December 05, 2016 Weekend eClips

State Library eClips

* EPA says federal study of Washington coal-export project inadequate
* Gov. Brown asks to expand groundwater studies following Oregonian investigation
* Oregon needs Courtney, others to create a grand bargain — Guest Opinion
* Hardy Myers, the gentleman statesman Opinion — Guest Opinion
* Oregon’s death penalty: True justice costs money — Guest Opinion
* Most Willamette River boaters have agreed to comply with eviction notices, state agency says
* Oregon revises marijuana rules after industry backlash
* State plans to revoke license of troubled Eastern Oregon youth program
* National Guard inaction exposes communities to lead
* Has your family visited a toxic armory?
* Did secret phone call jeopardize solar fraud prosecution?
* National monument fight comes to Cascade-Siskiyou in southern Oregon
* Portland heeds EPA’s guidance to reduce lead in water
* Obama should honor on-the-ground solutions in Oregon’s wildest places — Opinion
* 5 facts you should know about distracted driving
* Oregon wines nab top spots on Wine Spectator list
* University students face food insecurity
* Salem company fined $26,525 for illegal waste discharge
* Funding for fish, wildlife is complicated — Opinion
* Tales of family and tradition at the Christmas tree farm
* Oregon health officials change marijuana testing rules, intending to end shortages
* UO trustees worry that flat state funding, increased costs could lead to large tuition increases
* Finding shelter in Lane County — Opinion
* Respect for the law — Opinion
* Portland takes steps to reduce lead in drinking water
* Contracting with the government
* Controversial Inclusionary Housing proposal heading to City Council
* Portland’s Toxic Graveyard For World War II Ships
* Oregon measure calls for proof of citizenship to vote
* Seattle energy consultant seeks dismissal of Oregon charges
* Agencies detail plans for big transmission line
* Central Oregon continues strong economic growth
* Editorial: ODOT should not dodge examination of conflict of interest — Opinion
* Erik Lukens column: Time to talk property taxes, school funding and local control — Opinion
* Editorial: Legislature, don’t kick the can — Opinion
* Editorial: ODFW should not seek special carve-outs — Opinion
* Commentary: Get past stale debates on charter schools — Guest Opinion
* Oregon Universities Try ‘Instant’ Admissions To Land High School Seniors
* Washington Agencies Preempt Potentially Pesky Pork Problems
* Oregon Releases Plan To Confront ‘Chronic Absenteeism’ In School
* Oregon To Create Murrelet Protection Plan For State, Private Lands
* Weed, predator funding on chopping block at ODA
* Analyst: Export market key to growth of Oregon microbreweries
* Our view: The hole in Browns budget — Opinion
* Wheat growers face challenges ahead
* Council approves recreational pot dispensaries
* Rare, Bizarre Glowing Creatures Strand on Oregon Coast Beaches
* Oregon Launches Plan to End New HIV Infections in State
* Could this be Oregon’s next big wind farm?
* Housing state of emergency
* Oregon Audit Finds IT Vulnerabilities Remain
* Atkins Reflects On 22-Month Stint As Oregon Secretary Of State
* State Still Mulling Federal Waivers for Better Healthcare Even as Trump Presidency Looms
* Brown Budget Closes Junction City Psychiatric Hospital, Hikes Sin Taxes

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EPA SAYS FEDERAL STUDY OF WASHINGTON COAL-EXPORT PROJECT INADEQUATE (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2016/12/epa_says_federal_study_of_wash.html

The Environmental Protection Agency has criticized as inadequate a draft study the Army Corps of Engineers did on a proposed coal-export project in Washington state.

The corps’ draft environmental review is flawed because it fails to take a hard look at potential environmental impacts, such as air quality, rail traffic and climate change, EPA wrote to the corps in a letter Tuesday.

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GOV. BROWN ASKS TO EXPAND GROUNDWATER STUDIES FOLLOWING OREGONIAN INVESTIGATION (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2016/12/gov_kate_brown_asks_to_expand.html#incart_river_index

Gov. Kate Brown’s recommended budget includes money for a new team of researchers to study underground water sources in Oregon.

If approved, the additional $1.8 million requested for the study means the state would effectively double its capacity to perform groundwater research, adding a second team of people to review the resource every five years.

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OREGON NEEDS COURTNEY, OTHERS TO CREATE A GRAND BARGAIN — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/12/oregon_needs_courtney_others_t.html#incart_river_index

Oregon Senate President Peter Courtney is a veteran politician with a passion for history. A year ago, the Democrat predicted that a brewing fight between business and public employee unions would become Oregon’s political Antietam, the Civil War’s bloodiest day.

Then, opposing campaigns — for what would become Measure 97 — unleashed more than $40 million in ads on television and social media. It became the biggest ballot measure fight in the history of the Pacific Northwest.

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HARDY MYERS, THE GENTLEMAN STATESMAN OPINION — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/12/hardy_meyers_the_gentleman_sta.html#incart_river_home

The loss of Hardy Myers leaves Oregon minus one of the best public servants we have had.

In 1975, I had the pleasure of serving my first two terms on the Oregon House Revenue Committee with him and it was the beginning of a special friendship.

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OREGON’S DEATH PENALTY: TRUE JUSTICE COSTS MONEY — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/12/oregons_death_penalty_true_jus.html#incart_river_home

In its November 20th editorial, The Oregonian devoured hook, line, and sinker, two more studies churned out by academics and legal experts who think they know what’s best for the public.

The “study,” undertaken last fall, claimed seeking the death penalty costs a lot of money.

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MOST WILLAMETTE RIVER BOATERS HAVE AGREED TO COMPLY WITH EVICTION NOTICES, STATE AGENCY SAYS (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2016/12/most_willamette_river_boaters.html

Oregon’s Department of State Lands says it plans to continue keeping boaters from squatting long term on state-owned waterways in 2017 after an administrative law judge recently ruled the agency can legally evict them and tow away their boats if they refuse to move.

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OREGON REVISES MARIJUANA RULES AFTER INDUSTRY BACKLASH (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/marijuana/index.ssf/2016/12/oregon_revises_marijuana_rules.html#incart_river_index

Oregon on Friday issued temporary new rules aimed at easing what marijuana producers and processors say is a major backlog that has brought parts of the industry to a standstill, left store shelves empty and prompted some companies to lay off workers.

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STATE PLANS TO REVOKE LICENSE OF TROUBLED EASTERN OREGON YOUTH PROGRAM (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2016/12/state_plans_to_revoke_license.html#incart_river_index

A troubled residential program allowed to remain open when an Oregon child welfare official reversed abuse and neglect findings this fall may have to close after all.

The Oregon Department of Human Services on Friday threatened the license of Eastern Oregon Academy, near Burns, over instances of sex abuse by a female staffer, the failure to report a youth who’d been left in the wilderness for two hours and poor supervision.

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NATIONAL GUARD INACTION EXPOSES COMMUNITIES TO LEAD (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/page/visitors_soldiers_children_exposed_to_lead_dust_in_armories.html#incart_big-photo

In a former Montana National Guard armory where more than 20 workers got sick, lead-laced dust bunnies the size of tangerines clogged the ventilation system.

In two Oregon armories where parents unwittingly let infants crawl, the neurotoxin blanketed floors at levels as high as 10 times the federal safety standard.

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HAS YOUR FAMILY VISITED A TOXIC ARMORY? (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2016/12/national_guard_armories_events.html#incart_river_index

Because the National Guard consists of part-time soldiers, its armories often sit idle.

To help pay for their upkeep, the Guard has long rented out rooms or whole buildings for community events and private parties.

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DID SECRET PHONE CALL JEOPARDIZE SOLAR FRAUD PROSECUTION? (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2016/12/defense_alleges_prosecutorial.html#incart_river_index

State and federal law enforcement agents hoped for a confession.

But Seattle energy consultant Martin Shain wasn’t playing ball.

Agents from the Oregon Department of Justice and the FBI investigating an Oregon solar power project last September persuaded another player in the case to telephone Shain in hopes he would incriminate himself.

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NATIONAL MONUMENT FIGHT COMES TO CASCADE-SISKIYOU IN SOUTHERN OREGON (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/travel/index.ssf/2016/12/national_monument_fight_comes.html#incart_river_index

Southern Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou is an unlikely place to fight over a national monument. It is, after all, already a national monument.

But since ecologists recommended a massive 65,000-acre expansion – in effect doubling the size of the federal monument – Cascade-Siskiyou has quietly become an important battleground in the nationwide debate over federal lands.

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PORTLAND HEEDS EPA’S GUIDANCE TO REDUCE LEAD IN WATER (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2016/12/portland_heeds_epas_guidance_i.html#incart_river_index

Under pressure to reduce lead in drinking water, the Portland Water Bureau on Friday agreed to increase pH levels and evaluate the effectiveness of related programs.

Now it’s up to state regulators to sign off.

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OBAMA SHOULD HONOR ON-THE-GROUND SOLUTIONS IN OREGON’S WILDEST PLACES — OPINION (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/12/obama_should_honor_on-the-grou.html#incart_river_index

Two separate fights to protect two extraordinary patches of Oregon have in recent months escalated as President Barack Obama’s term comes to a close. That’s because he could, by the authority Congress granted to him in a far less populous time, singularly issue sweeping protections to the Owyhee Canyonlands in southeastern Oregon and the Cascade-Siskiyou Mountains in southwestern Oregon and northern California.

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5 FACTS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT DISTRACTED DRIVING (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2016/12/03/5-facts-you-should-know-distracted-driving/94736958/

The sheriff’s deputy in the passenger seat read a series of numbers aloud, and I punched them into my phone calculator with one hand on the steering wheel as I drove through the parking lot.

My rear tire crunched over a traffic cone, and I failed to brake at the basket of plastic balls thrown in front of the SUV. It was bad  really bad. After a parallel parking nightmare, one of the deputies joked, “Well, you left one cone standing.”

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OREGON WINES NAB TOP SPOTS ON WINE SPECTATOR LIST (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2016/12/02/oregon-wines-nab-top-spots-wine-spectator-list/94818666/

Two of the top three wines of the year, as ranked by Wine Spectator magazine, come from Willamette Valley wineries.

Domaine Serene’s Dundee Hills Evenstad Reserve 2014 Chardonnay ranked second on Wine Spectator’s yearly Top 100 list; Beaux Frres 2014 Pinot Noir followed as the third best of 2016.

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UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FACE FOOD INSECURITY (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/education/2016/12/02/university-students-face-food-insecurity/93963562/

Imagine having to decide between paying for a course textbook or your next meal.

Situations like that are becoming more common for students in higher education.

“I had a student come in … who hadn’t seen vegetables for three years,” said Grecia Garcia, who helps oversee the Chemeketa Community College pantry.

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SALEM COMPANY FINED $26,525 FOR ILLEGAL WASTE DISCHARGE (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/tech/science/environment/2016/12/02/salem-company-fined-illegal-waste-discharge/94816492/

Oregon environmental regulators have fined a South Salem rock products company $26,525 for discharging industrial wastewater slurry without a permit.

Bella Pietra Marble and Granite cuts and grinds granite, marble and stone at its facility at 3780 Boone Road SE.

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FUNDING FOR FISH, WILDLIFE IS COMPLICATED — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/opinion/2016/12/02/funding-fish-wildlife-complicated/94747512/

A task force charged with finding ways to help the state protect Oregon’s fish and wildlife has come up with a couple of novel funding mechanisms that don’t automatically pass the cost on to hunters and anglers. The concept is sound given that hunters and fishing enthusiasts aren’t the only ones using the state’s lands and waters, and have been bearing the brunt of the cost for some time.

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TALES OF FAMILY AND TRADITION AT THE CHRISTMAS TREE FARM (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35052825-75/tales-of-family-and-tradition-at-the-christmas-tree-farm.html.csp#

-Hundreds head out Saturday to Northern Lights Christmas Tree Farm to pick their perfect evergreen-

Any old Christmas tree wasn’t going to satisfy Stella Carlton.

I want a big one the 6-year-old squealed, tugging her moms sleeve in an ocean of fir trees at the Northern Lights Christmas Tree Farm.

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OREGON HEALTH OFFICIALS CHANGE MARIJUANA TESTING RULES, INTENDING TO END SHORTAGES (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35050782-75/oregon-health-officials-change-marijuana-testing-rules-intending-to-end-shortages.html.csp

Responding to reports of rising marijuana prices, product shortages and processors laying off employees, Oregon health officials Friday eased pesticide and other testing requirements for pot.

Processors and growers had complained that strict testing rules for medical and recreational marijuana imposed by the state on Oct. 1 had created a backlog at testing labs, which led to pot product shortages at dispensaries.

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UO TRUSTEES WORRY THAT FLAT STATE FUNDING, INCREASED COSTS COULD LEAD TO LARGE TUITION INCREASES (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35051511-75/uo-trustees-worry-that-flat-state-funding-increased-costs-could-lead-to-large-tuition-increases.html.csp#

University of Oregon students may return to the bad old days of whopping tuition increases next year if the figures in the governors proposed state budget dont change.

Gov. Kate Brown plans to give the states public universities a flat $667 million for the next two-year budget cycle. If thats the final figure, tuition increases are likely to exceed 5 percent, according to discussion at the UO Board of Trustees meeting in Portland on Friday.

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FINDING SHELTER IN LANE COUNTY — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/opinion/35044013-78/finding-shelter-in-lane-county.html.csp

The statistics in a new report were bad enough: 21,340 students in Oregon public schools were homeless in the last school year; 1,929 pre-kindergarten students were homeless; 524 students  about one out of every 10  in the Bethel School District were homeless, 900 students in the Eugene School District, about one in 20, were homeless; 480 students in the Springfield School District were homeless, also about one out of 20.

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RESPECT FOR THE LAW — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/opinion/35046828-78/respect-for-the-law.html.csp

Like long snappers on football teams, state attorneys general don’t attract a lot of attention unless they make a big mistake.

Three-term Oregon Attorney General Hardy Myers, who died Tuesday at 77, didn’t attract a lot of attention for all the right reasons. He was a quiet and consistent enforcer of justice  after a similarly distinguished stint in the Oregon Legislature.

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PORTLAND TAKES STEPS TO REDUCE LEAD IN DRINKING WATER (Portland Tribune) http://pamplinmedia.com/pt/9-news/334967-214827-portland-takes-steps-to-reduce-lead-in-drinking-water

Corrosive water can cause lead to leach out of ordinary household pipes and plumbing fixtures and into drinking water, so one way to reduce lead exposure across a city is to change the pH of its water by adding chemicals.

The Portland Water Bureau is taking immediate steps to reduce the amount of lead in the water at taps across the Portland metro area.

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CONTRACTING WITH THE GOVERNMENT (Portland Tribune) http://pamplinmedia.com/but/239-news/334866-214125-contracting-with-the-government

At the close of 2016, the COBID team will have participated in more than 100 outreach events.

Without fail, the main question we hear from attendees is, “Why should I get certified?” Closely followed by concern that their firm is not in the construction business and, therefore, minimal opportunities exist. In addition, there is the widespread belief that working with the government is cumbersome, difficult, and not worth the effort.

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CONTROVERSIAL INCLUSIONARY HOUSING PROPOSAL HEADING TO CITY COUNCIL (Portland Tribune) http://pamplinmedia.com/pt/9-news/334970-214836-controversial-inclusionary-housing-proposal-heading-to-city-council

The proposal, which became possible after the 2016 Oregon Legislature lifted the statewide ban on Inclusionary Housing, would require residential developers to include affordable units in multi-family projects with more than 20 units. It includes incentives intended to offset the revenue that would be lost by the lower-priced units.

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PORTLAND’S TOXIC GRAVEYARD FOR WORLD WAR II SHIPS (Portland Tribune) http://pamplinmedia.com/sl/334834-214678-portlands-toxic-graveyard-for-world-war-ii-ships

-Zidell business boomed by recycling scrap metal from surplus Navy vessels, but left PCB and other contamination in the Willamette River-

Paul Fishman spots a rusty chunk of metal jutting out of the riverbank on Portland’s South Waterfront.

“Ah-ha” he said. “Here’s a piece of a ship’s hull.”

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OREGON MEASURE CALLS FOR PROOF OF CITIZENSHIP TO VOTE (Bend Bulletin)

http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4868327-151/oregon-measure-pitches-citizenship-proof-despite-lack-of?referrer=carousel4

-Voting rights groups say such laws suppress voting-

With concerns that are based on fear, rather than proof, that voter fraud exists in Oregon, a conservative duo is proposing a solution: put a clause in the state constitution that requires all voters to prove they’re U.S. citizens before they can vote.

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SEATTLE ENERGY CONSULTANT SEEKS DISMISSAL OF OREGON CHARGES (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4874224-151/seattle-energy-consultant-seeks-dismissal-of-oregon-charges

A Seattle energy consultant accused of forgery in connection with a major Oregon solar power project is seeking to have the charges dismissed, arguing that the state committed prosecutorial misconduct and that the statute of limitations for bringing an indictment had expired.

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AGENCIES DETAIL PLANS FOR BIG TRANSMISSION LINE (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4868333-151/agencies-detail-plans-for-big-transmission-line

-Project could stretch across five Oregon counties-

A proposed 300-mile long, $1 billion transmission line in Eastern Oregon has attracted a lot of scrutiny, including some from at least one resident and a conservation group in Bend.

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CENTRAL OREGON CONTINUES STRONG ECONOMIC GROWTH (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/business/4861144-151/central-oregon-continues-strong-economic-growth

Central Oregon’s economy is still growing rapidly, with no immediate reasons for concern, according to the most recent quarter of data from the Central Oregon Business Index.

The index rose from a revised 137.5 in the second quarter to 141 in the third, the largest single-quarter increase since first quarter 2015.

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EDITORIAL: ODOT SHOULD NOT DODGE EXAMINATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST — OPINION (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/4864975-151/editorial-odot-should-not-dodge-examination-of-conflict#

The state of Oregon is having an extraordinarily difficult time completing a management review of the Oregon Department of Transportation. The latest wrinkle? As things now stand, the New York company hired to do the audit may not look at how well the department avoids conflicts of interest when awarding project contracts.

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ERIK LUKENS COLUMN: TIME TO TALK PROPERTY TAXES, SCHOOL FUNDING AND LOCAL CONTROL — OPINION (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/4864730-151/erik-lukens-column-time-to-talk-property-taxes

-Tax measures did what they were supposed to, but there are trade-offs-

Oregon’s public schools receive the bulk of their funding from the state. So when Measure 97 fizzled this fall, school officials who’d been salivating over the prospect of a $3 billion annual boost in state tax revenue were left to contemplate a very different future. Oregon now faces a $1.8 billion budget shortfall for the next biennium. To make matters worse, school districts will wrestle with soaring contributions to the states public pension system. Bend-La Pines pension bill will jump by $4.5 million in 2017.

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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATURE, DON’T KICK THE CAN — OPINION (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/4867937-151/editorial-legislature-dont-kick-the-can

Oregon politicians have been talking about the ultimate can kick: Gambling with borrowed money to reduce the states $22 billion unfunded liability in its pension system for public employees.

Its a misguided idea, and the states Legislative Fiscal Office spelled out why this week.

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EDITORIAL: ODFW SHOULD NOT SEEK SPECIAL CARVE-OUTS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/4867918-151/editorial-odfw-should-not-seek-special-carve-outs

Oregon’s Department of Fish and Wildlife says it needs money. To that end, a task force is poised to recommend that the 2017 Legislature raise taxes to keep the agency on reasonably sound financial footing.

While ODFW can find ways to spend more money, the proposed surcharges on personal income taxes and beverage containers at the wholesale level are not the best way to provide it. ODFW should not get special tax carve-outs.

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COMMENTARY: GET PAST STALE DEBATES ON CHARTER SCHOOLS — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/4864399-151/commentary-get-past-stale-debates-on-charter-schools

You’re an enemy of American public schools

You’re an enemy of poor American children

Welcome to our national debate  such as it is  over charter schools, which received a shot in the arm last week after President-elect Donald Trump nominated Michigan charter-school activist Betsy DeVos for secretary of education. In predictably lockstep fashion, DeVos critics warned that charter schools are harming American public education; meanwhile, her champions said charters improve schooling for Americas least privileged kids.

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OREGON UNIVERSITIES TRY ‘INSTANT’ ADMISSIONS TO LAND HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS (Oregon Public Broadcasting) http://www.opb.org/news/article/oregon-college-admissions-instant/

Seniors at Portland’s Cleveland High School were packed into the counseling center on a recent November day. Some were at computers filling out college applications. Others were waiting to hear an admissions officer from Portland State University call out their names.

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WASHINGTON AGENCIES PREEMPT POTENTIALLY PESKY PORK PROBLEMS (Oregon Public Broadcasting) http://www.opb.org/news/article/washington-feral-pig-hotline/

Feral pigs are a problem in 39 U.S. states and the Northwest is not immune. Thats why officials from four Washington agencies issued a reminder to residents last week to be on the lookout.

So, far this year, there have been only 11 reports of feral pigs in Washington state. That number is up, but Justin Bush said that’s because the states Invasive Species Council is trying to raise awareness. He said if Washington were to become a permanent home for feral pigs, they’d do really well.

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OREGON RELEASES PLAN TO CONFRONT ‘CHRONIC ABSENTEEISM’ IN SCHOOL (Oregon Public Broadcasting) http://www.opb.org/news/article/chronic-absent-school-oregon-plan/

The underlying problem seems obvious: teachers cant teach the kids who dont show up.

Officials are trying to get a handle on chronic absenteeism, one of Oregons biggest problems with its schools.

State officials have released a Chronic Absenteeism Report in response to a law Oregon passed earlier this year, though the push to address chronic absenteeism in the state goes back even before that.

