Old Oregon State Library eClips Blog Is Retired

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February 06, 2017 Weekend Edition

State Library eClips
* Embattled Oregon fish and wildlife commissioners will face public at sportsmen’s show
* On eve of possible repeal, the good, bad and ugly of Obamacare
* Portland’s Tina Kotek explains her rent control plans – and landlord pains
* Loretta Smith forced staffer to work on her campaign, mistreated employees, email alleges
* Gender, racial inequities need first attentions by Oregon leaders — Guest Opinion
* African-American employee refuses to play ‘hangman’ at work, is fired, lawsuit claims
* 2017 session: a chance to stand up for Oregon values — Guest Opinion
* Rat infestation shuts Beaverton Bakery
* Fatal auto crashes in Oregon on the rise again
* To save public lands, liberal hikers and conservative hunters unite
* Animal Abuse in Oregon
* Students shortchanged when voter mandates aren’t funded properly — Opinion
* What’s next in the Elliott State Forest rigmarole? — Guest Opinion
* Oregon Promise aid for community college students going heavily to higher-income families, review finds
* Lane County employee accuses deputy of racial profiling during traffic stop
* Oregon AG wrong in opposing Trump’s executive order — Guest Opinion
* Forestry analysis must include all the facts — Guest Opinion
* Our Opinion: Racial disparities will continue without better information — Opinion
* State budget-writers bring road show to PCC
* Reduced speed limits in Central Oregon remain in flux
* Self-serve gas could expand to 24-hours in rural Oregon
* Deschutes County sees spike in concealed handgun licenses
* Public lands sale bill sparks criticism in Oregon
* Editorial: Raise the minimum legal age for tobacco to 21 — Opinion
* Erik Lukens column: Will Kate Brown fight for rural jobs? — Opinion
* Trump said unemployment rate wasn’t real: some other options
* Oregon Budget Writers Get Down To Business This Week
* Oregon, Washington Team Up For Share Of VW Emissions Settlement Money
* Chef: Taste can play key role in potato marketing
* Growing Latino population means new outreach efforts
* Our view: Development dollars shouldn’t be squandered — Opinion
* Stout: ODFW, fire and winter doing a number on wildlife — Guest Opinion
* When waste is want
* Coos County, state of Oregon, make sanctuary status
* Editorial: Legislature takes steps on PERS — Opinion
* State agency to hear arguments on city land-use policies
* Public lands sale bill sparks criticism in Oregon
* Manufacturing overtime dispute: Whose hardship should prevail?
* 2017 Legislative Preview: Cap-and-trade hits lawmakers agenda
* Secretary of State Dennis Richardson Convenes a Redistricting Panel. It’s Light on Democrats, Women and Minorities
* The U.S. Is Running Out of Nurses
* The Healthy-Lifestyle Curriculum
* The Myth of Working Your Way Through College
* Legislators Work to Fill Gaps in State Assistance for Homeless, Mentally Ill
* Dembrow Is Hopeful Single Payer Option Can Move Forward
* Demand For Popular Short-Term Insurance Plans Could Surge If Health Law Is Relaxed
* Q Corp Compares Cost of Care at the Local, National Level
* Raising Oregon Smoking Age to 21 Has Bipartisan Support
* North campus historic buildings will come down

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EMBATTLED OREGON FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMISSIONERS WILL FACE PUBLIC AT SPORTSMEN’S SHOW (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commissioners under fire from sport anglers will help host a reception Thursday at the Pacific Northwest Sportsmen’s Show.

The reception comes on the heels this past week of a sharply worded demand by a legislator for the resignation of all four commission members who defied a plan to remove gill-nets from the lower Columbia River.
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ON EVE OF POSSIBLE REPEAL, THE GOOD, BAD AND UGLY OF OBAMACARE (Portland Oregonian)

The much-maligned Affordable Care Act may well be headed for the public policy scrap heap if the Trump administration has its way.

But the controversial law — funded by a prodigious river of at least $6.7 billion in tax money — has already fundamentally changed the health care industry.
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PORTLAND’S TINA KOTEK EXPLAINS HER RENT CONTROL PLANS – AND LANDLORD PAINS (Portland Oregonian)

It hasn’t been easy for House Speaker Tina Kotek to carry the torch on boosting renter protections. The Portland Democrat has successfully pushed tenant-friendly legislation, much to the chagrin of some area landlords. Last week, when she spoke at a real estate conference, a landlord threatened to finance a candidate to run against her — to which the crowd of property owners and developers cheered, according to The Daily Journal of Commerce.
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LORETTA SMITH FORCED STAFFER TO WORK ON HER CAMPAIGN, MISTREATED EMPLOYEES, EMAIL ALLEGES (Portland Oregonian)

Multnomah County human resources officials are investigating County Commissioner Loretta Smith after a staffer leveled a host of complaints, including that she used county resources for her campaign, bullied her employees and forced a staffer to use vacation time to work on Smith’s campaign.
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GENDER, RACIAL INEQUITIES NEED FIRST ATTENTIONS BY OREGON LEADERS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The numbers are shocking: Perpetrators have sexually or domestically assaulted more than half of Oregon’s women and girls. Oregon families face some of the least affordable childcare in the nation. And Oregon women have the highest rates of depression in the country.
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AFRICAN-AMERICAN EMPLOYEE REFUSES TO PLAY ‘HANGMAN’ AT WORK, IS FIRED, LAWSUIT CLAIMS (Portland Oregonian)

A former U.S. Bank employee filed a $632,000 lawsuit against her former employer this week, saying she was fired in part because she complained that playing “hangman” as a department game to get prizes was racially insensitive.

