are, they are increasingly difficult to afford. They are being squeezed by our state Legislature. For the past 20 years, lawmakers have been chipping away at financial support for the states seven public universities. The state once funded 80 percent of universities budgets; now it funds 25 percent. Among the 50 states, Oregon ranks an embarrassing 46th in funding for higher education.

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BUSINESS QUIET ON MINIMUM WAGE RULES (Portland Tribune)

-Labor activists expressed support for draft rules during hearing Monday-

The business community was nearly absent from a public hearing Monday on draft rules for how itinerant employees will be paid under Oregons new regional minimum wage law.

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LOW SUPPLY CREATES HOUSING GRIDLOCK (Portland Tribune)

The Portland area is experiencing a gridlock of homebuyers because of rapidly rising housing prices, according to some local real estate agents.

We are virtually sold out of inventory, and theres a pipeline of stalled buyers, said Lennox Scott, chairman and CEO of John L. Scott Real Estate.

According to Scott, the competition for available housing is so intense that existing homeowners who want to move are hesitant to put their homes up for sale. They are afraid their homes will sell before they can find and buy their next one  a Catch-22 that is keeping more and more homes off the market.

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PRIMARY ELECTION REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS MIDNIGHT TUESDAY (Portland Tribune)

Oregonians who are legally eligible to vote have until midnight Tuesday to register or change their registration to participate in the May 17 primary election.

Oregonians have just a few hours left to ensure that they will be able to cast a ballot in this historic primary, says Oregon Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins. Every day we hear from voters who are eager to make their voices heard this May. I hope they take the time to review their registration and make updates if necessary.

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WILDFIRE REHAB EFFORT GOING WELL SO FAR (Bend Bulletin)

-$14M has been spent repairing land scorched by fire in Oregon and Idaho-

Scientists say a $67 million rehabilitation effort following a wildfire in southwest Idaho and southeast Oregon is starting off well thanks to good precipitation over the winter.

About $14 million has been spent since October as part of a five-year restoration plan to develop new strategies to combat increasingly destructive rangeland wildfires in the West.

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STATE EDUCATION LEADERS VISIT REDMOND (Bend Bulletin)

-ODE seeking input on new federal education law-

State education leaders took their listening tour to Redmond on Monday to hear what should be the priority in Oregon under a new federal education law.

The Every Student Succeeds Act was signed into law in December, replacing No Child Left Behind and giving states more control. They will still be required to test students regularly and identify low-performing schools, but now states will come up with their own plans for issues such as accountability, school improvement and teacher evaluation, rather than taking orders from the federal government.

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CRITICS QUESTION EASTERN PROMISE PROGRAM (Bend Bulletin)

Critics are questioning the effectiveness of programs that allow high school students to gain college credit while attending high school but supporters of the program say those fears are unfounded.

The Oregon Educational Associations Community College Council recently wrote in a paper that programs like Eastern Promise are just a way for colleges to make extra money and that high school students often dont do as well in subsequent classes as traditional college students.

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WHY IS THE STATE OF OREGON CONDUCTING INTELLIGENCE WORK? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Oregon Department of Justice recently commissioned a review into why state investigators were scrutinizing Oregonians who used the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter on social media, including tweets by the head of the agencys own Civil Rights Division.

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ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS SUE OVER BULL TROUT RECOVERY PLAN (Capital Press)

Two environmental groups have filed a lawsuit against the federal government over the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services plan to recover threatened bull trout.

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STUDY: FEWER FARMWORKERS MIGRATE, AGGRAVATING LABOR SHORTAGE (Capital Press)

The agricultural labor shortage has less to do with the shrinking population of farmworkers than with its changing work habits, a new economic study found.

Since the late 1990s, the proportion of farmworkers who regularly migrate from place to place has decreased from about 50 percent to less than 20 percent, said Maoyong Fan, an economist at Ball State University and the studys lead author.

The key problem is not that we have an absolute smaller number of farmworkers, the key problem is theyre not willing to move to take multiple jobs, Fan said.

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LITTLE INTEREST FROM ENERGY COMPANIES IN STATE LAND (East Oregonian)

Democratic secretary of state candidate Brad Avakian wants to lease out public rangelands in Central and Eastern Oregon for renewable energy development.

Avakian, the states labor commissioner, said he would use the secretary of states position on the three-member State Land Board to push for wind, solar and geothermal leases on lands that belong to the Common School Fund.

The land board, whose other members are the governor and state treasurer, carries out a mandate in the Oregon Constitution to manage the lands to raise money for public schools.

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SPEAKER SERIES HIGHLIGHTS OREGON’S CHINESE HISTORY (East Oregonian)

The Oregon Historical Society is sponsoring programs across the state highlighting the impact of the Chinese American immigration in the mid-19th century.

From building infrastructure through the railroad and mining industries, establishing restaurants and laundry businesses to initiating advancements in pharmaceutical care, the stories of Chinese Americans reach across the state.

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MOST NEW VOTERS WONT HAVE SAY IN PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY (East Oregonian)

With the presidential races still competitive in both major parties, Oregon voters have a rare chance to make a difference late in the primary season.

There’s one catch: out of the 2,243,077 registered voters in Oregon, only 69 percent of them will be able to cast a ballot for the Republican or Democratic presidential races in the May 17 primary.

Thats because Oregon has a closed primary, which means that voters who are unaffiliated or registered with a third party cant participate in the major party primaries.

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MEDFORD MAY LOOK FOR WAYS TO CURB NUISANCE WILD TURKEYS (Medford Mail Tribune)

-City may look for ways to curb nuisance wildlife-

At first a single wild turkey showing up in an east Medford yard could be seen as a cute addition to urban life, then someone breaks out the bread crumbs and now you have an entire neighborhood grousing over gobblers.

That lone turkey invites 24 of his family and friends that start digging up flowerbeds, laying landmines on sidewalks and tearing up shingles with their sharp talons as they roost on roofs to the delight of a few but the chagrin of the majority.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: NEW OREGON DRIVERS GET A FREE PASS TO VOTE (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: My son will be 18 in early October, and is excited to be able to vote for our next president. Will he have to register to vote? Or will he be automatically registered because he is a licensed driver?

A: The short answer to your question, Ann, is yes, your son and anyone with U.S. citizenship and Oregon residency turning 18 by election day are eligible to vote in November’s general election. And that will happen automatically, although he can weigh in on his party preference.

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GROUP ALLEGES COUNTY VIOLATED ELECTION LAWS (Medford Mail Tribune)

A local property rights group has filed a complaint with the Oregon Secretary of State’s Office claiming two Jackson County officials violated election laws by taking steps interfering with Commissioner Doug Breidenthals re-election bid.

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OREGON NO LONGER AN ENVIRONMENTAL LEADER (The World)

In 1973, Gov. Tom McCall proudly referenced “Oregon’s status as the environmental model of this nation.”

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DIRE TSUNAMI RISK PROMPTS WYDEN STOPOVER (Daily Astorian)

Help is the message from Seaside School Superintendent Doug Dougherty, and U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden responded to the SOS Sunday.

Dougherty and Seaside Mayor Don Larson served as guides on a tour of the citys tsunami zone, from Seaside High School to Broadway Middle School before going east to Seaside Heights Elementary School.

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CLATSOP CARE CENTER TO RELOCATE SOME RESIDENTS (Daily Astorian)

A shortage of certified nursing assistants is forcing Clatsop Care Center, the only nursing home in Clatsop County, to downsize its long-term resident population over the next two months.

By July, the center in Astoria plans to help relocate a dozen residents to other care providers  adult foster homes, assisted-living facilities or, if the residents prefer, a nursing home outside the county  decreasing the number of long-term care residents from 24 to 12.

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HOUSING SHORTAGE TIED TO VACATION RENTALS (Daily Astorian)

Cannon Beachs approach to vacation rentals has been held out as a model for other cities, including Gearhart, which is wrestling over new rules.

But problems surfacing in Cannon Beach indicate flaws to the short-term rental system, which includes a lottery, limitation on short-term rental properties, infrequent inspections and limited enforcement. In addition, too many vacation rentals could be inhibiting the citys long-term housing stock and even further diminishing workforce and affordable housing.

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EDITORIAL: GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS ON FISH STOCKS — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

There is good news and bad news in NOAA Fisheries latest Status of Stocks report. It notes the rebuilding of two local groundfish species and marks new complications for salmon fisheries.

Longtime residents well remember the economic stresses created by stringent controls on groundfish harvests starting after the turn of the millennium.

For communities like ours at the mouth of the Columbia, loss of any major fishery is like removing one leg of a table  our entire economy becomes less stable.

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EDITORIAL: CASH-ONLY POT BUSINESS IS WORRISOME — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Lets say that you run a business that sells recreational marijuana. These businesses, as you know, are legal in many parts of Oregon, but not so much in Linn County, at least not until the November elections.

But we already digress. Judging by the unexpectedly high level of taxes paid to the state from the sales of recreational pot in January and February nearly $7 million, some 10 times more than state economists originally guessed, chances are decent that your recreational marijuana business is doing reasonably well.

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FOUR CONSEQUENCES OF A $15 MINIMUM WAGE (Los Angeles Times)

Exhaustive research over the past few decades suggests raising the minimum wage has little negative impact on overall employment.

Problem is, most past wage hikes have been relatively modest, and there’s no data to confidently predict what might happen following the kinds of increases now planned in California and New York.

Going to $15 an hour represents a 50% rise from California’s current minimum pay of $10, and a 67% jump for New York.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on April 26, 2016 OSL eClips

April 25, 2016 eClips Weekend Edition

State Library eClips
* Look again: Phony version of Oregon voters’ pamphlet targets House Speaker Tina Kotek
* Sophisticated phone scammers are targeting Oregon college students, Treasurer Ted Wheeler says
* Ocean, Columbia River salmon seasons set, including a Buoy 10 twist
* Is liquor coming to the Wilsonville Costco?
* Commission adopts ocean fishing, bird hunting regulations
* Courts are no judge of wildlife science — Opinion
* Feds must recognize Oregon reality: Pot is big business — Opinion
* Why I stopped building affordable housing — Guest Opinion
* Lane County voter registration hits record as May primary nears
* Lowell students learn how to budget with minimum wage
* Homelessness is everyones problem — Guest Opinion
* Redmond Airport closing: Whats the impact?
* Many DA elections in Oregon go uncontested
* Larger snowpack might equate to milder fire season
* Eugene, Portland eye doctor accused of not being M.D.
* Women in Deschutes County make less than men
* Oregon Researchers Frustrated By Federal Genetic Testing Block
* State Selects 14 New Stores To Sell Liquor In Portland Area
* Old-Growth Forests Provide Temperature Refuges In Face Of Climate Change: Study
* 4 Things You Need To Know About Oregon’s Voter Registration Deadline
* Anne Kubisch: There Is Economic Potential In Oregon’s Rural Economies
* April heat did a number on Oregon’s snowpack
* Rancher says hes a conservation-easement convert
* Energy bill amendment to enable Klamath Basin water, power plans
* Growers urged to scout fields for black leg
* Secretary of states election duties drive endorsements
* Lawsuit over Oregon wolf delisting ruled moot
* Is Eastern Promise living up to the promise?
* Wuerthner: Logging a cause not a cure for wildfires — Guest Opinion
* Finding new life in Ontario
* Agency works to protect resources at the local level
* Crater Lake visitors spent $52.2 million last year
* Pied Pipers for trout bums
* Crater Lake impact: $71 million
* Oregon delegation applauds TSA’s return to Klamath airport
* Pen Air could return to Klamath Falls by October
* Special Report: Primary primer
* Issue not just about a drug, but about the right to farm; it deserves voters’ support — Guest Opinion
* Marijuana hurts developing brains — Guest Opinion
* Circuit Court judge candidate Inokuchi suspended by Oregon State Bar
* Resource management plan opposition seeks more favorable balance
* Sue ’em; but what do we do in the meantime? — Opinion
* Filing mishap won’t disqualify David Brock Smith from state race
* Warrenton still open for business
* Mid-Valley InBusiness: Travel, tourism drive economic growth
* Think Too Much: Getting a better grip on youth suicide — Opinion
* Rabid bat bites local man
* OSU norovirus outbreak declared over
* ODF fire training on tap
* Restoration proposals sought
* Feds ruling still leaves some key questions unanswered
* Senate pushes forward Mount Hood land trade
* Another Voice: Burdensome STR regulations would discriminate against homeowners — Guest Opinion
* Roseburg police on front lines of transient crisis
* Observers: Courts not the answer to solve transient crisis
* Timber execs, county officials slam BLM plan
* Guest Column: Build the Jordan Cove LNG Pipeline — Guest Opinion
* Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission adopts ocean salmon and halibut seasons, bird hunting regulations
* Fake ‘Voters’ Pamphlet Guide’ targets House Speaker Kotek
* Group Files Complaint Against Jackson County Administrator and Auditor
* Aftermass: Bicycling In A Post-Critical Mass Portland – Video
* Insurers Pressure State Regulators to Deny Expanded Access to Hearing Aids
* State Regulators Consider Sale of Advantage Dental to National Company
* PEBB Reserve Cut in Half After Legislature Raids Fund, Followed By Rising Costs

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LOOK AGAIN: PHONY VERSION OF OREGON VOTERS’ PAMPHLET TARGETS HOUSE SPEAKER TINA KOTEK (Portland Oregonian)

The folded postcard that landed in mailboxes across North and Northeast Portland this month looked suspiciously like Oregon’s official voters’ guide down to the typeface, buoyant stars and conspicuous use of a state seal.
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SOPHISTICATED PHONE SCAMMERS ARE TARGETING OREGON COLLEGE STUDENTS, TREASURER TED WHEELER SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon college students need to be aware of a new and sophisticated phone scam from an impersonator claiming to represent an obscure state treasury office.

Ted Wheeler, Oregon’s State Treasurer, issued a warning Thursday that students in Corvallis, Eugene and Salem had received scam phone calls from “a threatening impersonator” whose calls appeared to originate from a state agency.
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OCEAN, COLUMBIA RIVER SALMON SEASONS SET, INCLUDING A BUOY 10 TWIST (Portland Oregonian)

In a scramble as wild and quixotic as the salmon runs they’re trying to keep with, Oregon and Washington fish managers closed the loops this past week on 2016 summer and fall sport-fishing seasons.
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IS LIQUOR COMING TO THE WILSONVILLE COSTCO? (Salem Statesman Journal) /

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission has selected 14 new stores to sell liquor in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties.

Four of the new grocery store liquor locations will be inside Walmarts. One store location is listed by the OLCC as being in Wilsonville, at 8697 SW Jack Burns Ave.
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COMMISSION ADOPTS OCEAN FISHING, BIRD HUNTING REGULATIONS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Due to “an overforecast in 2015 and poor ocean conditions that could impact this years return,” fishery managers are taking a cautious approach for 2016 coho seasons.

As such, the Fish and Wildlife Commission adopted bird hunting and fishing regulations Friday at its meeting in Bandon.
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COURTS ARE NO JUDGE OF WILDLIFE SCIENCE — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

U.S. District Judge Ann Aikens recent, well-reasoned opinion and order in the Oregon spotted frog case makes it more clear than ever that the courts can be a really bad place to set public policy. The frogs needs cannot and should not be considered in a vacuum.
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FEDS MUST RECOGNIZE OREGON REALITY: POT IS BIG BUSINESS — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Eugene Home Science Club, which is more than 100 years old, has about two dozen members these days.

All the women are age 60 or older. And for a recent meeting, their guest speaker was a state specialist in marijuana.
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WHY I STOPPED BUILDING AFFORDABLE HOUSING — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

After reading several responses to the Statesman Journals April 3 Rapid Response question as to why there’s a lack of affordable housing in Salem, I thought I might share the experiences of an old guy who built over 1,000 affordable houses in the Salem area.
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LANE COUNTY VOTER REGISTRATION HITS RECORD AS MAY PRIMARY NEARS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Whether the cause is Oregon’s new motor-voter law or residents zeal to take part in the fiery presidential primary, voter registration in Lane County is up sharply, hitting a record for March and very likely heading into a record for April.
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LOWELL STUDENTS LEARN HOW TO BUDGET WITH MINIMUM WAGE (Eugene Register-Guard)

After examining the estimated cost of living in Oregon and crunching some numbers, students at Lowell Junior/Senior High School said Friday they may take their education more seriously and possibly open a savings account.
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HOMELESSNESS IS EVERYONE’S PROBLEM — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

What defines our humanity? From our days as cave dwellers to the present, we human beings have made homes for ourselves as best as we are able: places to be, where we seek safety from the elements, where we sleep, keep our belongings, fix our meals and raise our families.
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REDMOND AIRPORT CLOSING: WHATS THE IMPACT? (Bend Bulletin)

-Tourism and aviation leaders weigh in on the May closure-

On a warm afternoon last week, employees of the Knife River construction company were busy repaving a portion of runway 5-23, the main runway at Redmond Airport. For the time being, operations have shifted to the secondary runway, and the repairs are not affecting the flow of traffic to and from Central Oregons only commercial airport, according to Airport Director Zachary Bass. But starting May 2, that will change, when the airport will close for 21 days for a resurfacing project.
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MANY DA ELECTIONS IN OREGON GO UNCONTESTED (Bend Bulletin)

-Deschutes County bucks trend-

Quick whos the district attorney?

The answer to that question is more than a trivia tidbit, but many Oregonians dont cast a vote for district attorney, according to a report released last week by the American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon.

District attorneys have many responsibilities, among them investigating crimes, filing charges and prosecuting cases at trial. There is a district attorney in every county in Oregon, and terms are four years long.
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LARGER SNOWPACK MIGHT EQUATE TO MILDER FIRE SEASON (Bend Bulletin)

-From here on out, depends on weather and people being cautious not careless-

State and federal officials are cautiously optimistic that this winters larger snowpack will lead to a milder fire season compared with the past few years.