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OREGON TO CREATE MURRELET PROTECTION PLAN FOR STATE, PRIVATE LANDS (Oregon Public Broadcasting) http://www.opb.org/news/article/oregon-to-create-murrelet-protection-plan-for-state-private-lands-/

A threatened sea bird that relies on coastal old growth forests to nest will be getting further protections in Oregon.  This week, the Board of Forestry agreed to join with other state agencies to create a plan to conserve marbled murrelet habitat on state and private lands.

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WEED, PREDATOR FUNDING ON CHOPPING BLOCK AT ODA (Capital Press) http://www.capitalpress.com/Oregon/20161202/weed-predator-funding-on-chopping-block-at-oda

Funding for weed biocontrol and predator control is on the chopping block at the Oregon Department of Agriculture as the state prepares for a budget shortfall.

The agency plans to eliminate state funding for USDAs Wildlife Services program, which kills coyotes and other predators that prey on livestock. The move would save more than $460,000.

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ANALYST: EXPORT MARKET KEY TO GROWTH OF OREGON MICROBREWERIES (Capital Press) http://www.capitalpress.com/Oregon/20161202/analyst-export-market-key-to-growth-of-oregon-microbreweries

Van Havig, co-owner of Gigantic Brewing Co. on the citys hipster-heavy east side, has an app on his phone that provides instantly updated currency exchange rates. The company, formed by Havig and Ben Love five years ago, sells 5 to 7 percent of its beer outside the country, primarily to Canada but a bit to Japan, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. The strong U.S. dollar makes Gigantic something of an expensive choice overseas.

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OUR VIEW: THE HOLE IN BROWNS BUDGET — OPINION (East Oregonian) http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/editorials/20161202/our-view-the-hole-in-browns-budget

There is a gaping hole in Gov. Kate Browns proposed budget, released last Thursday. Browns financial road map for Oregon has nothing to say about the Public Employees Retirement System PERS and its burgeoning costs to local governments and school districts.

To propose a financial plan for Oregon and omit PERS is a bit like offering a battle strategy and leaving out ammunition costs.

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WHEAT GROWERS FACE CHALLENGES AHEAD (Argus Observer) http://www.argusobserver.com/news/wheat-growers-face-challenges-ahead/article_abd2ee80-b8bc-11e6-a822-13c80c1681c1.html

Malheur County members of Oregon Wheat Growers League met Thursday for their annual meeting, with a new leader at the helm.

Ted Buhrig, a Vale area farmer, led the meeting, having succeeded Dana Tuckness, as county president for the Wheat Growers League.

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COUNCIL APPROVES RECREATIONAL POT DISPENSARIES (Medford Mail Tribune) http://www.mailtribune.com/news/20161201/council-approves-recreational-pot-dispensaries

The Medford City Council has approved changes to zoning laws allowing the sale of recreational marijuana within city limits.

The council voted unanimously Thursday night with six members in favor to allow permits for Oregon Liquor Control Commission-licensed marijuana dispensaries in commercial areas zoned community commercial, “regional commercial” and “heavy commercial.”

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RARE, BIZARRE GLOWING CREATURES STRAND ON OREGON COAST BEACHES (Oregon Coast Beach Connection) http://www.beachconnection.net/news/glowcr120216_401.php

Imagine a giant glowing worm-like creature, some 60 feet long and emitting a bright green-blue. But it’s harmless, and reportedly soft as a boa. Most photos by Tiffany Boothe, Seaside Aquarium.

This is a relative of the truly bizarre and rarely-seen creature that has suddenly washed up along the Oregon coast. It’s called a pyrosome, and the ones found here are less than a foot. They are actually massive colonies of cloned creatures related to a kind of jellyfish called a salp.

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OREGON LAUNCHES PLAN TO END NEW HIV INFECTIONS IN STATE (Salem News) http://www.salem-news.com/articles/december012016/oregon-end-hiv.php

Oregon today launched an initiative that will end new HIV infections in the state, building on decades of foundational work to introduce a new five-year plan focused on testing, prevention and treatment.

The initiative, called End HIV Oregon, envisions a state in which all new HIV infections are eliminated and where all people living with HIV have access to high-quality care, free from stigma and discrimination.

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COULD THIS BE OREGON’S NEXT BIG WIND FARM? (Oregon Business Journal) http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/news/2016/12/02/could-this-be-oregons-next-big-wind-farm.html

A big wind farm proposed for Eastern Oregon now has the permit it needs to go forward from the states Energy Facility Siting Council.

That doesn’t guarantee that the 399-megawatt Saddle Butte project, in both Morrow and Gilliam counties, will be built. Proposed projects, even permitted ones, regularly linger or even vanish, and a wind farm approaching Saddle Butte’s scale hasnt been completed in Oregon in more than four years.

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HOUSING STATE OF EMERGENCY (NW Labor Press) https://nwlaborpress.org/2016/12/housing-state-of-emergency/

In Portland, City Council declared a housing state of emergency Sept. 7  for the second year in a row. The emergency is real, and worsening rapidly.

Portland home prices are now out of range for most working people. The median sale price is $385,000, having risen at or above 10 percent annually for the last five years.

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OREGON AUDIT FINDS IT VULNERABILITIES REMAIN (Government Technology) http://www.govtech.com/security/Oregon-Audit-Finds-IT-Vulnerabilities-Remain.html

An audit by the Oregon Secretary of State’s office finds vulnerabilities in the systems of 13 state agencies, but an executive order from the Governor assigns more authority over security to the CIO’s office.

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ATKINS REFLECTS ON 22-MONTH STINT AS OREGON SECRETARY OF STATE (NW News Network) http://nwnewsnetwork.org/post/atkins-reflects-22-month-stint-oregon-secretary-state

Oregon Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins said she was “taken aback” by the amount of misinformation that surrounded Oregon’s recent election process. In a speech at Salem City Club, Atkins said even her own Facebook friends were sharing bad information.

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STATE STILL MULLING FEDERAL WAIVERS FOR BETTER HEALTHCARE EVEN AS TRUMP PRESIDENCY LOOMS (The Lund Report) https://www.thelundreport.org/content/state-still-mulling-federal-waivers-better-healthcare-even-trump-presidency-looms

An Oregon Health Authority representative said submitted waivers are often concluded in the last hours of a presidential administration, adding hope that Oregon may get its giant Medicaid waiver and continue the work of the coordinated care organizations.

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BROWN BUDGET CLOSES JUNCTION CITY PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL, HIKES SIN TAXES (The Lund Report) https://www.thelundreport.org/content/brown-budget-closes-junction-city-psychiatric-hospital-hikes-sin-taxes

The newly elected governors 2017-2019 budget increases the hospital assessment tax and restores an insurance tax to offset a $1 billion reduction in federal funding to Medicaid. Oregon Project Independence would lose funding, and the General Assistance Program for the homeless would end Gov. Kate Brown boldly called on Oregon to cover all children living in Oregon, regardless of immigration status.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on December 05, 2016 Weekend eClips

December 05, 2016 OSL eClips

* Snake River prison inmate charged in fellow inmate’s death, court records show
* Commentary: Oregon high school athletics has a well-to-do school problem — Opinion
* State finally inks plan to combat rampant school absenteeism
* Concerns remain after OHA relaxes pot-testing rules
* Get used to it: Economists see “new normal” of slow growth
* Analyst: Craft beer industry slows, but opportunities exist
* Pacific fisher makes a comeback in Washington state
* Energy consultant seeks dismissal of Oregon charges
* Costs of train derailment along Columbia River adding up
* Easy and beautiful hike leads to 289-foot Elowah Falls
* Lawmakers ask government to spend more on hops research
* Springfield City Council to submit urban growth boundary expansion to state
* Brown highlights tradeoffs — Opinion
* Controversial Inclusionary Housing proposal heading to City Council
* Oregon measure calls for proof of citizenship to vote
* Oregon Warns About Internet-Based Title Loan Companies
* Brown will need to follow through on tech problems — Opinion
* No – Obama legacy quest to be at Klamath’s expense — Guest Opinion
* Gov. Kate Brown Names Karl “Rick” Miller To Oregon Investment Council, Completing His Transition
* New Survey Looks at Race and Problems at Voting Polls
* City Club of Eugene: Will Inclusionary Zoning Help Solve Eugene’s Housing Affordability Crisis?
* Taxes, Budget Up For Discussion As Business Leaders, Politicians Gather In Portland
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SNAKE RIVER PRISON INMATE CHARGED IN FELLOW INMATE’S DEATH, COURT RECORDS SHOW (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2016/12/snake_river_prison_inmate_char.html#incart_river_home

A Snake River Correctional Institution inmate found dead in his cell in February is believed to have been killed by another inmate, court records show.

Michael S. Lay, 37, is accused of aggravated murder for the Feb. 25 death of 22-year-old Michael Anthony Teves at the Ontario-based prison, according to an indictment filed Friday in Malheur County Circuit Court.

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COMMENTARY: OREGON HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETICS HAS A WELL-TO-DO SCHOOL PROBLEM — OPINION (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/sports/index.ssf/2016/12/commentary_oregon_high_school.html

It’s a debate that has boiled over in recent years in Oregon high school sports: the advantages of the private schools.

I have stupidly allowed myself to get dragged into this discussion, because many want to make it about recruiting. Which is ridiculous, because recruiting is the lifeblood of all private schools. Recruiting is how private schools fill seats in their classrooms.

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STATE FINALLY INKS PLAN TO COMBAT RAMPANT SCHOOL ABSENTEEISM (Portland Oregonian) http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/12/state_finally_inks_plan_to_com.html#incart_river_home_pop

Oregon education officials laid out their plans late Thursday for how to fight chronic absenteeism, a rampant problem in schools and a prime reason the state has one of the nation’s worst graduation rates.

In a report required by the Legislature, the Oregon Department of Education and Gov. Kate Brown’s Chief Education Office said they would deploy a team of on-the-ground experts to help the 30 percent of schools with sky-high absenteeism do better. They also call for more attention from the top.

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CONCERNS REMAIN AFTER OHA RELAXES POT-TESTING RULES (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2016/12/02/heath-authority-temporarily-revamps-pot-testing-rules/94841898/

The Oregon Health Authority temporarily relaxed marijuana testing rules on Friday in an effort to lower costs for people in the business while still looking out for the public’s welfare. But industry concerns remain that the move isn’t enough to relieve a shortage of marijuana in the legal market.

A report published last week had argued strict policies the state started to enforce in early October were causing tightened supplies and pushing marijuana sales onto the black market.

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GET USED TO IT: ECONOMISTS SEE “NEW NORMAL” OF SLOW GROWTH (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/money/business/2016/12/05/get-used-economists-see-new-normal-slow-growth/94986246/

Americans should get used to a “new normal” of slow economic growth, business economists say.

The median estimate from economists surveyed by the National Association for Business Economics calls for the American economy to grow 2.2 percent in 2017, up from a forecast 1.6 percent this year and unchanged from the previous survey in September.

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ANALYST: CRAFT BEER INDUSTRY SLOWS, BUT OPPORTUNITIES EXIST (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/money/business/2016/12/04/analyst-craft-beer-industry-slows-but-opportunities-exist/94980382/

Oregon’s craft beer industry is slowing down after a decade of explosive growth, but a state economic analyst says the outlook is good for neighborhood microbreweries.

Josh Lehner, of the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis, gave that outlook in remarks to the annual meeting of the Oregon Brewers Guild in Portland last week, the Capital Press reported.

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PACIFIC FISHER MAKES A COMEBACK IN WASHINGTON STATE (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/tech/science/environment/2016/12/04/pacific-fisher-makes-comeback-washington-state/94980104/

The elusive weasel-like mammal poked its head out of the wooden crate, glanced around and quickly darted into the thick forest of Mount Rainier National Park  returning to a landscape where it had been missing for seven decades.

One by one, 10 Pacific fishers that had been trapped in British Columbia were set free at the park south of Seattle as part of a multiyear effort to reintroduce the native species to its historical range.

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ENERGY CONSULTANT SEEKS DISMISSAL OF OREGON CHARGES (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2016/12/04/energy-consultant-seeks-dismissal-oregon-charges/94977636/

A Seattle energy consultant accused of forgery in connection with a major Oregon solar power project is seeking to have the charges dismissed, arguing that the state committed prosecutorial misconduct and that the statute of limitations for bringing an indictment had expired.

Martin Shain was the lead consultant on Oregon’s $24 million Solar by Degree project. Prosecutors say he created a fake invoice from a fictional subcontractor to help secure nearly $12 million in tax credits from the Oregon Department of Energy.

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COSTS OF TRAIN DERAILMENT ALONG COLUMBIA RIVER ADDING UP (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2016/12/04/costs-train-derailment-along-columbia-river-adding-up/94973428/

Six months after a train hauling Bakken crude oil derailed along the Columbia River Gorge, Washington, Oregon and other officials are still tabulating a bill to send to Union Pacific Railroad.

Union Pacific said in a statement that it is committed to absorbing all the costs incurred as a result of the fiery crash on June 3 in Mosier, Oregon.

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EASY AND BEAUTIFUL HIKE LEADS TO 289-FOOT ELOWAH FALLS (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/travel/outdoors/2016/11/22/elowah-falls-hike-columbia-river-gorge-upper-mccord-creek-falls/94244610/

Elowah Falls is one of my favorite spots in the Columbia River Gorge.

A frozen rope of a waterfall, Elowah drops 289 feet into an amphitheater of layered basalt, kicking mist into a mossy forest populated with boulders the size of small houses.

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LAWMAKERS ASK GOVERNMENT TO SPEND MORE ON HOPS RESEARCH (Salem Statesman Journal) http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2016/12/01/lawmakers-ask-government-spend-more-hops-research/94737470/

More than 100 members of Congress are asking the federal government to increase its commitment to research related to growing hops, a key ingredient in beer.

The lawmakers say the brewing industry generated more than $250 billion in economic activity in 2014.

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SPRINGFIELD CITY COUNCIL TO SUBMIT URBAN GROWTH BOUNDARY EXPANSION TO STATE (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35050623-75/springfield-city-council-to-submit-urban-growth-boundary-expansion-to-state.html.csp

The City Council on Monday will vote to formally expand Springfield’s urban growth boundary by 257 acres, opening up new land to try to attract employers.

The council is expected to approve an expansion of the urban growth boundary at Monday night’s council meeting, capping discussions that started in 2009.

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BROWN HIGHLIGHTS TRADEOFFS — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard) http://registerguard.com/rg/opinion/35050439-78/brown-highlights-tradeoffs.html.csp

A governor’s budget is a starting point  the spending plan for 2017-19 approved by the Legislature about six months from now will differ in major respects from the one Gov. Kate Brown proposed late last week. That’s a good thing, because Brown’s budget contains disappointments that the Legislature should seek to avoid. The bad news is that Brown has made clear that the choices facing Oregon are not easy. More spending for one program will mean less for another.

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CONTROVERSIAL INCLUSIONARY HOUSING PROPOSAL HEADING TO CITY COUNCIL (Portland Tribune) http://portlandtribune.com/pt/9-news/334970-214836-controversial-inclusionary-housing-proposal-heading-to-city-council

The proposal, which became possible after the 2016 Oregon Legislature lifted the statewide ban on Inclusionary Housing, would require residential developers to include affordable units in multi-family projects with more than 20 units. It includes incentives intended to offset the revenue that would be lost by the lower-priced units.

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OREGON MEASURE CALLS FOR PROOF OF CITIZENSHIP TO VOTE (Bend Bulletin) http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/4868327-151/oregon-measure-pitches-citizenship-proof-despite-lack-of

-Voting rights groups say such laws suppress voting-

With concerns that are based on fear, rather than proof, that voter fraud exists in Oregon, a conservative duo is proposing a solution: put a clause in the state constitution that requires all voters to prove they’re U.S. citizens before they can vote.

Two Republicans have already filed a proposed constitutional amendment well ahead of the 2018 election that would require each of the state’s 2.5 million voters to register again within two years, this time proving to the state they are eligible U.S. citizens using approved government documents.

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OREGON WARNS ABOUT INTERNET-BASED TITLE LOAN COMPANIES (Oregon Public Broadcasting) http://www.opb.org/news/article/oregon-internet-title-loan-companies/

Title loans are a convenient way to borrow money.

But customers should make sure their lender is licensed.

Jake Sunderland, with the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, says there aren’t any online title lenders in Oregon.

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BROWN WILL NEED TO FOLLOW THROUGH ON TECH PROBLEMS — OPINION (Herald and News) http://www.heraldandnews.com/members/forum/editorials/brown-will-need-to-follow-through-on-tech-problems/article_cf2bdc36-294d-5a5f-8bdf-ece2c30b5a72.html

What’s with a state that’s home to large high-end high-tech firms and yet can’t seem to get things right when state government tries install major high-tech technology. Surely, help can’t be all that far away.

We’re talking, of course, about Oregon and our jumping off point is a finding from the Oregon Secretary of State’s audit division that the 13 state agencies it checked are too vulnerable to hacking. No surprise there, coming in a state where previous hardware-software issues have made it look like the gang that couldn’t shoot straight.

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NO – OBAMA LEGACY QUEST TO BE AT KLAMATH’S EXPENSE — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News) http://www.heraldandnews.com/members/forum/guest_commentary/no-obama-legacy-quest-to-be-at-klamath-s-expense/article_007eeb2b-2509-5b66-8f3e-ceb58b4d282e.html

Nearing the end of his two terms, it is apparent that Barrack Obama’s signature initiatives are failing.

His Affordable Care Act is an insolvent disaster. His energy policies are incoherent, ineffectual and ridiculously expensive.

A vast majority of the population appear to fear his confused and dangerous immigration programs. His economic strategies have resulted in the slowest economic recovery witnessed in more than half a century. Inflation-adjusted American household income is significantly less than when Obama took office in 2008.

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GOV. KATE BROWN NAMES KARL “RICK” MILLER TO OREGON INVESTMENT COUNCIL, COMPLETING HIS TRANSITION (Willamette Week) http://www.wweek.com/news/2016/12/05/gov-kate-brown-names-karl-rick-miller-to-oregon-investment-council-completing-his-transition/

-Former GOP donor is now a Democratic darling.-

Gov. Kate Brown has named Karl “Rick” Miller to the Oregon Investment Council, handing the Lake Oswego investor one of the most sought-after state appointments.

Brown’s decision to add Miller to the five-member panel marks his acceptance by the Democratic establishment.

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NEW SURVEY LOOKS AT RACE AND PROBLEMS AT VOTING POLLS (KEZI) http://www.kezi.com/news/video/New_Survey_Looks_at_Race_and_Problems_at_Voting_Polls.html

If you had to describe your voting experience, would it be more positive or negative? According to a new survey, how easy of a time you had voting may have come down to your race.

A recent survey by Democracy Fund, shows that more black and Hispanic voters expressed fear, intimidation, and other problems voting on Election Day.

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CITY CLUB OF EUGENE: WILL INCLUSIONARY ZONING HELP SOLVE EUGENE’S HOUSING AFFORDABILITY CRISIS? (KLCC) http://klcc.org/post/city-club-eugene-will-inclusionary-zoning-help-solve-eugenes-housing-affordability-crisis

Housing in Eugene is becoming less and less affordable, even for those who are employed. There is a shortage of reasonably priced housing units in Eugene. This mirrors an escalation in rental rates and cost of buying a home in many cities on the west coast. Portland is one of the cities leading the nation in this housing shortage. Several strategies have been suggested to address the issue. One of the most common is Inclusionary Zoning.

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TAXES, BUDGET UP FOR DISCUSSION AS BUSINESS LEADERS, POLITICIANS GATHER IN PORTLAND (KUOW) http://kuow.org/post/taxes-budget-discussion-business-leaders-politicians-gather-portland

Oregon business and political leaders are meeting in Portland Monday for an annual economic conference. The gathering is expected to focus heavily on tax and budget issues.

The Oregon Leadership Summit at the Oregon Convention Center is hosted by several key business groups and will feature speeches from Gov. Kate Brown and legislative leaders.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on December 05, 2016 OSL eClips

December 02, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Gov. Brown’s budget falls below higher education’s wish list, but omits drastic cuts
* Top takeaways from Gov. Kate Brown’s $20.8 billion budget proposal
* What’s the answer to toxic National Guard armories?
* Gov. Brown proposes cuts, new taxes to close $1.7 billion budget shortfall
* Where are the environmentalists now that Elliott State Forest is for sale? — Guest Opinion
* Facing deficit, Gov. Brown reveals budget with ‘painful cuts
* Governor calls for range of tax increases, plus some sharp spending curbs
* Governors plan to shut Junction City psychiatric hospital stuns employees, local residents
* UO considers buying into derivatives
* Will Oregon be in middle of health care debate? — Opinion
* Council approves Vision Zero Action Plan
* Brown’s 2017-19 budget ‘a short-term solution’
* Portland housing increasingly unaffordable; new policies, plans could pay dividends
* More public school students in the state than ever, and other surprising findings in Oregon’s report card
* Eastmoreland historic district boundaries focus of neighborhood meeting
* Portland’s tech scene in the top 30 for growth
* Deschutes sheriff investigated for alleged civil rights violation
* Gov. Brown proposes budget with series of cuts, tax and fee hikes
* Greg Walden picked to lead powerful House committee
* State may alter marijuana testing rules
* Commentary: Why the U.S. Education Department never dies — Guest Opinion
* Oregon Says Its Plan Could End HIV Infections By 2021
* Unemployment Rate Drops To 4.6 Percent, Lowest Level Since 2007
* University Leaders, Gov. Brown Dissatisfied With Higher Ed Budget
* Portland Adopts Plan To End Traffic Fatalities But Doesn’t Fund It
* Elliott State Forest
* Funding Measure 98 & Gov. Brown’s Budget – Think Out Loud
* U.S. farm income continues to shrink
* Wheat growers oppose dam breaching during public scoping meeting
* Our dams support us; its time to support them — Guest Opinion
* Brown proposes cuts, tax hikes in 2017-19 budget
* Our View: Governor’s budget avoids the big issues — Opinion
* Governors budget would close youth prison in Warrenton
* Budgeting by initiative? Bad idea — Opinion
* Survey Says? Portland Is Losing Its Luster

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GOV. BROWN’S BUDGET FALLS BELOW HIGHER EDUCATION’S WISH LIST, BUT OMITS DRASTIC CUTS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon higher education leaders greeted Gov. Kate Brown’s proposed spending plan Thursday like a dental patient anticipating a root canal, only to discover they’d just need a crown.