Belinda Jackson, who is African American, says she also complained that the timing of the game — during Black History Month in February 2016 — was particularly offensive.
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2017 SESSION: A CHANCE TO STAND UP FOR OREGON VALUES — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

With the start of the 79th Legislative Assembly, Oregon faces a set of challenges unlike any we’ve faced before. Solving them will mean coming together with courage, optimism, and a commitment to protecting Oregon values.

This session, we’ll tackle a $1.8 billion budget deficit caused by the longstanding flaws in our revenue system, craft a statewide transportation package, and do everything we can to resist the destructive actions of the Trump Administration and Republicans in Congress.
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RAT INFESTATION SHUTS BEAVERTON BAKERY (Portland Oregonian)

Beaverton Bakery closed Tuesday after health inspectors found a rat infestation throughout the space.

The inspection of the bakery, founded in 1925, was triggered by an email complaint, John Burr, program manager at the Oregon Department of Agriculture, said.
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FATAL AUTO CRASHES IN OREGON ON THE RISE AGAIN (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon ranks among the states with the best transportation safety laws, according to an annual roadway report.

The state has strong laws on seat belt usage, wearing helmets, restricting cell phone use, and more.
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TO SAVE PUBLIC LANDS, LIBERAL HIKERS AND CONSERVATIVE HUNTERS UNITE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Once upon a time, it was common to hunt, fish and be a member of the Sierra Club.

Today the bond between the conservation community and sportsman often feels splintered, the coalition of hikers, hunters and anglers fragmented by wedge issues and the urban-rural divide.
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ANIMAL ABUSE IN OREGON (Salem Statesman Journal)

Thousands of animals are abused every year. In Oregon, there are more than 20 anti-animal cruelty laws.

-Video Clip-
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STUDENTS SHORTCHANGED WHEN VOTER MANDATES AREN’T FUNDED PROPERLY — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon taxpayers were generous at the polls last November.

They approved measures that didn’t raise their personal taxes, but trounced those that tried to take even a dime out of their wallets.
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WHAT’S NEXT IN THE ELLIOTT STATE FOREST RIGMAROLE? — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Aw, shucks. We were just kidding. We weren’t really gonna sell the Elliott State Forest despite all the time and money invested in the proposal by Indian tribes, private timber companies, the Department of Forestry and a small army of timber cruisers. Such might summarize the press release from the Oregon Land Board on Dec. 13, 2016.
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OREGON PROMISE AID FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS GOING HEAVILY TO HIGHER-INCOME FAMILIES, REVIEW FINDS (Eugene Register-Guard)

-An advocate of the program says families who earn too much to get federal grants deserve the assistance-

To great fanfare and national attention, state lawmakers created the Oregon Promise tuition assistance program in 2015, widely billed at the time as free community college for in-state high school graduates.
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LANE COUNTY EMPLOYEE ACCUSES DEPUTY OF RACIAL PROFILING DURING TRAFFIC STOP (Eugene Register-Guard)

A Lane County employee has filed a complaint with the state of Oregon claiming to have been racially profiled in Eugene last month by a Lane County sheriffs deputy, and accusing the county of not having a legally required racial profiling complaint system.
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OREGON AG WRONG IN OPPOSING TRUMP’S EXECUTIVE ORDER — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

My opponent in last years Oregon attorney generals race, Ellen Rosenblum, has joined 14 other extreme left-wing attorneys general in denouncing President Trumps executive order titled Protection of the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States. Rosenblum calls Trumps order unconstitutional, un-American and unlawful.
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FORESTRY ANALYSIS MUST INCLUDE ALL THE FACTS — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Were tired of the bickering over logging. Tired of people talking past one another: Logging is good No, its bad

Lets replace the rhetoric with facts. Compare the benefits of logging against the costs. If the facts show that the benefits exceed the costs, cut the trees down; if not, let them stand.
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OUR OPINION: RACIAL DISPARITIES WILL CONTINUE WITHOUT BETTER INFORMATION — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

-As with many projects like this, they found more questions than answers.-

In July 1945 members of the City Club of Portland issued a 17-page report on “The Negro in Portland.”

The club looked at various issues, including their own research showing that black residents, who made up less than 2 percent of Multnomah County’s population at the time, represented 13.2 percent of those sent to the state penitentiary.
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STATE BUDGET-WRITERS BRING ROAD SHOW TO PCC (Portland Tribune)

Local residents are asked to weigh in on the 2017-19 budget, which is $1.8 billion in the red.

How much is too much, or too little, to pay for schools? For human services? For prisons?

Local residents will get an opportunity on Saturday, Feb. 11, to weigh in on those questions when the Oregon Legislature’s budget-writing team brings its statewide road show to Portland Community College.
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REDUCED SPEED LIMITS IN CENTRAL OREGON REMAIN IN FLUX (Bend Bulletin)

-Lowered last spring, speed limits could go up again next summer-

Speed limits that were increased to 65 mph between Redmond and Madras and east of Bend before being dropped back to 55 mph will go up again next year if Oregon lawmakers dont take action on the issue.