Were starting the season in a better place, but theres no guarantee, said Jean Nelson-Dean, a Deschutes National Forest spokeswoman.

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EUGENE, PORTLAND EYE DOCTOR ACCUSED OF NOT BEING M.D. (Bend Bulletin)

There’s a difference between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist.

An optometrist treats the vision prescribing glasses, for instance, to correct a patients sight. An ophthalmologist treats the eye diagnosing and treating disease, prescribing medications and performing eye surgeries if necessary.

But there is another difference between those two professions, one that may prove costly for a Eugene optometrist if recent allegations made against him are true. And it all comes down to two little letters: M.D.
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WOMEN IN DESCHUTES COUNTY MAKE LESS THAN MEN (Bend Bulletin)

-Women make less than half the wages of men in health care, finance-

Women in Deschutes County made up 51 percent of the workforce in 2014 but received 30 percent less money for their work than men did, according to numbers provided by the Oregon Employment Department.

The numbers were localized from a statewide report, titled Where Women Work and How Much They Earn, produced by the department in March. In it, Nick Beleiciks, state employment economist and the study’s author, examined wages from more than 820,000 women who held jobs in Oregon in 2014, the most recent full-year data available.

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OREGON RESEARCHERS FRUSTRATED BY FEDERAL GENETIC TESTING BLOCK (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Congressional efforts to block research on the genes of human embryos continue, and researchers at Oregon Health & Sciences University are finding it particularly frustrating.

The House Appropriations Subcommittee has included language in the Food & Drug Administrations budget for next year that effectively bans federal research on genetic editing in humans.
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STATE SELECTS 14 NEW STORES TO SELL LIQUOR IN PORTLAND AREA (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission has selected 14 new stores to sell liquor in the Portland metropolitan area.

Back in the 1980s, Oregon had one liquor store for every 12,000 customers. In Portland, that ratio is now one for every 25,000.

The OLCC wants to change that, and announced Thursday theyd be adding 14 new outlets. Four of those liquor stores will be small sections inside area Walmarts.
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OLD-GROWTH FORESTS PROVIDE TEMPERATURE REFUGES IN FACE OF CLIMATE CHANGE: STUDY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Old-growth forests in the Northwest have the potential to make the extremes of climate change less damaging for wildlife. New research out of Oregon State University shows complex forests do a surprisingly good job of regulating temperature on the ground even compared to fully mature tree plantations.

On a sunny day, if you were sitting underneath them, youd get a similar amount of shade, says study co-author Matt Betts, an Ecologist at OSU.
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4 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT OREGON’S VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Tuesday is the deadline to register to vote in Oregon’s May 17 primary. Here’s what you need to know:

1. Oregon generally has voting rules aimed at maximizing participation, but not when it comes voter registration.
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ANNE KUBISCH: THERE IS ECONOMIC POTENTIAL IN OREGON’S RURAL ECONOMIES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The doom and gloom stories about Oregon’s rural communities are legion.

But Anne Kubisch says she sees the potential in rural communities, and wants others to start seeing it as well.
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APRIL HEAT DID A NUMBER ON OREGON’S SNOWPACK (Capital Press)

Wildly fluctuating April weather sent Oregon’s snowpack up, down and now, in some areas, melted out.

Its still too early to project water trouble this summer the return of cool weather could help retain snow or even increase the snowpack a bit but as the USDAs Natural Resources Conservation Service in Portland put it, What a difference three weeks can make.
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RANCHER SAYS HES A CONSERVATION-EASEMENT CONVERT (Capital Press)

As a fifth-generation rancher in Oregon’s Jordan Valley, Bob Skinner was adamantly opposed to conservation easements.

But the former president of the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association and a long-time director for the Public Lands Council had a change of philosophy when he was invited to find out more about how conservation easements can protect working landscapes.

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ENERGY BILL AMENDMENT TO ENABLE KLAMATH BASIN WATER, POWER PLANS (Capital Press)

Proponents of certain water solutions in the Klamath Basin say an energy bill amendment that passed the U.S. Senate provides key support for improving facilities and other initiatives.

The amendment by Oregon Sens. Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, both Democrats, authorizes measures first proposed as part of the 2010 Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement, although it doesnt address the controversial removal of four dams on the Klamath River.

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GROWERS URGED TO SCOUT FIELDS FOR BLACK LEG (Capital Press)

Pacific Northwest farmers should scout their winter canola, brassica and crucifer crops for black leg fungus.

Industry concern is still at a heightened level, said Victor Shaul, seed program manager with the Washington State Department of Agriculture.

Black leg was found in Oregon and Idaho, but not yet in Washington, which has a crucifer quarantine and accepts only seed certified as black leg-free.

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SECRETARY OF STATES ELECTION DUTIES DRIVE ENDORSEMENTS (East Oregonian)

In Oregon, the secretary of state functions as the states chief elections officer, auditor and archivist.

That has not stopped candidates for secretary of state, particularly Democrats, from competing for endorsements from special interest groups focused on policy issues from abortion, to the environment and labor.
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LAWSUIT OVER OREGON WOLF DELISTING RULED MOOT (East Oregonian)

An environmentalist legal challenge against Oregon’s decision to remove wolves from the states endangered species list has been dismissed due to legislation passed earlier this year.

Wolves were delisted by state wildlife regulators last year, but three environmental groups Cascadia Wildlands, Center for Biological Diversity and Oregon Wild asked the Oregon Court of Appeals to reverse that decision, claiming it wasn’t based on sound science.

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IS EASTERN PROMISE LIVING UP TO THE PROMISE? (East Oregonian)

Edith Velasco will start at Oregon State University next fall as a sophomore.

The 18-year-old Riverside High School student will have earned more than 40 college credits by the time she graduates this spring. When Velasco was an underclassman, she learned about the Eastern Promise program where she could earn college credit while attending high school. Riverside, she learned, would foot the bill.
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WUERTHNER: LOGGING A CAUSE NOT A CURE FOR WILDFIRES — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

The Forest Service solution to large wildfires is more logging, but this prescription ignores the growing body of scientific research that suggests that logging/thinning/prescribed burning does not work under severe fire conditions.

Why is this important?

Because the vast majority of all fires self-extinguish whether we do anything or not.
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FINDING NEW LIFE IN ONTARIO (Argus Observer)

-School district program strives to assist migrant families-

Migrant consultants Carolina Gomez and Mimi Rodriguez gather their things and flip off the light to their office in the Ontario School District building before heading to what they call their mobile office, a minivan.

Their destinations: homes of migrants living in Ontario with students who are part of the school district.
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AGENCY WORKS TO PROTECT RESOURCES AT THE LOCAL LEVEL (Argus Observer)

Monuments, wilderness and wilderness study areas are management designations for federal public lands that are written in laws passed by Congress or designation by the president.

Those designations have become lightning rods for the debate over how public lands should be used and how much protection they need.
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CRATER LAKE VISITORS SPENT $52.2 MILLION LAST YEAR (Medford Mail Tribune)

A longer-than-usual visitor season and stepped-up tourism campaigns helped Crater Lake National Park generate $52.2 million in visitor spending last year, up 16 percent, according to the National Park Service.

The park lured about 614,000 visitors, who spent money on everything from meals and hotels to gas and souvenirs during their visits, up from about 535,000 visitors who spent $44.8 million in the same fashion in 2014, according to a park service economic report.
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PIED PIPERS FOR TROUT BUMS (Medford Mail Tribune)

There’s nothing like the BEEP BEEP BEEP sound of a stocking truck backing down a boat ramp to signal that your day of trout fishing at your favorite lake or bank spot on the far upper Rogue River near Union Creek is about to improve greatly.

Oregon’s so-called “put-and-take” trout fisheries the trucks put them in, you take them out remains one of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s most popular programs.
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CRATER LAKE IMPACT: $71 MILLION (Herald and News)

A new National Park Service NPS report shows that 614,712 recreational visitors to Crater Lake National Park in 2015 spent $52.18 million in communities near the park.

That spending supported 887 jobs in the local area and had a cumulative benefit to the local economy of $71,212,400.

Crater Lake National Park welcomes visitors from across the country and around the world, said Superintendent Craig Ackerman in a press release.

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OREGON DELEGATION APPLAUDS TSA’S RETURN TO KLAMATH AIRPORT (Herald and News)

Oregon’s Senators Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden and Congressmen Greg Walden and Peter DeFazio today applauded news that the Transportation Security Administration TSA will restore screening services at the Crater Lake-Klamath Regional Airport in Klamath Falls, clearing the path for commercial service to return to the airport.
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PEN AIR COULD RETURN TO KLAMATH FALLS BY OCTOBER (Herald and News)

It’s been a celebratory week for local leaders in the Klamath Basin.

Applause broke out at the South Portal building Thursday morning as Klamath Falls Mayor Todd Kellstrom announced to a room full of community members and leaders that the Transportation Security Administration will return to Klamath Falls this year.

We have it on good authority that TSA is coming to Klamath Falls, Kellstrom said.
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SPECIAL REPORT: PRIMARY PRIMER (Herald and News)

-Marijuana sales issue most contentious; commission, sheriff’s race fills out ballot-

Allowing state-licensed recreational marijuana businesses in Klamath County is a divisive issue, and it depends who you talk to as to the potential impact.

Measure 18-105 would amend Klamath County ordinance 36.07 to allow recreational pot businesses to operate within county limits. The ordinance currently bans four types of licensing producer, processor, wholesaler and retailer.

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ISSUE NOT JUST ABOUT A DRUG, BUT ABOUT THE RIGHT TO FARM; IT DESERVES VOTERS’ SUPPORT — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

Like many of Oregon’s farmers, I’m female, also a native urban Oregonian who chose to become a farmer.

We began farming in Clackamas County, then moved our farm to Josephine County in 2006. We’ve raised alpacas for 15 years, and developed five income streams from them. In 2014 we added another income stream, medicinal cannabis, and this crop is the reason our farm is still in business.

Oregon Department of Agriculture announced earlier this year that cannabis has been recognized by ODA as an agricultural crop.
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MARIJUANA HURTS DEVELOPING BRAINS — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

In the last six months with the Blue Zones Project, many citizens of Klamath County have shown a desire to be part of a healthier community. Recreational marijuana is not a harmless pleasure or a healthy choice.

Marijuana is mainly smoked. Inhaling any foreign substance into ones lungs is an unhealthy practice. Marijuana cannabis has more than 400 chemicals that are burned and inhaled into the lungs. It is harmful to lung tissue. When I go camping, I dont try to inhale the campfire smoke from burning natural wood fibers, but avoid the harmful smoke.

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CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE CANDIDATE INOKUCHI SUSPENDED BY OREGON STATE BAR (The World)

The Oregon State Bar may have thrown a curve ball into District 15’s Circuit Court judge race.

The bar has temporarily suspended candidate Rick Inokuchi as of April 18 for failing to respond to an OSB investigation that began in the latter stages of 2015.
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RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN OPPOSITION SEEKS MORE FAVORABLE BALANCE (The World)

Nick Smith isn’t taking any joy from bashing the BLM’s Resource Management Plan for Western Oregon, but what’s being proposed just doesn’t add up.

And it’s not just the executive director of Healthy Forest, Healthy Communities who feels this way.

From logging interests, conservationists to county government, very few seem happy with the plan.
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SUE ‘EM; BUT WHAT DO WE DO IN THE MEANTIME? — OPINION (The World)

After meeting this week with some local timber representatives, its pretty clear that the Bureau of Land Managements recently unveiled Resource Management Plan for Western Oregon creates a devastating outlook for South Coast timber production.

In their attempt to satisfy multiple mandates for use of the forest, the federal planners may have crafted a plan that satisfies the letter of the law as they interpret it. But as with any plan that tries to satisfy multiple desires, its ultimately a compromise. And in any compromise, there are winners and losers.
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FILING MISHAP WON’T DISQUALIFY DAVID BROCK SMITH FROM STATE RACE (The World)

There’s been a lot of chatter swirling behind how Curry County Commissioner David Brock Smith filed for the District 1 State Rep. position, but according to the state, it’s more smoke than fire.

Fellow politicians and community members keyed on a 39-second differential in time stamps between Smith’s filing for the representative position and the withdrawal of his candidacy to be re-elected as commissioner.

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WARRENTON STILL OPEN FOR BUSINESS (Daily Astorian)

In light of Oregon LNG’s decision to ditch a proposed $6 billion terminal and pipeline project on the Skipanon Peninsula, the City Commission wants outside industries to know that Warrenton still welcomes business development.

Commissioner Henry Balensifer said the city should also devise a strategic plan for Warrentons economy, a document that spells out the kinds of businesses the community wants to encourage.

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MID-VALLEY INBUSINESS: TRAVEL, TOURISM DRIVE ECONOMIC GROWTH (Albany Democrat Herald)

Its happy hour on a sunny spring afternoon in Lebanon, and people are starting to arrive at the 1847 Bar & Grill at the mid-valleys newest hotel, Boulder Falls Inn. Later that evening, the Miss Rodeo Oregon coronation will convene inside the Boulder Falls Center.

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THINK TOO MUCH: GETTING A BETTER GRIP ON YOUTH SUICIDE — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

A couple of weeks ago, a mid-valley high school student killed herself.

We didn’t write a story about the death, because of longtime policies in our newsrooms that a suicide occurring in a private place isn’t newsworthy. We are particularly careful about suicides that involve young people, because of documented worries that news coverage of those deaths might inspire copycat attempts.

But here’s the thing that gave me pause: This most recent death was the 10th suicide in Oregon this calendar year involving someone between 10 and 24 years of age.

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RABID BAT BITES LOCAL MAN (Albany Democrat Herald)

A south Benton County man who was bitten by a bat is receiving rabies shots after the animal tested positive for the deadly disease.

According to information released Friday by the Benton County Health Department, the man woke up on Wednesday morning with a stinging pain in his hand and discovered he’d been bitten by a bat.
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OSU NOROVIRUS OUTBREAK DECLARED OVER (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

The norovirus outbreak that made dozens of dorm residents sick at Oregon State University appears to have run its course.

At least 80 to 100 people were stricken by the gastrointestinal illness after it appeared in late March, as students were returning to the Corvallis campus from their spring break travels.

But after the number of people reporting symptoms slowed to a trickle, health officials cautiously declared victory this week.

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ODF FIRE TRAINING ON TAP (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The Oregon Department of Forestry will host Fire Shelter refresher training and Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration fire training from 8 a.m. to noon Friday, May 13, at the ODF office, 415 Patterson Bridge Drive, John Day.

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RESTORATION PROPOSALS SOUGHT (Blue Mountain Eagle)

USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is seeking to restore critical wetlands in Oregon and declining aspen habitats across Eastern Oregon.

Up to $290,000 in funding available this year for farmers and ranchers to help restore aspen habitat on private lands. Financial incentives are available to help voluntary landowners perform aspen conservation practices such as fencing, conifer juniper removal, invasive weed control, brush management, upland habitat management and livestock watering systems.
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FEDS RULING STILL LEAVES SOME KEY QUESTIONS UNANSWERED (LaGrande Observer)

To protect federally endangered fish species, Wallowa and Union county cities enrolled in the National Flood Insurance Program will have to follow new rules regarding floodplain development.

The new mandates stem from a lawsuit filed against the Federal Emergency Management Administration by the Audubon Society of Portland and other environmental groups. The legal action asserted the Federal Emergency Management Administration floodplain insurance allowed for the development in Oregon’s floodplains.

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SENATE PUSHES FORWARD MOUNT HOOD LAND TRADE (Hood River News)

A stalled land exchange between the U.S. Forest Service and Mt. Hood Meadows ski resort inched forward this week.

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday passed a bill launched by Sen. Ron Wyden and Sen. Jeff Merkley that aims to resolve the decades-long tussle over development on the mountains northeast slope.

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ANOTHER VOICE: BURDENSOME STR REGULATIONS WOULD DISCRIMINATE AGAINST HOMEOWNERS — GUEST OPINION (Hood River News)

Lost in the emotional arguments about short term vacation rentals STRs is a simple fact: an overwhelming majority of Hood River residents support STRs and smart policies that both address community concerns and maximize economic growth. Many of us support our families through tourism revenue, and STRs are a critical part of that.

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ROSEBURG POLICE ON FRONT LINES OF TRANSIENT CRISIS (Douglas County News-Review)

-Homeless in Roseburg Part 1-

During a night patrol last week, Roseburg Police Officers Tony Powers and Ryan Dingman stopped at an empty house on northeast Winchester Street.

Shining a light through the living room window, it was clear the home had become a hideout for squatters.

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OBSERVERS: COURTS NOT THE ANSWER TO SOLVE TRANSIENT CRISIS (Douglas County News-Review)

-Homelessness in Roseburg: Part 2-

After arraignment, Tasha Beck left the Douglas County Courthouse, walked a few hundred yards outside and stepped under a bridge to yell at a friend.

Hey You missed court she said, her voice bouncing off the bridges beams. Youre going back to jail

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TIMBER EXECS, COUNTY OFFICIALS SLAM BLM PLAN (Douglas County News-Review)

Adopting the latest plan from the Bureau of Land Management could lead to the financial ruin of Douglas County, timber executives and a county official said Thursday.

Timber industry executives, advocates and Douglas County Commissioner Tim Freeman spoke to The News-Review, emphasizing that the bureaus recently announced plan for managing forestland in Western Oregon continues to squeeze timber harvests so downsizing, for private companies and the county itself, is inevitable.

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GUEST COLUMN: BUILD THE JORDAN COVE LNG PIPELINE — GUEST OPINION (Douglas County News-Review)

My father and mother lived through the difficult times of World War I, the Depression and World War II. They also witnessed and participated in the economic growth that occurred thereafter, led by citizens who had experienced tough times and wanted to make our country a better place for their children, grandchildren and those who followed.
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OREGON FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMISSION ADOPTS OCEAN SALMON AND HALIBUT SEASONS, BIRD HUNTING REGULATIONS (Tillamook County Pioneer)

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission adopted the following bird hunting and fishing regulations at its Friday, April 22 meeting in Bandon:
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FAKE ‘VOTERS’ PAMPHLET GUIDE’ TARGETS HOUSE SPEAKER KOTEK (KATU)

Fake “Voters’ Pamphlet Guides” are landing in mail boxes and at front doors of people in Oregon’s District 44 in North Portland.