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TOP TAKEAWAYS FROM GOV. KATE BROWN’S $20.8 BILLION BUDGET PROPOSAL (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown released her proposed 2017-19 budget on Thursday.

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WHAT’S THE ANSWER TO TOXIC NATIONAL GUARD ARMORIES? (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregonian/OregonLive interviewed public health officials.

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GOV. BROWN PROPOSES CUTS, NEW TAXES TO CLOSE $1.7 BILLION BUDGET SHORTFALL (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown on Thursday made the first move in a looming, months-long chess game over Oregon’s finances, putting forth a mix of new revenues and “unacceptable” cuts to close a $1.7 billion budget gap normally seen in the throes of a recession.

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WHERE ARE THE ENVIRONMENTALISTS NOW THAT ELLIOTT STATE FOREST IS FOR SALE? — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Be careful what you wish for because you might just get it.

For decades, the Elliott State Forest has quietly churned out millions of dollars for the Oregon school system. The revenue was generated from the sale of carefully planned timber sales crafted by the Oregon Department of Forestry. All went well until zealots filed lawsuits and protesters blocked roads to halt timber harvesting on the Elliott. Their radical strategy brought timber sales to a virtual halt on some 82,500 acres of prime, tree-growing lands.

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FACING DEFICIT, GOV. BROWN REVEALS BUDGET WITH ‘PAINFUL CUTS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown released a recommended budget Thursday which includes program expansions mixed with “painful cuts,” she said.

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GOVERNOR CALLS FOR RANGE OF TAX INCREASES, PLUS SOME SHARP SPENDING CURBS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Gov. Kate Brown released her 2017-19 spending plan on Thursday, proposing a mix of spending curbs and tax increases  including higher taxes on cigarettes, cigars and liquor, and on hospitals  to fill a projected $1.7 billion gap between expenses and revenues.

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GOVERNORS PLAN TO SHUT JUNCTION CITY PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL STUNS EMPLOYEES, LOCAL RESIDENTS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Junction City’s 18-month-old, $130 million psychiatric hospital unexpectedly found itself on the states chopping block Thursday.

Gov. Kate Brown, seeking to plug a big healthcare budget hole, proposed to permanently close the hospital in mid-2018. The move would save the state an estimated $34.5 million a year.

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UO CONSIDERS BUYING INTO DERIVATIVES (Eugene Register-Guard)

Now that Oregon voters approved giving public universities the authority to invest public funds in the stock market by passing Measure 95 in the November election, the University of Oregon wants to buy into a particular sort, known as derivatives.

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WILL OREGON BE IN MIDDLE OF HEALTH CARE DEBATE? — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Does the Oregon Health Plan have a price on its head? If the incoming administrations pick for Secretary of Health and Human Services is approved, the OHP may have the boot of Rep. Tom Price on its neck. The Georgia congressman has hated Obamacare since the beginning. He may come to Oregon looking for a refund of the $1.9 billion the feds granted the state in 2012.

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COUNCIL APPROVES VISION ZERO ACTION PLAN (Portland Tribune)

Plan includes 32 steps to eliminate fatal crashes and serious injury crashes by 2025 _________________________________________

BROWN’S 2017-19 BUDGET ‘A SHORT-TERM SOLUTION’ (Portland Tribune) \

Governor says her plan should be seen as a starting point for ‘broader conversation’ about resources and shared values.

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PORTLAND HOUSING INCREASINGLY UNAFFORDABLE; NEW POLICIES, PLANS COULD PAY DIVIDENDS (Portland Tribune)

Housing Commissioner Dan Saltzman believes City Council efforts beginning to make a difference.

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MORE PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS IN THE STATE THAN EVER, AND OTHER SURPRISING FINDINGS IN OREGON’S REPORT CARD (Portland Tribune)

The stereotypical Oregon student is white, English-speaking, poor enough to qualify for free or reduced lunch prices, and taught with more than 24 classmates in a large district.

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EASTMORELAND HISTORIC DISTRICT BOUNDARIES FOCUS OF NEIGHBORHOOD MEETING (Portland Tribune)

Opposition group ‘Keep Eastmoreland Free’ is concerned because the neighborhood association ‘neglected to present it to our neighborhood.’

It’s official: The Eastmoreland Neighborhood Association and consulting firm AECOMA has submitted a draft nomination for the Eastmoreland Historic District to State Historic Preservation Office.

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PORTLAND’S TECH SCENE IN THE TOP 30 FOR GROWTH (Portland Tribune)

Portland’s high tech sector is in the top 30 for job growth.

Portland’s high-tech jobs grew 12.1 percent from 2013 to 2015, according to CBRE’s annual Tech-Thirty report.

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DESCHUTES SHERIFF INVESTIGATED FOR ALLEGED CIVIL RIGHTS VIOLATION (Bend Bulletin)

-Deputy alleges Sheriff Nelson discriminated against her based on gender-

Deschutes County Sheriff Shane Nelson is being investigated for alleged civil rights violations that include discriminating against a female deputy and touching her inappropriately as a way to demean and humiliate her, according to the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries.

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GOV. BROWN PROPOSES BUDGET WITH SERIES OF CUTS, TAX AND FEE HIKES (Bend Bulletin)

-Bridging a $1.8 Billion Gap-

Gov. Kate Brown today released her proposed budget that bridges a $1.8 billion budget deficit through a series of tax hikes and by asking lawmakers to give state agencies about $1 billion less than what they say they need to meet rising costs.

Still, the proposal would lead to state spending that at $20.6 billion would be about 9 percent above what lawmakers agreed to spend in the current, two-year budget that ends July 1, 2017.

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GREG WALDEN PICKED TO LEAD POWERFUL HOUSE COMMITTEE (Bend Bulletin)

-Committee oversees policies on healthcare, energy, among others-

A good year for U.S. Rep. Greg Walden got better Thursday as Republican colleagues chose him over two other lawmakers vying to chair the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee.

At a time when Republicans control the House, Senate and White House and are looking to dismantle President Obama’s signature health care law, Walden’s appointment would give him the reins controlling the Houses approach to that as well as other efforts.

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STATE MAY ALTER MARIJUANA TESTING RULES (Bend Bulletin)

-Businesses report delays, higher costs-

The Oregon Health Authority may announce changes today to the regulations on pesticide testing to address widespread discontent within the legal marijuana business community.

Thursday, spokesman Jonathan Modie said he did not know specifically what the changes would address.

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COMMENTARY: WHY THE U.S. EDUCATION DEPARTMENT NEVER DIES — GUEST OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Ever since President Jimmy Carter created the U.S. Department of Education in 1979, conservatives have been trying to abolish it. Rick Perry, the Texas governor who in a 2011 presidential debate couldn’t remember all the U.S. agencies he wanted to shutter, had total recall over one  the Education Department.

Will conservatives finally get the job done?

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OREGON SAYS ITS PLAN COULD END HIV INFECTIONS BY 2021 (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregonians have a 1 in 200 chance of being diagnosed with HIV, according to the CDC.

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UNEMPLOYMENT RATE DROPS TO 4.6 PERCENT, LOWEST LEVEL SINCE 2007 (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Unemployment dropped by 0.3 percentage points, to 4.6 percent, last month  the lowest rate since 2007  according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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UNIVERSITY LEADERS, GOV. BROWN DISSATISFIED WITH HIGHER ED BUDGET (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

College students have made a habit of rallying in Salem to get more state funding, and 2015 brought some improvements.

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PORTLAND ADOPTS PLAN TO END TRAFFIC FATALITIES BUT DOESN’T FUND IT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Portland City Council adopted a new action plan for street safety Thursday.

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ELLIOTT STATE FOREST (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

News Roundtable, Elliott State Forest, Solitary Confinement in Oregon _________________________________________

FUNDING MEASURE 98 & GOV. BROWN’S BUDGET – THINK OUT LOUD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Sen. Sara Gelser and Stand for Children Oregon executive director Toya Fick talk about the future of Measure 98, which would pay for career and technical education in Oregon high schools, but may not receive funding.

Chris Lehman, OPB political reporter based in Salem, gives you the skinny about Gov. Kate Browns new proposed budget.

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U.S. FARM INCOME CONTINUES TO SHRINK (Capital Press)

This years net income for U.S. farms is expected to be down 17.2 percent compared to 2015, driven by a sizable decline in cash receipts for livestock and animal products.

Its shaping up to be the third straight year of decline in the value of the ag sector, said USDA economist James Williamson during a webinar on the latest farm financial forecast on Wednesday.

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WHEAT GROWERS OPPOSE DAM BREACHING DURING PUBLIC SCOPING MEETING (Capital Press)

Breaching four dams on the lower Snake River would cause significant harm to the Pacific Northwest agricultural industry, Idaho wheat industry leaders said Nov. 29 during a public meeting.

The meeting is one of 15 being held around the region by federal agencies to get input on the operation of the hydropower dams on the Columbia-Snake River system, a process initiated by a federal judge handling a lawsuit brought by dam removal supporters.

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OUR DAMS SUPPORT US; ITS TIME TO SUPPORT THEM — GUEST OPINION (Capital Press)

Following Judge Michael Simon’s recent decision to require a full review of the Columbia and Snake River systems, there has been a movement to re-evaluate what our dams mean to Eastern Washington.

Here in our region, the four lower Snake River dams provide renewable, reliable, affordable energy and act as a superhighway for barges to transport goods. As a community, we need to let our federal partners know that we want to continue to invest in and improve our dams.

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BROWN PROPOSES CUTS, TAX HIKES IN 2017-19 BUDGET (East Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown Thursday proposed a 2017-19 budget that cuts spending across most areas in state government, while keeping whole K-12 education and programs assisting low-income students with college tuition.

The $20.8 billion budget plan uses a potpourri of cuts and tax increases to fill in a $1.7 billion state revenue hole, caused largely by increases in negotiated salaries and benefits and a loss of federal funding for subsidizing health insurance for low-income residents.

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OUR VIEW: GOVERNOR’S BUDGET AVOIDS THE BIG ISSUES — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Gov. Kate Brown says her budget proposal, released Thursday, contains cuts she finds “absolutely unacceptable.” She also calls her plan “a short-term solution, nothing more.” Unfortunately, that’s been this state’s approach for far too long: patch the leaks, tax the usual victims just enough to limp through another biennium, but never address the underlying problems.

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GOVERNORS BUDGET WOULD CLOSE YOUTH PRISON IN WARRENTON (Daily Astorian)

The North Coast Youth Correctional Facility is on the chopping block.

Gov. Kate Brown’s proposed two-year budget would close the youth prison by next fall to help the state reduce a $1.7 billion shortfall.

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BUDGETING BY INITIATIVE? BAD IDEA — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Gov. Kate Brown released her proposed budget for 2017-19 on Thursday. The budget, which is just the first word in a discussion that will last until the end of next year’s legislative session, calls for a variety of program cuts and additional taxes to help cover what’s now estimated as a state budget shortfall of $1.7 billion.

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SURVEY SAYS? PORTLAND IS LOSING ITS LUSTER (Willamette Week)

-A new poll from the auditor’s office shows fewer respondents consider Portland livable.-

Think things are tough in Portland? You’re not alone.

Only 63 percent of residents think Portland is a livable city in 2016compared with 79 percent of residents in 2006.

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State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

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newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on December 02, 2016 OSL eClips

December 01, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Oregon outshines most states at reporting to parents on school performance
* Oregon’s poaching problem stretches far and wide
* Gov. Brown leaves landowners out of commission appointment — Guest Opinion
* Marijuana industry brought to a standstill by new pesticide testing regulations
* Is my Oregon disabled parking permit valid in other states?
* Oregon’s cyber security shortfalls leave state data vulnerable to hackers
* ‘Urgent’ need for Medicaid waiver before Trump takes over, says Governor’s office
* Report argues new Oregon testing rules are straining pot supply
* More expenses for the superfund cleanup plan
* Agencies still face IT security vulnerabilities
* Marijuana testing poses regulatory quandaries for ODA
* LOFD Chief Goff joins team battling N.C. wildfire
* Former Oregon lawmaker, attorney general Hardy Myers passes away
* Helpline aids in pediatric psychiatry doctor shortage
* Hospital smoking bans yield fewer fires
* Bend-La Pine’s 2016 grad plans
* With legal pot, warehouses cash in on rent
* Editorial: No time to play chicken — Opinion
* Editorial: OSU-Cascades brings dividends — Opinion
* Panhandling Laws & Transportation Funding
* Portlanders Ratings Of City Livability Fall To New Low
* Oregon State Government Has Significant Lapses In Cybersecurity
* Since The Election, Dozens Of Hate Incidents Reported In The Northwest
* Farmers warned against more attacks on crop insurance
* New fund helps removal of small dams
* Food producers looking to go big have to deal with institutional hurdles
* Hunting and fishing licenses available online again in Idaho
* Marijuana testing poses regulatory quandaries
* Rural interests plan to fight new BLM planning regs
* Since You Asked: State board increased speed on McAndrews
* Our View: Housing crisis hits students especially hard — Opinion
* Rick Holmes: How Big Pharma profits from the pain caused by painkillers — Guest Opinion
* ‘Not ambitious enough’ Tule Lake plan draws comments
* Rural broadband expansion suffers setbacks
* Mills Elementary School awarded federal funding
* Timber suit could bring county millions, but increase harvest
* A pivotal time to serve on parks commission — Opinion
* Mid-Valley InBusiness: The growing crowd of at-home businesses
* Reshaping rural economy won’t be easy — Opinion
* Reversing the Oregon Trail: A Beer Expedition– Blog
* Oregon Health Authority Salaries Show Sharp Rise Under Saxton
* Oregons CCOs: A Deep Look at Patients Take on AllCare

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OREGON OUTSHINES MOST STATES AT REPORTING TO PARENTS ON SCHOOL PERFORMANCE (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon does a better job than most states of communicating clear and thorough information about public schools’ performance to parents and the public, a new study finds.

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OREGON’S POACHING PROBLEM STRETCHES FAR AND WIDE (Portland Oregonian)

In mid-November, state police troopers were called after a pair of bull elk was shot and killed one night in rural Union County.

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GOV. BROWN LEAVES LANDOWNERS OUT OF COMMISSION APPOINTMENT — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Jim Bittle, a recent appointee to the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission, is clearly a valid and bona-fide stakeholder in Oregon wildlife management.

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MARIJUANA INDUSTRY BROUGHT TO A STANDSTILL BY NEW PESTICIDE TESTING REGULATIONS (Portland Oregonian)

Once packed with marijuana concentrates and extracts, the Human Collective’s shelves are nearly empty.

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IS MY OREGON DISABLED PARKING PERMIT VALID IN OTHER STATES? (Portland Oregonian)

Through the magic of reciprocity, that same parking permit is valid not only in all other states but even in some other countries.

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OREGON’S CYBER SECURITY SHORTFALLS LEAVE STATE DATA VULNERABLE TO HACKERS (Portland Oregonian)

Cyber security weaknesses at state agencies are putting Oregonians’ sensitive data at risk, according to a new audit released on Wednesday.

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URGENT’ NEED FOR MEDICAID WAIVER BEFORE TRUMP TAKES OVER, SAYS GOVERNOR’S OFFICE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Obtaining $1.25 billion waiver would ease state budget deficit, though nearing deadline and Trump Administration leaves uncertainties.

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REPORT ARGUES NEW OREGON TESTING RULES ARE STRAINING POT SUPPLY (Salem Statesman Journal)

New marijuana testing regulations may be hurting the profitability of Oregon’s young pot industry, with some marijuana businesses considering closing their doors because of strained supplies, according to a new report.

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MORE EXPENSES FOR THE SUPERFUND CLEANUP PLAN (Portland Tribune)

The cleanup plan under consideration for the Portland Harbor Superfund site is not the only potential cost for restoring the Willamette River.

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AGENCIES STILL FACE IT SECURITY VULNERABILITIES (Portland Tribune)

-The audit also found weaknesses in security awareness training and network security-

Longstanding information technology security weaknesses continue at several state government agencies, according to a state audit released Wednesday.

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MARIJUANA TESTING POSES REGULATORY QUANDARIES FOR ODA (Portland Tribune)

The Oregon Department of Agriculture has also been heavily involved in regulations _________________________________________

LOFD CHIEF GOFF JOINS TEAM BATTLING N.C. WILDFIRE (Portland Tribune)

-Oregon Department of Forestry joins dozens of agencies to help fight wildfires in the drought-stricken area –

Firefighters need to be ready to drop everything at a moments notice and rush to the site of a fire  and sometimes that can mean traveling all the way across the country.

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FORMER OREGON LAWMAKER, ATTORNEY GENERAL HARDY MYERS PASSES AWAY (Portland Tribune)

A lawyer who became a politician in the state Legislature in his 30s, Myers was then elected state attorney general three times. He’ll be remembered for the settlement with big tobacco, which is still yielding the state millions of dollars in annual payments.

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HELPLINE AIDS IN PEDIATRIC PSYCHIATRY DOCTOR SHORTAGE (Bend Bulletin)

-OHSU specialists offer rural providers free consultations-

Its not uncommon for physician assistant Sharon DeHart to get a child in her office who appears to have symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder  not focusing at school, behavioral issues at home, lack of friends  but she isnt sure about the diagnosis.

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HOSPITAL SMOKING BANS YIELD FEWER FIRES (Bend Bulletin)

-Number of fires from cigarettes and lighters drops-

Over the past two decades, U.S. hospitals have been moving steadily toward establishing smoke-free campuses in a bid to promote healthier lifestyles among their patients and their staff. But the movement has had a secondary benefit  a reduction in the number of hospital fires.

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BEND-LA PINE’S 2016 GRAD PLANS (Bend Bulletin)

-Great majority of 2016 graduates planned to attend post-secondary school-

More than 70 percent of students from Bend-La Pines class of 2016 reported they planned to attend college or a trade school.

Of the more than 1,100 seniors in the school districts 2016 graduating class, more than 800 planned to continue their education after high school, according to data the school district recently released. While a majority decided on a school in Oregon, many others went to schools across the nation and abroad.

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WITH LEGAL POT, WAREHOUSES CASH IN ON RENT (Bend Bulletin)

It took Chris Abbott six stressful months to find a new space for his growing company. The 10,000-square-foot warehouse on the outskirts of Portland was once used to store industrial-strength compressors. Now the gritty space, its cinder walls repainted white, resembles a cross between a high-end laboratory and an industrial bakery. Its the home of Botanica, Abbotts edible marijuana company.

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EDITORIAL: NO TIME TO PLAY CHICKEN — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon lawmakers will head to Salem early next year with a major problem before them. The states financial needs for 2017-19 are expected to exceed its revenue by at least $1.4 billion. They’ll have to make cuts, raise taxes or some combination of both to balance the budget, as the state constitution requires.

It likely wont be easy.

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EDITORIAL: OSU-CASCADES BRINGS DIVIDENDS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The new OSU-Cascades campus has brought a dose of parking dysfunction, but thats minor compared with the continuing dividends the campus will bring to Central Oregon.

Consider, for instance, what it is doing for the emergency room at St. Charles in Bend.

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PANHANDLING LAWS & TRANSPORTATION FUNDING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

We speak to Albany Mayor Sharon Konopa and Oregon ACLU attorney Kelly Simon about a new ordinance passed by Albany city council that makes it illegal to hand money from a car to someone panhandling on the side of the road.

Legislators were unable to agree on a transportation funding package in 2015. Will they be able to work something out in the next session? Republican representative Cliff Bentz and Democrat Caddy McKeown join us to discuss what Oregon’s transportation needs are, and how they will be funded.

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PORTLANDERS RATINGS OF CITY LIVABILITY FALL TO NEW LOW (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Portland residents are giving the city the lowest livability ratings on record, according to a City Auditors report released Wednesday.

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OREGON STATE GOVERNMENT HAS SIGNIFICANT LAPSES IN CYBERSECURITY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

An audit released Wednesday shows significant cyber security lapses in Oregon government agencies.

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SINCE THE ELECTION, DOZENS OF HATE INCIDENTS REPORTED IN THE NORTHWEST (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Southern Poverty Law Center says it has documented 867 post-election hate incidents  including 33 in Oregon and 48 in Washington.

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FARMERS WARNED AGAINST MORE ATTACKS ON CROP INSURANCE (Capital Press)

Agriculture is gearing up to fend off continued attacks on crop insurance in Congress as negotiations over a new farm bill begin.

I don’t think there’s any doubt that crop insurance is going to have a target on its back, said Tara Smith, vice president of federal affairs for the Crop Insurance and Reinsurance Bureau, which is a liaison between member companies and regulatory agencies.

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NEW FUND HELPS REMOVAL OF SMALL DAMS (Capital Press)

Small dam removal projects in Oregon, Washington and California are receiving money from a new fund set up by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation for dam removal and river restoration in the West.

The foundation, based in Menlo Park, Calif., marked its 50th anniversary on Nov. 29 by announcing a $50 million grant to the Resources Legacy Fund to establish the new Open Rivers Fund.

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FOOD PRODUCERS LOOKING TO GO BIG HAVE TO DEAL WITH INSTITUTIONAL HURDLES (Capital Press)

Truitt Family Foods, a Salem, Ore., processing company, recently spread the word it is looking for subcontractors who can provide ingredients it uses to make hummus and vegetable dips.