The speed limits across much of Eastern and Central Oregon, approved by the Legislature in 2015, rose in March last year to 65 mph along most of U.S. Highway 97 and on U.S. Highway 20 east of Bend, as well as several less traveled highways to the east.
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SELF-SERVE GAS COULD EXPAND TO 24-HOURS IN RURAL OREGON (Bend Bulletin)

Residents in rural Oregon counties may soon be able to pump their own gas at all hours of the day.

Two bills introduced this Legislative session propose expanding the availability of self-service gas stations to 24 hours a day in rural Oregon counties, including Crook and Jefferson counties.
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DESCHUTES COUNTY SEES SPIKE IN CONCEALED HANDGUN LICENSES (Bend Bulletin)

-Compared to the state as a whole, Central Oregon has higher rate of license holders-

A spike in applications for concealed handgun licenses in 2016 pushed the number of people allowed to carry a concealed weapon to a record high in Deschutes County.

According to data compiled by Oregon State Police, 13,202 people 7.5 percent of Deschutes County residents are licensed to carry a concealed firearm.
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PUBLIC LANDS SALE BILL SPARKS CRITICISM IN OREGON (Bend Bulletin)

-Now withdrawn, the bill would have mandated sale of 4,200 acres in Central Oregon-

Conservation groups and elected officials in Oregon breathed a sign of relief following the withdrawal of a House bill that would have mandated the sale of around 4,200 acres of public lands in Central Oregon.
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EDITORIAL: RAISE THE MINIMUM LEGAL AGE FOR TOBACCO TO 21 — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

There’s nothing easy about stopping smoking. Its better to never start.

That’s why Oregon should raise the legal age for buying cigarettes and other tobacco products to 21 from 18. State Rep. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, D-Portland, has proposed legislation that would do so.

Despite the alarming public service ads and parental finger-wagging, young people still light up. How to douse that? Make it harder for people to start. Raise the minimum legal age.
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ERIK LUKENS COLUMN: WILL KATE BROWN FIGHT FOR RURAL JOBS? — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

-Oregon Health Authority’s call center absurdity is a chance for leadership-

The Bulletins best-read story online Tuesday wasn’t, strictly speaking, a story at all. It was an editorial, a piece that expresses the opinion of the papers editorial board, and it was headlined Gov. Brown forgets rural Oregon. It was the best-read piece online Wednesday, too.

Its impossible to know why, exactly, some pieces gain more traction online than others, but Ill offer a couple of educated guesses in this case.
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TRUMP SAID UNEMPLOYMENT RATE WASN’T REAL: SOME OTHER OPTIONS (Bend Bulletin)

With the January jobs report released Friday by the Labor Department, we know that President Donald Trump took office amid a relatively low unemployment rate it ticked up to 4.8 percent in January, strong job growth 227,000 positions added that month and weak wage growth average hourly earnings up 0.1 percent in January and 2.5 percent over the past year.

There was even some welcome progress in the number of people who count themselves as part of the labor force.
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OREGON BUDGET WRITERS GET DOWN TO BUSINESS THIS WEEK (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Budget writers in the Oregon Legislature are getting down to business this week.

Revenue is going up in Oregon, but so is the cost of providing state services, as well as the number of people needing those services.
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OREGON, WASHINGTON TEAM UP FOR SHARE OF VW EMISSIONS SETTLEMENT MONEY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon and Washington state are teaming up to a get a share of a remediation fund created under a court case against Volkswagen for emissions fraud. The first grants to promote electric cars could come later this year.
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CHEF: TASTE CAN PLAY KEY ROLE IN POTATO MARKETING (Capital Press)

-Leif Benson, retired chef and a public member of the Oregon Potato Commission, suggests designating particular potato production areas, similar to wine growing regions.-

Quick: Describe the taste of a potato.

But there’s a catch. Don’t use the word potato while describing it.
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GROWING LATINO POPULATION MEANS NEW OUTREACH EFFORTS (East Oregonian)

-Oregon’s Latino population has grown from 8 percent in 2000 to about 12 percent now.-

Oregon’s Latino population continues to grow, spurring communities to improve their outreach.

A report by the Oregon Community Foundation titled Latinos in Oregon estimates 12 percent of the states population is now Latino, compared to 8 percent in 2000.

In some Eastern Oregon communities, the growth has been even more rapid.
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OUR VIEW: DEVELOPMENT DOLLARS SHOULDN’T BE SQUANDERED — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Umatilla County has taken its economic development fund in a new direction, a welcome change after decades of under-the-radar and ineffective economic development that lacked a clear focus.

This year the county received about $300,000 of state lottery dollars to spend on economic development. And as the county pivots to a new way of dispersing it, oversight of the process and clear expectations about the results must be present.
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STOUT: ODFW, FIRE AND WINTER DOING A NUMBER ON WILDLIFE — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

This winter has many similarities to the winters of 1983 and 1992. If history proves itself again, there will be a dramatic die-off of our game animals. There is one stark difference that accompanies this year and not the previous two disaster years. In 1983 and 1992 the animals were counted after the spring die-off, and the tag numbers were allocated according to the amount of animals that survived the winter. According to the radio, ODFW is going to fly after spring green-up and reassess the number of tags they planned for in the 2017 synopsis. That is how it is suppose to be, but maybe things are not as cut and dried as ODFW is claiming they are.
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WHEN WASTE IS WANT (Medford Mail Tribune)

For four years, the livestock on Clay Charley’s ranch near White City were living the high life while Charley sat back like a ranching version of Tom Sawyer, getting paid to have someone else feed his cows.