On the outside, the pamphlet’s font and layout look legitimate. There is also a similar state seal on the front of both flyers, but upon closer inspection, the flyer clearly favors one candidate: lesser known Oregon House of Representative for District 44 hopeful, Sharon Nasset.
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GROUP FILES COMPLAINT AGAINST JACKSON COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR AND AUDITOR (kdrv.com Medford)

Citizens for Constitutional Fairness filed a complaint against the Jackson County Administrator Danny Jordan and the Jackson County Auditor Eric Spivak for conducting prohibited political activities on the clock.

The group filed the complaint on Friday to the Secretary of State Elections Division. According to the complaint, “Jackson County employees have engaged in election related activities which oppose the re-election of the incumbent and which were conducted in county offices during work hours.”

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INSURERS PRESSURE STATE REGULATORS TO DENY EXPANDED ACCESS TO HEARING AIDS (The Lund Report)

-If a ruling by Insurance Commissioner Laura Cali stands, insurance companies would have to pay for hearing aids for adults, a benefit currently limited to those on the Oregon Health Plan. Insurers are required to cover the devices for children, and the feds insist they cannot discriminate by age.-

Representatives from Oregons leading health insurers urged state regulators to fight a federal requirement that their companies be required to provide hearing aids to anyone who needs them, an expansion of their current coverage, which is limited to children.
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STATE REGULATORS CONSIDER SALE OF ADVANTAGE DENTAL TO NATIONAL COMPANY (The Lund Report)

-Boston-based DentaQuest, the largest provider of Medicaid dental services, wants to buy 80 percent of Oregon dental company Advantage Dental, and expand its dental care organization model to Medicaid programs across the country.-

The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation appeared poised to approve the sale of Advantage Community Holding Company to DentaQuest, after a public hearing in Salem on the sale of Advantages dental health insurance line to the nations second-largest oral health company, which is based in Boston.
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PEBB RESERVE CUT IN HALF AFTER LEGISLATURE RAIDS FUND, FOLLOWED BY RISING COSTS (The Lund Report)

-Three years of below-budget spending by the Public Employees Benefit Board drove the governor and Legislature to take $120 million away from the health benefit plans reserve and place it in the state general fund. But now PEBBs costs have spiked, and the health plan will have to lean on its reserves to pay benefits, cutting the reserve to $159 million in 2018, and possibly draining the fund by 2025.-

The Public Employees Benefit Board will have to make do with less than half of their current reserve by 2018 because the Legislature voted at the end of the 2015 session to raid the health plans fund of $120 million to cover other expenses in the general fund.
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State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on April 25, 2016 eClips Weekend Edition

April 25, 2016 OSL eClips

* Death of farmworker strangled by safety vest leads to $7 million lawsuit
* Ammon Bundy to challenge authority of feds to prosecute Oregon standoff defendants
* Benton County man bitten by bat is Oregon’s first 2016 rabies case
* Norovirus outbreak at OSU dorm declared over
* What happens if there’s no home for homework?
* Kate Brown builds ‘war chest’ for general election
* Circuit Court judge candidate suspended by Oregon State Bar
* Voting registration cutoff is April 26
* Redmond Airport closing: What’s the impact?
* State Regulators Scuttle Talk of Year-Round Insurance Enrollment for Pregnant Women
* PEBB Reserve Cut in Half After Legislature Raids Fund, Followed By Rising Costs
* Insurers Pressure State Regulators to Deny Expanded Access to Hearing Aids
* State Regulators Consider Sale of Advantage Dental to National Company

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DEATH OF FARMWORKER STRANGLED BY SAFETY VEST LEADS TO $7 MILLION LAWSUIT (Portland Oregonian)

The family of a 51-year-old farmworker who was strangled by his safety vest after it got caught in some rotating machinery has filed a $7 million lawsuit against the machinery’s maker and seller.

Jose Carmen Olmedo Zaragoza died at about 10:40 a.m. on Sept. 18, 2015, as he was harvesting hazelnuts on Christensen Farms near Amity, just south of the Yamhill County line.

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AMMON BUNDY TO CHALLENGE AUTHORITY OF FEDS TO PROSECUTE OREGON STANDOFF DEFENDANTS (Portland Oregonian)

Ammon Bundy’s lawyers intend to argue that the federal government doesn’t have the authority to prosecute protesters who took over the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, claiming that the federal government lacks control of the land.

The U.S. Constitution granted “very limited powers” to the federal government, and that once Oregon became a state, the federal government lost a right to own land inside the state’s borders, his attorney Lissa Casey wrote in a court motion filed late Friday.

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BENTON COUNTY MAN BITTEN BY BAT IS OREGON’S FIRST 2016 RABIES CASE (Portland Oregonian)

A man is undergoing treatment after being bitten by a bat carrying the state’s first confirmed case of rabies this year.

The Albany Democrat-Herald reports a Benton County Health Department news release says a man who woke up Wednesday to find he’d been bitten by a bat took the animal to the Benton County Environmental Health Division.

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NOROVIRUS OUTBREAK AT OSU DORM DECLARED OVER (Portland Oregonian)

A norovirus outbreak that sickened dozens of residents in a dorm at Oregon State University has been declared over.

The Gazette-Times reports that at least 80 to 100 students fell ill with the gastrointestinal virus after it appeared in late March after students returned from spring break.

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WHAT HAPPENS IF THERE’S NO HOME FOR HOMEWORK? (Salem Statesman Journal)

Homelessness can lead to measurable consequences, such as increased dropout rates, as well as things more difficult to grasp, such as feelings of abandonment, discomfort or shame.

More than 20,500 students in Oregon were experiencing homelessness in the 2014-15 school year, an 8 percent increase from the year before, according to the Oregon Department of Education.

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KATE BROWN BUILDS ‘WAR CHEST’ FOR GENERAL ELECTION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown is running to finish out the remaining two years of a four-year term vacated by John Kitzhaber, but the subdued tenor of her campaign belies the fact that she faces a number of primary challengers.

Yet her campaign is raising capital in the quiet before November’s general election.

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CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE CANDIDATE SUSPENDED BY OREGON STATE BAR (Salem Statesman Journal)

An attorney running in District 15’s Circuit Court judge race is applying for reinstatement to the Oregon State Bar after he was suspended for failing to respond to an investigation into his alleged misconduct.

The World reports that Attorney Rick Inokuchi, who was suspended April 18, responded to the bar’s disciplinary counsel’s office in a letter issued last week.

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VOTING REGISTRATION CUTOFF IS APRIL 26 (Salem Statesman Journal)

Reminder: To participate in Oregon’s May 17 primary election, Oregonians must be registered to vote by April 26.

Those who have moved within the past five years may need to update their registration, or face inactivation. Go to OregonVotes.gov to check voting status and re-register.

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REDMOND AIRPORT CLOSING: WHAT’S THE IMPACT? (Bend Bulletin)

-Tourism and aviation leaders weigh in on the May closure-

On a warm afternoon last week, employees of the Knife River construction company were busy repaving a portion of runway 5-23, the main runway at Redmond Airport. For the time being, operations have shifted to the secondary runway, and the repairs are not affecting the flow of traffic to and from Central Oregon’s only commercial airport, according to Airport Director Zachary Bass. But starting May 2, that will change, when the airport will close for 21 days for a resurfacing project.

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STATE REGULATORS SCUTTLE TALK OF YEAR-ROUND INSURANCE ENROLLMENT FOR PREGNANT WOMEN (The Lund Report)

The Oregon Department of Consumer & Business Services has scuttled an idea to open enrollment for women who get pregnant outside the three-month window when consumers can buy individual health insurance, after discovering that technical shortcomings of the federal enrollment website will not allow the state to offer such an option.

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PEBB RESERVE CUT IN HALF AFTER LEGISLATURE RAIDS FUND, FOLLOWED BY RISING COSTS (The Lund Report)

The Public Employees Benefit Board will have to make do with less than half of their current reserve by 2018 because the Legislature voted at the end of the 2015 session to raid the health plan’s fund of $120 million to cover other expenses in the general fund.

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INSURERS PRESSURE STATE REGULATORS TO DENY EXPANDED ACCESS TO HEARING AIDS (The Lund Report)

Representatives from Oregon’s leading health insurers urged state regulators to fight a federal requirement that their companies be required to provide hearing aids to anyone who needs them, an expansion of their current coverage, which is limited to children.

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STATE REGULATORS CONSIDER SALE OF ADVANTAGE DENTAL TO NATIONAL COMPANY (The Lund Report)

The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation appeared poised to approve the sale of Advantage Community Holding Company to DentaQuest, after a public hearing in Salem on the sale of Advantage’s dental health insurance line to the nation’s second-largest oral health company, which is based in Boston.

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State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

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newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on April 25, 2016 OSL eClips

April 22, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Hurry Oregon’s voter registration deadline is Tuesday, April 26
* Intel layoffs: Who qualifies, and what they’ll get
* LifeWise Health Plan of Oregon is pulling out of the state
* Oregon’s health care data overload — Guest Opinion
* National parks spending supports 1,397 jobs in Oregon
* Oregon to be more transparent on lead in drinking water
* Group offering free earthquake guide
* Oregon State Police eyes Goshen site for new regional headquarters and forensic lab
* Seven Lane County high schools make list of Oregon’s best
* Child welfare system stumbles on foster family services
* ODE kicks off new study on school district spending
* Intel restructuring to cut 12,000 jobs, save $1.4 billion
* Prineville project will yield man-made wetlands
* Bend hammers out UGB boundary expansion
* LifeWise leaving Oregon market in 2017
* Janet Stevens Column: Food stamp cutoff is going to hurt — Opinion
* Oregon Commission Approves New Pollution Rules For Glassmakers
* Portland Air Monitors Find More Toxic Chromium, But Source Unknown
* News Roundtable: April 22 & Independent Party Of Oregon Primary
* Q&A: Could Seismic Activity Elsewhere Prompt A Northwest Quake?
* Independent Party Is A Wild Card In Oregon’s Primary
* W. Oregon plan attacked from all sides — Opinion
* Oregon farmers fighting bank to sell radish seed
* Three administrators cleared in TSPC investigation of teacher/student relationship
* Garlic mustard encroaches on Oxbow site in Hermiston
* ‘Family opener’
* Statewide advisory issued against eating bass
* Guest Opinion: Make a call; you may help save a child
* Circuit Court judge candidate suspended by Oregon State Bar
* Lewis and Clark discovered video gambling? — Opinion
* Coos Bay bringing wastewater loan back to the table
* ODFW hosts town hall meetings on proposed 2017-19 budget
* Bandon School District receives $1.5 million seismic grant
* It takes two to trawl for science
* Editorial: Despite good news on jobs, clouds remain — Opinion
* Burn now, not later
* MNF to begin invasive plant treatments
* County to complete Canyon City national hazard mitigation flood plan
* Irrigation season getting started in valley
* Land managers take advantage of spring weather
* MY VOICE: Papers should re-ignite focus — Opinion
* Another Oregon health insurer exits market amid lose– Blog
* 3 questions with the Columbia Riverkeeper’s Brett VandenHeuvel as he takes an LNG victory lap– Blog
* Intel Layoffs Are A Sign Of Poor Management — Guest Opinion
* Ceremony Will Honor Fallen Oregon Workers April 28

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HURRY OREGON’S VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS TUESDAY, APRIL 26 (Portland Oregonian)

It’s probably hard to hear over the din of the campaign chatter increasingly flooding Oregon’s airwaves.

But if you’re hoping to vote in the May 17 primary, the clock counting down to next week’s registration deadline is slowly, quietly ticking away.

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INTEL LAYOFFS: WHO QUALIFIES, AND WHAT THEY’LL GET (Portland Oregonian)

Intel has said nothing publicly about how it will manage 12,000 pending job cuts, the centerpiece of an effort announced this week to remake the company for the post-PC era.

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LIFEWISE HEALTH PLAN OF OREGON IS PULLING OUT OF THE STATE (Portland Oregonian)

LifeWise Health Plan of Oregon is pulling out of the state’s competitive insurance market.

The company, headquartered in a Seattle suburb, will continue covering its individual customers through the end of the year and will eliminate group plans at the end of their term this year or in 2017.

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OREGON’S HEALTH CARE DATA OVERLOAD — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In health care today, data is king. It can help doctors, nurses and other health care providers improve the ways they deliver care.

But the real value of this information comes when everyone agrees on what we want to measure, why we want to measure it and who should collect and report the data.

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NATIONAL PARKS SPENDING SUPPORTS 1,397 JOBS IN OREGON (Salem Statesman Journal)

Skeeter Reed has seen firsthand what a boost in tourism can mean for a small towns economy.

The owner of the Oregon Hotel in Mitchell, a town of 130 in Eastern Oregon, has seen her town revitalized by the influx of tourists to the nearby John Day Fossil Beds National Monument.

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OREGON TO BE MORE TRANSPARENT ON LEAD IN DRINKING WATER (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon health officials are promising greater transparency around the presence of lead in drinking water, including the location of lead service lines and the results of mandatory tests.

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GROUP OFFERING FREE EARTHQUAKE GUIDE (Salem Statesman Journal)

To complement the Statesman Journal’s yearlong series on earthquake preparedness, a number of members of the Mid-Willamette Emergency Communications Collaborative are making two booklets on personal readiness available for free throughout the local area and online.

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OREGON STATE POLICE EYES GOSHEN SITE FOR NEW REGIONAL HEADQUARTERS AND FORENSIC LAB (Eugene Register-Guard)

The new Oregon State Police regional headquarters and lab for the Lane County area may be built in Goshen, just off Interstate 5.

The OSP regional HQ, Eugene area command station and forensic lab could be built as part of a larger commercial development on 2.8 acres at Old Willamette Highway, next to the I-5 and Highway 58 interchange south of Eugene, in the unincorporated Goshen area, state records show.

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SEVEN LANE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS MAKE LIST OF OREGON’S BEST (Eugene Register-Guard)

-South Eugene, Churchill and Lowell are placed in top 35 in U.S. News rankings-

Three Lane County high schools have earned a spot on U.S. News & World Reports 2016 list of Oregons 35 Best High Schools and four more made the complete list of 249 nationally recognized schools.

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CHILD WELFARE SYSTEM STUMBLES ON FOSTER FAMILY SERVICES (Portland Tribune)

Oregon’s child welfare system failed to meet all of the standards in a recent federal assessment, Department of Human Services Director Clyde Saiki told lawmakers in an email Wednesday, April 20.

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ODE KICKS OFF NEW STUDY ON SCHOOL DISTRICT SPENDING (Portland Tribune)

-The legislatively mandated study sparked fears lawmakers might attack local school board control-

The Oregon Department of Education has launched a controversial study of how variations in school district expenditures affect student outcomes such as attendance and graduation rates.

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INTEL RESTRUCTURING TO CUT 12,000 JOBS, SAVE $1.4 BILLION (Portland Tribune)

-Washington County Chair says Intel plans to keep investing in local facilities- Intel Corp. said Tuesday that it expects to cut 12,000 jobs worldwide as part of a major restructuring initiative to accelerate its evolution from a PC company to one that powers the cloud and billions of smart, connected computing devices.

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PRINEVILLE PROJECT WILL YIELD MAN-MADE WETLANDS (Bend Bulletin)

-New wetlands will filter wastewater, expand treatment system-

When the city of Prineville was faced with expanding its wastewater capacity a decade ago, estimates showed a new mechanical treatment plant would cost $62 million.

Over several years, city staff researched a more environmentally friendly option that would save millions of dollars: man-made wetlands that filter the water and return some of it to the Crooked River.

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BEND HAMMERS OUT UGB BOUNDARY EXPANSION (Bend Bulletin)

-Next step is for public hearings in August-

The Bend City Council finished tinkering with and gave its blessing to a planned expansion of the city’s urban growth boundary at a meeting Thursday afternoon. The vote ushers the boundary toward public hearings and eventually review by the state.

The roughly 2,000-acre expansion is intended to accommodate population growth through 2028. An earlier expansion proposal was rejected in 2010 after the state ruled the request, which called for 8,000 new acres, didn’t do enough to embrace density.

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LIFEWISE LEAVING OREGON MARKET IN 2017 (Bend Bulletin)

LifeWise Health Plan of Oregon announced Thursday that 2016 will be the last year it sells health insurance policies in the states market, citing current and future market conditions.

The company, which has about 50,000 commercial clients in Oregon, will stop selling new plans in the group market but will remain on HealthCare.gov to allow people to purchase individual policies through the remainder of this year.

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JANET STEVENS COLUMN: FOOD STAMP CUTOFF IS GOING TO HURT — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

It was no joke, but on April 1 more than 6,000 men and women in Washington and Multnomah counties saw their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program food stamps benefits disappear. If there’s a positive face to be put on that number, its that its proof of improvements in the economies of those two counties.

It doesn’t take into account a bunch of other things, however, that are likely to mean increased food insecurity or downright hunger for some of the 6,000.

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OREGON COMMISSION APPROVES NEW POLLUTION RULES FOR GLASSMAKERS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Oregon Environmental Quality Commission voted 4-1 Thursday to approve new air pollution restrictions for colored glassmakers statewide.

Commissioner Morgan Rider voted no, saying the rules were a rushed overreaction to public outcry and would be unnecessarily burdensome to businesses.

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PORTLAND AIR MONITORS FIND MORE TOXIC CHROMIUM, BUT SOURCE UNKNOWN (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon regulators have results back from new air quality monitors installed after toxic hot spots were found in Portland. They show yet another reason for concern.