On the surface its a fairly routine development; a processor looking for suppliers of garbanzo bean puree, sesame seed paste, lime and lemon juice concentrate, garlic powder and puree, and sugar and salt.

But the back story takes off on a number of tracks.

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HUNTING AND FISHING LICENSES AVAILABLE ONLINE AGAIN IN IDAHO (Capital Press)

Idaho officials say online sales of hunting and fishing licenses are up and running again following a three-month shutdown due to a computer breach at the vendor that handles those sales.

Idaho Fish and Game announced Tuesday that more security features have been added that will require additional steps by those seeking to make purchases online.
OSL Ed. Note:  Story refers to Oregon breach.  Oregon uses same vendor.

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MARIJUANA TESTING POSES REGULATORY QUANDARIES (Capital Press)

Marijuana testing is creating several quandaries for Oregon regulators at a time of overall uncertainty for the newly legalized crop, according to a state official.

Testing for pesticides poses one challenge, as the necessary instrumentation is expensive and complicated, said Jeff Rhoades, senior adviser on marijuana policy for Gov. Kate Brown.

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RURAL INTERESTS PLAN TO FIGHT NEW BLM PLANNING REGS (Capital Press)

A national livestock industry leader warns proposed changes to the Bureau of Land Management planning process are on the fast track for implementation and threaten public lands grazing.

Ethan Lane, executive director of the Public Lands Council, which represents cattle and sheep ranchers with public lands grazing permits, said senior BLM officials have assured him a final version of the agency’s proposed Planning 2.0 will be released before the current administration leaves office.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: STATE BOARD INCREASED SPEED ON MCANDREWS (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: Why was the speed increased to 40 mph going up McAndrews Road to Hillcrest Road?…

A: Joyce, the speed on McAndrews Road was increased to from 35 to 40 mph in the last year after several citizens submitted requests for the city to evaluate it.

However, the states Speed Control Board, and not city officials, sets the speed limit.

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OUR VIEW: HOUSING CRISIS HITS STUDENTS ESPECIALLY HARD — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

It may sound far-fetched that 1,364 students in the Medford School District are homeless, but it is reality. And the number of homeless students is growing. Thanks to the efforts of the Maslow Project, those students are getting help with basic necessities and with schoolwork, but the need for affordable housing continues.

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RICK HOLMES: HOW BIG PHARMA PROFITS FROM THE PAIN CAUSED BY PAINKILLERS — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

You knew addiction had gone fully mainstream when TV ads suddenly appeared offering remedies for an affliction most people had never heard of: Opioid Induced Constipation.

It turns out that along with such dire side effects as abuse, addiction, overdose and death, opioids can leave you really backed up.

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‘NOT AMBITIOUS ENOUGH’ TULE LAKE PLAN DRAWS COMMENTS (Herald and News)

-About $12 million could be spent on upgrades-

Support for developing a Tule Lake National Historic Site was expressed during Monday and Tuesday night hearings on the sites proposed general management plan in Tulelake and Klamath Falls.

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RURAL BROADBAND EXPANSION SUFFERS SETBACKS (Herald and News)

Lake County found itself in the dark once again Monday night, void of internet service following complications with a fiber optic line maintained by Centurylink. The outage continued into Tuesday afternoon, leaving many clientele without service in the latest of what has been months of repeated outages and delays on a planned path for vast broadband upgrades in rural southern Oregon.

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MILLS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AWARDED FEDERAL FUNDING (Herald and News)

-Money to go to school improvement-

Mills Elementary School was awarded a federal grant of $879,000 for school improvement, Monday.

For the past three years, Mills has been an identified high poverty focus school due to its low achievement rates in comparison with statewide test scores, Principal Fred Bartels said.

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TIMBER SUIT COULD BRING COUNTY MILLIONS, BUT INCREASE HARVEST (Daily Astorian)

On Monday, Clatsop County received something it has been expecting for weeks: formal notice of a $1.4 billion class action lawsuit that includes 15 counties and dozens of local taxing districts.

By late January, the Board of Commissioners will need to decide whether or not to remain involved in a legal clash that could bring millions of dollars to the county  or could, as some fear, dangerously increase harvest on county forestland and hand over control of these lands to the private timber industry.

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A PIVOTAL TIME TO SERVE ON PARKS COMMISSION — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Last weeks visit by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission to some of Cannon Beach’s many attractions was a valuable reminder for commissioners and residents alike of the North Coasts attractions and the need to protect them in light of 21st century challenges.

The accessibility of Clatsop beaches and other assets was a motif of the meeting.

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MID-VALLEY INBUSINESS: THE GROWING CROWD OF AT-HOME BUSINESSES (Albany Democrat Herald)

Katie Lantz-Phillips owns Potion Bath, which makes soaps and lotions, so she sometimes has about 10 artisan soap bars at her testing laboratory.

And that lab, much to her husbands chagrin, doubles as her home shower. Lantz-Phillips creates her bath products at her house north of Corvallis, then sells them online or at bazaars to help support her family.

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RESHAPING RURAL ECONOMY WON’T BE EASY — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Dozens of people assembled last month in Lebanon for the unveiling of a long-term economic development plan for Linn County, and you couldn’t have blamed any of the participants for coming away with this conclusion:

This business of reworking an economy is hard.

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REVERSING THE OREGON TRAIL: A BEER EXPEDITION— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

The beer industry is transforming before our eyes. Start-ups are booming and driving growth, particularly here in Oregon. However, craft beer overall is slowing and macros are declining outright. What does the outlook hold for Oregon breweries and what growth opportunities remain?

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OREGON HEALTH AUTHORITY SALARIES SHOW SHARP RISE UNDER SAXTON (The Lund Report)

The state agency has hired 862 more employees since 2013 and increased salaries on upper management by 18 percent, helping to drive a 29 percent overall increase in payroll.

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OREGONS CCOS: A DEEP LOOK AT PATIENTS TAKE ON ALLCARE (The Lund Report)

Please contact the State Library of access to this premium story from the Lund Report.  library.help@state.or.us , 503-378-8800

Patients of Grants Pass-based AllCare Health, one of Oregons 16 Medicaid-funded coordinated care organizations, are demographically different: they are more likely to be men, less likely to hold a post-graduate degree, and whiter than CCO members as a whole, across the stat.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on December 01, 2016 OSL eClips

November 30, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Former Attorney General Hardy Myers dies at age 77
* Oregon’s public universities see big increases in Hispanic, multi-racial student enrollment
* Hot Button responses: Readers on whether to sell the Elliott State Forest — Guest Opinion
* Ensuring healthy bodies, healthy minds for Oregon students — Guest Opinion
* Oregon agrees to stop using juvenile detention as temporary housing for foster kids
* Sport groups ask Oregon governor to stop changes in Columbia River net plan
* Tax hikes proposed to fund Oregon fish and wildlife
* DHS settles class action suit over foster care housing
* Forest Service sets fire to Black Butte ground house
* Aerial pesticide use well regulated in Oregon — Guest Opinion
* Portland not growing all that fast
* Heritage Elementary School has the highest number of unvaccinated students in the county
* Bend to tweak rules for planning large developments
* Economic study on horizon for outdoor recreation industry
* Central Oregon groups work to prevent homelessness
* Editorial: M98 rules need flexibility — Opinion
* Hot Hot Hot Seattle, Portland Home Prices Rising Fastest In Nation
* Oregon To Stop Housing Foster Kids In Offices, Hotels, Hospitals, Detention Centers
* Expanded Cascade-Siskiyou Monument Could Help Tourism, Hurt Loggers
* Despite Execution Moratorium, Oregon Gives Another Inmate The Death Penalty
* Cascade-Siskiyou Monument Expansion
* Ag industry gears up for 14-week river closure
* Schools of hard knocks: County’s homeless student rate rises
* Search for lead pipes nearing the end in Medford
* Commissioners reject proposal to fight monument expansion
* Juvenile offenders face new restorative justice program
* Sunset Bay, Shore Acres open after extensive flooding
* Lots of work still needed on ethics reform — Guest Opinion
* Editorial: Budget will show need to end shortsightedness — Opinion
* State and local GMO bans declared legal
* State weighs new area liquor stores
* Federal government to study a cornerstone of Oregon’s economy
* Portland’s Diego Hernandez Has Stood With Standing Rock, and Says the “Water Protectors” Aren’t Going Anywhere
* New Report on Post-Election Hate Incidents Shows Oregon at Top of List

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FORMER ATTORNEY GENERAL HARDY MYERS DIES AT AGE 77 (Portland Oregonian)

Former Oregon Attorney General Hardy Myers, who worked in state politics for more than three decades, died Tuesday night, his son said. He was 77.

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OREGON’S PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES SEE BIG INCREASES IN HISPANIC, MULTI-RACIAL STUDENT ENROLLMENT (Portland Oregonian)

The number of Latino and multi-racial students at Oregon’s public universities is more than double what it was seven years ago, according to an analysis of enrollment records by The Oregonian/OregonLive.

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HOT BUTTON RESPONSES: READERS ON WHETHER TO SELL THE ELLIOTT STATE FOREST — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

On Sunday, we asked another Hot Button question: Should the state keep or sell the Elliott State Forest?

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ENSURING HEALTHY BODIES, HEALTHY MINDS FOR OREGON STUDENTS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Regular physical activity is good for our kids. Too many of our children aren’t getting enough exercise. We have to get our kids moving.

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OREGON AGREES TO STOP USING JUVENILE DETENTION AS TEMPORARY HOUSING FOR FOSTER KIDS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon has stopped housing foster children in juvenile detention facilities and hospitals and will limit placements in hotels, under an interim settlement agreement with children’s advocates released on Tuesday.

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SPORT GROUPS ASK OREGON GOVERNOR TO STOP CHANGES IN COLUMBIA RIVER NET PLAN (Portland Oregonian)

Four powerful sportfishing groups have asked Oregon Gov. Kate Brown to keep the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission from significantly altering a plan to move gill-nets from the lower Columbia River in 2017.

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TAX HIKES PROPOSED TO FUND OREGON FISH AND WILDLIFE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Could drinking beer help fund Oregon’s fish and wildlife programs?

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DHS SETTLES CLASS ACTION SUIT OVER FOSTER CARE HOUSING (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Department of Human Services has agreed not to house foster children in hotels or its offices unless it is an emergency, according to a settlement reached between the agency and lawyers representing foster children.

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FOREST SERVICE SETS FIRE TO BLACK BUTTE GROUND HOUSE (Salem Statesman Journal)

The U.S. Forest Service set fire to the Black Butte Lookout ground house on Tuesday, Nov. 29, eliminating a non-historic structure that often showed up in pictures of the popular hiking destination near Sisters.

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AERIAL PESTICIDE USE WELL REGULATED IN OREGON — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Respectfully, it is disappointing to see Shawn Donnille spreading fear about pesticides on the opinion pages of The Register-Guard once again guest viewpoint, Nov. 21. Donnille is entitled to his opinion, but he should know the facts. Oregons regulation of and restrictions on the use of pesticides across the state are founded on scientific data and research, public health protection and practical application.

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PORTLAND NOT GROWING ALL THAT FAST (Portland Tribune)

The Portland metropolitan region grew by less than 1 percent last year, according to a study by the ABODO residential research organization.

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HERITAGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL HAS THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF UNVACCINATED STUDENTS IN THE COUNTY (Portland Tribune)

-Eighteen percent of student body has nonmedical exemptions, Oregon Health Authority data show-

Heritage Elementary School students have more nonmedical exemptions for vaccination requirements than any other school in Marion County, data from the Oregon Health Authority show.

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BEND TO TWEAK RULES FOR PLANNING LARGE DEVELOPMENTS (Bend Bulletin)

-Big parcels currently in the county would go through the new process-

If no one appeals the city of Bends recently approved plan to expand its boundaries within the next week, some Deschutes County property owners can start submitting proposals to develop their properties.

But the process for planning large developments could change because the city is looking to clarify planning rules for residential, industrial and commercial developments. This comes after the state recently approved the city’s plan to take over 2,380 acres of land in the county, as well as set rules for what can be built in areas that are currently rural.

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ECONOMIC STUDY ON HORIZON FOR OUTDOOR RECREATION INDUSTRY (Bend Bulletin)

-Central Oregon is home to nearly 100 outdoor-products companies-

The U.S. Congress this week passed bipartisan legislation meant to garner more data on the economic impact of outdoor recreation across the country.

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., co-sponsored the legislation that passed the Senate on Monday. A version of it passed the House of Representatives earlier this month. It now awaits the presidents signature. The outdoor industry expects President Barack Obama to sign it into law before the end of the year.

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CENTRAL OREGON GROUPS WORK TO PREVENT HOMELESSNESS (Bend Bulletin)

-Rent and utility assistance allow people to keep their homes-

As local nonprofits and other organizations work on the complicated task of finding housing for Central Oregon’s homeless population, others have undertaken a more straightforward assignment  preventing people from losing their homes in the first place.

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EDITORIAL: M98 RULES NEED FLEXIBILITY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregonians were definitive in their approval of Measure 98, voting by a 65 percent to 34 percent margin for an initiative that backers promised would improve the states dismal graduation rate.

Now its time for the Legislature and Department of Education to adjust and interpret and regulate.

The measure was not a constitutional change, so lawmakers and rule-makers have lots of leeway. And, indeed, the measures language raises issues that wont be easy to resolve.

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HOT HOT HOT SEATTLE, PORTLAND HOME PRICES RISING FASTEST IN NATION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Home prices in the Seattle and Portland metro areas are rising faster than anywhere else in the country right now  about twice as fast as the national average.

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OREGON TO STOP HOUSING FOSTER KIDS IN OFFICES, HOTELS, HOSPITALS, DETENTION CENTERS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

This summer, some of Oregon’s foster children were being temporarily housed in state offices and hotels for days  and sometimes weeks.

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EXPANDED CASCADE-SISKIYOU MONUMENT COULD HELP TOURISM, HURT LOGGERS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Conservation groups are lobbying President Obama during his final weeks in the White House to expand the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southern Oregon.

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DESPITE EXECUTION MORATORIUM, OREGON GIVES ANOTHER INMATE THE DEATH PENALTY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon has a new death row inmate, bringing the total to 35.

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CASCADE-SISKIYOU MONUMENT EXPANSION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Ashland City Councilor Pam Marsh and Klamath County Commissioner Tom Mallams share their perspective on a controversial proposal to expand the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Southern Oregon.

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AG INDUSTRY GEARS UP FOR 14-WEEK RIVER CLOSURE (Capital Press)

Ag industry representatives say they’re as ready as possible for an upcoming 14-week closure of the Columbia/Snake river system that carries their goods overseas.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is closing the river from Dec. 12 through March 20. The extended closure allows the corps to make repairs at six dams on the river system, including navlock controls at Bonneville Lock and Dam and new operating machinery for the downstream gate at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam. Information from the corps includes repairs costing at least $33 million.

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SCHOOLS OF HARD KNOCKS: COUNTY’S HOMELESS STUDENT RATE RISES (Medford Mail Tribune)

The number of homeless students is at an all-time high across the state, with Jackson County ranking second with 2,452 students, according to data released by the Oregon Department of Education.

The homeless rates in the Medford, Phoenix-Talent, Eagle Point, Rogue River and Butte Falls school districts have increased since 2014-15. And Butte Falls currently has the highest percentage  35.62  of homeless students in the state.

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SEARCH FOR LEAD PIPES NEARING THE END IN MEDFORD (Medford Mail Tribune)

A six-month search that has so far uncovered 24 lead pipes in Medford’s water system is almost complete and should be finished by the end of the year.

“We are nearing the end of this investigation,” said Eric Johnson, interim manager of the Medford Water Commission.

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COMMISSIONERS REJECT PROPOSAL TO FIGHT MONUMENT EXPANSION (Herald and News)

Klamath County has opted out of a proposal by a Kansas consulting firm to fight expansion of the Cascades-Siskiyou National Monument, saying the proposal would likely be unsuccessful at this time.

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JUVENILE OFFENDERS FACE NEW RESTORATIVE JUSTICE PROGRAM (The World)

-North Bend Police Department hold high expectations-

The North Bend Police Department has adopted a new program to help juvenile offenders, one that also gives power back to the victims.

Chief Robert Kappelman first heard of restorative justice when he was still working for his old department in Wisconsin, where troubled youth had no place to go. The juvenile detention center had closed, so his department was forced to find an alternative method, and rightly so, because locking kids up is not the best way to change future behavior and we know that, Kappelman said.

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SUNSET BAY, SHORE ACRES OPEN AFTER EXTENSIVE FLOODING (The World)

Two Cape Arago Highway State Parks are reopened after park rangers evacuated them due to flooding last week.

Shore Acres State Park was back in business Saturday, after its popular holiday lights display was cancelled the prior evening. Visitors reveling at the large waves crashing against the rocky cliffs at the park were evacuated Friday afternoon due to concerns of high tide flooding.

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LOTS OF WORK STILL NEEDED ON ETHICS REFORM — GUEST OPINION (The World)

Gov. Kate Brown pledged to increase transparency and accountability in Oregon state government after she took office in early 2015 following John Kitzhabers resignation under a cloud of ethics challenges related to alleged influence peddling.

The fact of the matter is that little ethics reform has been accomplished during the nearly two years since Brown became governor. Legislators on both sides of the aisle have introduced several ethics reform bills.

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EDITORIAL: BUDGET WILL SHOW NEED TO END SHORTSIGHTEDNESS — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

How much does state governmental shortsightedness cost?

Oregonians will get the answer to that question on Thursday when Gov. Kate Brown is scheduled to unveil her proposed balanced budget for the state. The budget for the next biennium comes amid a predicted $1.4 billion deficit. While the governor hasnt publicly detailed it, she has strongly hinted the spending plan will contain deep cuts for state agencies and services to make up the gap, which has been a long time in the making.

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STATE AND LOCAL GMO BANS DECLARED LEGAL (Daily Astorian)

Federal law does not preempt state or local governments from banning genetically engineered crops that have been deregulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has reversed an earlier ruling that held Maui County in Hawaii was prohibited from banning commercialized genetically modified organisms in 2014 because the ordinance was preempted by federal rules for biotechnology.

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STATE WEIGHS NEW AREA LIQUOR STORES (Albany Democrat Herald)

A handful of new liquor stores could be coming to the mid-valley.

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission has received 10 applications for potential new outlets in Linn, Benton and Lane counties, including one in Corvallis, two in Albany and one in Scio.

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FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO STUDY A CORNERSTONE OF OREGON’S ECONOMY (Oregon Business Journal)

The U.S. Senate has passed a bill backed by Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden that would require study of the outdoor recreation industry, a cornerstone of the state’s economy.

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PORTLAND’S DIEGO HERNANDEZ HAS STOOD WITH STANDING ROCK, AND SAYS THE “WATER PROTECTORS” AREN’T GOING ANYWHERE (Willamette Week)

On Thanksgiving Day, state Rep.-elect Diego Hernandez D-East Portland took a stand.

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NEW REPORT ON POST-ELECTION HATE INCIDENTS SHOWS OREGON AT TOP OF LIST (Willamette Week)

-Southern Poverty Law Center info paints alarming picture of Pacific Northwest-

The Southern Poverty Law Center on Tuesday released a report about the surge of “hate incidents” in the wake of the Nov. 8 election of Donald Trump.

Using media reports and the organization’s own complaint system, the SPLC tallied 867 “hate incidents” in the 10 days after the election. To be counted, the incidents had to take place in the real world (i.e. not on social media).

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State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

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newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on November 30, 2016 OSL eClips

November 29, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* State claims Raussen, head of insurance board, accepted meals, gifts
* Comcast fights $170 million Oregon tax bill, extending seven-year dispute
* Report finds former Oregon official misused state resources, took gifts from contractors
* Salem dumps 22 million gallons of raw sewage in the Willamette
* 2 Oregon State Hospital staff injured in assault by patient
* Heed warning on spending — Opinion
* More states focusing on Native American pupils
* Cover Oregon saga not dead yet: how much should state pay Uncle Sam?
* ODOT audit plan excludes examination of conflicts in contracting
* Task force eyes tax hikes for fish and wildlife funding
* My View: Abolish the death penalty in Oregon — Guest Opinion
* Editorial: COCC shouldnt forget the public in public records — Opinion
* Editorial: Home health workers should not be locked into paying dues — Opinion
* Deschutes 911 upgrades communication, will allow texting
* Responding to injured animals
* Editorial: State is unforgivably silent on Cover Oregon — Opinion
* Movement seeks to bring back flood irrigation in some areas
* Laboratory tracks down poisonous plants
* Hunting stops growth in Idaho’s wolf population
* Western Innovator: Researcher studies big role of lowly earthworm
* Umatilla Indian Reservation grapples with pipelines
* Pendleton UAS range manager has eye on the sky
* Wuerthner: The many problems with grazing — Guest Opinion
* Project proposed to remove juniper trees
* Agency releases final environmental impact statement ahead of final decision
* New agriculture program goal: create leaders
* Researchers look for super spuds amid new potato strains
* Since You Asked: Cable fencing on I-5 is to prevent ‘crossover crashes’
* Lack of health care affects Rogue River students’ ability to learn
* Grant funds available for brush clearing in parts of Jackson County
* Since You Asked: Vote by mail has boosted, not cut, voter turnout
* Guest Opinion: Our communities are counting on Alan DeBoer’s swing vote — Guest Opinion
* Meeting on future of World War II sites tonight
* Why the skills gap doesn’t explain slow hiring
* State closes Shore Acres amidst flooding concerns
* Myrtle Point School District ranks high statewide for homeless students
* US Army eyes South Tongue Point for training
* Oregon parks commissioners tour Cannon Beach
* Renewing a promise to students — Opinion
* I-84 speed signs off to slow start
* Sanctuary cities and protection — Opinion
* Motor voters and apathy — Opinion
* Federal board denies county’s proposed geographic names
* City focuses on treatment plant
* Feds grant $28M for Mitchell Point crossing
* Jobs report: Hood River employment steady in fall
* Wilderness area proponents hope to preserve forests, rivers
* Coastal Casts: Crabbing closure a major impact on the central Oregon coast
* Josephine County commissioner warns of jail closing
* Mobile home park closures reduce housing supply
* Proposal may pave way for deer removal in city limits
* ODFW confirms wolf attack on calf in Crow Creek area
* Oregon campuses plan for the worst in case tragedy strikes again

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STATE CLAIMS RAUSSEN, HEAD OF INSURANCE BOARD, ACCEPTED MEALS, GIFTS (Portland Oregonian)

In eight months on the job as executive director of the Oregon Educators Benefits Board, James Raussen allegedly accepted a handful of spendy meals and, on one occasion, tickets to a Blazers game courtesy of insurers and consulting firms.