Since 2011 his herd had been feasting on tons of food processing waste from Tree Top’s processing operation in Medford and, later, heaps of scraps of high-end pizza and other organic foods from Amy’s Kitchen in White City.
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COOS COUNTY, STATE OF OREGON, MAKE SANCTUARY STATUS (The World)

-Status earned by following the law, sheriff and governor explain-

Since President Donald Trump signed executive orders denying federal funding to go to sanctuary cities or states, local government leaders have taken a stand of defiance, including in Oregon.
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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATURE TAKES STEPS ON PERS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

There was a promising sign last week out of Salem as the Legislature settled down to work: Lawmakers appear to be serious this session about trying to find money-saving options to the state’s troubled public-pension system.

PERS issues grabbed the spotlight as the Senate Workforce Committee met on Wednesday, the official first day of the 2017 session. And the committee’s chair, Portland Democrat Kathleen Taylor, made it clear that the committee would entertain any PERS proposal from legislators.
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STATE AGENCY TO HEAR ARGUMENTS ON CITY LAND-USE POLICIES (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

City of Corvallis land-use policies in the Timberhill area go before a state hearings officer starting this morning at 9 a.m. in Salem.

Oral arguments before hearings officer John Bagg in the Department of Land Conservation and Development case could extend into Tuesday, LCDC officials said. A decision is expected in late February or March.
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PUBLIC LANDS SALE BILL SPARKS CRITICISM IN OREGON (LaGrande Observer)

-Now withdrawn, the bill would have mandated sale of 3.3 million acres of land managed by BLM-

Conservation groups and elected officials in Oregon breathed a sigh of relief following the withdrawal of a House bill that would have mandated the sale of around 4,200 acres of public lands in Central Oregon.
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MANUFACTURING OVERTIME DISPUTE: WHOSE HARDSHIP SHOULD PREVAIL? (Oregon Business Journal)

Lynne Barra said shes happy to pay her Paradigm Foodworks employees time-and-a-half when a shift goes past 10 hours. Or when a workers week extends past 40 hours.

But both at the same time?
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2017 LEGISLATIVE PREVIEW: CAP-AND-TRADE HITS LAWMAKERS AGENDA (Oregon Business Journal)

Last year brought the momentous passage of the Clean Electricity and Coal Transition Plan. Is the Legislature up for another big energy bill? Well find out, as environmentalists and clean-energy advocates push for a cap-and-trade style program for Oregon.
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SECRETARY OF STATE DENNIS RICHARDSON CONVENES A REDISTRICTING PANEL. IT’S LIGHT ON DEMOCRATS, WOMEN AND MINORITIES (Willamette Week)

-Officials begin pondering crucial process of redrawing legislative districts-

Secretary of State Dennis Richardson on Wednesday announced the formation of a panel that will examine Oregon’s redistricting process.

Redistricting is an obscure but extremely important process that takes place every ten years, after the completion of the U.S. Census. It involves redrawing the boundaries of congressional and legislative districts. The responsibility falls first to the Legislature and, if lawmakers cannot agree, defaults to the secretary of state, Oregon’s top elections official.

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THE U.S. IS RUNNING OUT OF NURSES (The Atlantic)

-The country has experienced nursing shortages for decades, but an aging population means the problem is about to get much worse.-

Five years ago, my mother was rushed to the hospital for an aneurysm. For the next two weeks, my family and I sat huddled around her bed in the intensive-care unit, oscillating between panic, fear, uncertainty, and exhaustion.
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THE HEALTHY-LIFESTYLE CURRICULUM (The Atlantic)

-At Perea Preschool in Memphis, Tennessee, lesson plans come with a heaping portion of nutrition.-

At Perea Preschool in Memphis, Tennessee, a teacher introduces mango to a circle of 16 4-year-olds for the first time. Another day, the children discover pumpkin during a play activity. Most of these children come from impoverished families where lettuce is considered a luxury item. According to Vicki Sallis Murrell, a professor of counseling, educational psychology, and research at the University of Memphis, parents are making tough choices between a $1 head of lettuce and five boxes of macaroni and cheese.
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THE MYTH OF WORKING YOUR WAY THROUGH COLLEGE (The Atlantic)

-Once upon a time, a summer spent scooping ice cream could pay for a year of college. Today, the average student’s annual tuition is equivalent to 991 hours behind the counter.-

A lot of Internet ink has been spilled over how lazy and entitled Millennials are, but when it comes to paying for a college education, work ethic isn’t the limiting factor.
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LEGISLATORS WORK TO FILL GAPS IN STATE ASSISTANCE FOR HOMELESS, MENTALLY ILL (The Lund Report)

Rep. John Lively wants the state to give free copies of birth certificates to the homeless while the state hospital superintendent testifies that he needs better legal authority to automatically assist discharged patients with federal disability benefits.
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DEMBROW IS HOPEFUL SINGLE PAYER OPTION CAN MOVE FORWARD (The Lund Report)

-New legislation would create an interim task force to delve into creating such a system.-

The recent study by the RAND Corp. that looked at the feasibility of a single payer system has given renewed hope to advocates, while concerns are being raised about how such a system would play out financially.