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NEWS ROUNDTABLE: APRIL 22 & INDEPENDENT PARTY OF OREGON PRIMARY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

We analyze some of the big national and regional stories of the week with our news roundtable. This weeks guests are Amelia Templeton, Jim Pasero, Phyllis Fletcher, and retired city administrator Art Alexander. Well discuss a lawsuit filed against the City of Portlands policy on homeless camps, the patrol deputies union asking embattled Multnomah County Sheriff Dan Staton to step down, the announcement that Harriet Tubman will be featured on the 20 dollar bill, and more.

Then well check in with the Oregon secretary of state and the secretary of the Independent Party of Oregon ahead of the deadline to affiliate with a political party.

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Q&A: COULD SEISMIC ACTIVITY ELSEWHERE PROMPT A NORTHWEST QUAKE? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

In little more than a week, a series of earthquakes has hit around the Ring of Fire  first in Myanmar, then Japan, and then Ecuador, where hundreds of people died.

The Ring of Fire is the horseshoe-shaped zone around rim of the Pacific Ocean. Its very seismically active, and it includes the Pacific Northwest, where there’s growing awareness that a megaquake could strike at any time.

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INDEPENDENT PARTY IS A WILD CARD IN OREGON’S PRIMARY (Jefferson Public Radio)

One of the things that makes the upcoming Oregon primary unusual is the fact that, for the first time, the state has three designated major parties on the ballot.

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OREGON PLAN ATTACKED FROM ALL SIDES — OPINION (Capital Press)

In the 21st century, government agencies follow a step-by-step protocol for any resource management plans they put together. It goes something like this:

Talk about the plan.

Write the plan.

Show the plan to people.

Change the plan to reflect what people said.

Get sued by special interest groups.

Defend the plan in court.

Rewrite the plan according to what the judge decides.

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OREGON FARMERS FIGHTING BANK TO SELL RADISH SEED (Capital Press)

Several warehouses are caught in the middle of a legal dispute over radish seeds between Oregon farms and an out-of-state bank.

Both the farms and the bank claim to own the radish seeds, which are currently stored at five Oregon warehouses.

Whether those warehouses are acting as agents of the farms or the bank will be a key legal question in a lawsuit that’s scheduled to go to trial on June 7.

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THREE ADMINISTRATORS CLEARED IN TSPC INVESTIGATION OF TEACHER/STUDENT RELATIONSHIP (East Oregonian)

The Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission is still considering the fate of a local educator accused of a sexual relationship with a student, but recently dismissed the cases of three administrators that were part of the investigation.

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GARLIC MUSTARD ENCROACHES ON OXBOW SITE IN HERMISTON (East Oregonian)

Eileen Laramore patrols the edge of the Umatilla River along the Bureau of Reclamations Oxbow site in Hermiston, her eyes trained on the bright green invaders with the broad leaves and small white flowers.

Its already too late to stop garlic mustard from moving in, Laramore said. The highly invasive weed is virtually impossible to eradicate once its been found. All they can do is raise awareness and try to contain it, she said, to keep the scourge from spreading.

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‘FAMILY OPENER’ (Medford Mail Tribune)

Saturday will find Bob Isaacs with two old classmates in their requisite seats in his grandfather’s 54-year-old boat anchored somewhere in Hyatt Lake for the first time this year in search of more than rainbow trout.

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STATEWIDE ADVISORY ISSUED AGAINST EATING BASS (Medford Mail Tribune)

State health officials have expanded their advisories against eating sport-caught bass after elevated levels of mercury were confirmed in bass across Oregon.

The Oregon Health Authority has warned people for years to limit their consumption of bass from such lakes as Emigrant and Applegate, but this is the first statewide advisory.

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GUEST OPINION: MAKE A CALL; YOU MAY HELP SAVE A CHILD (Medford Mail Tribune)

A presidential proclamation declared the month of April Child Abuse Prevention month in 1983. Since then, child serving agencies around the country have come together to shed light on a subject that most people would prefer to think doesnt affect them or anyone they know.

After all, who really wants to focus on something as ugly and heartbreaking as child abuse? Here’s why you should take a moment and think about it. Then you can go on with your day a better-informed, ready-to-act, responsible citizen.

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CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE CANDIDATE SUSPENDED BY OREGON STATE BAR (The World)

The Oregon State Bar may have thrown a curve ball into District 15’s Circuit Court judge race.

The bar association has temporarily suspended candidate Rick Inokuchi as of April 18 for failing to respond to an OSB investigation that began in the latter stages of 2015.

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LEWIS AND CLARK DISCOVERED VIDEO GAMBLING? — OPINION (The World)

Were not surprised that the Coquille Tribe is not pleased with the state lottery’s current ad campaign.

You’ve probably seen the ads depicting the intrepid explorers, Lewis and Clark, originally dispatched by President Thomas Jefferson to explore the new American frontier. In the state lottery’s current interpretation, the hardy pioneers brave 8,000 miles of wilderness to arrive in Oregon and discover  a video lottery machine standing amid the new territorys majesty. Eureka

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COOS BAY BRINGING WASTEWATER LOAN BACK TO THE TABLE (The World)

The plan to build a wastewater plant in Empire has been a long and complicated process made even more so after Coos Bay voted not to accept the Department of Environmental of Quality’s loan agreement to finance the project two weeks ago.

But after Tuesday’s council meeting, the council has voted to bring the loan agreement back to the table at its May 3 meeting.

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ODFW HOSTS TOWN HALL MEETINGS ON PROPOSED 2017-19 BUDGET (The World)

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is hosting a series of town hall meetings around the state this month to gather public input on the agency’s proposed 2017-2019 budget.

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BANDON SCHOOL DISTRICT RECEIVES $1.5 MILLION SEISMIC GRANT (The World)

The Bandon School District has received an almost $1.5 million grant from Business Oregon to rehabilitate Ocean Crest Elementary School to better prepare it to withstand a major earthquake.

Business Oregon, the state’s economic development agency awarded 41 grants totaling $50,360,396 to Oregon schools and colleges.

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IT TAKES TWO TO TRAWL FOR SCIENCE (Daily Astorian)

The Siliqua and Quinnat, two vessels from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, trawled 300 feet apart Wednesday just upriver from the Wauna Mill, the net between them slowly gathering juvenile, mostly hatchery, salmon headed down the main channel of the Columbia River toward the Pacific Ocean.

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EDITORIAL: DESPITE GOOD NEWS ON JOBS, CLOUDS REMAIN — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The good news about employment in Oregon, and specifically in Linn County, continues to roll in, but were still concerned about a cloud or two.

First, the headline, which is undeniably good news: Linn Countys unemployment rate for March adjusted to reflect the usual seasonal fluctuations, stood at 5.9 percent, down from February’s revised rate of 6.0 percent. Its the lowest rate in the area since 1990, when the state began tracking county-by-county rates

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BURN NOW, NOT LATER (Baker City Herald)

-Forest Service officials hope Mondays 40-acre prescribed fire near the Baker City Watershed will reduce the risk of a much larger wildfire during summer-

Its better to light em instead of fight em.

Willy Crippen was talking Monday about prescribed burns and how they can help to prevent catastrophic wildfires.

Crippen is the fire management officer for the Wallowa-Whitman National Forests Burnt-Powder Fire Zone.

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MNF TO BEGIN INVASIVE PLANT TREATMENTS (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The Malheur National Forest will soon begin an integrated approach to manage invasive plants, which includes prevention; manual, mechanical, herbicide, biological control and cultural treatments; and restoration work.

This work to prevent the expansion of infestations will be implemented under the 2015 decision for the Malheur Site-Specific Invasive Plants Treatment Project and the Forest Plan amended by the Pacific Northwest Region 2005 decision for Preventing and Managing Invasive Plants.

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COUNTY TO COMPLETE CANYON CITY NATIONAL HAZARD MITIGATION FLOOD PLAN (Blue Mountain Eagle)

Grant County is stepping up to help complete a national hazard mitigation flood plan for Canyon City.

At the Grant County Court meeting April 20, County Judge Scott Myers said the county and the city of John Day completed a regional plan in 2013, but Canyon City was not included. He said FEMA funding would not be available after a flood without the plan in place.

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IRRIGATION SEASON GETTING STARTED IN VALLEY (LaGrande Observer)

Grande Ronde Valley farmer Matt Insko is reaching for his smartphone a little more frequently than he did a week ago.

Insko began irrigating his crops this week, a process he does with the help of his smartphone. Insko has an application on the device that allows him to switch any part of his central pivot irrigation system on or off, adjust the water application rate and monitor it.

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LAND MANAGERS TAKE ADVANTAGE OF SPRING WEATHER (LaGrande Observer)

There’s been a little smoke on the horizon the past few weeks as landowners and public land managers take advantage of spring weather to clean up the woods and ditches with fire.

Steve Hawkins of the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest said burning is more easily controlled when temperatures are lower and humidity is higher.

In the spring we are trying to get rid of fuel loading and not denude the soil, Hawkins said. The fire is cleaning up whats on the surface, like slash, and you don’t create as much smoke.

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MY VOICE: PAPERS SHOULD RE-IGNITE FOCUS — OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

It is hard to believe that the second easiest place in the world to run a shady, anonymous, and often criminal corporation is right here in the United States. According to a recent academic study, the United States is second only to Kenya for harboring these shell companies used to launder money and skirt their taxes.

Much like the classic sleight of hand game, companies across the country, including many here in Oregon, are shifting and shuffling ownership and holdings until we lose track of who or where they are.

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ANOTHER OREGON HEALTH INSURER EXITS MARKET AMID LOSSES— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

LifeWise Health Plan of Oregon will exit the Oregon health insurance market at the end of 2016 after 22 years in business.

The company is another casualty of intense competition and declining market share in the state.

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3 QUESTIONS WITH THE COLUMBIA RIVERKEEPER’S BRETT VANDENHEUVEL AS HE TAKES AN LNG VICTORY LAP— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

When Oregon LNG reportedly scotched a planned liquefied natural gas facility on the Oregon Coast, it likely marked the end of a contentious battle involving business and environmental groups.

The group, according to the Daily Astorian, told Warrenton city officials last Friday of its plans to abandon the $6 billion project.

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INTEL LAYOFFS ARE A SIGN OF POOR MANAGEMENT — GUEST OPINION (Forbes)

Intel announced plans Tuesday to cut its workforce by 12,000 people, 11 percent of its current headcount. Such a massive, top-down layoff by any corporation always makes me wonder whats wrong with the company. Certainly circumstances change and reductions in workforces are required. But why not a few hundred last week, another hundred next month, in a gradual process that has a similar result? Massive layoffs are to me a sign of poor management.

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CEREMONY WILL HONOR FALLEN OREGON WORKERS APRIL 28 (Workers Compensation)

To remember those who have died on the job and to reinvigorate the call to protect workers, Oregon OSHA invites all Oregonians to the Workers Memorial Day ceremony at noon Thursday, April 28, in Salem.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on April 22, 2016 OSL eClips

April 21, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Foster care crisis: Oregon failing in every area possible in federal review
* In Oregon, child care costs more than public college tuition: report
* Dead cyclist’s family sues Portland and Oregon for disappearing bike lane, bad road design
* Steve Duin: Fishing for answers in the Portland harbor
* Oregon has collected $6.84 million in recreational pot taxes since January
* Tribal member committed crime by killing bighorn sheep without tags, appeals court rules
* Job fair to help fill more than 500 law enforcement openings
* Owyhee Canyonlands monument unnecessary and ignores local voices — Guest Opinion
* Confronting Oregon’s opioid epidemic — Guest Opinion
* Report: Ore. DHS fails all federal child care standards
* A growing recovery — Opinion
* Estimates show Oregon pot stores sold nearly three tons of legal weed in first two months of this year
* American Lung Association gives Lane County air quality an F
* Police, courts need options for handling mentally ill — Guest Opinion
* Happy 420: state rolls in more pot tax revenue than expected
* Independent Party might be able to scratch off write-ins
* Registered to vote? Primary election deadline looming
* BPA sees ‘normal water year’ ahead, thanks to heavy rain, snow
* Experts upbeat on Bend real estate
* Program still can aid potential homebuyers in La Pine, Redmond
* Oregon pot tax nets nearly $7 million in two months
* Washington More Responsive Than Oregon on Air Complaints, But Problems Remain
* Surrogacy & Questioning Travel Bans
* What We Know So Far About The Intel Job Cuts
* Banking Woes Easing For Some Legal Pot Businesses
* Neighbors To North Portland Polluter Say DEQ Ignored Their Complaints
* Senate Energy Bill Would Move Northwest Projects Forward
* Trashing The Forest: Long-term Camping Causes Environmental Problems
* Precision Castparts Says It Needs To Communicate With Neighbors
* Demystifying The Oregon Presidential Primary
* USDA faulted for biotech loophole
* Lawsuit claims USDA undermining organics board
* Bureau of Reclamation makes offer irrigators cant refuse — Opinion
* Oregon’s child welfare system fails federal standards
* Tribes speak out against federal hatchery lawsuit
* Gonorrhea rates in Umatilla County highest in state
* NOAA: Populations of salmon, flounder added to overfishing list
* Growers appeal new Jackson County pot regulations
* Klamath Basin benefits from Energy Bill
* Senate Passes Energy bill and key Klamath amendments
* Fish and Wildlife town hall planned in Klamath
* Sky Lakes, OHSU announce $50 million clinical, educational center for Klamath Falls
* Port awaits word on Oregon LNG lease
* Unemployment at 4.5 percent in Clatsop County
* Editorial: Again …. a scary leak at Hanford — Opinion
* Low unemployment equals low turnout at LBCC Career Fair
* Oregon coast closed to mussel harvesting from Columbia River to Cascade Head
* Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian Wants to Redefine the Secretary of States Job
* Oregon Spotted Frog
* Oregon’s U.S. Senators Urge Removal of Barriers to Cannabis Research
* Side Notes 4/20-4/27: Saving Monarch Butterflies in Central Oregon & Report Sick Bats
* The Future of Oregon’s Weed Industry
* DEQ announces overhaul of clean-air rules
* New Lung Assn. report says Oregon air quality worsened
* Senate OK’s two Wyden renewable energy bills
* Merkley, Wyden back bill to pull lead pipes, invest in water systems
* Months Before Oregon Standoff, Armed Activists Were in Town
* Best High Schools in Oregon
* 2016 Initiative Petitions Tackle K-12 Education
* Governing Repost: Lessons from Georgia, the No. 1 Procurement State– Blog

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FOSTER CARE CRISIS: OREGON FAILING IN EVERY AREA POSSIBLE IN FEDERAL REVIEW (Portland Oregonian)

A new federal study finds Oregon’s child welfare system is failing across the board when it comes to keeping thousands of children in state care safe and healthy.

According to the report, caseworkers are still taking too long to check on allegations of abuse and neglect, with just more than half of investigations completed on time.
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IN OREGON, CHILD CARE COSTS MORE THAN PUBLIC COLLEGE TUITION: REPORT (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon is one of 33 states and Washington D.C. where infant care costs more than college tuition, according to data from the Economic Policy Institute.

The nonprofit think tank released a report earlier this month calling for greater national investment in early childhood care and education.
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DEAD CYCLIST’S FAMILY SUES PORTLAND AND OREGON FOR DISAPPEARING BIKE LANE, BAD ROAD DESIGN (Portland Oregonian)

The family of a cyclist who was killed by a driver suspected to be high on marijuana has filed a $3.6 million lawsuit against not only the driver, but also the Portland and Oregon for road design the family says puts cyclists in grave danger.
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STEVE DUIN: FISHING FOR ANSWERS IN THE PORTLAND HARBOR (Portland Oregonian)

For as long as I can remember heck, since Hillary Clinton last lived in the White House the wrangling over the cleanup of the Portland harbor has been as infuriating and intractable as a rush-hour rendezvous with the Ross Island Bridge.
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OREGON HAS COLLECTED $6.84 MILLION IN RECREATIONAL POT TAXES SINCE JANUARY (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon dispensaries have something to celebrate on this stoner holiday: They’ve sold an estimated $27 million worth of recreational marijuana since the start of the year.
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TRIBAL MEMBER COMMITTED CRIME BY KILLING BIGHORN SHEEP WITHOUT TAGS, APPEALS COURT RULES (Portland Oregonian)

More than eight years after a member of the Nez Perce tribe in eastern Oregon killed two bighorn sheep — arguing it was his native right — the Oregon Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday that his criminal convictions shall stand.
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JOB FAIR TO HELP FILL MORE THAN 500 LAW ENFORCEMENT OPENINGS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon law enforcement agencies hope to recruit candidates for more than 500 open positions at a job fair April 29-30 in Salem.

Openings include sworn positions, such as police officers, and civilian positions, such as chemists, analysts and crime scene investigators.
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OWYHEE CANYONLANDS MONUMENT UNNECESSARY AND IGNORES LOCAL VOICES — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

My family has lived and worked in southeast Oregon since the 1800s. We are people of the land and for the land. Our businesses have worked hand-in-hand with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Department of State Lands to care for this land since the agencies were created.
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CONFRONTING OREGON’S OPIOID EPIDEMIC — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Medical Association OMA is holding its annual conference Saturday, and there is just a single issue on the agenda: Oregon’s opioid epidemic.

In 2014, more than 500 Oregonians needlessly lost their lives due to drug overdose a 13 percent increase from 2013.
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REPORT: ORE. DHS FAILS ALL FEDERAL CHILD CARE STANDARDS (Salem Statesman Journal)

State officials knew eight years ago of deficiencies in their child welfare programs and failed to address any of the significant issues, according to a report sent to federal assessors last month.
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A GROWING RECOVERY — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Lane County’s unemployment rate fell to 4.9 percent last month, the first time its cracked the 5 percent mark in this century.