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COMCAST FIGHTS $170 MILLION OREGON TAX BILL, EXTENDING SEVEN-YEAR DISPUTE (Portland Oregonian)

Comcast has extended a seven-year tax fight worth as much as $170 million to Oregon schools and local governments, asking the state’s tax court to reduce its liability under an obscure application of tax law.

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REPORT FINDS FORMER OREGON OFFICIAL MISUSED STATE RESOURCES, TOOK GIFTS FROM CONTRACTORS (Salem Statesman Journal)

The official who ran the Oregon Educators Benefit Board until his resignation this month had conflicts of interest with insurers seeking contracts with the state, used state resources for personal purposes, was dishonest and had poor leadership, according to investigation documents released by the Oregon Health Authority.

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SALEM DUMPS 22 MILLION GALLONS OF RAW SEWAGE IN THE WILLAMETTE (Salem Statesman Journal)

The city of Salem released more than 22 million gallons of diluted raw sewage into the Willamette River on Thanksgiving afternoon and the following morning after heavy rain overwhelmed its sewer system.

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2 OREGON STATE HOSPITAL STAFF INJURED IN ASSAULT BY PATIENT (Salem Statesman Journal)

Two Oregon State Hospital staff were injured Nov. 22 when they were assaulted by a patient.

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HEED WARNING ON SPENDING — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon’s budgetary roller coaster is climbing, with economic growth and one of the nations healthiest job-creation rates providing record revenues to the state. Yet legislators preparing for the 2017 session that begins in January are speaking of tapping reserve funds that were created for times when the roller coaster plunges downward. Such talk is an unmistakable sign of budgetary unsustainability.

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MORE STATES FOCUSING ON NATIVE AMERICAN PUPILS (Eugene Register-Guard)

On the Spokane Indian Reservation in Eastern Washington, about 40 public school teachers gathered recently in a field of reeds that stretched as high as their heads.

Before harvesting the reeds, or tules, to make mats, they prayed. Later, they left tobacco as a gift. By learning the rituals of the Spokane tribe, the teachers of the Wellpinit School District hope to connect the culture to their lessons to better engage their students  almost all of whom are indigenous.

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COVER OREGON SAGA NOT DEAD YET: HOW MUCH SHOULD STATE PAY UNCLE SAM? (Portland Tribune)

-State officials downplayed Oracle settlement to avoid federal ‘clawback.’ Will new administration want more?-

Call it the debacle that would not die.

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ODOT AUDIT PLAN EXCLUDES EXAMINATION OF CONFLICTS IN CONTRACTING (Portland Tribune)

-Lawmakers have raised concerns about how ODOT handles conflicts of interests-

A $1 million management audit of the Oregon Department of Transportation may not address how well the agency avoids conflicts of interest in awarding project contracts.

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TASK FORCE EYES TAX HIKES FOR FISH AND WILDLIFE FUNDING (Portland Tribune)

-Panel recommends income tax surcharge, wholesale beverage tax to help fund department-

A task force convened to find ways to raise revenue for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Monday will recommend two tax increases to add $86 million to the departments budget.

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MY VIEW: ABOLISH THE DEATH PENALTY IN OREGON — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Much has been said in recent weeks about the high financial cost of prosecuting death penalty cases in Oregon, and the cost of the imposition of such sentences.

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EDITORIAL: COCC SHOULDNT FORGET THE PUBLIC IN PUBLIC RECORDS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

When it comes to providing access to public records in Oregon, governments are supposed to keep the public part uppermost in mind. Central Oregon Community College doesn’t see things quite that way.

COCC recently completed a $2 million solar project on its Redmond campus. Sunlight, ironically, didn’t penetrate the language of two contracts the college signed to build the arrays. They put secrecy before public transparency.

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EDITORIAL: HOME HEALTH WORKERS SHOULD NOT BE LOCKED INTO PAYING DUES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

In 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court limited the power of unions to coerce public workers to pay dues.

The decision specifically concerned home health care workers in Illinois. They are similar to home health care workers in Oregon. They are not full-fledged public employees because they are employed by individuals. They are paid in part by the state.

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DESCHUTES 911 UPGRADES COMMUNICATION, WILL ALLOW TEXTING (Bend Bulletin)

-Texting is the first next generation service to be implemented-

Deschutes County 911 is preparing to launch two new upgrades to help provide better public safety services.

All public safety entities in the county will move to a new radio system that will allow for better communication. That transition will take about a year to be fully implemented. More immediately, the emergency dispatch center will be able to receive text messages.

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RESPONDING TO INJURED ANIMALS (Bend Bulletin)

-Injuries usually stem from interactions with people-

Area residents might want to hang their holiday lights a little higher when decorating outdoor trees and shrubs.

Anything that deer can get tangled in, they will, said wildlife biologist Corey Heath of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Every year, we take Christmas lights off of deer.

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EDITORIAL: STATE IS UNFORGIVABLY SILENT ON COVER OREGON — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

State officials did such a good job with the launch of Cover Oregon, the $300 million health care exchange that sank at the dock, that we understand why they dont want to tell anyone whats going on now.

Leading up to the scheduled launch of Cover Oregon in 2013, state officials assured the public there was nothing to worry about. The health insurance website would work

But then, surprise The thing didn’t work after all. Notwithstanding the states assurances, people who wanted to obtain coverage through the site couldn’t.

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MOVEMENT SEEKS TO BRING BACK FLOOD IRRIGATION IN SOME AREAS (Capital Press)

Chris Colson champions an admittedly antiquated and inefficient method of watering crops  flood irrigation.

The Boise-based regional biologist for Ducks Unlimited is part of a movement that recognizes the wildlife and water-supply benefits of flood irrigation, and the need to make certain it continues to be used in floodplains and other strategic locations across the West.

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LABORATORY TRACKS DOWN POISONOUS PLANTS (Capital Press)

Poisoning by plants can result in serious economic losses to livestock producers in the western United States.

The Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory PPRL has continued to develop better understanding of how certain plants become toxic to animals and how livestock managers can take action to minimize the impact on their livestock.

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HUNTING STOPS GROWTH IN IDAHO’S WOLF POPULATION (Capital Press)

As hunting is resulting in a slow but steady decline of Idahos wolf population, a Boise State University poll taken earlier this year showed strong statewide support for the hunting of wolves.

Idahos minimum, documented wolf population has been on a steady decline since the state began allowing hunters to kill the animals.

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WESTERN INNOVATOR: RESEARCHER STUDIES BIG ROLE OF LOWLY EARTHWORM (Capital Press)

Jodi Johnson-Maynard has been playing with dirt for a long time.

She remembers playing in a dirt pile in her backyard while growing up in California.

At one point my mom realized she had no spoons left in the house because I was constantly taking her spoons and any digging implements I could find, she said. I would dig these giant holes, look at the soil, add water to see what would happen. Early on, I guess I was fascinated by soil.

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UMATILLA INDIAN RESERVATION GRAPPLES WITH PIPELINES (East Oregonian)

The explosion shook the ground beneath the Umatilla Indian Reservation and unleashed a massive fireball that roared up to 500 feet into the air.

On Jan. 2, 1999, a natural gas pipeline ruptured about a mile south of Cayuse at the base of the Blue Mountains, triggering the blast that left behind a large crater and sent shrapnel flying hundreds of feet.

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PENDLETON UAS RANGE MANAGER HAS EYE ON THE SKY (East Oregonian)

While drones might not have entered Pendleton’s consciousness until a few years ago, they’ve been on Darryl Abling’s radar for much longer.

Abling, the Pendleton Unmanned Aerial Systems Range manager, came to Eastern Oregon after a 29-year career at Northrop Grumman, a company that has been working with drones since 2000.

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WUERTHNER: THE MANY PROBLEMS WITH GRAZING — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

The Department of Interior recently released its Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy whose goal is to reduce range fires in sagebrush ecosystems critical to sage grouse.

The plan correctly identifies that cheatgrass, a highly flammable exotic annual, is a major threat to the bird, as well as the sagebrush ecosystems. However, the plan failed to acknowledge that livestock grazing is the major factor facilitating the spread of cheatgrass and targeted grazing as a fire prevention solution is a delusion for reasons Ill discuss below.

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PROJECT PROPOSED TO REMOVE JUNIPER TREES (Argus Observer)

Federal officials are proposing one of the largest ever projects to remove juniper trees to protect habitat for imperiled sage grouse and might also benefit cattle ranchers.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management on Monday announced its taking public comments through Jan. 3 on the plan to eliminate the trees from 940 square miles in Owyhee County in southwest Idaho.

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AGENCY RELEASES FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT AHEAD OF FINAL DECISION (Argus Observer)

Though the path of a proposed power lines project has not been set in stone, a decision will be made soon. The outcome could impact some of Malheur Countys agriculture activities, including aerial spraying and irrigation, which could in turn affect water rights.

Bureau of Land Management Vale District officials on Friday released the final environmental impact statement for the proposed Boardman to Hemingway transmission line project.

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NEW AGRICULTURE PROGRAM GOAL: CREATE LEADERS (Argus Observer)

REAL Oregon is a program to train people in the agriculture and natural resources fields to move into leadership positions at the local and state level.

REAL stands for Resource Education and Agriculture Leadership.

New to Oregon, the states first program is scheduled to start next fall with sessions to be held at different locations around the state.

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RESEARCHERS LOOK FOR SUPER SPUDS AMID NEW POTATO STRAINS (Argus Observer)

A program that teamed up three universities and three agricultural commissions in 1984 has recently experienced its fourth great success with a newly bred potato that seems to be superior in numerous ways to the old gold standard.

The Northwest Potato Variety Development Program  which includes researchers from Washington State University, the University of Idaho, Oregon State University and the U.S. Department of Agricultures Agricultural Research Service  has introduced about 45 varieties since its inception, including four since 2000 that have rocketed to stardom  or its closest equivalent in the potato world  as McDonalds french fries.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: CABLE FENCING ON I-5 IS TO PREVENT ‘CROSSOVER CRASHES’ (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: Seeing plenty of fencing going up in the I-5 median out toward Ashland. I assume it’s to prevent U-turns by freeway drivers. Is that the case? How long is this fence line going to be, and how much does it cost?

A: Oregon Department of Transportation officials say the cable rail installation is a small part of a $5.9 million I-5 paving project. The paving portion included I-5 stretches and ramps, except for Exit 24. The cable rail, included in the second half of the project, will be installed between mileposts 11 and 27.

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LACK OF HEALTH CARE AFFECTS ROGUE RIVER STUDENTS’ ABILITY TO LEARN (Medford Mail Tribune)

After every class, 13-year-old Isaiah Remington asks fellow students for their notes.

From his desk, he cant make out the letters and numbers on the white board. Its why hes failing science, he said.

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GRANT FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR BRUSH CLEARING IN PARTS OF JACKSON COUNTY (Medford Mail Tribune)

The terrain around Wally McCahon’s home has a strong potential for wildfire.

“This is a tinder box,” McCahon says of the landscape near his home off Rolling Hills Drive outside Eagle Point. “Just nothing but buckbrush, poison oak, manzanita, poison oak. A lot of poison oak. And a lot of it has grown very close to the road.”

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SINCE YOU ASKED: VOTE BY MAIL HAS BOOSTED, NOT CUT, VOTER TURNOUT (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: While visiting the New Hampshire capitol recently, we had a chance to visit with their secretary of state, Bill Garner. Oh, so you are from Oregon,” he said. “Remember your secretary of state, Phil Keisling? Well, he tried to talk New Hampshire into switching over to vote by mail. We are so glad we did not. Oregon’s vote participation has plummeted since the switch to mail-in ballots. Is Mr. Garner correct? Are Oregon voters voting less under the vote-by-mail system?

A: After digging into recent voting records, we also looked into whether New Hampshire has recently legalized marijuana, because we wondered what Mr. Garner had been smoking….

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GUEST OPINION: OUR COMMUNITIES ARE COUNTING ON ALAN DEBOER’S SWING VOTE — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Whether the state Legislature is able to meet the needs of Southern Oregon’s students, seniors and working families is now to a large extent in the hands of Alan DeBoer.

As the Mail Tribune reported on Nov. 17, the state is facing a $1.7 billion deficit in the wake of the defeat of Measure 97.

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MEETING ON FUTURE OF WORLD WAR II SITES TONIGHT (Herald and News)

Tonight the National Park Service will host a public meeting in Klamath Falls on the future of the Tule Lake Unit during the second in a three-week series of 11 public meetings on on plans for the former World War II segregation center site.

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WHY THE SKILLS GAP DOESN’T EXPLAIN SLOW HIRING (Herald and News)

Customers cant get enough of Cambrias quartz countertops, and the million-square-foot production facility here is racing to keep up. Under bright lights and high ceilings, churning machinery fuses quartz crystals into heavy slabs and polishes them until they shine.

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STATE CLOSES SHORE ACRES AMIDST FLOODING CONCERNS (The World)

State Parks rangers evacuated two Cape Arago Highway state parks, Shore Acres and Sunset Bay, on Friday afternoon amid concern that flooding could result in people stranded at high tide.

Rick Ripley, a state park ranger, called Friday’s flooding, “the worst I’ve seen in 18 years.”

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MYRTLE POINT SCHOOL DISTRICT RANKS HIGH STATEWIDE FOR HOMELESS STUDENTS (The World)

Myrtle Point has the fourth-highest percentage of homeless students in the state according to a recent report by the Oregon Department of Education.

Last school year there were 108 homeless students in the Myrtle Point school district, accounting for 18 percent of those enrolled.

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US ARMY EYES SOUTH TONGUE POINT FOR TRAINING (Daily Astorian)

The dock at South Tongue Point has long been a staging ground for Clatsop Community Colleges mariners in training. It could soon became a training ground for the U.S. Army, as well.

The Army’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington has inquired about acquiring a square of land and the dock owned by the Corps.

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OREGON PARKS COMMISSIONERS TOUR CANNON BEACH (Daily Astorian)

State parks staff and seven parks commissioners met in Cannon Beach to discuss state lands, forestry projects, the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Beach Bill and more at the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commissions mid-November meeting.

Longtime Cannon Beach resident Robin Risley is the west of the Coast Range commissioner. With her term ending in March, she said it has been a joy serving on the commission.

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RENEWING A PROMISE TO STUDENTS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

We understand that legislators will be under some severe financial constraints when they gather for the 2017 session.

But here’s hoping that they can find the funds, and the time, to fine-tune the Oregon Promise program, which is intended to help state students pay for the costs of attending community colleges.

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I-84 SPEED SIGNS OFF TO SLOW START (Baker City Herald)

-Installed This Summer Along Interstate 84 Between Baker City and Ladd Canyon-

The new variable speed limit signs on Interstate 84 had their first chance to shine on Monday as dense fog cloaked sections of the freeway near Baker City.

The signs fizzled.

Sensors within at least one sign failed to recognize that fog had reduced the visibility below one-tenth of a mile, at which point the sign is supposed to reduce the posted speed limit from the usual 70 mph for passenger cars.

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SANCTUARY CITIES AND PROTECTION — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

We would be amused by the schoolyard antics of the mayors of some sanctuary cities, including Portland and Eugene, except the potential results of their pre-adolescent stubbornness could be fatal for some of their own innocent constituents.

Which is no laughing matter, obviously.

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MOTOR VOTERS AND APATHY — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

Oregon Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins was all but rapturous in touting the effect the states new Motor Voter law had on the Nov. 8 election.

A press release from Atkins office last week was enlivened by such adjectives as fantastic and historic.

The law, which took effect Jan. 1, certainly had a significant effect on the number of Oregonians who are registered to vote.

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FEDERAL BOARD DENIES COUNTY’S PROPOSED GEOGRAPHIC NAMES (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The U.S. Board on Geographic Names denied Grant County’s most recent request to change names of two geographic features formerly known as Squaw Creek and Squaw Meadow.

In a Nov. 1 letter to County Judge Scott Myers and Commissioners Chris Labhart and Boyd Britton, U.S. Board on Geographic Names Executive Secretary Lou Yost said the board had already changed the names for the creek and meadow near U.S. Highway 26 near the Grant-Baker county line to Wiwaanaytt Creek and Wiwaanaytt Meadow at a meeting April 14.

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CITY FOCUSES ON TREATMENT PLANT (The Dalles Chronicle)

-Work session geared to nail down final design, costs-

The city of The Dalles is ready to begin upgrading its aging wastewater plant, and work could begin as soon as January.

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FEDS GRANT $28M FOR MITCHELL POINT CROSSING (Hood River News)

Oregon Department of Transportation has found a light at the end of the tunnel in its endeavor to fully restore the Historic Columbia River Highway as a single trail.

The Federal Lands Access Program in early November awarded ODOT a $28 million grant to complete a crossing at Mitchell Point, a rocky cape west of Hood River, which has been an expensive hurdle in the project.

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JOBS REPORT: HOOD RIVER EMPLOYMENT STEADY IN FALL (Hood River News)

Despite shedding some jobs, Hood River County employment held firm at second best statewide.

The county’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate steadied in October at 4.5 percent, low enough to come second in Oregon behind Benton County. The countys unemployment rate fell by a scant 0.3 percentage point.

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WILDERNESS AREA PROPONENTS HOPE TO PRESERVE FORESTS, RIVERS (Douglas County News-Review)

About 500,000 acres could be preserved as wilderness if the proposed Crater Lake Wilderness becomes reality.

Creating a new wilderness area requires an act of Congress, and no new legislation has been drafted to make that happen, yet. Wilderness advocates said U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley and U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Portland, have expressed interest. Representatives of the Crater Lake Wilderness campaign handed 37,000 signatures from supporters to Wyden this week.

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COASTAL CASTS: CRABBING CLOSURE A MAJOR IMPACT ON THE CENTRAL OREGON COAST (Douglas County News-Review)

Happy Sunday everyone

There’s not a whole bunch to talk about in the world of fishing. A few steelhead are getting caught but no real numbers yet. Some nice salmon on the Elk and Sixes are being caught when the water levels are right and some perch and rockfish are being caught here locally in Coos Bay.

Oh, I almost forgot that the surf perch fishing is pretty good but not on big ocean swell days.

The big story this week is of course is the crab closure.

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JOSEPHINE COUNTY COMMISSIONER WARNS OF JAIL CLOSING (Douglas County News-Review)

Josephine County commissioners Tuesday rejected putting a law enforcement levy on the May ballot. That could lead to Josephine County’s jail closing in 2017. If so, Josephine officials shouldn’t look north to Douglas County to house their inmates, said Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin.

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MOBILE HOME PARK CLOSURES REDUCE HOUSING SUPPLY (Douglas County News-Review)

Rickety plyboard patios, threadbare awnings, chain-link fences and metal signs surround the ramshackle trailers at Junction Mobile Park in Winston. Knock on a door and someone will yell out, but no one will answer.

Residents here have settled into their spaces over the years. They have built gardens and walls and fences bordering their small homes, protecting them from a world that has deemed them a collection of old junkers, as one man put it.

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PROPOSAL MAY PAVE WAY FOR DEER REMOVAL IN CITY LIMITS (Wallowa.com)

A clear plan for dealing with excessive deer populations for Joseph and many other towns across the state may finally emerge from the State Senate next year.

Dist. 29 State Sen. Bill Hansell has informed Joseph Mayor Dennis Sands that he intends to introduce a legislative counsel amendment  1066  during the upcoming session that begins Feb. 1, 2017, to address issues related to excessive deer populations.

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ODFW CONFIRMS WOLF ATTACK ON CALF IN CROW CREEK AREA (Wallowa.com)

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife on Wednesday issued an investigation report confirming a wolf attack on an 8-month-old calf on private land in the Crow Creek area northeast of Enterprise in Wallowa County.

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OREGON CAMPUSES PLAN FOR THE WORST IN CASE TRAGEDY STRIKES AGAIN (KVAL)

Run, Hide, Fight. Those were the three words for students and staff at Ohio State during the attack Monday. They are also key words at the University of Oregon.

Campus police say its part of the first statewide higher education plan of its kind.

The Governors Campus Safety Work Group focuses on creating a plan to protect all higher education campuses in Oregon.