Sen. Michael Dembrow D-Portland, whose legislation gave the impetus for the RAND study, is fully aware that more work lies ahead.
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DEMAND FOR POPULAR SHORT-TERM INSURANCE PLANS COULD SURGE IF HEALTH LAW IS RELAXED (The Lund Report)

Short-term health plans have been around for decades, bridging coverage gaps for people who are between jobs or have recently graduated from school, among other things. After the health law passed, some people gravitated toward them because they were willing to trade comprehensive coverage for a cheaper sticker price even if it meant paying a tax penalty for not having the comprehensive coverage required in the law.
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Q CORP COMPARES COST OF CARE AT THE LOCAL, NATIONAL LEVEL (The Lund Report)

Please contact the State Library of access to this premium story from the Lund Report. library.help@state.or.us , 503-378-8800

Q Corps Cost of Care methodology has progressed from a pilot to national study, revealing Oregons resource use for healthcare services is low but has some of the highest prices 17 percentage above average – compared to four other states. Q Corp is now working on Cost of Care for the Medicare Fee For Service populations, with the Medicaid segment soon to follow.
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RAISING OREGON SMOKING AGE TO 21 HAS BIPARTISAN SUPPORT (The Lund Report)

The American Cancer Society, OHSU and others concerned about stamping out early addiction to carcinogenic tobacco took the first day of the legislative session to renew their push to increase the legal age of tobacco to the same age as alcohol and marijuana.
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State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

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newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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February 06, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Oregon governance in the first, upside-down weeks under Trump: Editorial — Opinion
* Heavy rains cause flooded roads, landslide on Historic Columbia River Highway
* Finally, we have a path forward for Oregon’s transportation agency — Guest Opinion
* Group plans interpretive center for Old McKenzie Fish Hatchery site
* Reduced speed limits in Central Oregon remain in flux
* Lawmakers Consider Expanding Self-Serve Gas In Rural Oregon
* Army Corps could put Cole Rivers Hatchery operation up for bid
* Legislature’s story lines are in place — Opinion
* Editorial: ODOT needs more accountability, better procedures — Opinion
* Where We Live: Glenn Jackson, King of the Road

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OREGON GOVERNANCE IN THE FIRST, UPSIDE-DOWN WEEKS UNDER TRUMP: EDITORIAL — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Few people in the progressive Oregon that voted for Hillary Clinton misread the conservative campaign priorities of candidate Donald Trump: He’d shouted them out. But few Oregonians, like many across the country, could foresee the daily carnival attending the implementation of executive orders and directives from President Donald Trump.

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HEAVY RAINS CAUSE FLOODED ROADS, LANDSLIDE ON HISTORIC COLUMBIA RIVER HIGHWAY (Portland Oregonian)

Sunday’s aqueous deluge is starting to take a toll.

The heavy rain caused a landslide on the Historic Columbia River Highway near the Stark Street Bridge, the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office reported.

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FINALLY, WE HAVE A PATH FORWARD FOR OREGON’S TRANSPORTATION AGENCY — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

A solution may be at hand to resolve the ongoing dispute between the Oregon Department of Transportation, Oregon legislators and members of the public. It is a dispute that culminated in the need for an ODOT audit last year.

Concerns driving the need for the audit had focused on the agency’s fiscal practices, project management performance and disconnects with the overseeing Oregon Transportation Commission.

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GROUP PLANS INTERPRETIVE CENTER FOR OLD MCKENZIE FISH HATCHERY SITE (Eugene Register-Guard)

-$43 million project could lure tens of thousands of visitors each year-

The Old McKenzie Fish Hatchery looks very much like it did in 1907 when it was built, says Ken Engelman, president of a nonprofit group dedicated to preserving the hatchery.

The Friends of Old McKenzie Fish Hatchery have worked to maintain the hatchery buildings. Now, they want to undertake the vastly more daunting task of raising $43 million to build an interpretive center and museum on the site that would celebrate the McKenzie River and draw tens of thousands of visitors a year.

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REDUCED SPEED LIMITS IN CENTRAL OREGON REMAIN IN FLUX (Bend Bulletin)

-Lowered last spring, speed limits could go up again next summer-

Speed limits that were increased to 65 mph between Redmond and Madras and east of Bend before being dropped back to 55 mph will go up again next year if Oregon lawmakers don’t take action on the issue.

The speed limits across much of Eastern and Central Oregon, approved by the Legislature in 2015, rose in March last year to 65 mph along most of U.S. Highway 97 and on U.S. Highway 20 east of Bend, as well as several less traveled highways to the east.

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LAWMAKERS CONSIDER EXPANDING SELF-SERVE GAS IN RURAL OREGON (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Residents in rural Oregon counties may have to get used to pumping their own gas, as lawmakers are considering expanding the availability of self-service gas stations.

The Bulletin reports that two bills introduced this legislative session propose expanding self-service gas stations to 24 hours a day in rural Oregon counties, including Crook and Jefferson counties.