The decreased unemployment rate locally echoes the statewide drop reported last week. And, as in the case statewide, Lane Countys brightening job picture isnt a sudden turn-around. Its the result of a less dramatic, but seemingly sustainable, period of slow but steady job growth that began around 2012.

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ESTIMATES SHOW OREGON POT STORES SOLD NEARLY THREE TONS OF LEGAL WEED IN FIRST TWO MONTHS OF THIS YEAR (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon’s fledgling legal recreational marijuana industry may have sold about 2 tons of pot during the first two months of the year, according to estimates based on marijuana tax payments received by the state.

The Oregon Department of Revenue announced Wednesday that it has received $6.84 million in taxes on marijuana sales for January and most of February.
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AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION GIVES LANE COUNTY AIR QUALITY AN F (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Low grade is due to wintertime woodstove use in Oakridge, Eugene-Springfield, and to forest fires-

Lane Countys air quality made it onto the American Lung Associations latest annual worst-in-the-nation list, due to summer forest fires and to winter woodstove air pollution in Oakridge and Eugene-Springfield.
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POLICE, COURTS NEED OPTIONS FOR HANDLING MENTALLY ILL — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

When a state psychiatric hospital has empty beds, its a good sign for Oregon’s health system and for people who struggle with mental illness. While a March 22 Register-Guard story focused on unopened beds at the Oregon State Hospital facility in Junction City, Oregons state hospitals are grappling with a growing capacity challenge: a rising tide of people committed for long hospitalizations due to minor criminal offenses, not because a hospital stay is the best treatment option.
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HAPPY 420: STATE ROLLS IN MORE POT TAX REVENUE THAN EXPECTED (Portland Tribune)

-Department of Revenue reported $6.84 million in collections in January and February-

Oregon’s Department of Revenue unwittingly marked unofficial Weed Day Wednesday by announcing another better-than-predicted return in recreational marijuana revenue.

The state collected $6.84 million in taxes from sales of recreational pot in January and February the first two months since a 25 percent tax on the product took effect. Tax collections exceeded state economists projection of $2 million to $3 million for the first year of taxation on the product.

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INDEPENDENT PARTY MIGHT BE ABLE TO SCRATCH OFF WRITE-INS (Portland Tribune)

The Independent Party of Oregon will not be bound by the results of a May write-in election for its presidential nominee.

That is the upshot of a memorandum issued this week by the Oregon Department of Justice, in response to a dispute between the Independent Party of Oregon and the secretary of states office, which administers statewide elections.
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REGISTERED TO VOTE? PRIMARY ELECTION DEADLINE LOOMING (Portland Tribune)

Are you registered to vote in the May 17 primary election?

If not, time is running out. The deadline to register is midnight Tuesday, April 26.
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BPA SEES ‘NORMAL WATER YEAR’ AHEAD, THANKS TO HEAVY RAIN, SNOW (Portland Tribune)

The Bonneville Power Administration says 2016 should be a normal water year after last years dry spring and summer. The federal agency said Wednesday, April 20, that record rain and snow fall in December and a wet March helped boost this year’s water supply forecast.
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EXPERTS UPBEAT ON BEND REAL ESTATE (Bend Bulletin)

-Central Oregon better situated for next downturn-

Bends future lies in developing its urban core, said Jon Skidmore, Bend assistant city manager, not in tract homes thrown up by the tens or hundreds.

Skidmore, one of five panelists Wednesday at the Bend Chamber Real Estate Forecast, said the planned expansion of the Bend urban growth boundary by as much as 2,500 acres, will not be enough alone to accommodate an expected city population of 120,000 by 2028 , an increase of about 50 percent. Clusters of townhomes and mixed-use developments of first-story shops and upper-story homes should be part of Bends future, he said.
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PROGRAM STILL CAN AID POTENTIAL HOMEBUYERS IN LA PINE, REDMOND (Bend Bulletin)

-Loan for down payment is interest-free, but application process is daunting-

A federal housing aid program that provides potential homebuyers in Redmond and La Pine with an interest-free loan for a down payment is still dishing out money five years after it started.

But qualifying for the Neighborhood Stabilization Program, which is administered through a partnership between Housing Works and the cities of Redmond and La Pine, can be tricky.

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OREGON POT TAX NETS NEARLY $7 MILLION IN TWO MONTHS (Bend Bulletin)

-Oregon Revenue Department reports February tax revenue-

State pot tax nets nearly $7M

The Oregon Department of Revenue collected approximately $3.36 million in taxes from sale of recreational marijuana at medical marijuana dispensaries in February, according to data released Wednesday.

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WASHINGTON MORE RESPONSIVE THAN OREGON ON AIR COMPLAINTS, BUT PROBLEMS REMAIN (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

When residents in Longview, Washington, complained about dust from the nearby Export Grain Terminal, local air regulators took notice.

The Southwest Clean Air Agency has issued the facility eight notices of violation in the past five years.
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SURROGACY & QUESTIONING TRAVEL BANS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

We talk to OPB reporter Kristian Foden-Vencil about Oregon’s surrogacy industry.

Lewis & Clark professor Nathan Christensen questions the wisdom of travel bans as a form of protest.
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WHAT WE KNOW SO FAR ABOUT THE INTEL JOB CUTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon’s largest private employer, Intel, announced plans to shed 12,000 jobs worldwide by next year. Chief Executive Officer Brian Krzanich announced the cuts Tuesday.

The company is staying quiet on which parts of its business will be affected the most, but we do know some key details about the changes as of now.
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BANKING WOES EASING FOR SOME LEGAL POT BUSINESSES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

In a once-empty office in Oregon’s Department of Revenue headquarters, officials have created a mini-fortress.

Recently hired workers sit behind bulletproof glass at a window inaccessible to the public. Police officers brought out of retirement roam the building with handguns on their hips. Security cameras monitor the hallways.
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NEIGHBORS TO NORTH PORTLAND POLLUTER SAY DEQ IGNORED THEIR COMPLAINTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Adam Bartell felt like a crackpot for complaining about air pollution in his neighborhood.

The smell of paint fumes in University Park was potent, frequent and eventually intolerable.
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SENATE ENERGY BILL WOULD MOVE NORTHWEST PROJECTS FORWARD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The U.S. Senate passed energy legislation Wednesday with a host of provisions important for the Pacific Northwest. This is the first time in nearly a decade an energy bill of this scale has passed from one house of Congress to the other.
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TRASHING THE FOREST: LONG-TERM CAMPING CAUSES ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

When Zak Stone visited one of his favorite camping spots last September, he ran into something both shocking and common in Oregon’s national forests.

In the sweet little spot along the Breitenbush Rivers South Fork, the Salem resident came across a campsite where someone had cut trees, strewn garbage and run hoses from the river into his campsite.
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PRECISION CASTPARTS SAYS IT NEEDS TO COMMUNICATE WITH NEIGHBORS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Portland company Precision Castparts detailed steps Tuesday it is taking to reduce pollution at its factory in southeast part of the city.

Neighbors had raised concerns about their health after researchers found elevated levels of nickel in moss nearby. Precision Castparts makes round metal components for airplane engines at the southeast Portland facility.
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DEMYSTIFYING THE OREGON PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY (Jefferson Public Radio)

This has been to put it mildly an unusual presidential election season. And for the first time in many years, Oregon’s May 17th primary could actually make a difference in the outcome at both major party nominating conventions.

But now that the primary is suddenly relevant, a lot of people find themselves confused about how the process works.
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USDA FAULTED FOR BIOTECH LOOPHOLE (Capital Press)

The U.S. Government Accountability Office has faulted the USDA for regulating only those biotech crops containing genes from plant pests.

Current USDA biotech restrictions only apply when genetic material from a plant pest, such as a bacteria or virus, is inserted into the crop.

Plants modified with gene editing and other alternative methods, however, are not subject to USDA oversight during field trials or deregulation procedures that involve environmental analysis.

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LAWSUIT CLAIMS USDA UNDERMINING ORGANICS BOARD (Capital Press)

Cornucopia Institute has filed a lawsuit against USDA alleging misconduct by the department resulted in its inappropriate influence in the workings of the National Organic Standards Board.

Cornucopia alleges USDA actions demonstrate a shirking of its duty to maintain the integrity of organic food standards on behalf of the American people, according to the complaint, filed in U.S. District Court in Wisconsin on April 18.

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BUREAU OF RECLAMATION MAKES OFFER IRRIGATORS CANT REFUSE — OPINION (Capital Press)

Many may recall how Don Vito Corleone had helped the fading career of singer godson Johnny Fontane to secure a film role he had previously been denied by making the film studio owner an offer he couldn’t refuse.

In much the same way, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Mid Pacific Regional Director David Murillo and Area Manager Therese O’Rourke Bradford are seeking to help the Klamath Irrigation District to undertake the significant repair of a structurally compromised water flume integral to the Klamath Irrigation Project, which the Bureau recently thrust upon it by making the District an offer to provide a $10 million low-interest government loan bearing onerous non-negotiable terms that its board cannot refuse.

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OREGON’S CHILD WELFARE SYSTEM FAILS FEDERAL STANDARDS (East Oregonian)

Oregon’s child welfare system failed to meet all of the standards in a recent federal assessment, Department of Human Services director Clyde Saiki told lawmakers in an email Wednesday.

The state fell short of federal goals from foster parent recruitment and retention, to ensuring children are first and foremost protected from abuse and neglect, Saiki wrote, regarding the report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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TRIBES SPEAK OUT AGAINST FEDERAL HATCHERY LAWSUIT (East Oregonian)

Columbia River tribes are speaking out against litigation that calls into question federal funding for hatchery programs across the Northwest.

The Wild Fish Conservancy, a nonprofit conservation group based in Duvall, Washington, has sued the U.S. Department of Commerce and National Marine Fisheries Service, accusing the agencies of violating the Endangered Species Act by not properly weighing the negative impact of hatcheries on wild fish populations.
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GONORRHEA RATES IN UMATILLA COUNTY HIGHEST IN STATE (East Oregonian)

The Umatilla County Public Health Department reported a spike in gonorrhea cases this year with 35 cases so far, the highest rate in the state.

Confirmed gonorrhea cases have increased at a rate of 700 percent since 2013. Umatilla Public Health Director Meghan DeBolt urged sexually active individuals to protect themselves against, and screen for, sexually transmitted diseases.

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NOAA: POPULATIONS OF SALMON, FLOUNDER ADDED TO OVERFISHING LIST (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Some flounder populations also added to the list-

The federal government has added several populations of economically important food fish, including stocks of salmon and flounder, to its list of fish stocks that are being subjected to overfishing.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Wednesday that three regional populations of Chinook salmon and one regional population each of Coho salmon, summer flounder, yellowtail flounder and winter flounder are suffering from overfishing.
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GROWERS APPEAL NEW JACKSON COUNTY POT REGULATIONS (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Land Use Board of Appeals to consider issue-

A marijuana growers advocacy group called Right to Grow USA has appealed new Jackson County regulations governing marijuana cultivation.

Sandy Diesel, director of the locally based group, filed the appeal April 7 with the state Land Use Board of Appeals. The Jackson County Board of Commissioners gave final approval to the new regulations Wednesday afternoon.

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KLAMATH BASIN BENEFITS FROM ENERGY BILL (Herald and News)

The U.S. Senate Tuesday passed a long-anticipated bipartisan energy bill, and Klamath Basin irrigators will reap some benefits, according to a press release.

The Klamath Water Users Association KWUA announced that it has been working for more than six months on the package along with Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley, both Oregon Democrats, and othe.
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SENATE PASSES ENERGY BILL AND KEY KLAMATH AMENDMENTS (Herald and News)

-$3 million in C-Flume funding for KID key part of bill-

The U.S. Senate Tuesday passed a long-anticipated bipartisan Energy bill.

Of significant note for interests in the Klamath Basin is the inclusion of an amendment package designed to assist Klamath irrigators.

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FISH AND WILDLIFE TOWN HALL PLANNED IN KLAMATH (Herald and News)

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is hosting a series of town hall meetings around the state to gather public input on the agency’s proposed 2017-19 budget, according to a news release.

The meeting in Klamath Falls will be from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 10 at Oregon Institute of Technology in the College Unions Mount Bailey Room

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SKY LAKES, OHSU ANNOUNCE $50 MILLION CLINICAL, EDUCATIONAL CENTER FOR KLAMATH FALLS (Herald and News)

Sky Lakes Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University announced a partnership to launch a $50 million project for a new clinical and education building.

The facility will host clinical care, provide training to students in OHSU’s Family Practice Residency Program and be the academic center for OHSU’s Campus for Rural Health.

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PORT AWAITS WORD ON OREGON LNG LEASE (Daily Astorian)

The Port of Astoria is still waiting to learn the intentions of Oregon LNG, which subleases more than 90 acres from the agency on the Skipanon Peninsula in Warrenton but has abandoned a $6 billion terminal and pipeline project.

The Port leases the property from the Department of State Lands for $129,000 annually, which is paid through the sublease to Oregon LNG. Opponents of the liquefied natural gas project shared their relief Tuesday at a Port Commission meeting that the saga is finally ending.
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UNEMPLOYMENT AT 4.5 PERCENT IN CLATSOP COUNTY (Daily Astorian) y

Clatsop County’s unemployment rate in March was 4.5 percent, the state Employment Department reported.

The county’s seasonally adjusted rate was down slightly from the previous month 4.6 percent, and even more from the year prior 5.3 percent. Oregon’s unemployment rate fell to a record low 4.5 percent in March. The U.S. rate was 5 percent.
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EDITORIAL: AGAIN …. A SCARY LEAK AT HANFORD — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Its an example of a culture at Hanford of We don’t have problems here. Were doing just fine. Which is a total lie, former Hanford Nuclear Reservation worker Mike Geffre told KING 5 this week.

Geffre was reacting to news that a supposedly supersafe double-walled underground storage tank for highly radioactive waste has a major leak in the space between its inner and outer walls.

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LOW UNEMPLOYMENT EQUALS LOW TURNOUT AT LBCC CAREER FAIR (Albany Democrat Herald)

Thanks to Oregon’s record-low unemployment rate, which stood at 4.5 percent in March, fewer people are looking for jobs.

As a result, employers are finding it hard to hire workers, and the crowd was noticeably smaller at the 38th annual Linn-Benton Community College Career Fair on Wednesday.

Its a good thing for the economy, but its difficult for an employer looking for good talent, said Mike Litten, human resources manager for SnoTemp.

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OREGON COAST CLOSED TO MUSSEL HARVESTING FROM COLUMBIA RIVER TO CASCADE HEAD (Tillamook County Pioneer)

The Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife recently announced the closure of recreational and commercial mussel harvesting from the south jetty of the Columbia River to Cascade Head, located south of Neskowin and north of Lincoln City.

The closure is due to elevated levels of paralytic shellfish toxins PSTs and includes mussels on all beaches, rocks, jetties and bay entrances in this section of the Oregon Coast.
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LABOR COMMISSIONER BRAD AVAKIAN WANTS TO REDEFINE THE SECRETARY OF STATES JOB (Willamette Week)

– He’s told supporters he’d audit private corporations, pursue polluters and police workplace pay.-

Oregon Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian is making bold promises in his campaign to become secretary of state.

Avakian, 55, who’s won the bulk of the endorsements in a three-way Democratic primary, has told supporters he’d audit private corporations, pursue polluters and police workplace pay.

Those are laudable goals. But none of them is a duty of the office Avakian is seeking.

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OREGON SPOTTED FROG (Bend Source Weekly)

-Respecting the Endangered Species Act-

A group that has worked to restore upper basin flows in the Deschutes River says short-term steps must be taken immediately to improve habitat for the endangered spotted frog. The Coalition for the Deschutes was formed in 1985 as a not-for-profit corporation to protect the economic, recreational and environmental future of the Deschutes River basin. It says that regulating water release volumes from Wickiup dam to avoid extreme high and low flows associated with irrigation needs in the spring and summer will help restore critical habitat for the frog.
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OREGON’S U.S. SENATORS URGE REMOVAL OF BARRIERS TO CANNABIS RESEARCH (Bend Source Weekly)

On April 15, Oregon’s U.S. Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley, U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer and 24 other members of Congress urged President Obama to remove barriers to research on medical marijuana. This would facilitate new medical research on cannabis and its derivatives that has not been possible in the U.S. under current federal law enforced by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration DEA.
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SIDE NOTES 4/20-4/27: SAVING MONARCH BUTTERFLIES IN CENTRAL OREGON & REPORT SICK BATS (Bend Source Weekly)

Monarch butterflies are declining drastically with 80 percent of the population of eastern monarchs lost in the last decade. Central Oregonians can learn how to protect monarch butterflies at two upcoming events in May.

-Report Sick or Dead Bats to ODFW-

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife ODFW activated an online bat reporting website and hotline to prevent the spread of White-Nose Syndrome WNS recently found in a little brown bat in Washington state

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THE FUTURE OF OREGON’S WEED INDUSTRY (Portland Mercury)

-Our Cannabis Programs Are the Best in the Country-

When the Mercury put out its last weed issue “The High Life,” Feature, April 15, 2015 exactly one year ago, recreational marijuana was not yet legal in Oregon. Measure 91 had passed and everyone was anxiously awaiting July, when adults 21 and older could legally possess weed for personal use. At the time, we knew that the legislature would enact laws to implement Measure 91 in the summer, and that the Oregon Liquor Control Commission OLCC would be running the administrative show. Really, that was all we knew.
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DEQ ANNOUNCES OVERHAUL OF CLEAN-AIR RULES (KGW)

After air quality issues in Portland and The Dalles exposed problems with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality’s monitoring and regulatory systems, Governor Brown has launched a regulatory overhaul to update air quality rules.

Brown announced the overhaul, Cleaner Air Oregon, on April 6. A public presentation of the new rules will take place Thursday in Portland.
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NEW LUNG ASSN. REPORT SAYS OREGON AIR QUALITY WORSENED (KTVZ Bend)

-Crook County gets ‘F’ grade for particle pollution; Deschutes an ‘A’ for ozone-

The American Lung Associations 2016 State of the Air report released Wednesday found Lake County ranked as the 20th most polluted county in the nation for short-term particle pollution.