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State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit: http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

Hosted by the Oregon State Library – (503)378-8800

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on November 29, 2016 OSL eClips

November 28, 2016 Weekend eClips

State Library eClips

* Most of Oregon’s homeless families live on the street, in cars, parks: Highest percentage in U.S., says HUD report
* Oregon, with Legislature’s help, must re-examine its priorities on Elliott State Forest — Opinion
* State fines McMenamins $62,553 for stormwater violations at Edgefield
* Giving thanks to all Oregonians — Guest Opinion
* The plight of Oregon women should see needed relief from Salem — Opinion
* Independent Party of Oregon regroups after disappointing election
* Scientists link humans to ocean acidification, sea snail shells ‘dissolving’
* Oregon steelhead bill honors a North Umpqua legend — Guest Opinion
* Standing with all of our students — Guest Opinion
* With America’s fisheries rebounding, we can’t turn back — Guest Opinion
* Supply cools for Oregon’s Christmas tree industry
* Rep. Jodi Hack to play new role in Legislative session
* The bitter fight over Oregon’s Grand Canyon
* Willamette & Pacific Railroad fined $7,280 for stormwater violations
* DEQ fines McMenamins for wastewater discharge in creek
* DEQ to oversee Salem’s CTEC contamination
* Give counties more weight in determining governorship — Guest Opinion
* Son of indicted judge decries prosecution
* Marion Commissioner nominated for State Hospital board
* Homelessness on the rise for local students
* Respect the Pacifics power — Opinion
* Floodplain recommendations push development elsewhere — Guest Opinion
* A big job for Edwards — Opinion
* Beware at the beach: Its sneaker wave season in Oregon
* Local law enforcers: Immigration status alone is no crime
* Brown plans bill to maximize state investment returns
* Who will be Oregon’s next U.S. attorney?
* COIC to look to Salem for new transit funding tool
* Mapping reveals a shifting landscape
* This is why Bend will become more dense
* Friday is Oregons busiest day for drivers
* Homeless student numbers down in Central Oregon
* Scientists on track to produce aquatic species map for West
* Job market mystery: Where are the men?
* Mortgage rates rise shock buyers, lenders
* Oregon home prices on the rise
* State, feds tight-lipped over ongoing Cover Oregon talks
* Solar farm proposed east of Bend
* Editorial: The right way and wrong way to restrict public land — Opinion
* Editorial: State leaders need to engage on PERS legislation — Opinion
* Concerns remain over inappropriate use of broad-spectrum antibiotics
* Ashland Republican nominated to transportation commission
* Our View: Jobs feed the state and hungry families — Opinion
* Murphy to rule on state’s request to dismiss unfunded mandates lawsuit
* Oregon solar industry calls RETC extension top 2017 priority, and signs of support emerge
* Oregon at Fullish Employment, Redux — Blog
* Why So Few Kids Are Getting the HPV Vaccine
* How Governments Are Tackling a Deadly Threat to Seniors: Falling
* Water for Life
* Oregon Health Authority narrows focus on housing as health care
* October Unemployment Rate Lowest in Benton County — Blog
* Oregon physicians oppose Marion County burning

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MOST OF OREGON’S HOMELESS FAMILIES LIVE ON THE STREET, IN CARS, PARKS: HIGHEST PERCENTAGE IN U.S., SAYS HUD REPORT (Portland Oregonian)

While homelessness across the nation continues to decline, Oregon has the highest percentage of homeless families with children not living in a shelter, according to the latest national estimate by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD.

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OREGON, WITH LEGISLATURE’S HELP, MUST RE-EXAMINE ITS PRIORITIES ON ELLIOTT STATE FOREST — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The terrain near Coos Bay, in Oregon’s Coast Range, is steeply sloped, densely forested, and abundant in fish-bearing rivers and other wildlife. An 82,500-acre patch of it constitutes the Elliott State Forest, created on consolidated lands  transferred to Oregon by the federal government with the mandate its riches be turned to money so children could go to school and build a life.

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STATE FINES MCMENAMINS $62,553 FOR STORMWATER VIOLATIONS AT EDGEFIELD (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon environmental regulators hit McMenamins Inc. with a $62,553 fine for illegally dumping spent grain, hops and other byproducts from its distillery, brewery and winery operation in Troutdale into nearby creeks.

The state Department of Environmental Quality also said the food, lodging and entertainment giant has run its Edgefield location without an industrial wastewater permit since 1998.

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GIVING THANKS TO ALL OREGONIANS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

More than 4 million people call Oregon home, and we all have a great deal for which to be thankful this holiday season. Our remarkable state holds a pioneering history, breathtaking natural beauty and an engaged citizenry from endlessly diverse cultures and identities.

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THE PLIGHT OF OREGON WOMEN SHOULD SEE NEEDED RELIEF FROM SALEM — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Come January, Democratic women will make up the majority of the controlling party in Oregon’s House for the first time. And, as reported by The Oregonian/OregonLive’s Hillary Borrud, women also will make up the majority of House Democrats’ new leadership team.

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INDEPENDENT PARTY OF OREGON REGROUPS AFTER DISAPPOINTING ELECTION (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s upstart Independent Party felt confident 2016 would be the election cycle that cemented its status in the state as a viable third party.

Late last year, party Secretary Sal Peralta told The Oregonian/OregonLive the party’s goal was to control a few seats in the Legislature and “prevent either the Democrats or Republicans from reaching a majority.” The Independent Party of Oregon even discussed the possibility of having its own office in the Capitol.

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SCIENTISTS LINK HUMANS TO OCEAN ACIDIFICATION, SEA SNAIL SHELLS ‘DISSOLVING’ (Portland Oregonian)

Elevated carbon dioxide levels in the Pacific Ocean are connected to human activity, according to a study from the federal government, and that acidification is causing the shells of a key microscopic sea snail to dissolve, a phenomenon that could affect other species in the ecosystem.

Research from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released Tuesday linked elevated human-caused carbon dioxide levels along the waters off the West Coast to “shell dissolution” among the microscopic sea snail known as pteropods.

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OREGON STEELHEAD BILL HONORS A NORTH UMPQUA LEGEND — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The Station isn’t a place you’ll find on any map. It’s just a name anglers gave long ago to a little patch of water on one of the most storied steelhead rivers in North America.

The Station is a short run where Steamboat Creek enters the main river.

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STANDING WITH ALL OF OUR STUDENTS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Our decision to declare Portland State University a sanctuary campus has been met with broad support from our students and the community. But it also raises some questions and concerns about what it means and how it might affect our relationship with the federal government. Let me explain our decision and its implications.

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WITH AMERICA’S FISHERIES REBOUNDING, WE CAN’T TURN BACK — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In the last 20 years, one of the country’s most valuable natural resources has transformed from a national disaster to a great American recovery story. But unless you’re a fishery scientist or a fisherman who suffered through the near collapse of a fishery, you’ve probably never heard the story.

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SUPPLY COOLS FOR OREGON’S CHRISTMAS TREE INDUSTRY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Be prepared to pay a bit more for your Christmas tree this year.

Oregon’s Christmas tree industry, traditionally a powerhouse for the country’s holiday firs, has faced a cool down in supply as growers have sold fewer trees and left the market.

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REP. JODI HACK TO PLAY NEW ROLE IN LEGISLATIVE SESSION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Representative Jodi Hack R-Salem has recently been elected by her colleagues to serve as Whip for the Oregon House Republican caucus.

Rep. Hack, who will be sworn in for her second term in 2017, previously served as Deputy Whip during her first two-year term.

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THE BITTER FIGHT OVER OREGON’S GRAND CANYON (Salem Statesman Journal)

Drive east from Portland, past the dense forests west of the Cascades, past where the juniper trees smooth out into rolling hills. Keep driving and you’ll hit what some call Oregon’s Grand Canyon.

Two and a half million acres of rivers and cliffs, desert and meadows, the Owyhee Canyonlands is one of the most remote places in the west.

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WILLAMETTE & PACIFIC RAILROAD FINED $7,280 FOR STORMWATER VIOLATIONS (Salem Statesman Journal)

State environmental regulators have fined Willamette & Pacific Railroad Inc. $7,280 for failing to properly monitor its storm water discharge.

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DEQ FINES MCMENAMINS FOR WASTEWATER DISCHARGE IN CREEK (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has fined McMenamins Inc. $62,553 for discharging wastewater without a permit from a distillery, winery and brewery at its Edgefield property to nearby creeks that drain to the Columbia River.

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DEQ TO OVERSEE SALEM’S CTEC CONTAMINATION (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality will oversee testing and cleanup during expansion of the Salem-Keizer School Districts Career Technical Education Center.

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GIVE COUNTIES MORE WEIGHT IN DETERMINING GOVERNORSHIP — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Regarding the presidency of these United States, ours is a Republic based not upon the popular vote, but upon the voiced support of the majority of the country. The citizenry of our state would actually benefit from a similar form of electing our governor.

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SON OF INDICTED JUDGE DECRIES PROSECUTION (Salem Statesman Journal)

A son of Marion County Judge Vance Day has posted an essay online defending his father, claiming  his indictment is politically motivated and the media’s coverage of it is biased.

On Nov. 18, a grand jury indicted Day on two counts of felony firearms and official misconduct charges, allegations that relate to an earlier ethics case.

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MARION COMMISSIONER NOMINATED FOR STATE HOSPITAL BOARD (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown has nominated Marion County Commissioner Janet Carlson for a spot on the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board, the public body that advises the Legislature and Oregon Health Authority officials on the Salem psychiatric facility.

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HOMELESSNESS ON THE RISE FOR LOCAL STUDENTS (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Numbers reported statewide in 2015-16 are higher than those recorded during the Great Recession-

Seven-year-old Luke Perrin and his father, Robert Perrin, 35, slept Tuesday night in the bushes behind the Walmart Supercenter on West 11th Avenue in Eugene.

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RESPECT THE PACIFIC’S POWER — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Nothing on Earth is bigger than the Pacific Ocean  and with size comes power, unpredictability and danger. The Portland Oregonian recently reported a timely warning from the U.S. Coast Guard that visitors to the Oregon Coast should be wary of sneaker waves this time of year. That’s good advice in any season, and sudden surges of ocean water are not the only hazards that must be borne in mind.

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FLOODPLAIN RECOMMENDATIONS PUSH DEVELOPMENT ELSEWHERE — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Flood damages nationwide total more than $8 billion a year. While some see a flood as an act of God, the real problem is that we’ve built so many houses and commercial buildings in harms way  on floodplains prone to high water.

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A BIG JOB FOR EDWARDS — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-And now his Senate seat must be filled-

Job titles in academic administration sometimes obscure more than they reveal, so its hard to guess exactly what state Sen. Chris Edwards will be doing in his new job as assistant vice president for strategic initiatives at the University of Oregon.

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BEWARE AT THE BEACH: ITS SNEAKER WAVE SEASON IN OREGON (Eugene Register-Guard)

Never turn your back to the ocean.

That’s probably the best piece of advice when it comes to surviving sneaker waves  the sudden, unpredictable surges of water that can knock you over or pull you out to sea. And while there’s no official season for sneaker waves, plotting out major incidents in Oregon shows an undeniable seasonal trend.

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LOCAL LAW ENFORCERS: IMMIGRATION STATUS ALONE IS NO CRIME (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Two state lawmakers launch move to dismantle Oregon’s defacto sanctuary status-

There’s a movement afoot to change it, but Oregon has a nearly 30-year-old law that forbids local and state police from investigating federal immigration violations.

Somehow, people have this fear that local police are going to jump on the bandwagon and help enforce immigration law, Lane County Sheriff Byron Trapp said. But its really a nonissue. There are no changes at the local level.

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BROWN PLANS BILL TO MAXIMIZE STATE INVESTMENT RETURNS (Portland Tribune)

-Governor’s plan would end outsourcing of portfolio management to reduce costs-

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown plans to advance a bill in the upcoming legislative session aimed at maximizing returns on the states investments, according to her office.

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WHO WILL BE OREGON’S NEXT U.S. ATTORNEY? (Portland Tribune)

-As names circulate for state’s top federal prosecutor, Congressman Greg Walden has new, key role-

President-elect Donald Trump wont take office until January, but legal circles are already buzzing with speculation about who will take on the powerful appointed position of Oregon’s top federal prosecutor.

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COIC TO LOOK TO SALEM FOR NEW TRANSIT FUNDING TOOL (Bend Bulletin)

-Concept would give COIC authority to ask voters to raise property taxes for transit-

Local governments in Central Oregon have banded together ahead of the 2017 legislative session in support of a proposal that some say could lead to improved mass transit in the region.

The proposal would give the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, which operates transit service in the tri-county region, new authority to ask cities and voters to raise property taxes to beef up transit. State law doesn’t allow such an arrangement.

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MAPPING REVEALS A SHIFTING LANDSCAPE (Bend Bulletin)

The Columbia River Gorge is famous for sweeping dramatic vistas, but new research published by the U.S. Geological Survey reveals a shifting landscape beneath the forest.

Three researchers with USGS mapped a history of 215 different landslides across 64 percent of a 86-square-mile area between Prindle and Carson in Skamania County, Washington, just north of the Mt. Hood National Forest.

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THIS IS WHY BEND WILL BECOME MORE DENSE (Bend Bulletin)

-A city plan allows for taller buildings and denser development-

It could be only a matter of weeks before developers can submit plans to the city to redevelop parts of Bend  something that could dramatically change the way the city looks in the future.

Last week, the state approved the city’s plan to expand onto county land and allow for more than 17,000 new homes. But the plan only allows for Bend to take over 2,380 acres, which means development wont just expand outward  it’ll have to go up.

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FRIDAY IS OREGON’S BUSIEST DAY FOR DRIVERS (Bend Bulletin)

-An ODOT study used cell phone data, GPS devices to monitor volume-

Winter weather has arrived in Central Oregon, just in time for some of the busiest travel days of the year.

The Oregon Department of Transportation has determined that today, the Friday following Thanksgiving, is historically the most congested day of the year on Oregon highways.

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HOMELESS STUDENT NUMBERS DOWN IN CENTRAL OREGON (Bend Bulletin)

-Local school districts buck statewide trend of rise in homeless students-

While Oregon’s population of homeless students is up overall from last year, in every school district in Central Oregon, the number of homeless students declined, at least slightly.

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SCIENTISTS ON TRACK TO PRODUCE AQUATIC SPECIES MAP FOR WEST (Bend Bulletin)

It sounds like a big fish story: a plan to create a biodiversity map identifying thousands of aquatic species in every river and stream in the western U.S.

But scientists say they’re steadily reeling in that whopper and by next summer will have the first Aquatic Environmental DNA Atlas available for the public.

Boise-based U.S. Forest Service fisheries biologist Dan Isaak is leading the project and says such a map could help with land management decisions and deciding where to spend limited money and resources.

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JOB MARKET MYSTERY: WHERE ARE THE MEN? (Bend Bulletin)

As the recovery from the Great Recession continues, job growth is solid and the labor force is growing at close to its fastest pace since 2000 because more unemployed workers are coming off the sidelines.

Still, the percentage of working-age Americans in the labor force remains stuck near its lowest level since the late 1970s. Although retiring baby boomers are the main reason, there’s another troubling factor that experts predict wont be solved by stronger economic growth.

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MORTGAGE RATES RISE SHOCK BUYERS, LENDERS (Bend Bulletin)

When Jared Rutledge called his mortgage broker one morning last week after putting in an offer on a home in Glendale, Arizona, just west of Phoenix, he discovered that the 3.8 percent rate he had been quoted a couple of months ago had already gone up to 4.125 percent. That afternoon, it had inched up to 4.25, and by evening, when he finally called back to finalize the deal, it was 4.375 percent.

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OREGON HOME PRICES ON THE RISE (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon saw the second-highest increase in home prices in the nation over the past 12 months, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency.

For the year ending in the third quarter, home prices in Oregon rose by 10.4 percent, second only to Florida’s 10.7 percent increase over the same period. Nationally, the rate was 6.1 percent over that period, the highest level of appreciation since 2013, according to the agency.

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STATE, FEDS TIGHT-LIPPED OVER ONGOING COVER OREGON TALKS (Bend Bulletin)

-Governors office, Department of Justice meet with federal officials to talk about failed exchange-

Oregon’s recently settled lawsuit over its failed $300 million health insurance website marked the end of a long chapter that embarrassed the states top political leaders, but the state isn’t out of the woods with Cover Oregon yet.

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SOLAR FARM PROPOSED EAST OF BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-Project would be fifth in county; neighbors plan to contest it-

Deschutes County might get a fifth solar farm next year if a Virginia company’s plan for a 90-acre facility east of Bend is approved.

The project, which Charlottesville-based Bear Creek Solar Center LLC submitted planning permit applications for this month, is still under consideration by the county. The county’s planning division will accept written comments on the proposal until Dec. 2. If necessary, a public hearing will take place in the next three to four months.

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EDITORIAL: THE RIGHT WAY AND WRONG WAY TO RESTRICT PUBLIC LAND — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

There’s a right way for wilderness proponents to restrict the use of huge swaths of public land, and there’s a wrong way. The right way is to go through a public process and to get a bill through Congress and signed by the president. The wrong way is to skip Congress and meaningful public debate and have a president create a national monument.

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EDITORIAL: STATE LEADERS NEED TO ENGAGE ON PERS LEGISLATION — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Gov. Kate Brown and the Democratic legislative leadership have been looking the other way while others have fashioned proposals to address the states public pension crisis.

It was never a wise position. But now that Measure 97s disastrous tax proposal has been soundly defeated, Brown and other leaders need to face reality, even if doing so means upsetting their union supporters.

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CONCERNS REMAIN OVER INAPPROPRIATE USE OF BROAD-SPECTRUM ANTIBIOTICS (Bend Bulletin)

-Oregon makes progress on antibiotic overuse-

Oregon has made progress in curbing inappropriate antibiotic use, but too many doctors still prescribe antibiotics when they are ineffective or choose more broadly acting antibiotics when a more targeted medication will do.

A report issued by the Oregon Health Authority last week found that prescriptions for oral antibiotics in doctors offices and outpatient clinics dropped 29 percent since 2008, including an 8 percent drop from 2014 to 2015.

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ASHLAND REPUBLICAN NOMINATED TO TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION (East Oregonian)

Paula Brown, a Republican from Ashland, has been nominated by Gov. Kate Brown to succeed Susan Morgan on the Oregon Transportation Commission.

As a member of the five-member commission, Brown could be a power player in the shaping of a transportation package in the 2017 legislative session.

The transportation legislation will likely send hundreds of millions of dollars to the Department of Transportation, which the commission oversees.

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OUR VIEW: JOBS FEED THE STATE AND HUNGRY FAMILIES — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

As we recover from a day of feasting, let’s pause and consider this news: During the three-year period of 2013-15, Oregon led the nation in the increase in food insecurity, with nearly one in six households not certain it would be able to put food on the table.

While metro Oregon has seen a great recovery from the Great Recession, that’s not necessarily true in rural Oregon.

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MURPHY TO RULE ON STATE’S REQUEST TO DISMISS UNFUNDED MANDATES LAWSUIT (Albany Democrat Herald)

Linn County Circuit Court Judge Daniel Murphy will rule before the end of the year on a motion to dismiss a lawsuit challenging the state’s paid sick-leave law.

Murphy made the announcement at the end of a Wednesday hearing into the lawsuit, filed by Linn County and eight other counties. The counties are arguing that the law represents an unfunded mandate and therefore is unconstitutional.

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OREGON SOLAR INDUSTRY CALLS RETC EXTENSION TOP 2017 PRIORITY, AND SIGNS OF SUPPORT EMERGE (Oregon Business Journal)

Legislative support is showing up for an extension, in some form, of the sunsetting Residential Energy Tax Credit, a top priority of the Oregon solar energy industry.

A set of draft recommendations put out by the Joint Interim Committee on Department of Energy Oversight recently included a call to continue RETC, due to end on Jan. 1, 2018, for two years or until a replacement program is adopted.

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OREGON AT FULLISH EMPLOYMENT, REDUX — BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

Over the lunch hour I will be on OPBs Think Out Loud discussing Oregons economy that is currently at fullish employment. Recently we have highlighted that the state now has neither an unemployment nor underemployment gap. What remains is the participation gap.

First, however, lets talk a little about full employment. Unfortunately there are a few different definitions and no specific data series that magically says when an economy is at full employment.

Ed. Note: Think Out Loud Story is available here: http://www.opb.org/radio/programs/thinkoutloud/segment/talking-business-young-voters-economic-check-in/

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WHY SO FEW KIDS ARE GETTING THE HPV VACCINE (Governing)

-“Most places don’t like to think about teens having sex.” But that’s not the only reason.-

In the decade since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the vaccine for the human papillomavirus HPV, its been a tough sell for states, students and their parents.

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HOW GOVERNMENTS ARE TACKLING A DEADLY THREAT TO SENIORS: FALLING (Governing)

-Fall injuries among older adults cost Medicare almost as much as cancer treatment last year.-

Falls are the leading cause of injury and injury-related deaths among older adults and cost more than $30 billion a year in medical charges.

A recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC found that nationally just over 10 percent of older Americans reported an injury from a fall in the past year. The report tracked falls and fall injuries for adults age 65 and over in each state, discovering sizable variation across different regions of the country.

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WATER FOR LIFE (Eugene Weekly)

-When disaster strikes, Eugene needs a second source of water-

A massive earthquake, a toxic chemical spill, a huge forest fire. If a disaster strikes the McKenzie River, it strikes Eugene’s sole source of drinking water. There is also the possibility of a malevolent attack on the water system, EWEB says.

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OREGON HEALTH AUTHORITY NARROWS FOCUS ON HOUSING AS HEALTH CARE (Street Roots News)

-Increased investment has begun in Portland with a newly announced health and housing alliance-

In a report released in late October, Oregon Health Authority examined the role of housing as a social determinant of health.

The report, which surveyed 15 of the states 16 coordinated care organizations, or CCOs, showed CCOs offer a variety of housing-related services and have an eagerness to invest and expand upon what already exists.

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November 28, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Roseburg sawmill challenges investigators of state energy tax credit program
* Expanding Cascade-Siskiyou Monument a holy cause Opinion — Guest Opinion
* Two quakes strike off of Oregon Coast
* Lawmakers wary of dipping into reserve funds
* Sanctuaries send a message — Opinion
* Oregon needs to step up a notch in the battle against adult obesity
* State updates its list of sensitive species
* New timeline addresses M98 funding for schools
* Its here: Winter driving conditions have arrived
* Central Oregon Cities Turn To Salem For Help With New Transit System Funding Idea
* What Does A Trump Administration Mean For Legal Marijuana?
* LBCC carrying out Oregon Promise

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ROSEBURG SAWMILL CHALLENGES INVESTIGATORS OF STATE ENERGY TAX CREDIT PROGRAM (Portland Oregonian)

Managers of a Roseburg sawmill say investigators hired to audit Oregon’s controversial business energy tax credit program made a negligent mistake that harmed its reputation.