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ARMY CORPS COULD PUT COLE RIVERS HATCHERY OPERATION UP FOR BID (Medford Mail Tribune)

A change in how the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers interprets its acquisition regulations means it could privatize the operation of Cole Rivers Hatchery on the Rogue River and six other hatcheries it owns in Oregon.

The agency is floating the concept of contracting the Cole Rivers operation – and its nearly 2.8 million fish grown there for release in the Rogue River Basin – to the lowest bidder on a one-year contract as early as spring.

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LEGISLATURE’S STORY LINES ARE IN PLACE — OPINION (Herald and News)

All the preliminaries are over. The first batch of bills has been filed. A pair of early budgets already have been written. Legislators have gone through their training about treating each other with respect. This is true. …

The big storylines  are in place:

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EDITORIAL: ODOT NEEDS MORE ACCOUNTABILITY, BETTER PROCEDURES — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-Million-dollar audit critical of agency’s oversight-

Those who proclaim government agencies should be run like businesses are, in some ways, wrong.

A case in point: If government services and infrastructure were awarded to low-population areas in proportion to the income they produce, large swaths of America wouldn’t have paved roads, bridges or anything but one-room schools.

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WHERE WE LIVE: GLENN JACKSON, KING OF THE ROAD (KOIN)

-Glenn Jackson built the roads thousands of Oregonians use every day-

Thousands of Portlanders cross the I-205 bridge between Oregon and Washington every day. It’s named for Glenn Jackson, a man called “Mr. Oregon.”

If it weren’t for Jackson, where we live could have been a very different place. The bridge, crossed 16,000 times a day as drivers travel across the Columbia River. was Jackson’s crowning achievement.

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newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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February 03, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Gov. Kate Brown strengthens sanctuary law, asks AG to fight Trump’s travel ban
* Oregon Health Authority focuses on health effects of climate change
* Portland landlords must pay relocation costs to evict tenants without cause
* Deputy who yelled ‘Trump’ at voters violated law, says Oregon Secretary of State
* The New Yorker heralds Kate Brown as the natural leader of the Donald Trump resistance
* Our leaders shouldn’t be silent now — Opinion
* Oregon Gov. Kate Brown orders state to not participate in a Muslim registry
* I-5 sound wall construction begins soon in South Salem
* Trump’s sanctuary order will inspire more exploitation, criminal activity — Opinion
* Get free cake at Oregon’s birthday party
* Gov. Brown blasts Trump anti-immigration order, seeks legal options
* Oregon is getting warmer, climate report finds
* Bumpy road ahead — Opinion
* Dealing with Trump — Opinion
* Boys still lag behind girls in graduation, and no one talks about it
* Brown lines up legal ammunition to fight Trump travel restrictions
* Senate committee will release revenue plan next week
* Council votes to make landlords pay eviction relocation costs
* Oregon lawmakers consider stronger invasive mussel defenses
* State law protects Oregon’s immigrants from Trump’s orders
* Report: Oregon needs extra $1.3B a year for transportation
* Editorial: Free speech knocked back by Oregon Supreme Court — Opinion
* Editorial: Cancel Oregon Promise if the money is not there — Opinion
* Juniper Industry – OPB’s Think Out Loud
* Huge Bill Is Coming Due For Oregon’s Past Pension System Mistakes
* Oregon Bill To Provide ‘Peer Services’ To Mentally Ill Gets First Hearing
* Portland Decides Landlords Must Pay For No-Cause Evictions, Effective Immediately
* Oregon Releases Plan To Address The Health Risks Of Climate Change
* Oregon Governor Issues Executive Order Meant To Solidify State’s Sanctuary Status
* Don’t gut Oregon’s Right to Farm law — Opinion
* Checkoff debate exposes organic split — Opinion
* Statewide campaign aims to get more people to run for school boards
* Arlington landfill working to keep Portlands trash
* Marine Board looks to smooth Chetco steelheading conflicts
* Since You Asked: ODOT will sweep cinders off Interstate 5
* Battle brewing over Oregon Health Plan
* Keeping your graduates close — Opinion
* Hatching a new fish plan
* Editorial: There’s more work to be done to improve graduation rates — Opinion
* Sen. Gelser urges attendance at Wyden town hall
* Educators discuss funding, legislative fixes for rural schools
* County to be hit hard by loss of Forest Service payments
* Despite increase, Douglas County still among the worst in graduation rates
* UCC shooting victim aid, education reform among local legislators’ top issues
* Morning Roundup
* State agency looking into high power bills
* Gov. Kate Brown Signs Executive Order on Immigration
* Oregon Legislature Begins 2017 Session
* Oregon Strengthens Its Immigrant Sanctuary Status
* Oregon governor expands protections for immigrants
* Oregon governor urges legal action against Trump directive
* Healthcare Budget Deficit and Turmoil in D.C. Loom Over Oregon Session
* Advice for progressives from america’s radical feminist governor

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GOV. KATE BROWN STRENGTHENS SANCTUARY LAW, ASKS AG TO FIGHT TRUMP’S TRAVEL BAN (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown on Thursday issued an executive order that forbids all state agencies and employees from helping federal immigration officials locate or apprehend undocumented immigrants.

“We will not retreat,” she said.

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OREGON HEALTH AUTHORITY FOCUSES ON HEALTH EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon Health Authority has turned its focus toward climate change and the expected effects that pollution, drought and a curtailed food supply will have on public health.