Several counties in Oregon saw increased days of ozone pollution, in spite of a trend seen across the nation of lower ozone and particle pollution levels, the report said.
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SENATE OK’S TWO WYDEN RENEWABLE ENERGY BILLS (KTVZ Bend)

-Would boost geothermal, tidal power generation-

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., announced the Senate on Wednesday passed two bills he wrote to increase domestic production of low-carbon renewable energy from underground hotspots and the power in ocean waves, tides and currents.

Wydens Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Act would boost domestic production of renewable energy from ocean waves, tides and currents and facilitate private investment in potential projects. His Geothermal Energy Opportunities Act would encourage geothermal production by streamlining government permitting and mapping geothermal resources.
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MERKLEY, WYDEN BACK BILL TO PULL LEAD PIPES, INVEST IN WATER SYSTEMS (KTVZ Bend)

-Legislation would direct $70 billion over decade to water system needs-

Oregon Sens. Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden joined fellow Senate Democrats Wednesday to introduce the Testing, Removal and Updated Evaluations of Lead Everywhere in America for Dramatic Enhancements that Restore Safety to Homes, Infrastructure and Pipes Act of 2016, or True LEADership Act S.2821.
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MONTHS BEFORE OREGON STANDOFF, ARMED ACTIVISTS WERE IN TOWN (ABC News)

Months before their takeover of a national wildlife refuge became an international fascination, an armed group of ranchers made its presence known in the surrounding Oregon community, following around the sheriff, his deputies and their families and intimidating those who publicly disagreed with them, Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward said.

The federal government has charged 26 people with the 41-day-long occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge this winter in a protest over land policy.
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BEST HIGH SCHOOLS IN OREGON (U.S. News & World Report)

Oregon high school students are required to earn at least 24 credits to graduate. Students also must demonstrate mastery of essential skills, such as writing clearly and accurately, according to the Oregon Department of Education.
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2016 INITIATIVE PETITIONS TACKLE K-12 EDUCATION (Eugene Weekly)

Oregon educators say that K-12 school funding is in crisis mode. From dwindling high school graduation rates to booming elementary school class sizes, Oregon kids have endured years of underfunding.

Though many in education agree that schools need more money, there’s less consensus about how to acquire those funds.
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GOVERNING REPOST: LESSONS FROM GEORGIA, THE NO. 1 PROCUREMENT STATE— BLOG (Oregon Auditing)

In February, Governing released a report ranking 39 states based on their procurement policies. They were ranked in 10 categories, including their use of technology, how they engage with vendors and how effectively central procurement offices work with agencies.

Six states stood out as top performers: Georgia in the lead, followed by Virginia, Minnesota, Utah, and, tied for 5th place, Massachusetts and Ohio.

Ed. Note: Oregon ranked #11
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on April 21, 2016 OSL eClips

April 20, 2016 OSL eClips

* Cougar spotted in Gresham; three cats reported dead
* Columbia River tribal village picks up steam as House includes language in appropriations bill
* State finishes 1st of 3 treatments to eradicate N. Portland’s gypsy moths
* Tribal pilot program may point to dental-care future for all Oregonians — Guest Opinion
* How Facebook is getting involved in the Oregon primary
* You need an income of $60,195 to ‘live comfortably’ in Portland, study says
* How Oregon pot dealers pay taxes
* High levels of mercury found in Oregon bass
* Intel to lay off 11% of workforce in big shift from PCs
* Hanford officials prepare to pump nuke waste back into tank
* Go fishing and catch a $50 trout at Empire Lakes
* Eugene judge orders Oregon to pay $318,000 in lawyer fees to man kicked in chest by state trooper
* Let’s slam the brakes on rising traffic fatalities — Guest Opinion
* Report: Improving school quality would create a half-trillion dollars in Oregon
* Intel restructuring to cut 12,000 jobs, save $1.4 billion
* Yeah, we’re green, just not the ‘greenest’ state
* Central Oregon Zika tests turn up negative
* Anglers ready for fishing opener
* Deschutes County jobless rate below 5 percent
* Map: Where Can Adults Legally Buy Marijuana In Oregon? Almost Everywhere
* Limit Your Consumption Of Bass, Oregon Officials Say
* News Roundtable: April 22 Independent Party Of Oregon Primary The Student Vote
* Foresters seek solution to clear-cut image problem
* Census Bureau data provides snapshots of life in Umatilla County
* Another bighorn ram poached in Gilliam County
* Oregon Rising asks people to dream big for schools
* UAS test range reauthorization bill passes Senate
* Construction industry finding it tough to add workers
* Since You Asked: Wanton, careless litterers dirty state highways
* Our View: Institute proponents may have picked wrong place — Opinion
* Forums planned for new Every Student Succeeds Act
* BOLI finds evidence of retaliation by Gold Hill city manager
* Tribe calls lottery ad campaign ‘hypocritical’
* TSA Fairness Act passes Senate
* DEQ official calls Powers wastewater treatment project alternative ‘disconcerting’ as USDA deadline looms
* Coquille Tribe offended by state’s lottery campaign
* Editorial: Floodplains are vital for residents and salmon — Opinion
* Astoria uneasy about vacation rentals
* Editorial: It’s time to pull pot from Schedule 1 — Opinion
* Editorial: Ranked-choice voting system worth a look — Opinion
* OSP seeks publics help in finding elk poachers
* County geographic squaw references renamed
* Guest Comment: Sexual assault prevention is possible — Guest Opinion
* Crosstalk: Preparing ahead for an emergency — Guest Opinion
* Be prepared for ‘Big One’
* Cascade Locks Port nears decision on bridge toll hike
* Open Range: A deals a deal, including the wolf plan — Guest Opinion
* Guest editorial: Rural white women face declining lifespans — Guest Opinion
* An Oregon-made kite that can power 5 homes Video
* Oregon’s Total Employment Gap, March 2016– Blog
* You Need to Make $60,000 a Year to Live Comfortably in Portland, Study Says
* Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian Wants to Re-Define the Secretary of State’s Job
* The Early Disappointments of Cannabis Legalization in Oregon — Opinion
* Independent Party gets clarity on nomination process
* Oregon Senate Republicans seek repeal of low-carbon fuel standard
* Voters In Two Oregon Counties To Decide Fate Of Marijuana Businesses
* Tax compression is a minus for teaching math in Oregon
* Earthquake hazard report reflects a compromise
* Legislative Work Group in Oregon Grappling With Drug Pricing

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COUGAR SPOTTED IN GRESHAM; THREE CATS REPORTED DEAD (Portland Oregonian)

Police have increased the number of officers on patrol in Northeast Gresham after a cougar was spotted there Tuesday evening.

Six people reported to police that they saw a cougar near the 800 block of Northeast 25th Street in Gresham, police spokesman John Rasmussen said. He said three residents in an approximately five-block radius told officers they found their cats dead Tuesday.

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COLUMBIA RIVER TRIBAL VILLAGE PICKS UP STEAM AS HOUSE INCLUDES LANGUAGE IN APPROPRIATIONS BILL (Portland Oregonian)

Both houses of Congress have now included a directive to build a new tribal village along the Columbia River into their appropriations bills.

Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., inserted language into the U.S. House appropriations bill Tuesday that mirrors the Senate’s version, which passed the appropriations committee last week.

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STATE FINISHES 1ST OF 3 TREATMENTS TO ERADICATE N. PORTLAND’S GYPSY MOTHS (Portland Oregonian)

The first of three applications to eradicate the leaf-eating gypsy moth in North Portland finished Monday after a helicopter malfunction halted efforts Sunday.

The remaining untreated area in the 8,800-acre treatment zone was sprayed by 9 a.m., said Bruce Pokarney, spokesman for the Oregon Department of Agriculture. The areas included Linnton and a portion of Forest Park, officials said.

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TRIBAL PILOT PROGRAM MAY POINT TO DENTAL-CARE FUTURE FOR ALL OREGONIANS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon, already nationally recognized as a leader in health care innovation, is now making similar strides to address the barriers to oral health care that many face. Last month, the Oregon Health Authority took a common sense step to improve dental health access by approving a dental pilot project that will help dentists in tribal communities see more patients. As a co-author of recent legislation that strengthened Oregon’s pilot law, it is rewarding to see the initial pilots gain approval, providing a pathway to modernize Oregon’s oral health care system in some of the communities that need it the most.

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HOW FACEBOOK IS GETTING INVOLVED IN THE OREGON PRIMARY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Have you registered to vote?

If not, you’re not alone  two of Donald Trump’s own children didn’t register in time to vote in Tuesday’s New York primary election.

But if you’re still eligible to register, you’ll be getting a reminder in your Facebook news-feed.

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YOU NEED AN INCOME OF $60,195 TO ‘LIVE COMFORTABLY’ IN PORTLAND, STUDY SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

A Portland resident needs to make about $60,000 to “live comfortably” in the city, according to a report by a personal finance and banking site.

The idea of what it means to “live comfortably” is subjective and can of course vary depending on the person.

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HOW OREGON POT DEALERS PAY TAXES (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon raked in $3.48 million from January recreational pot sales  the first month of the state’s 25 percent tax  far outpacing the $3 million projected for the entire year.

Collecting those taxes is no simple task. More than half of Oregon’s recreational pot dealers paying their taxes that month did so in cash, a symptom of the industry’s yearslong struggle for banking access that’s also a big security risk.

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HIGH LEVELS OF MERCURY FOUND IN OREGON BASS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon health officials have issued a permanent, statewide consumption advisory for bass because of high levels of mercury contamination.

The Oregon Health Authority evaluated samples from 62 bass in 11 water bodies across the state  eight rivers, two reservoirs and one lake  between 2008 and 2014.

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INTEL TO LAY OFF 11% OF WORKFORCE IN BIG SHIFT FROM PCS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Intel will lay off 11% of its global workforce, up to 12,000 employees, a painful downsizing aimed at accelerating its shift away from the waning PC market to one more focused on cloud computing and connected devices.

In an email to employees, CEO Brian Krzanich said that after the restructuring, “I am confident that we’ll emerge as a more productive company with broader reach and sharper execution.”

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HANFORD OFFICIALS PREPARE TO PUMP NUKE WASTE BACK INTO TANK (Salem Statesman Journal)

Hanford Nuclear Reservation officials are preparing to pump thousands of gallons of leaked radioactive waste back into a 46-year-old storage tank that contains toxic leftovers from the production of plutonium for nuclear weapons.

The Washington state Department of Ecology says none of the waste appears to have been released into the environment when it leaked Sunday, and there is no known danger to the public.

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GO FISHING AND CATCH A $50 TROUT AT EMPIRE LAKES (Salem Statesman Journal)

Empire Lakes anglers have a chance of taking home a $50 VISA gift card if they land a specially tagged rainbow trout.

Empire Lakes is a popular coastal rainbow trout fishery in Coos Bay, and ODFW biologists need anglers to help them keep it that way by reporting tagged fish they catch.

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EUGENE JUDGE ORDERS OREGON TO PAY $318,000 IN LAWYER FEES TO MAN KICKED IN CHEST BY STATE TROOPER (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Judge McShane faults state attorneys for their poor conduct and stalling tactics in federal trial-

U.S. District Judge Michael McShane has ordered the state to pay more than $318,000 in attorney fees to lawyers for a Eugene man who proved to a federal jury in January that an Oregon State Police captain violated his civil rights by kicking him in the chest after a traffic stop in rural Lane County.

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LET’S SLAM THE BRAKES ON RISING TRAFFIC FATALITIES — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

How many people killed or maimed in road crashes can we accept?

In 1938, Washington, D.C., flew a black skull-and-crossbones flag whenever The Washington Post reported a car crash death, part of the city’s “program to aid the fight against wanton killing.” Such tragedies were rare then; now it seems we accept them as a fact of life.

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REPORT: IMPROVING SCHOOL QUALITY WOULD CREATE A HALF-TRILLION DOLLARS IN OREGON (Portland Tribune)

How do we improve school quality?

According to a new report, that’s the nations $76 trillion question.

Stanford University economist and researcher Eric Hanushek led a study published Wednesday in EducationNext that says Oregon alone could realize $574 billion more in gross domestic product during the lifetime of a child born today, if it improved school quality to the level of the best-educated state in the nation.

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INTEL RESTRUCTURING TO CUT 12,000 JOBS, SAVE $1.4 BILLION (Portland Tribune)

-Unknown how reductions will affect Oregon campuses-

Intel Corp. said Tuesday that it expects to cut 12,000 jobs worldwide as part of a major restructuring initiative to accelerate its evolution from a PC company to one that powers the cloud and billions of smart, connected computing devices.

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YEAH, WE’RE GREEN, JUST NOT THE ‘GREENEST’ STATE (Portland Tribune)

Oregon’s green, sure, but is it the greenest state in the nation?

Nope. Not according to a new WalletHub analysis, which puts the Sustainable Beaver State at No. 4 on its Greenest States list. The No. 1 Greenest State? Vermont.

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CENTRAL OREGON ZIKA TESTS TURN UP NEGATIVE (Bend Bulletin)

Nine Central Oregonians  eight in Deschutes County and one in Crook County  have tested negative for the Zika virus, local health department officials said Tuesday.

The primarily mosquito-borne virus, determined to be responsible for causing thousands of cases of serious birth defects in Brazil, has spread rapidly since early 2015 throughout South and Central America.

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ANGLERS READY FOR FISHING OPENER (Bend Bulletin)

-2 popular reservoirs to open Friday-

While an official opening day for trout fishing season no longer exists in Oregon, anglers remain excited about this Friday, when two popular Central Oregon reservoirs open to fishing.

Most other lakes in Oregon became open to fishing year-round starting Jan. 1 as part of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s simplification of sport fishing regulations.

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DESCHUTES COUNTY JOBLESS RATE BELOW 5 PERCENT (Bend Bulletin)

-Hiring in March stronger than expected-

Deschutes County passed a labor milestone in March when the county unemployment rate dipped below 5 percent for the first time since 2007, according to the Oregon Employment Department.
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MAP: WHERE CAN ADULTS LEGALLY BUY MARIJUANA IN OREGON? ALMOST EVERYWHERE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon’s recreational marijuana industry is booming. Recreational sales in the state have only been legal since Oct. 1, 2015, but already there are more than 300 locations where adults age 21 and older can legally purchase cannabis for recreational use.

According to data from the Oregon Health Authority, there are currently 418 dispensaries registered to sell medical marijuana. Under Oregon law, medical dispensaries can also opt to sell cannabis to recreational users; 333 of the licensed dispensaries have opted to do so.

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LIMIT YOUR CONSUMPTION OF BASS, OREGON OFFICIALS SAY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Oregon Health Authority is warning people not to eat too much bass. The fish is a top predator, so the longer it lives, the more mercury-contaminated fish it consumes.

David Farrer, a toxicologtist with the Oregon health Authority, said the state lists consumption advisories for 16 locations.

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NEWS ROUNDTABLE: APRIL 22 INDEPENDENT PARTY OF OREGON PRIMARY THE STUDENT VOTE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

We analyze some of the big national and regional stories of the week with our news roundtable.

Then we’ll check in with the Oregon secretary of state and the secretary of the Independent Party of Oregon ahead of the deadline to affiliate with a political party.

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FORESTERS SEEK SOLUTION TO CLEAR-CUT IMAGE PROBLEM (Capital Press)

Oregon’s timber industry has a blemish on its otherwise positive public image: People consider clearcutting unsightly.

Most Oregonians know that state law requires trees to be replanted after harvest, but clearcutting is nonetheless associated with negative words, including ugly, sad and greed, according to the Oregon Forest Resources Institute, which educates the public about forestry.

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CENSUS BUREAU DATA PROVIDES SNAPSHOTS OF LIFE IN UMATILLA COUNTY (East Oregonian)

Every year the U.S. Census Bureau publishes a treasure trove of demographic information, but much of it goes unnoticed by entities that could benefit from the research.

A search for Umatilla County brings up more than 30,000 data sets over the past 7 years, containing tidbits of information ranging from the obvious Hermistons population is younger than Pendletons to the unexpected slightly more women than men in Umatilla County hold management positions.

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ANOTHER BIGHORN RAM POACHED IN GILLIAM COUNTY (East Oregonian)

A third bighorn ram was shot and killed earlier this month along Interstate 84 in Gilliam County, east of Biggs Junction.

On April 10, Oregon State Police received several reports from passing motorists about a sheep that was in an unusual position and possibly dead near the highway. Fish and Wildlife troopers found the ram on top of a rock slide, and a necropsy later determined it had been shot with a high-powered rifle and left to waste.

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OREGON RISING ASKS PEOPLE TO DREAM BIG FOR SCHOOLS (East Oregonian)

A brand-new education initiative in Oregon was showcased at Hermiston’s Hispanic Advisory Committee meeting Monday night.

The initiative, called Oregon Rising, seeks to involve more than 10,000 Oregonians across the state in a discussion about creating a brighter future for Oregon’s schoolchildren.

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UAS TEST RANGE REAUTHORIZATION BILL PASSES SENATE (East Oregonian)

The Pendleton Unmanned Aerial Systems Range received some good news Tuesday as the U.S. Senate approved a provision that extends congressional authorization of test ranges from 2017 to 2022.

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CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY FINDING IT TOUGH TO ADD WORKERS (Medford Mail Tribune)

The employment numbers kicked out by the Bureau of Labor Statistics look good on the surface.

Jackson County’s jobless rate was a seasonally adjusted 5.1 percent in March, according to the federal agency’s estimates, down a notch from 5.2 percent in February and solidly below the 6.3 percent figure a year ago. There were 93,757 people on payrolls in March, up 469 from February and an increase of 5,280 from a year earlier.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: WANTON, CARELESS LITTERERS DIRTY STATE HIGHWAYS (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: I travel Highway 62 daily and wonder why I see so much trash and junk along the highway. Between Vilas Road and Eagle Point, it’s a mess. Our highways used to be beautiful  now they are starting to look worse than California’s. Why are they not being cleaned up?