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EXPANDING CASCADE-SISKIYOU MONUMENT A HOLY CAUSE OPINION — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Right now, one part of God’s creation is particularly in need of our attention and stewardship: The area surrounding the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southwest Oregon. This national monument is special to Oregon and to our nation. Established in 2000, the monument is one of the most biodiverse places in the country. Although it remains the only monument in the country designed specifically for the protection of biodiversity, its original boundaries were significantly constrained.

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TWO QUAKES STRIKE OFF OF OREGON COAST (Salem Statesman Journal)

Two earthquakes struck off the Oregon Coast late Sunday and early Monday morning according to USGS reports.

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LAWMAKERS WARY OF DIPPING INTO RESERVE FUNDS (Eugene Register-Guard)

In the wake of the resounding defeat of Measure 97, the corporate tax increase, state lawmakers have publicly stressed the challenge they face next year: a two-year budget gap that could reach $1.8 billion.

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SANCTUARIES SEND A MESSAGE — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Various Oregon cities, including Eugene, and colleges, including the University of Oregon and Oregon State University, are  or are considering becoming  sanctuary cities and campuses. This means they will not cooperate with federal immigration authorities seeking to deport people solely because they are in the United States illegally.

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OREGON NEEDS TO STEP UP A NOTCH IN THE BATTLE AGAINST ADULT OBESITY (Portland Tribune)

If you’re wondering if Oregon is winning the battle of the bulge, consider a report from the Trust For Americas Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The report, titled, The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America, reveals that the adult obesity rate in Oregon is 30.1 percent, giving us the 22nd highest rate in the United States.

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STATE UPDATES ITS LIST OF SENSITIVE SPECIES (Bend Bulletin)

-Review set for Friday meeting-

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission on Friday will review the states list of sensitive species, a designation meant to help prevent the decline of those species before they reach a more critical point when its harder and more expensive to recover them.

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NEW TIMELINE ADDRESSES M98 FUNDING FOR SCHOOLS (Bend Bulletin)

Money from Measure 98, the voter-approved requirement for state funding for dropout prevention and career and college readiness programs, is expected to be available for schools next fall.

The Oregon Department of Education has released a projected timeline of how Measure 98 will be implemented. Guiding principles have already been finalized, according to the states timeline, and plans are for the first report to go to the State Board of Education on Dec. 8.

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IT’S HERE: WINTER DRIVING CONDITIONS HAVE ARRIVED (Bend Bulletin)

-Slow down, and don’t follow so closely-

Winter conditions arrived in parts of Central Oregon today, and snow and ice turned roads around the region slippery.

Driving instructor Mark Larson with Deschutes Driver Education said local motorists have a number of bad habits, mostly centered around driving too fast and following too closely regardless of road conditions.

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CENTRAL OREGON CITIES TURN TO SALEM FOR HELP WITH NEW TRANSIT SYSTEM FUNDING IDEA (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Central Oregon governments want state lawmakers to allow requests for property tax increases that would fund the areas mass transit system.

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WHAT DOES A TRUMP ADMINISTRATION MEAN FOR LEGAL MARIJUANA? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The recent election saw California and three other states join Oregon, Washington, Colorado and Alaska in legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. Four more states voted for medical cannabis, as well.

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LBCC CARRYING OUT OREGON PROMISE (Albany Democrat Herald)

For Larissa James, Oregon Promise has delivered  mostly.

But the 19-year-old South Albany High School graduate would have preferred a little more clarity, however, when the new state grant program first made its promise to cover community college costs.

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newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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November 23, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Record 21,300 Oregon students are homeless, state says
* Post-election mortgage rate surge unlikely to dampen housing appetite in Oregon, experts say
* How can Portland cut lead levels in drinking water? EPA offers clues
* State senator resigns to take a job developing new University of Oregon science complex
* Federal judge blocks overtime rule expected to impact 4.2 million workers
* Bid for Elliott State Forest passes early review, heads to state land board
* Oregon Dungeness crabbing closed, mussel harvesting open along coast
* Court blocks federal plan to extend overtime pay to many
* Oregon’s food insecurity spike highest in nation
* Free fishing and state park entry offered for Black Friday
* DEQ fines G&R Auto Wreckers for stormwater violations
* Dungeness crab season delayed again
* Two new mountain bike trails approved for Silver Falls State Park
* Eugene state Sen. Chris Edwards stepping down for administrative job at UO
* Federal officials are proposing one of the largest ever projects to remove juniper trees to protect habitat for imperiled sage grouse
* More Oregon students than last year are homeless, state says
* Eugene nursing home sued in death of couple, ages 92 and 91
* New data show homelessness on the rise in schools
* UO student documentary challenges map showing ‘lead blob’ in NoPo
* State senator resigns to take university post
* Elliott forest purchase plan meets initial criteria
* Federal judge focuses on confession of former Franke murder suspect
* Governor nominates successor for transportation commission
* State agencies warn cannabis growers
* Editorial: Fighting for childhood immunizations — Opinion
* Editorial: Don’t shut out mountain bikers — Opinion
* Deschutes forest considers transmission line
* Oregon Roads Could See Record Travelers This Thanksgiving
* Could Trump Pop The West Coast’s Liberal Bubble?
* Oregon’s Homeless Student Population Rises For 3rd Year In A Row
* Economic Check In
* Study: Barriers between producers, buyers hinder local food movement
* WSDA seeks money to help small farms
* Groups seek order to stop logging on former state forest land
* Our view: Harnessing rivers power gives Northwest life — Opinion
* Ferrioli talks centers on taxes, PERS, and how to nullify an executive order
* New overtime law could help some while hurting others
* Administrator: Its definitely going to hurt
* OnTrack faces Department of Justice scrutiny
* Water call made on the Williamson
* Oregon Coast reopened to mussel harvesting, while crabbing is closed
* Commercial crab fishery along Oregon, Washington coasts
* Unemployment slightly higher in county than US
* Unemployment drops in Linn, Benton
* Guest Opinion: What we can do about affordable housing in Ashland — Guest Opinion
* Gas tax not the only idea — Opinion
* Islands: Public land that the public cant get to — Opinion
* I-84 variable speed signs fully active
* Gorging on the green
* Time for lawmakers to get busy — Opinion
* Douglas County growing more slowly than most in state
* Storm of 1996 caused death and destruction in Douglas County
* Oregon College Savings Plan makes matching contributions on Black Friday
* Three new grants awarded to local schools
* Oregon’s Voter Participation is Impressive, But It’s No Minnesota
* Portland Officials Begged State Lawmakers for Authority to Erect New Speed Cameras. They Installed Them Very Slowly.

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RECORD 21,300 OREGON STUDENTS ARE HOMELESS, STATE SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

The number of Oregon students who can’t go home to a safe place they call their own has grown to a record 21,340, or 3.7 percent of the state’s public school enrollment, the state reported Tuesday.

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POST-ELECTION MORTGAGE RATE SURGE UNLIKELY TO DAMPEN HOUSING APPETITE IN OREGON, EXPERTS SAY (Portland Oregonian)

Donald Trump’s surprise presidential victory triggered a sudden and unexpected increase in mortgage rates, but those higher home loan costs aren’t likely to cool prices in the red-hot Portland housing market.

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HOW CAN PORTLAND CUT LEAD LEVELS IN DRINKING WATER? EPA OFFERS CLUES (Portland Oregonian)

Portland officials have been tight-lipped about what immediate steps they’ll take to reduce lead in drinking water. But some clues have emerged, courtesy of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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STATE SENATOR RESIGNS TO TAKE A JOB DEVELOPING NEW UNIVERSITY OF OREGON SCIENCE COMPLEX (Portland Oregonian)

Sen. Chris Edwards, D-Eugene, announced his resignation on Tuesday to take a job developing a new science complex at the University of Oregon.

Edwards plans to start his job as vice president for strategic initiatives on Dec. 15, and he will initially focus on completing the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact. The project will be largely funded by a $500 million donation from the couple.

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FEDERAL JUDGE BLOCKS OVERTIME RULE EXPECTED TO IMPACT 4.2 MILLION WORKERS (Portland Oregonian)

On Tuesday, a federal judge in Texas temporarily blocked President Barack Obama’s update to overtime regulations, which would increase the salary threshold for many white collar workers exempt from overtime from $23,660 per year to $47,476 per year, reports The Hill.

The rule was set to go into effect on Dec. 1.

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BID FOR ELLIOTT STATE FOREST PASSES EARLY REVIEW, HEADS TO STATE LAND BOARD (Portland Oregonian)

The lone $220.8 million bid from a timber company and tribal government to buy Oregon’s Elliott State Forest passed a preliminary review this week.

The state said the 75-page proposal to manage the forest, submitted last week by Lone Rock Timber Management Partners and the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, met the minimum requirements for keeping public access to the land, generating jobs, protecting older forest stands and managing the areas surrounding creeks and rivers on the 82,500-acre territory.

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OREGON DUNGENESS CRABBING CLOSED, MUSSEL HARVESTING OPEN ALONG COAST (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s Dungeness crab season is starting similar to last year’s — with a ban on all harvesting.

Domoic acid, a toxin produced by warm waters and algae, is over safe levels for the second year in a row. The Oregon departments of agriculture and fish and wildlife have closed all commercial and recreational crabbing along the coast and in bays and estuaries.

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COURT BLOCKS FEDERAL PLAN TO EXTEND OVERTIME PAY TO MANY (Salem Statesman Journal)

In a blow to the Obama administration’s labor-law plans, a federal court has blocked the start of a rule that would have made an estimated 4 million more American workers eligible for overtime pay heading into the holiday season.

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OREGON’S FOOD INSECURITY SPIKE HIGHEST IN NATION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon recorded its sharpest increase in food insecurity of any state in the nation during the past three years, despite the state’s steady economic growth.

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FREE FISHING AND STATE PARK ENTRY OFFERED FOR BLACK FRIDAY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregonians will have a plenty of options for outdoor recreation on Black Friday.

The most notorious shopping day of the season is being co-opted by state agencies looking to entice people to hit the trail instead of the mall.

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DEQ FINES G&R AUTO WRECKERS FOR STORMWATER VIOLATIONS (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has fined G & R Auto Wreckers Inc. $11,011 for failing to comply with the monitoring requirements of its stormwater discharge permit at its facility in Independence.

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DUNGENESS CRAB SEASON DELAYED AGAIN (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon’s commercial Dungeness crab season will be delayed due to concern about high domoic acid levels in some areas.

Its the second year in a row the traditional Dec. 1 opening has been postponed.

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TWO NEW MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAILS APPROVED FOR SILVER FALLS STATE PARK (Salem Statesman Journal)

The next step in making Silver Falls State Park a destination for mountain biking is about to move forward.

Two new sections of trail designed specifically for mountain biking  but also open to hiking and running  have been approved for construction at Oregon’s largest state park.

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EUGENE STATE SEN. CHRIS EDWARDS STEPPING DOWN FOR ADMINISTRATIVE JOB AT UO (Eugene Register-Guard)

After a decade in the Oregon Legislature, Democratic state Sen. Chris Edwards of Eugene is leaving office to take an administrative position at the University of Oregon, where he will work on the proposed Phil and Penny Knight scientific campus.

Edwards, 43, submitted his letter of resignation on Tuesday, effective Dec. 31. He has represented Senate District 7, which includes much of Eugene and Junction City, since 2009. The former general manager of his family’s small timber business served in the Oregon House from 2006 to 2009.

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FEDERAL OFFICIALS ARE PROPOSING ONE OF THE LARGEST EVER PROJECTS TO REMOVE JUNIPER TREES TO PROTECT HABITAT FOR IMPERILED SAGE GROUSE (Eugene Register-Guard)

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management on Monday announced it’s taking public comments through Jan. 3 on the plan to eliminate the trees from 940 square miles in Owyhee County in southwest Idaho.

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MORE OREGON STUDENTS THAN LAST YEAR ARE HOMELESS, STATE SAYS (Eugene Register-Guard)

More students in Oregon are homeless than the number tallied last year, a disturbing trend that now has gone on for three years, state education officials said Tuesday.

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EUGENE NURSING HOME SUED IN DEATH OF COUPLE, AGES 92 AND 91 (Eugene Register-Guard)

A Eugene nursing home and its physical therapy and hospice providers have been hit with a nearly $2.7 million lawsuit filed by a Southern Oregon woman who blames them for the deaths of her mother and stepfather.

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NEW DATA SHOW HOMELESSNESS ON THE RISE IN SCHOOLS (Portland Tribune)

Nearly 8,000 public school children – a 9.3 percent increase from two years ago – in the tri-county area meet the federal definition of homeless.

That’s according to 2015-16 data released Thursday from the Oregon Department of Education.

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UO STUDENT DOCUMENTARY CHALLENGES MAP SHOWING ‘LEAD BLOB’ IN NOPO (Portland Tribune)

The Oregonian created the map based on 2013 data from the U.S. Forest Service that used innovative measurements of moss samples to track toxic air emissions. The one showing the lead blob in the Kenton neighborhood was one in a series of maps showing elevated levels of heavy metals found in tree moss.

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STATE SENATOR RESIGNS TO TAKE UNIVERSITY POST (Portland Tribune)

-Edwards will lead ‘strategic initiatives’ at University of Oregon’s Knight Campus-

State Sen. Chris Edwards, D-Eugene, announced Tuesday he is stepping down from the legislature to lead strategic initiatives at the University of Oregon’s new Knight Campus at the end of the year.

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ELLIOTT FOREST PURCHASE PLAN MEETS INITIAL CRITERIA (Portland Tribune)

-State Land Board will discuss proposal at its meeting Dec. 13-

The Department of State Lands says the sole plan to acquire an 82,500-acre parcel of the Elliott State Forest meets the departments initial criteria for acquisition.

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FEDERAL JUDGE FOCUSES ON CONFESSION OF FORMER FRANKE MURDER SUSPECT (Portland Tribune)

-Johnny Crouse confessed to killing Oregon corrections director before investigators focused on Frank Gable-

A deceased former suspect in the 1989 murder of Oregon Corrections Department Director Michael Franke unexpectedly dominated the closing stages of a Wednesday federal court proceeding on the appeal of the man convicted of killing him.

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GOVERNOR NOMINATES SUCCESSOR FOR TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION (Portland Tribune)

Paula Brown, a Republican from Ashland, has been nominated by Gov. Kate Brown to succeed Susan Morgan on the Oregon Transportation Commission.

As a member of the five-member commission, Brown could be a power player in the shaping of a transportation package in the 2017 legislative session.

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STATE AGENCIES WARN CANNABIS GROWERS (Bend Bulletin)

-Test failures, recalls prompt letter-

Three state agencies in a letter reminded marijuana producers in Oregon to be careful using pesticides in the wake of two recent public health alerts.

The letter states that cannabis producers whose products test below action levels for permitted pesticides may still fall afoul of state regulations if they use pesticides banned by the state Pesticide Control Act.

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EDITORIAL: FIGHTING FOR CHILDHOOD IMMUNIZATIONS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Fake news is in the news as the nation struggles to understand the meaning of Donald Trumps election. A Washington Post report this week tells the story of two young men in California making a big living posting and promoting admittedly phony reports that inflame the passions of readers who thrive on seeing their biases confirmed.

But however intense the problem may be in this election cycle, its far from new. The internet has enabled us to live in self-reinforcing bubbles, reading only information that agrees with our beliefs.

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EDITORIAL: DON’T SHUT OUT MOUNTAIN BIKERS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Mountain bikers should be able to experience wilderness without leaving their bikes at home. For this to happen, however, Congress must pass legislation requiring federal land managers to identify places in wilderness areas that are suitable.

Central Oregon does not suffer from a bike-trail shortage. But bikes aren’t allowed in wilderness areas, including  the Badlands Wilderness near Bend.

Thats because of an interpretation of the Wilderness Act of 1964, which prohibits mechanical transport in wilderness areas.

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DESCHUTES FOREST CONSIDERS TRANSMISSION LINE (Bend Bulletin)

-Proposal aims to ensure power around south Deschutes County-

Deschutes National Forest officials will soon start reviewing plans to build a new electricity transmission line on forestland near La Pine and are seeking public input on possible environmental impacts from the proposal.

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OREGON ROADS COULD SEE RECORD TRAVELERS THIS THANKSGIVING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

If you plan on driving on Oregon roads for the Thanksgiving holiday, you’re not alone.

The Oregon Department of Transportation estimates that the number of travelers on highways this holiday week could be around 600,000  a record for the state.

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COULD TRUMP POP THE WEST COAST’S LIBERAL BUBBLE? (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

In Novembers election, Republicans around the country won big up and down the ballot. But wins for conservatives were far fewer here on the West Coast, where voters largely doubled down on progressive policies and candidates.

Washington voters decided to increase the minimum wage. California joined the Pacific Northwest in legalizing recreational marijuana. And Oregon elected Democrat Kate Brown: the first openly bisexual governor in the country.

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OREGON’S HOMELESS STUDENT POPULATION RISES FOR 3RD YEAR IN A ROW (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The number of public school students in Oregon considered homeless has increased for the third year in a row, according to an annual report released by the state Department of Education.

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ECONOMIC CHECK IN (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon recently reached full employment  meaning everyone who wants a job can find one. Josh Lehner, senior economist in Oregon’s Office of Economic Analysis, tells us what that means for Oregon’s economy.

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STUDY: BARRIERS BETWEEN PRODUCERS, BUYERS HINDER LOCAL FOOD MOVEMENT (Capital Press)

The local food movement may be growing in popularity, but barriers exist between buyers and producers that make locally grown food harder to find, a pair of experts says.

Producers have difficulty finding local buyers to purchase a large portion of their crops, while buyers such as schools, restaurants, catering companies and stores complain they cant get sufficient volume locally to meet their needs.

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WSDA SEEKS MONEY TO HELP SMALL FARMS (Capital Press)

The Washington State Department of Agriculture proposes to roughly double state spending on helping small farms succeed, a program that’s been popular with lawmakers but has received uneven funding.

WSDA has submitted the two-year, $500,000 funding request to the governors budget office. If approved by Gov. Jay Inslee and the 2017 Legislature, the expenditure would fortify WSDA’s efforts to aid fledgling farms leap through regulatory hoops to get at their potential customers.

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GROUPS SEEK ORDER TO STOP LOGGING ON FORMER STATE FOREST LAND (Capital Press)

Environmentalist groups want an injunction to stop logging on roughly 50 acres of private property that was once part of Oregon’s Elliott State Forest.

Three nonprofits  Cascadia Wildlands, Center for Biological Diversity and Audubon Society of Portland  have asked U.S. District Judge Ann Aiken to prohibit tree harvest on the parcel due to hazards to the threatened marbled murrelet.

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OUR VIEW: HARNESSING RIVERS POWER GIVES NORTHWEST LIFE — OPINION (East Oregonian)

A federal judge in Portland has asked residents of the Pacific Northwest to comment on the impact of the Columbia and Snake rivers.

Were glad he asked.

All he has to do is turn on a light in his office, have lunch and take a walk around Portland to understand the rivers direct contributions to him and millions of other residents of the Pacific Northwest.

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FERRIOLI TALKS CENTERS ON TAXES, PERS, AND HOW TO NULLIFY AN EXECUTIVE ORDER (Argus Observer)

Oregon Senate Republicans gained one seat in their body in the General Election, and while still in the minority, that one seat gives them more leverage.

That was one of the comments from state Sen. Ted Ferrioli, John Day, Senate Republican Leader, during his talk before the Ontario Area Chamber of Commerce forum Monday.

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NEW OVERTIME LAW COULD HELP SOME WHILE HURTING OTHERS (Argus Observer)

Federal overtime regulations are being updated, effective Dec. 1, by order of President Barack Obama, but the order may hurt some of the people it is supposed to help.

According to a document from the U.S. Department of Labor, the update to overtime regulations is designed to help white collar workers, making more of them eligible for overtime time pay if they work more than 40 hours per work.

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ADMINISTRATOR: ITS DEFINITELY GOING TO HURT (Argus Observer)

The numbers have to yet to be determined by all entities, but for Malheur County its increased costs contributions into the Oregon Public Employee Retirement System will weigh heavily on budgets, starting with the 2017-18 fiscal year.

Its definitely going to hurt, Lorinda Dubois, county administrator said.

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ONTRACK FACES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCRUTINY (Medford Mail Tribune)

A report by the state over its contract with Southern Oregon’s largest addictions recovery services provider, OnTrack Inc., will spark a review by the Department of Justice, the Mail Tribune learned Tuesday.

On Aug. 15, 2016, the Oregon Department of Human Services required stricter oversight by Medford-based OnTrack of children living with recovering addicts, particularly during investigations of domestic violence and sexual assault cases.

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WATER CALL MADE ON THE WILLIAMSON (Herald and News)

Water users in the upper Klamath Basin have received shutoff notices for surface water use after the Klamath Tribes called on their water rights earlier this month.

According to the Oregon Water Resources Department OWRD, the tribes called on their rights Nov. 7 due to decreased flows in the Williamson River and other aquifers.

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OREGON COAST REOPENED TO MUSSEL HARVESTING, WHILE CRABBING IS CLOSED (The World)

Mussel harvesting has reopened along the Southern Oregon Coast this month after being closed since Sept. 24, while recreational and commercial crabbing have been shut down due to high levels of toxic domoic acid.

Samples of mussels taken from Heceta Head, north of Florence to the California Border show the levels of domoic acid have dipped below the alert level.

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COMMERCIAL CRAB FISHERY ALONG OREGON, WASHINGTON COASTS (Daily Astorian)

Going into November, the crab looked good and fishery managers in Oregon and Washington were hopeful about a Dec. 1 opener for the season.