The authority released its Oregon Climate and Health Resilience Plan on Thursday, outlining its strategy to help educate and collaborate with other agencies and local officials.

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PORTLAND LANDLORDS MUST PAY RELOCATION COSTS TO EVICT TENANTS WITHOUT CAUSE (Portland Oregonian)

Each time Coya Crespin crosses the St. Johns Bridge, she knows she’s home. She lives with her six-year-old daughter and five-month-old son in a St. Johns apartment that she’s called home for five years.

That could soon change. A California-based property management company bought her apartment complex in October. They’ve started handing out no-cause eviction notices to the more than 50 families living there.

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DEPUTY WHO YELLED ‘TRUMP’ AT VOTERS VIOLATED LAW, SAYS OREGON SECRETARY OF STATE (Portland Oregonian)

The Multnomah County sheriff’s deputy who, on Election Day, drove past a line of people waiting to vote in Southeast Portland and chanted “Trump, Trump” over the loudspeaker of a county vehicle violated election law, according to an investigation by the Oregon Secretary of State, Election Division.

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THE NEW YORKER HERALDS KATE BROWN AS THE NATURAL LEADER OF THE DONALD TRUMP RESISTANCE (Portland Oregonian)

Kate Brown is “a combination of Snoopy and Katniss Everdeen”?

So says Brown’s former communications director in a quote that pretty much sums up the tenor of a new New Yorker profile of Oregon’s governor. Katniss Everdeen, in case you didn’t know, is the butt-kicking protagonist from “The Hunger Games,” played by Jennifer Lawrence in the movies.

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OUR LEADERS SHOULDN’T BE SILENT NOW — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Some of Oregon’s political and academic leaders have begun putting federal officials on notice that they value all who live, work and attend school in Oregon regardless of where they came from.

Well done.

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OREGON GOV. KATE BROWN ORDERS STATE TO NOT PARTICIPATE IN A MUSLIM REGISTRY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has issued an executive order prohibiting the state from participating in the creation of a Muslim registry.

Brown also called upon Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum to take legal action opposing the federal governments anti-immigration measures.

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I-5 SOUND WALL CONSTRUCTION BEGINS SOON IN SOUTH SALEM (Salem Statesman Journal)

Construction on a new sound wall on Interstate-5 in South Salem will begin in the next couple weeks, according to the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The sound wall, part of the second phase of the Kuebler Interchange Project which expanded southbound on and off ramps to I-5 southbound last year, will run between Kuebler Blvd. and Battle Creek Road.

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TRUMP’S SANCTUARY ORDER WILL INSPIRE MORE EXPLOITATION, CRIMINAL ACTIVITY — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon is what the Trump administration would call a sanctuary jurisdiction.

Oregon’s been that way for 30 years, yet President Trump is now threatening to deny the state, its cities and towns, federal grants if they don’t let his Attorney General turn local law enforcement into federal immigration agents.

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GET FREE CAKE AT OREGON’S BIRTHDAY PARTY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Free cake is always a hit, so Oregon will once again be offering slices of the buttercream confection, while supplies last, at its 158th birthday celebration next month.

Oregon, which became the 33rd state on Feb. 14, 1859 and is the 9th largest in the union, will host a variety of activities to commemorate the day. The public is invited to the free celebration, which will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 11.

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GOV. BROWN BLASTS TRUMP ANTI-IMMIGRATION ORDER, SEEKS LEGAL OPTIONS (Eugene Register-Guard)

-She also signs an executive order reaffirming the states protections for illegal immigrants-

Gov. Kate Brown asked Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum on Thursday to sue the federal government in a bid to halt President Trumps executive order curbing immigration.

She also signed an executive order of her own, designed to bolster protections in Oregon for illegal immigrants against deportation and discrimination.

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OREGON IS GETTING WARMER, CLIMATE REPORT FINDS (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Progress continues on the states goals amid uncertainty about President Trumps plans-

Oregon just got its periodic climate change checkup  and the report says its going to be hot.

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BUMPY ROAD AHEAD — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-$1.3 billion a year for transportation is out of reach-

A new report showing that Oregon needs to spend an additional $1.3 billion a year on roads, bridges and other parts of the transportation system, plus $3.7 billion to erase a backlog of projects, has a lot in common with the biennial reports showing that the state ought to be spending $1 billion more each year on public schools. The reports are sobering, indisputable and destined to be ignored. If Oregon comes up with a quarter of the transportation money the report calls for, legislators will be able to count it as a success.

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DEALING WITH TRUMP — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-It requires more than a Social Action Team-

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown is in the process of creating a Trump resistance team.

Browns campaign emailed her supporters earlier this week, telling them that Donald Trumps first actions as president have attacked our values as Americans and as Oregonians and asking them to join a Social Action Team to bring communities together to resist in a divided nation, The Portland Oregonian reported earlier this week.

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BOYS STILL LAG BEHIND GIRLS IN GRADUATION, AND NO ONE TALKS ABOUT IT (Portland Tribune)

-Those who study the male brain say that creating a more welcoming environment for how males learn best could transform the state’s ability to improve its graduation rates – and decrease prison populations at the same time.-

Portland Public Schools boys are still significantly less likely to graduate high school in four years than their female counterparts.