A: Perhaps the better question, Ron, would be: How do our beautiful highways get so trashy in the first place?

Oregon Department of Transportation spokesman Gary Leaming says there’s two types of litterers traveling our highways and byways: those who are unaware there’s trash blowing out of the beds of their pickups and those who are just plain rude and throw their trash out their windows.

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OUR VIEW: INSTITUTE PROPONENTS MAY HAVE PICKED WRONG PLACE — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

A residential college on scenic rural acreage where students would study organic agriculture, forest management and wildlife habitat restoration in a hands-on setting. It’s an enticing vision, but there’s just one problem: It’s likely in the wrong place.

Rod and Brooks Newton, who operate Hidden Springs Wellness Center in Ashland, want to establish the private, nonprofit Novalis Institute on a 2,000-acre property off Buckhorn Springs Road south of Emigrant Lake
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FORUMS PLANNED FOR NEW EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT (Medford Mail Tribune)

State and local educators are seeking public input as they develop Oregon’s plan for the implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaces the No Child Left Behind Act.

The new federal law goes into effect in 2017-18 and affords states greater flexibility over areas of standards and assessments, accountability, school improvement and educator effectiveness, said Deputy Superintendent of Public Instruction Salam Noor.

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BOLI FINDS EVIDENCE OF RETALIATION BY GOLD HILL CITY MANAGER (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Employee alleged city manager singled her out-

The Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries has found “substantial evidence” to support allegations that Gold Hill City Manager Rick Hohnbaum retaliated against a longtime city employee after she accused him of sexual harassment.

BOLI investigator Charlie Burr confirmed that investigations into two charges over the past year and a half were concluded this week.

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TRIBE CALLS LOTTERY AD CAMPAIGN ‘HYPOCRITICAL’ (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Ads depict Lewis and Clark, omit native people-

A week after Gov. Kate Brown wrote to the Bureau of Indian Affairs opposing a new casino in Medford, the Coquille Tribe is calling a new Oregon Lottery ad campaign promoting video lottery games in bars hypocritical.

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TSA FAIRNESS ACT PASSES SENATE (Herald and News)

Crater Lake-Klamath Regional Airport Manager John Barsalou is hoping for commercial air service to return to Klamath Falls before the winter holiday season.

With the passage of the Transportation Security Administration Fairness Act in the U.S. Senate Tuesday, the legislation may give that hope a good nudge toward reality
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DEQ OFFICIAL CALLS POWERS WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVE ‘DISCONCERTING’ AS USDA DEADLINE LOOMS (The World)

The City of Powers on Tuesday issued a response to recent statements made by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. Department of Agriculture regarding the city’s wastewater treatment plant upgrade project.

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COQUILLE TRIBE OFFENDED BY STATE’S LOTTERY CAMPAIGN (The World)

The Coquille Indian Tribe is pushing back this week at the Oregon Lottery’s “Lewis and Clark” advertising campaign, saying it’s insensitive to indigenous people, and is placing emphasis on government enterprise over private enterprise.

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EDITORIAL: FLOODPLAINS ARE VITAL FOR RESIDENTS AND SALMON — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-FEMA flood insurance approach moves in the right direction-

A look around the Columbia River estuary’s edges reveals thousands of acres of land that were, are or will be floodplains. After a century in which dams, diking and a mostly stable climate allowed people to hold back floodwaters, local floodplains are back in the news.

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ASTORIA UNEASY ABOUT VACATION RENTALS (Daily Astorian)

Vacation rentals are not allowed in Astoria’s residential neighborhoods. Technically, the term doesn’t even exist in the development code, which was written when the city was known more for work than play.

But the City Council is concerned that a lack of enforcement on homestay lodging, which is permitted, could lead to the kind of conflicts over short-term rentals that have divided Gearhart and Cannon Beach.

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EDITORIAL: IT’S TIME TO PULL POT FROM SCHEDULE 1 — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The federal government last week announced that it was reviewing marijuanas status as a Schedule 1 drug, a move that  regardless of what you think about the drug  is long overdue.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency made the announcement in a memo to lawmakers and said it hopes to have a decision ready sometime in the first half of this year.

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EDITORIAL: RANKED-CHOICE VOTING SYSTEM WORTH A LOOK — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Yes, we know that we recently counseled you like, in yesterdays editorial to be cautious when approached by someone seeking your signature to push an initiative onto the ballot.

But some of the ideas on some of those clipboards being waved in your face are worth a second look. Here’s one of them:

State Rep. Dan Rayfield, D-Corvallis, and Blair Bobier, a Corvallis attorney who cofounded the Pacific Green Party of Oregon, are working to get a proposal for so-called ranked-choice voting on the Benton County ballot this November.

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OSP SEEKS PUBLIC’S HELP IN FINDING ELK POACHERS (Baker City Herald)

-Police investigating killing of two bull elk this winter near Sparta-

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking the public’s help in tracking down whoever illegally killed two bull elk near Sparta this winter.

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COUNTY GEOGRAPHIC SQUAW REFERENCES RENAMED (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The federal agency responsible for naming natural features has changed 13 names in Grant County that contained the word squaw.

Thursday, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names approved five names proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and seven proposed by the Grant County Court as alternatives to the tribal proposals, according to Oregon Geographic Names Board President Phil Cogswell.

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GUEST COMMENT: SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION IS POSSIBLE — GUEST OPINION (Blue Mountain Eagle)

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month SAAM. This years campaign focuses on ways that individuals, communities and the private sector can help prevent sexual violence. Nearly one in five women, and one in 71 men, are victims of sexual assault Black et al., 2011, but all of us are impacted by sexual violence.

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CROSSTALK: PREPARING AHEAD FOR AN EMERGENCY — GUEST OPINION (The Dalles Chronicle)

Opinion 1 – Emergency management agencies throughout Oregon are working out contingency plans for The Big One, a subduction zone earthquake off the Oregon Coast.

Opinion 2 – Do you really want to rely on the government if there is a manmade or natural disaster that shuts down stores and services for any significant length of time?

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BE PREPARED FOR ‘BIG ONE’ (Hood River News)

Columbia Gorge Community College and Hood River County Sheriffs Office of Emergency Management present an interactive learning event, offering insight into Cascadia earthquake geology, impacts and preparedness actions residents can take, on April 21 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. at Springhouse Cellar, 14 Railroad St., Hood River.

The Cascadia earthquake is Oregons greatest natural threat, according to the Governors Task Force on Resilience.
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CASCADE LOCKS PORT NEARS DECISION ON BRIDGE TOLL HIKE (Hood River News)

Crossing Bridge of the Gods may become more expensive for tourists this summer.

The Port of Cascade Locks plans to increase toll rates on the bridge through a tiered plan, with Gorge area residents paying the current $1 per crossing, while non-residents pay a boosted $2. The Port Commission hopes to finalize the rules and then adopt them May 5.

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OPEN RANGE: A DEALS A DEAL, INCLUDING THE WOLF PLAN — GUEST OPINION (Wallowa.com)

My Dad was odd in some ways. I never heard him cuss, he didnt drink, never smoked a cigarette and never lied. He did, however, really appreciate a good looking woman, the only thing I might have inherited from him. This was a personal code he had, not because he was afraid of going to hell or because he had any deep religious convictions.

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GUEST EDITORIAL: RURAL WHITE WOMEN FACE DECLINING LIFESPANS — GUEST OPINION (Wallowa.com)

Middle-aged white women in places like Eastern Oregon are dying long before they should  a reversal in decades of improving life expectancy in the U.S.

Delving into government and academic data, The Washington Post recently published a deeply troubling look at how addictions, depression and other factors cut decades from the lifespans of women, especially in Americas countryside and small towns.

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AN OREGON-MADE KITE THAT CAN POWER 5 HOMES VIDEO (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon researchers have developed a kite that generates enough electricity to power four or five homes.

Beaverton-based eWind Solutions has nabbed a $100,000 Small Business Innovation Research grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and a $125,000 commercialization grant from Oregon BEST, the state’s cleantech research accelerator.

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OREGON’S TOTAL EMPLOYMENT GAP, MARCH 2016— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

Last weeks employment report brought continued good news regarding Oregons labor market. The most commonly reported figure was an all-time record low unemployment rate in the states history. Or at least back to the 1970s when the good data begins. The only time period in Oregon’s history where our unemployment rate has been below 5% was a brief 11 month stretch in 1994-1995. That is until 2016, at least based on the initial data. Regardless of where revisions will take the data, we know Oregons labor market is doing quite well.

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YOU NEED TO MAKE $60,000 A YEAR TO LIVE COMFORTABLY IN PORTLAND, STUDY SAYS (Willamette Week)

-You’re probably feeling some discomfort right now.-

Does your day-to-day existence seem a little tenuous? Do you feel guilty when you buy brand-name toothpaste and do you wake up in a cold sweat after a dream involving a trip to the ER? You, my friend, are not alone.

According to a post today on GoBankingRates, you need to make $60,195 to “live comfortably” in Portland.
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LABOR COMMISSIONER BRAD AVAKIAN WANTS TO RE-DEFINE THE SECRETARY OF STATE’S JOB (Willamette Week)

-He’s told supporters he’d audit private corporations, pursue polluters and police workplace pay.-

Oregon Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian is making bold promises in his campaign to become secretary of state.

Avakian, 55, who’s won the bulk of the endorsements in a three-way Democratic primary, has told supporters he’d audit private corporations, pursue polluters and police workplace pay.

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THE EARLY DISAPPOINTMENTS OF CANNABIS LEGALIZATION IN OREGON — OPINION (Willamette Week)

-Are we sure weed is even legal?-

For 10 months now, cannabis has been legal in Oregon. Adults can buy flower, or grow their own, and medical patients still have access to other products without dosage or potency restrictions. Some have had cannabis-related convictions expunged. These are all good things, yes. But is this what you thought legalization would look like? Personally, I’ve felt some disappointments.

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INDEPENDENT PARTY GETS CLARITY ON NOMINATION PROCESS (KOIN)

-Independent Party of Oregon in first state-run primary election next month-

The Independent Party of Oregon got some clarity this week about how itll be allowed to pick a presidential nominee during its first state-run primary election next month.
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OREGON SENATE REPUBLICANS SEEK REPEAL OF LOW-CARBON FUEL STANDARD (KTVZ Bend)

-Ferrioli warns mandate will hike gas prices at least 19 cents-

Oregon Senate Republican leaders wrote to Gov. Kate Brown Monday, urging her to “protect struggling Oregonians by repealing the Low Carbon Fuel Standard before passing a transportation package in the 2017 legislative session.”

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VOTERS IN TWO OREGON COUNTIES TO DECIDE FATE OF MARIJUANA BUSINESSES (KUOW)

Voters in two Oregon counties will decide in the May primary whether to allow marijuana-related businesses. County commissioners banned marijuana retailers and growers in unincorporated parts of Klamath and Grant counties last year.

But local residents gathered enough signatures to force a vote to reverse that.

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TAX COMPRESSION IS A MINUS FOR TEACHING MATH IN OREGON (Around the O)

Oregon’s complex property tax system sometimes adds up to problems for eighth-graders who rely heavily on teachers for shaping their skills as they enter advanced math courses.

A study led by two University of Oregon undergraduate economics students has found that math scores go down by 5 percent in the first year of Oregon’s two-year budget cycle when tax-compression rules are triggered in local school districts. The problem is the unpredictability of funding that disrupts planning and teacher assignments.

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EARTHQUAKE HAZARD REPORT REFLECTS A COMPROMISE (Around the O)

The first one-year earthquake hazard report issued by the U.S. Geological Survey need not stir panic for Oregonians  beyond our already frayed nerves about an impending Cascadia rupture.

There are policy implications, says UO geologist Ray Weldon, a member of the report’s steering committee. The document, issued March 28, for the first time included induced earthquakes from the Great Plains to the East Coast.

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LEGISLATIVE WORK GROUP IN OREGON GRAPPLING WITH DRUG PRICING (Bloomberg BNA)

The death in the Oregon House of Representative of a drug-pricing transparency bill has led to the birth of a legislative work group with the ambitious goal of seeking “revolutionary” solutions at the state level to the national conundrum of high drug prices.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on April 20, 2016 OSL eClips

April 19, 2016 OSL eClips

* Coffee Creek inmate who had kidney removed files medical malpractice lawsuit against state
* Report names Oregon’s 25 safest cities: Did yours make the list?
* Malheur takeover part of larger ‘extreme movement’ threat, Interior chief says
* New Yorker writer wins Pulitzer for ‘The Really Big One’, thanks Steve Novick
* Portland Community College is cutting a free literacy tutoring program for refugees, immigrants
* Oregon police far less diverse than communities they serve, data show
* Workers study cause of fluctuations in nuclear waste tank
* Nurse allegedly abuses another patient after being let back on job, police say
* Oregon to marijuana dispensaries: No 4/20 raffles, giveaways
* Rescheduling marijuana: What the move would mean for researchers Q&A
* Why PSU alumni, foundation support regional payroll tax — Guest Opinion
* The Big Idea: Join us Thursday to discuss Portland’s toxic air
* Peter Courtney responds to recall petition
* University of Oregon report: Fraternities marred by blackout drinking and sexual abuse
* Retirement security — Opinion
* Interim DEQ director has fans, critics
* State vendors who owe taxes, other debt continue to be paid
* How much income tax do Oregon schools get?
* Brown goes another session without vetoing a bill
* Madras High native language class continues, expands
* Bend to consider support for upping tobacco age limit
* Feds to restore grazing allotment health standard stats in reports
* State officials to host education forum in Redmond
* Nursing board revokes Bend nurses license
* Editorial: Madras High has made investments pay — Opinion
* Oregon Public Utility Commission Chair To Step Down In May
* New Units Could Ease Rental Market Tension In Central Oregon
* Regional Roundup – Clatsop County
* Seismic Upgrades At School & UO Report On Sexual Violence
* Oregon Kite Power Start-Up Gets State And Federal Funding
* U.S. House members urge union, ports to cooperate
* Summer ODOT project will replace road signs
* Inmates train dogs to assist people with disabilities
* 2 bull elk poached near Sparta
* New Medford apartments fill up as fast as they can be built
* Medford school plan cuts staff, programs
* Warrant issued in White City water-pollution case
* Oregon steps up bat search amid new disease scare
* Oregon LNG confirms end of funding
* As Pacific sardine collapse worsens, scientists worry about possible ripple in the ecosystem
* Pacific salmon may be scarce, pricey in stores this summer
* Editorial: A victory for smart, courageous citizens — Opinion
* Editorial: Medical marijuana debate takes a new form — Opinion
* Editorial: Ballot measures bloom each election year — Opinion
* Here are Oregon’s top 35 high schools
* As it imports Kentucky’s IT, Oregon DHS not fazed by Bluegrass State glitches
* Learn about citizen science seabird monitoring at Nature Matters
* Significant Changes for Employers Doing Business in Oregon
* Pressure on Collaborative to Act Quickly to Adopt Federal Primary Care Reforms
* Advantage Dental Hearing Scheduled for Wednesday

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COFFEE CREEK INMATE WHO HAD KIDNEY REMOVED FILES MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAWSUIT AGAINST STATE (Portland Oregonian)

An inmate at the women’s state prison in Wilsonville contends medical staff failed to properly treat her kidney stone, causing her to eventually lose a kidney, according to a lawsuit filed in federal court.

Linda Anne Bond, 62, has filed a medical malpractice suit against the state of Oregon and physicians working for the Oregon Department of Corrections, alleging negligence and “deliberately indifferent treatment of a prisoner.”

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REPORT NAMES OREGON’S 25 SAFEST CITIES: DID YOURS MAKE THE LIST? (Portland Oregonian)

A new report released Monday named West Linn as Oregon’s safest city.

Public safety organization BackgroundChecks.org compiled a list of Oregon’s 25 safest cities based on Federal Bureau of Investigation violent crime data, internal research and an analysis of social media and language, according to a news release. The crime rates for the 2016 report were normalized per 100,000 residents.

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MALHEUR TAKEOVER PART OF LARGER ‘EXTREME MOVEMENT’ THREAT, INTERIOR CHIEF SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

An armed takeover of an Oregon national wildlife refuge is part of a disturbing “extreme movement” to seize public lands and reject the rule of law  putting communities and public employees at risk throughout the West, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell says in a speech outlining Obama administration conservation policies.

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NEW YORKER WRITER WINS PULITZER FOR ‘THE REALLY BIG ONE’, THANKS STEVE NOVICK (Portland Oregonian)

Kathryn Schulz, The New Yorker journalist whose article on an impending mega-earthquake in the Northwest went viral last summer, has won a Pulitzer in feature writing for the piece.

The Pulitzer website says Schulz won the award for “an elegant scientific narrative of the rupturing of the Cascadia fault line, a masterwork of environmental reporting and writing.”

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PORTLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE IS CUTTING A FREE LITERACY TUTORING PROGRAM FOR REFUGEES, IMMIGRANTS (Portland Oregonian)

Starting in July, hundreds of immigrants and refugees with little or no literacy skills will lose one long-time option for free tutoring help through PCC.

The community college, Oregon’s largest post-secondary institution, is eliminating its Volunteer Literacy Tutoring program effective June 30. The program has existed in some form since 1979, offering a place where immigrants and community volunteers connect and, supporters say, new Portlanders find one-on one help and a friendly face.

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OREGON POLICE FAR LESS DIVERSE THAN COMMUNITIES THEY SERVE, DATA SHOW (Portland Oregonian)

-UPDATE: This post has been updated with additional statistics from 2015.-

Minority representation in Oregon police departments has barely budged in the past five years, an analysis by The Oregonian/OregonLive shows.