Now the commercial Dungeness crab season will be delayed along the entire Oregon coast due to concerns about high levels of the marine toxin domoic acid in crab viscera the guts in some areas of the coast, and the likelihood of levels rising in other areas.

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UNEMPLOYMENT SLIGHTLY HIGHER IN COUNTY THAN US (Daily Astorian)

Clatsop County posted a 5.3 percent seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in October, according to the state Employment Department.

Unemployment was down from the previous month and the year prior, both 5.5 percent. The county had the 10th-lowest unemployment among Oregons 36 counties, tied with Wasco County. The state posted a 5.3 unemployment rate, and the U.S. 4.9 percent.

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UNEMPLOYMENT DROPS IN LINN, BENTON (Albany Democrat Herald)

Unemployment dropped slightly in Linn and Benton counties in October, according to figures released by the Oregon Employment Department on Tuesday.

In previous months, the unemployment rate had risen despite hiring increases as more people started searching for work, said Patrick O’Connor, state regional economist.

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GUEST OPINION: WHAT WE CAN DO ABOUT AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN ASHLAND — GUEST OPINION (Ashland Daily Tidings)

One of the most contentious issues during the recent City Council and mayoral races in Ashland was affordable housing. A number of the candidates advocated for regulation against greedy landlords, while others suggested the need for city planning that would create permanent rental and affordable housing. Some just threw up their hands, and wondered how do you solve this problem when you have houses selling for half a million dollars

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GAS TAX NOT THE ONLY IDEA — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

Rep. Cliff Bentz has been asking his constituents a question that not all politicians have the gumption to pose.

What it comes down to is whether residents in Bentz’s district, which includes Baker County, want the Ontario Republican to vote for increasing the state gas tax, and potentially boosting vehicle registration fees, in both cases to raise money to maintain streets, roads and highways.

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ISLANDS: PUBLIC LAND THAT THE PUBLIC CANT GET TO — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

Public land is great, except for public land that you cant get to without trespassing unless you have a helicopter or a parachute and an airplane to jump out of.

Which most of us don’t.

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I-84 VARIABLE SPEED SIGNS FULLY ACTIVE (Blue Mountain Eagle)

Digital speed limit signs mounted over a 30-mile stretch of Interstate 84 between Baker City and La Grande have replaced the standard speed signs in that area.

The new signs will use traffic, road, weather and visibility sensors to lower the legal speed limit when ice, snow, fog or a wreck ahead requires everyone to slow down, according to an Oregon Department of Transportation press release.

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GORGING ON THE GREEN (LaGrande Observer)

-The combination of October rain and November warmth has resulted in a lush crop of green grass, a boon for big game animals as they prepare for winter-

The green grass that has kept a bright bit of summer in your yard brings much more than aesthetic value to Northeastern Oregon’s big game animals and upland game birds.

For them it might even mean the difference between life and death.

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TIME FOR LAWMAKERS TO GET BUSY — OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

The election is over, which means elected lawmakers  and the governor  should get busy on several lingering state issues.

Now it is time for the governor and elected leaders on both sides of the political aisle to find solutions to problems haunting Oregon.

Time, in fact, is running out on some key issues, including the problems that plague the Oregon Public Employees Retirement System _________________________________________

DOUGLAS COUNTY GROWING MORE SLOWLY THAN MOST IN STATE (Douglas County News-Review)

Douglas County is growing, but very slowly, according to statistics released by Portland State University’s Population Research Center this week.

Oregon overall has netted 62,505 new residents, mostly people moving to the state rather than infants being born. However, Douglas County added just 485 new people between 2015 and 2016.

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STORM OF 1996 CAUSED DEATH AND DESTRUCTION IN DOUGLAS COUNTY (Douglas County News-Review)

Twenty years ago, heavy rain started falling in mid-November in Douglas County, and it seemed like it would never end.

The ground became so saturated that it caused floods, landslides, fallen trees, power outages and road washouts including a huge sinkhole on Interstate 5 in Roseburg.

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OREGON COLLEGE SAVINGS PLAN MAKES MATCHING CONTRIBUTIONS ON BLACK FRIDAY (Douglas County News-Review)

The Oregon College Savings Plan is encouraging this years Black Friday shoppers to invest in the gift of education.

On Black Friday of this year, Nov. 25, the Oregon Colleges Savings Plan will make a one-time matching contribution of $25 into any new account established online between 12 a.m. and 11:59 pm PDT. Match details and official rules are available at OregonCollegeSavings.com/BlackFriday.

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THREE NEW GRANTS AWARDED TO LOCAL SCHOOLS (Wallowa.com)

Wallowa County schools are tackling their educational goals with the help of three grants secured by the Wallowa County Education Service District ESD.

Wallowa, Enterprise and Joseph schools are upgrading their technology and experimenting with new math programs with the help of state and federal grants the ESD received this year.

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OREGON’S VOTER PARTICIPATION IS IMPRESSIVE, BUT IT’S NO MINNESOTA (Willamette Week)

-Let’s break down how many people in Oregon bother to vote by mail.-

In an election year when many states saw plummeting voter participation, Oregon bucked the trend.

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PORTLAND OFFICIALS BEGGED STATE LAWMAKERS FOR AUTHORITY TO ERECT NEW SPEED CAMERAS. THEY INSTALLED THEM VERY SLOWLY. (Willamette Week)

-Reducing driver speeds could reduce traffic deaths by 25 percent. Why isn’t it the city’s first priority?-

On Nov. 20, the activist group Families for Safe Streets placed 400 pairs of shoes in a semicircle near the Morrison Bridgeone pair for each person who has died on Oregon roads in 2016.

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THE STATES THAT COLLEGE GRADUATES ARE MOST LIKELY TO LEAVE (New York Times)

This years election has forced Americans to take notice of class divisions between workers. And while these divisions may at first ring of lazy stereotypes  the rural Rust Belt worker without a college degree and the coastal urban college-educated worker  theyre rooted in a real dynamic. Many of the most skilled workers  young people with college degrees  are leaving struggling regions of America for cities, specifically for cities in Southern and coastal states.

There are clear economic reasons for their choice. Dense metro areas tend to produce more jobs and make workers more productive. Wages, for all kinds of workers, are also higher.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on November 23, 2016 OSL eClips

November 22, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips
* Flu season hits Oregon; doctors advise getting a shot
* Youth psychiatric facility in Corvallis falsified records, hiding safety failures
* Conservation groups call for massive Crater Lake Wilderness Area
* Report: Solitary confinement used too much in Oregon prisons
* New Springfield affordable housing project to move forward with state funding
* Monument expansion would only deepen divide — Guest Opinion
* Water tests detect elevated lead levels in some Portland homes
* School Notes: Governor’s 10-step program for schools
* Election raises questions about immigrants’ future
* Deschutes and Crook counties lead the state in growth
* State retirement session coming to Bend
* Editorial: A new tool to bash Oregon business — Opinion
* Food Insecurity Rises In Oregon, Bucking National Decline
* Killing Wolves That Prey On Livestock Could Become More Common In Washington State
* Marijuana Under Trump
* Wet weather heralds busy season for slug researcher
* Breaching Snake River dams would devastate wheat industry, growers say
* West Coast H-2A minimum wage likely to increase
* Mishra and Zenger nominated for state boards
* Wilbur: Say no to condors in Hells Canyon — Guest Opinion
* TAPP-ing into absenteeism strategies
* Oregon fish, wildfire programs in need of financial help — Guest Opinion
* New OIT president enthusiastic about college’s future — Opinion
* After 13 years, city breaks ground on wastewater treatment project
* Oregon winegrape producers optimistic about 2016 harvest
* Bonamici visits Circle Creek, Boneyard Ridge
* Conservancy signs 3,300-acre deal for Onion Peak
* Election turnout shows some curious trends — Opinion
* Learning the lessons of legal pot — Opinion
* DEQ to monitor air near plant
* Second case of strain B confirmed
* Think Too Much: Tracking the mid-valley’s population trends — Opinion
* Busiest Thanksgiving travel in a decade predicted to coincide with winter storms in Oregon
* New Study Shows Even as Economy Boomed, More Oregonians Struggled to Put Food on Table
* Fukushima quake provides lessons for Oregon
* Funding set for Prineville school-to-housing project
* How Casinos Enable Gambling Addicts

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FLU SEASON HITS OREGON; DOCTORS ADVISE GETTING A SHOT (Portland Oregonian)

Don’t be fooled by the mild weather: Flu season has arrived.

It’s only a little more than a month old but the latest statistics from the state, which cover the week of Nov. 6, show a sharp surge of cases the week of Nov. 6, at 74. That’s more than half of the total number since the season started Oct. 2.
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YOUTH PSYCHIATRIC FACILITY IN CORVALLIS FALSIFIED RECORDS, HIDING SAFETY FAILURES (Portland Oregonian)

Employees at a residential psychiatric treatment facility for children in Corvallis routinely failed to perform mandatory welfare checks and falsified records to hide that fact, according to Oregon licensing records.
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CONSERVATION GROUPS CALL FOR MASSIVE CRATER LAKE WILDERNESS AREA (Portland Oregonian)

Conservation groups are stepping up the pressure on Oregon’s congressional delegation to designate more than 500,000 acres of public land, including Crater Lake National Park, as a federal wilderness area.
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REPORT: SOLITARY CONFINEMENT USED TOO MUCH IN OREGON PRISONS (Salem Statesman Journal)

The sights and sounds of solitary confinement can be bleak: Grown men raving incoherently, yelling at nothing in particular, sitting alone, sometimes for months. Inmates with mental illnesses sometimes harm or mutilate themselves while in solitary.
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NEW SPRINGFIELD AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROJECT TO MOVE FORWARD WITH STATE FUNDING (Eugene Register-Guard)

St. Vincent de Paul of Lane County is moving forward with building a low-rent housing project in downtown Springfield after a state agency awarded the nonprofit group a multimillion-dollar subsidy.

Oregon Housing and Community Services on Friday approved $6.5 million in tax credits over 10 years for St. Vincents $7.7 million Myrtlewood affordable housing project.
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MONUMENT EXPANSION WOULD ONLY DEEPEN DIVIDE — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The Register-Guard recently argued that Donald Trumps election adds urgency to doubling the size of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument through the federal Antiquities Act. I see it differently. The unexpectedly high level of Trumps support suggests many citizens are fed up with the federal governments misplaced priorities.
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WATER TESTS DETECT ELEVATED LEAD LEVELS IN SOME PORTLAND HOMES (Portland Tribune)

The results come as the state demands the city to take further steps to limit the amount of lead its water leeches out of old water fixtures.

Lead levels under the Portland Water Bureaus biannual testing were slightly higher than the federal action limit.
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SCHOOL NOTES: GOVERNOR’S 10-STEP PROGRAM FOR SCHOOLS (Portland Tribune)

-Governors council releases ideas to help teachers-

A new council created early this year by Gov. Kate Brown released 10 recommendations on Nov. 18 for improving the states education.
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ELECTION RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT IMMIGRANTS’ FUTURE (Portland Tribune)

Panelists say Oregon runs counter to national trend, but Trump presidency affects federal direction.

For recent immigrants and Hispanics, the message from panelists at a post-election symposium was similar to one offered by a longtime labor activist: Dont mourn, organize.
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DESCHUTES AND CROOK COUNTIES LEAD THE STATE IN GROWTH (Bend Bulletin)

-PSU study suggests regional population surge continues-

Central Oregon continues to lead the state in population growth, according to figures released last week by Portland State University.

The Population Research Center at PSU estimates Deschutes County added 5,895 residents between July 1, 2015, and July 1, 2016, for a growth rate of 3.5 percent. Crook County was in second place with a growth rate of 2.3 percent, or 495 new residents over the same period, while the state as a whole grew by an estimated 1.6 percent.
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STATE RETIREMENT SESSION COMING TO BEND (Bend Bulletin)

-Oregon Treasury holding employer roundtables-

The Oregon State Treasury has scheduled a 90-minute roundtable discussion with employers in Bend about the new Oregon Retirement Savings Plan.

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EDITORIAL: A NEW TOOL TO BASH OREGON BUSINESS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Voters soundly defeated Measure 97, which would have imposed a new $3 billion annual tax on businesses. But groups that backed it are coming after businesses again.

They say they will try again with another tax. They are also aiming for what they call tax transparency. They want to make corporate tax information public.

The transparency plan has been to put the tax information for any corporation doing business in Oregon on the internet so anybody in the world could read it.
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FOOD INSECURITY RISES IN OREGON, BUCKING NATIONAL DECLINE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

With Thanksgiving on the mind of most people this week, a new report shows the number of Oregonians who aren’t sure where their next meal is coming from continues to rise.
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KILLING WOLVES THAT PREY ON LIVESTOCK COULD BECOME MORE COMMON IN WASHINGTON STATE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Over the summer, wildlife managers killed seven wolves in the Profanity Peak pack in northeast Washington. The wolves had been preying on cattle grazing on the Colville National Forest. Under Washingtons wolf management plan, the trigger for so-called lethal action is when a wolf pack attacks livestock four or more times in a year.
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MARIJUANA UNDER TRUMP (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Cannabis business lawyer Amy Margolis weighs in on what this years election results mean for Oregon’s marijuana industry.
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WET WEATHER HERALDS BUSY SEASON FOR SLUG RESEARCHER (Capital Press)

Its the rainy season in Oregon, which means there’s plenty of work for Oregon State University’s new slug expert, Rory McDonnell.

With slugs emerging from their underground hibernation, McDonnell has found that Oregon’s reputation as a haven for the slimy pests is well deserved.

The populations are very large, he said.
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BREACHING SNAKE RIVER DAMS WOULD DEVASTATE WHEAT INDUSTRY, GROWERS SAY (Capital Press)

With the federal government seeking public comment on the Columbia-Snake river system, the Washington Association of Wheat Growers reaffirmed their opposition to breaching dams on the Snake River.

It would be devastating to the industry, said executive director Michelle Hennings.

Removing the dams would mean the river would not be useful for transporting wheat, Hennings said.
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WEST COAST H-2A MINIMUM WAGE LIKELY TO INCREASE (Capital Press)

he minimum wage for H-2A visa foreign guestworkers in Washington and Oregon likely will rise 5.44 percent to $13.38 per hour in 2017, making it the highest in the nation, according to WAFLA, formerly the Washington Farm Labor Association.

The rate has been $12.69 for the past year and goes up every Jan. 1 based on government surveys of regional prevailing wages.
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MISHRA AND ZENGER NOMINATED FOR STATE BOARDS (East Oregonian)

Two Umatilla County residents will be considered by the Oregon Senate for appointment to state boards during Legislative Days in December.

Jon Mishra of Hermiston and Sharon Zenger of Pendleton were nominated by Governor Kate Brown on Monday.
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WILBUR: SAY NO TO CONDORS IN HELLS CANYON — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently awarded the Nez Perce Tribe $200,000 to study introducing California condors into the Hells Canyon area between Idaho and Oregon.

I can save everybody time and money by announcing right now: California condors can almost certainly survive in the Snake River Canyon once introduced there
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TAPP-ING INTO ABSENTEEISM STRATEGIES (Herald and News)

When a student doesn’t show up for class at Chiloquin Elementary School, a team of staff is there to help.

Donna Ridenour starts by making a phone call to the students home. But she doesnt stop there. If the student needs it, she and Tom Riach, who fulfills the same role at Chiloquin Jr./Sr. High School, drive to the students house to pick him up.
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OREGON FISH, WILDFIRE PROGRAMS IN NEED OF FINANCIAL HELP — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

Changes in social behavior and public financing will increasingly affect how we fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and whether some of the Pacific Northwests outdoor traditions are able to continue.
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NEW OIT PRESIDENT ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT COLLEGE’S FUTURE — OPINION (Herald and News)

When it comes to the welcome enthusiasm that we applauded incoming elected officials for in an editorial Thursday we can add the new president of Oregon Institute of Technology.

Nagi Naganathan was chosen to head the Klamath Falls-based polytechnic university last week and in a phone interview with the Herald and News said, My wife and I were so touched by everyone we met in Klamath Falls. It was a big draw for us. It is such a welcoming community. We look forward to look for to being part of the community.
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AFTER 13 YEARS, CITY BREAKS GROUND ON WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROJECT (The World)

Coos Bay city officials struck ground Monday afternoon at the corner of South Empire Boulevard and Fulton Avenue, the future location of wastewater treatment plant no. 2.

The days event effectively concluded a 13-year planning process that was nearly derailed following a June city council decision to explore privatization.
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OREGON WINEGRAPE PRODUCERS OPTIMISTIC ABOUT 2016 HARVEST (Daily Astorian)

Oregon’s vineyard and winery operators are by nature an optimistic, glass-half-full bunch, and their assessment of the 2016 harvest is no exception.

The Oregon Wine Boards annual harvest report said the fruit produced throughout the state was marked by wonderful concentration and complexity with characteristic natural acidity despite numerous quirks in the growing season.
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BONAMICI VISITS CIRCLE CREEK, BONEYARD RIDGE (Daily Astorian)

U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici got a birds eye view of the North Coast Land Conservancys floodplain restoration project from an area on Boneyard Ridge, overlooking Circle Creek and U.S. Highway 101 and the ocean.
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CONSERVANCY SIGNS 3,300-ACRE DEAL FOR ONION PEAK (Daily Astorian)

What could be the largest land preservation deal in western Oregon was signed Friday.

The Seaside-based North Coast Land Conservancy and private investment equity firm Onion Peak Holdings took the first steps toward the acquisition of 3,300 acres of timberland from Stimson Lumber Co. as the conservancy raises funds to meet the costs over a five-year period.
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ELECTION TURNOUT SHOWS SOME CURIOUS TRENDS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

As we continue to sort through the results from the Nov. 8 election, some curious trends have emerged.

You know already that about 2.02 million ballots were returned in Oregon during the election, marking the first time that more than 2 million ballots have been returned in the state.
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LEARNING THE LESSONS OF LEGAL POT — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Who says Oregon voters never will approve new taxes?

In the Nov. 8 election, voters in 111 Oregon cities and counties faced a measure to impose a brand-new tax. The measure passed in all 111 localities.

Of course, it was a measure to impose a local 3 percent tax on the sales of recreational marijuana. The local tax goes on top of a 17 percent state tax.
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DEQ TO MONITOR AIR NEAR PLANT (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

In response to neighborhood health fears, the state Department of Environmental Quality plans to install air quality monitoring equipment near a South Corvallis factory early next year.

The department is scouting for locations in the vicinity of the Hollingsworth & Vose glass fiber plant at 1115 S.E. Crystal Lake Drive.
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SECOND CASE OF STRAIN B CONFIRMED (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Testing has confirmed that both recent cases of meningococcal disease in Benton County are the same type of the illness, known as strain B.

Both cases involve Oregon State University students who are being treated for the disease at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis, and both were reportedly in good condition on Monday.
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THINK TOO MUCH: TRACKING THE MID-VALLEY’S POPULATION TRENDS — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

What sort of population growth is just right for the mid-valley?

It’s a question of considerable importance, even though it hinges on a number of assumptions: First, of course, it implies that we can control the region’s population growth, which is a questionable assumption, at best. It also carries with it the assumption that some population growth is a good thing, and I know there are those of you who disagree with that. We’ll carry on that debate another time.
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BUSIEST THANKSGIVING TRAVEL IN A DECADE PREDICTED TO COINCIDE WITH WINTER STORMS IN OREGON (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Nearly 600,000 Oregonians are predicted to be hitting the road over the extended Thanksgiving weekend at the same time the Cascades could be hit by 2 feet of snow or more.

AAA estimates that a combination of low gas prices and an improving economy will mean this years Thanksgiving will have the highest amount of people on the road for the holiday since 2007.
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NEW STUDY SHOWS EVEN AS ECONOMY BOOMED, MORE OREGONIANS STRUGGLED TO PUT FOOD ON TABLE (Willamette Week)

The Oregon Center for Public Policy this morning released new data showing that a vast group of Oregonians got left behind when the state’s economy heated up in 2012.

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FUKUSHIMA QUAKE PROVIDES LESSONS FOR OREGON (KOIN)

-Japan Meteorological Agency said quake that struck Tuesday was aftershock of massive 2011 quake-

A massive earthquake near Fukushima, Japan triggered tsunami warnings and brought back a flood of memories from the disaster that hit in 2011.

Less than a week ago, another devastating quake rocked New Zealand, leveling structures and causing landslides.
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FUNDING SET FOR PRINEVILLE SCHOOL-TO-HOUSING PROJECT (KTVZ Bend)

-Old Ochoco Elementary to become apartments-

Housing Works announced Friday the funding of Ochoco Elementary School apartments, a repurposing of Ochoco School into multifamily housing in Prineville.

The project involves the conversion of the 70-year-old Ochoco Elementary School into 29 affordable apartments. The property is located at the junction of Highways 26 and 126.

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HOW CASINOS ENABLE GAMBLING ADDICTS (The Atlantic)

-Modern slot machines develop an unbreakable hold on many playerssome of whom wind up losing their jobs, their families, and even, as in the case of Scott Stevens, their lives.-

n the morning of Monday, August 13, 2012, Scott Stevens loaded a brown hunting bag into his Jeep Grand Cherokee, then went to the master bedroom, where he hugged Stacy, his wife of 23 years. I love you, he told her.

Stacy thought that her husband was off to a job interview followed by an appointment with his therapist. Instead, he drove the 22 miles from their home in Steubenville, Ohio, to the Mountaineer Casino, just outside New Cumberland, West Virginia.

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SELF-PILOTED DRONE WILL BE TESTED IN OREGON (My Columbia Basin)

SOAR Oregon has landed a contract with Airbus to test a new kind of drone. That means it will be tested at one of the three test ranges in Oregon  Pendleton, Warm Springs and Tillamook. The drone would signify a breakthrough in unmanned aircraft systems.
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