The examination of state certification and census data found that across the state, municipal police departments are typically 14 percentage points whiter than the populations they serve.

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WORKERS STUDY CAUSE OF FLUCTUATIONS IN NUCLEAR WASTE TANK (Portland Oregonian)

Fluctuations inside a huge tank of radioactive waste raised concerns on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state over the weekend, and workers prepared Monday to pump out the area of the leak.

A federal contractor said the amount of nuclear waste that has been leaking between the two walls of the underground tank for several years grew dramatically this weekend.

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NURSE ALLEGEDLY ABUSES ANOTHER PATIENT AFTER BEING LET BACK ON JOB, POLICE SAY (Portland Oregonian)

A Kaiser Permanente nurse under criminal investigation for allegedly having inappropriate contact with a patient at a Beaverton clinic was allowed to work during the police inquiry and is accused of abusing another patient during that time, Beaverton police said Monday.

Alex Matthew Woolner, 37, of North Plains was indicted by a grand jury Friday on one count of first-degree criminal mistreatment, three counts of invasion of personal privacy, two counts of computer crime and four counts of third-degree sex abuse, police said.

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OREGON TO MARIJUANA DISPENSARIES: NO 4/20 RAFFLES, GIVEAWAYS (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Health Authority on Monday reminded medical marijuana dispensary operators that they can’t sponsor raffles or contests that include free pot as a prize.

The bulletin was issued during the week of 4/20, the unofficial holiday of sorts for the marijuana set.

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RESCHEDULING MARIJUANA: WHAT THE MOVE WOULD MEAN FOR RESEARCHERS Q&A (Portland Oregonian)

The federal government said recently that it is reviewing marijuana’s status as a Schedule 1 drug under the Controlled Substances Act, a move that could loosen tight restrictions on cannabis research.

In a memo to U.S. lawmakers, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency said it is reviewing marijuana’s current status and hopes to have a decision about potential rescheduling “in the first half of 2016.”

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WHY PSU ALUMNI, FOUNDATION SUPPORT REGIONAL PAYROLL TAX — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The boards of the Portland State University Alumni Association and the PSU Foundation support the “Yes for PSU” initiative.

Most of PSU’s in-state students are from the tri-county region, and most stay here to live and work after they graduate. Portland State provides metro-area students an affordable, high-quality education, and for many, PSU is their only opportunity for a higher education. PSU graduates provide the region’s businesses with a well-educated workforce, which contributes to a growing and vibrant economy.

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THE BIG IDEA: JOIN US THURSDAY TO DISCUSS PORTLAND’S TOXIC AIR (Portland Oregonian)

The revelation of toxic air hotspots across Portland rocked the city’s image as a green, environmentally conscious place.

As Gov. Kate Brown has acknowledged, it also undercut public trust in the state’s clean air overseer, the Department of Environmental Quality.

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PETER COURTNEY RESPONDS TO RECALL PETITION (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Legislature’s longest-serving member is responding to the prospect of a recall.

A recall petition was filed in February against Senate President Peter Courtney, D-Salem, by Matt Geiger, a two-time candidate for House District 22.

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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON REPORT: FRATERNITIES MARRED BY BLACKOUT DRINKING AND SEXUAL ABUSE (Eugene Register-Guard)

-But Greek members are taking steps to change the culture, and an official says they can be powerful leaders-

University of Oregon fraternity and sorority members earn social status by drinking themselves into a stupor, according to a report commissioned by the university.

The archaic practice of hazing continues underground in university frat houses or off campus, the report said.
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RETIREMENT SECURITY — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

State officials have begun work on a program that would allow hundreds of thousands of Oregon workers who aren’t offered any kind of retirement plan to begin saving for the future.

The Oregon Retirement Savings Plan is scheduled to launch in mid-2017. In the meantime, the state treasurer’s office has begun surveying employers on how best to set up and operate the plan. Input from workers also will be sought as the plan begins to take shape.

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INTERIM DEQ DIRECTOR HAS FANS, CRITICS (Portland Tribune)

Being asked to deal with activists hungry for information and fix an agency’s problems is nothing new for Pete Shepherd.

But he hasn’t always made people happy while doing so.

Shepherd is the longtime Salem lawyer tapped by Gov. Kate Brown to head the state Department of Environmental Quality in the wake of accusations that the agency had tolerated dangerous toxic air pollution in the heart of Portland and failed to protect public safety.

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STATE VENDORS WHO OWE TAXES, OTHER DEBT CONTINUE TO BE PAID (Portland Tribune)

For years, contractors who behind on their taxes have been able to continue collecting checks from the state of Oregon because most state agencies had no procedures in place to detect whether vendors owed taxes or other public debt.

It is difficult to gauge the size of the problem because the state has not tracked contractor debt, despite repeated suggestions to do so from state auditors since the late 1990s. Agencies started taking initial steps to address the problem after lawmakers passed a bill last year to encourage them to identify whether contractors owe money to the state.

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HOW MUCH INCOME TAX DO OREGON SCHOOLS GET? (Portland Tribune)

-Oregon has a unique system in the nation for funding schools-

With income tax returns due today, you may be wondering just where all that hard-earned cash is going. For your state returns, look no further than your schools.

Oregonians have a high income tax rate. A 2015 Legislative Revenue Office report says Oregon has one of the highest personal income tax rates in the nation, averaging $1,494 per person.

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BROWN GOES ANOTHER SESSION WITHOUT VETOING A BILL (Bend Bulletin)

-Governor signs all 970 pieces of legislation sent to her desk in 2015, 2016-

For the second straight session since taking office, Gov. Kate Brown signed every bill that crossed her desk  including some that got her into political hot water.

One of Browns spokesmen confirmed Monday the governor this month approved each of the 124 bills lawmakers in the Democratic-controlled House and Senate sent her way. Brown for months avoided saying whether she planned to reject any of the bills.

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MADRAS HIGH NATIVE LANGUAGE CLASS CONTINUES, EXPANDS (Bend Bulletin)

-Now students first educational brush with native culture can come before high school-

A Madras High School Native American language class has grown over the years, and soon, curriculum in more classes will teach the culture too.

Five years ago, Madras High School offered an elective class in which students learned three Native American languages spoken by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. The class took place two days a week. Today, that class has expanded to four days a week, and Madras High, along with the rest of Jefferson County School District, is gearing up to incorporate more Native American cultural curriculum, via a state plan.

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BEND TO CONSIDER SUPPORT FOR UPPING TOBACCO AGE LIMIT (Bend Bulletin)

Bend City Councilor Nathan Boddie will introduce a proclamation at a meeting Wednesday night that supports bumping the minimum age of tobacco buyers up to 21.

The proclamation is part of a nationwide campaign to raise the age limit, something that has already happened in 135 cities and counties, as well as Hawaii. In Oregon, the effort is being led by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, which aims to support statewide action on the issue in 2017, according to Luis Rodriguez, its Oregon government relations director.

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FEDS TO RESTORE GRAZING ALLOTMENT HEALTH STANDARD STATS IN REPORTS (Bend Bulletin)

Federal land managers have agreed to restore information about grazing allotments not meeting rangeland health standards in 13 Western states after a public lands advocacy group complained about the omission.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management agreed the information covering 150 million acres is needed after Washington, D.C.-based Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility filed an administrative complaint.

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STATE OFFICIALS TO HOST EDUCATION FORUM IN REDMOND (Bend Bulletin)

State education officials will bring their listening tour to Central Oregon next week.

Officials are holding a series of forums in preparation for changes under the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaces No Child Left Behind and allows for more flexibility in assessment and school improvement. Parents, students, teachers and community members are invited to learn about the states education initiatives and offer feedback.

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NURSING BOARD REVOKES BEND NURSES LICENSE (Bend Bulletin)

The Oregon Board of Nursing has revoked a Bend residents nursing license after she failed to request a hearing within 20 days to a notice of proposed revocation.

The board suspended Barbara L. Jaques registered nurse license Feb. 17 after she failed to respond to three letters seeking response to its investigation into her alleged problematic drinking.

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EDITORIAL: MADRAS HIGH HAS MADE INVESTMENTS PAY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Education doesn’t come cheap, but deciding just how much money is the right amount can be difficult. Perhaps whats happened at Madras High School in the last year offers some lessons, at least about schools with an outsized set of problems.

It seems money, effectively deployed, can make a difference.

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OREGON PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION CHAIR TO STEP DOWN IN MAY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The chair of the commission that regulates Oregon utilities says she wont seek appointment to another term and will step down in May. Susan Ackerman did not give a reason for her decision in a letter to Governor Kate Brown Friday.

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NEW UNITS COULD EASE RENTAL MARKET TENSION IN CENTRAL OREGON (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Central Oregon’s tight housing rental market may soon see hundreds of new units on the market.

Bend and Central Oregon have seen some of the lowest rental vacancy rates in the state for about two years. At times, there have been fewer than 20 rental units available in the entire city of Bend. But a number of new apartment complexes are slated to come online this summer and later this year.

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REGIONAL ROUNDUP – CLATSOP COUNTY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

We talk to Steve Forrester, editor and publisher of the Daily Astorian, about the canceled LNG pipeline project, contentious vacation rentals in Gearhart, affordable housing in Seaside, Astoria and Warrenton, and other issues affecting Clatsop County.

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SEISMIC UPGRADES AT SCHOOL & UO REPORT ON SEXUAL VIOLENCE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

-Show airs at noon today-

Oregon Senate President Peter Courtney and Shannon Farrier, finance director for the Tillamook School District, join us to talk about how schools and communities around Oregon will be affected by state grant money for seismic upgrades.

The University of Oregon administration reacts to a report finding that sexual violence and blackout drinking, among other issues, are widespread in the campus fraternities and sororities. We talk with Robin Holmes, vice president for student life at the University of Oregon.

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OREGON KITE POWER START-UP GETS STATE AND FEDERAL FUNDING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

An Oregon start-up that’s trying to use kites to generate electricity has secured close to a quarter of a million dollars from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and state agencies.

Beaverton-based eWind Solutions is working with Oregon State University to develop kites that generate power by flying in a figure ‘8’ pattern. The hope is that will make the kites pull hard on their cords, which are attached to a ground-based ratchet system that spins a power generator.

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U.S. HOUSE MEMBERS URGE UNION, PORTS TO COOPERATE (Capital Press)

Nine members of Congress, led by Washington Reps. Dan Newhouse and Dave Reichert, are urging the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association to find ways to prevent port disruptions.

A work slowdown crippled container exports in 2014 and 2015.

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SUMMER ODOT PROJECT WILL REPLACE ROAD SIGNS (East Oregonian)

Traffic signs around Eastern Oregon will be getting bigger and better this summer as the Oregon Department of Transportation completes a $550,000 project.

The project will span hundreds of road signs in Umatilla, Morrow, Union, Baker, Harney and Malheur counties through the summer months.
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INMATES TRAIN DOGS TO ASSIST PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES (East Oregonian)

-Six new inmates arrived Monday at the Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution.-

Unlike most newbies, these guys seemed genuinely happy to arrive at their new home. They wagged their tails, romped and licked the faces of every correctional officer they met.

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2 BULL ELK POACHED NEAR SPARTA (Argus Observer)

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the publics assistance in locating the person responsible for the unlawful taking of two bull elk near Sparta, within the Keating Wildlife Management Unit, located in Baker County about 20 miles northeast of Baker City.

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NEW MEDFORD APARTMENTS FILL UP AS FAST AS THEY CAN BE BUILT (Medford Mail Tribune)

As fast as a 204-unit apartment complex is built on West Main Street, eager tenants are clamoring to move in.

The first two buildings are full, said Philip Smith, one of the owners of Orchard Glen Estates LLC.

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MEDFORD SCHOOL PLAN CUTS STAFF, PROGRAMS (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Seven secondary teaching slots, after-school and readiness on the block-

Medford schools Superintendent Brian Shumate on Monday presented his plan for getting the district back to a balanced budget in 2016-17, including eliminating seven secondary teaching positions and making cuts in two programs launched just a year ago to improve academic performance.

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WARRANT ISSUED IN WHITE CITY WATER-POLLUTION CASE (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Accused polluter again fails to show up for court date-

A White City man is on the lam after allegedly dumping garbage in a creek while operating an illegal White City auto-salvage operation he later abandoned, stiffing the landlord for the cleanup.

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OREGON STEPS UP BAT SEARCH AMID NEW DISEASE SCARE (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Oregon steps up bat research after white-nose syndrome found in Washington-

State wildlife officials are ramping up the monitoring of bats this spring after a deadly fungal strain surfaced last week in Washington.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists have more questions than answers on whether Oregon bats are at increasing risk from white-nose syndrome, commonly called WNS, which has killed 6 million bats in North America since it was discovered a decade ago.

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OREGON LNG CONFIRMS END OF FUNDING (Daily Astorian)

Oregon LNG confirmed Monday that a $6 billion terminal and pipeline project on the Skipanon Peninsula was scrapped because Leucadia National Corp., the New York-based holding company that financed the project, decided to cease funding.

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AS PACIFIC SARDINE COLLAPSE WORSENS, SCIENTISTS WORRY ABOUT POSSIBLE RIPPLE IN THE ECOSYSTEM (Daily Astorian)

Nearly a year into a West Coast sardine fishing ban enacted to protect the collapsing population, the fish formerly worth more than $8 million to Oregons economy have shown no signs of a comeback.

New federal research indicates numbers of the small, silvery, schooling fish have plummeted further than before the fishing moratorium, dashing any hope of lifting it in 2016.

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PACIFIC SALMON MAY BE SCARCE, PRICEY IN STORES THIS SUMMER (Daily Astorian)

Salmon caught off the Pacific Coast may be harder to find in stores this summer and cost more with tight restrictions imposed on fishermen who anticipate pulling fewer of the prized catch into their boats, officials said Friday.

Four years of bruising drought in the West has strained inland rivers where salmon spawn, putting the fish in sharp decline.

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EDITORIAL: A VICTORY FOR SMART, COURAGEOUS CITIZENS — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-Some big opportunities are not worth it-

So this is how it ends. Oregon LNG representatives call the mayor of Warrenton and email the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to say the company is dropping its long-standing proposal. That’s what happened Friday. The company’s dream of a liquefied natural gas terminal in Warrenton on the Skipanon suddenly died.
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EDITORIAL: MEDICAL MARIJUANA DEBATE TAKES A NEW FORM — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The recent news about a looming controversy regarding medical marijuana and an experimental epilepsy drug raises intriguing questions  but, in the long run, likely will be seen as a footnote on the road to more widespread legalization.

At issue in the recent case is an experimental drug, Epidiolex, which is made from cannabis plants grown in England. The drug is a nearly pure extract of cannabidiol, or CBD. It has little of the substance in marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol THC, that produces the traditional pot high.

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EDITORIAL: BALLOT MEASURES BLOOM EACH ELECTION YEAR — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

We complain from time to time about how our general election ballots in November are crammed with measures: Some of them have been referred to the ballot by legislators. Some have made their way to the ballot by virtue of initiative campaigns. It all makes for heavy lifting by the time voters get to the end of the ballot, especially considering that many of these measures have the potential to make a bigger difference than any of the races for political office.

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HERE ARE OREGON’S TOP 35 HIGH SCHOOLS (Oregon Business Journal)

Thirty-five Oregon high schools have landed honors as, per the measurements of U.S. News & World Report, the best such institutions in the state.

The designation accords “silver” or “gold” honors to high schools based on which educators best prepare students for college and careers.

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AS IT IMPORTS KENTUCKY’S IT, OREGON DHS NOT FAZED BY BLUEGRASS STATE GLITCHES (Oregon Business Journal)

The Oregon Department of Human Services last week formally embarked on a two-and-a-half-year IT project to help low-income Oregonians obtain benefits more easily.

The department started the process of figuring out what changes are required in the “Benefind” system Oregon is importing from Kentucky to meet the state’s needs, said Sarah Miller, project manager and DHS Chief Operating Officer for Technology.

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LEARN ABOUT CITIZEN SCIENCE SEABIRD MONITORING AT NATURE MATTERS (Coastweekend.com)

Join the North Coast Watershed Association and Lewis and Clark National Historical Park for this month’s Nature Matters lecture. Amelia O’Connor will give the presentation “Citizen Science Seabird Monitoring in Oregon’s Marine Reserves” and talk about how individuals can help monitor seabirds on the Oregon Coast.

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SIGNIFICANT CHANGES FOR EMPLOYERS DOING BUSINESS IN OREGON (National Law Review)

Employers should be aware of several recent changes to various employment laws in Oregon. These laws affect how the majority of private employers in Oregon do business.

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HOW DWINDLING FISH STOCKS GOT A REPRIEVE (New York Times)

Several critical species  from the spiky, orange canary rockfish to the large lingcod  had dropped to below one-quarter of their natural, un-fished levels. Sharp restrictions were brought in, and the fishery was officially declared an economic disaster. Many fishermen found themselves stranded and facing bankruptcy. “It was a perfect example of too many trawlers chasing too few fish,” says Pettinger, who is now director of the Oregon Trawl Commission. “It was a dark time.”

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PRESSURE ON COLLABORATIVE TO ACT QUICKLY TO ADOPT FEDERAL PRIMARY CARE REFORMS (The Lund Report)

A new primary healthcare delivery reform collaborative that was convened this month by the Oregon Health Authority will have to act quickly if the state wants to join a national reform model that’s been implemented by the Affordable Care Act.

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ADVANTAGE DENTAL HEARING SCHEDULED FOR WEDNESDAY (The Lund Report)

-If approved by Oregon’s Insurance Commissioner, DentaQuest will enter into a partnership with Advantage.-

DentaQuest and Advantage Dental will plead their case to Oregon’s Insurance Commissioner Laura Cali on Wednesday night, leading the way to a partnership agreement. The hearing gets underway at 6 p.m. in the Labor & Industry Building in Salem.

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