That’s according to 2015-16 data released last week from the Oregon Department of Education on students who entered high school four years earlier.

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BROWN LINES UP LEGAL AMMUNITION TO FIGHT TRUMP TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS (Portland Tribune)

Governor urges attorney general’s office to sue Trump administration over immigration executive orders.

Gov. Kate Brown signed an executive order Thursday barring the use of any state resources to enforce federal immigration policy and called on the state Attorney General’s Office to sue the Trump administration over the president’s executive order on immigration.

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SENATE COMMITTEE WILL RELEASE REVENUE PLAN NEXT WEEK (Portland Tribune)

Revenue proposals will likely contain a broad-based tax on businesses.

Lawmakers in the Oregon Senate’s Finance and Revenue committee are expected to release a package of measures next week that will likely include a broad-based tax on business.

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COUNCIL VOTES TO MAKE LANDLORDS PAY EVICTION RELOCATION COSTS (Portland Tribune)

-UPDATE: Landlords will sue to block new policy as soon as possible, claiming it violates statewide ban against local rent control measures.-

After a lengthy hearing, the City Council unanimously passed an ordinance Thursday to require landlords to pay relocation costs for “involuntary displacement of tenants.”

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OREGON LAWMAKERS CONSIDER STRONGER INVASIVE MUSSEL DEFENSES (Portland Tribune)

-Legislators are considering a bill to strengthen regulatory defenses against invasive mussels that threaten irrigation systems.-

Oregon lawmakers are considering whether to strengthen the state’s defenses against invasive aquatic mussels that threaten both irrigation systems and ecosystems.

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STATE LAW PROTECTS OREGON’S IMMIGRANTS FROM TRUMPS ORDERS (Bend Bulletin)

-But that could mean the state could lose out on federal funding-

Every client that Bend immigration attorney Micaela Guthrie has met with since President Donald Trump signed executive orders on immigration last week has felt the same thing  scared.

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REPORT: OREGON NEEDS EXTRA $1.3B A YEAR FOR TRANSPORTATION (Bend Bulletin)

-Analysis includes possible new transportation funding sources-

The Oregon Department of Transportation and the states cities and counties estimate they need an extra $1.3 billion a year to preserve roads and bridges, ease congestion and bolster public transportation, according to an analysis state lawmakers released Wednesday.

Additionally, Oregon’s cities estimate they would need $3.7 billion to deal with their backlog in road and other transportation work.

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EDITORIAL: FREE SPEECH KNOCKED BACK BY OREGON SUPREME COURT — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

If you’re a member of the Bend City Council, you have less right to free speech than nearly everyone else in the city. The Oregon Supreme Court said so in a ruling issued Thursday.

The 4-3 decision involved a Lebanon city councilor, the city, a public employee union and the city’s newspaper, the Lebanon Express.

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EDITORIAL: CANCEL OREGON PROMISE IF THE MONEY IS NOT THERE — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

As Oregon lawmakers get back to doing the states business, they have a problem: The states general fund, which pays for everything from state police to social workers, is expected to get about $1.8 billion less in money over the 2017-18 biennium that it would take to balance the states budget without cutting services or programs.

Gov. Kate Brown would fill that gap largely by raising fees and taxes. Thats unacceptable.

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JUNIPER INDUSTRY – OPB’S THINK OUT LOUD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

We talk to Kendall Derby, the owner of one of Oregon’s only juniper sawmills, to find out how the industry has been growing and get his take on the impact of recent state grants to juniper loggers and sawmill owners like him.

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HUGE BILL IS COMING DUE FOR OREGON’S PAST PENSION SYSTEM MISTAKES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

In the 1990’s, Oregon let public pension benefits get out of hand, and now this decades-old mistake is returning to haunt the states taxpayers, schoolchildren and younger government workers.

Like the slow spread of dry rot that leads to an expensive home repair, a scary bill is coming due.

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OREGON BILL TO PROVIDE ‘PEER SERVICES’ TO MENTALLY ILL GETS FIRST HEARING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

People in the mental health community are pushing a bill in Salem this session to mandate peer services.

The phrase peer services sounds wonky. But for someone who’s mentally ill, it basically means having someone at their side who’s been through what they’re experiencing.

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PORTLAND DECIDES LANDLORDS MUST PAY FOR NO-CAUSE EVICTIONS, EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Portland City Council voted unanimously to pass a bill requiring landlords to pay tenants a relocation fee when they evict them without cause or raise rents more than 10 percent.

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OREGON RELEASES PLAN TO ADDRESS THE HEALTH RISKS OF CLIMATE CHANGE (Northwest Public Radio)

The state of Oregon needs to prepare for the human health risks that come along with climate change. That’s the message Oregon Health Authority delivered in a plan released Thursday.  In recent years, Oregon has seen the warmest year on record and the lowest snowpack. Its had one of the most severe fire seasons and declared widespread drought emergencies.

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OREGON GOVERNOR ISSUES EXECUTIVE ORDER MEANT TO SOLIDIFY STATE’S SANCTUARY STATUS (Northwest Public Radio)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown issued an executive order Thursday meant to counteract President Trump’s recent directives on immigration. The Democrat also announced a possible lawsuit against Trumps actions.

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DON’T GUT OREGON’S RIGHT TO FARM LAW — OPINION (Capital Press)

-The practices of farmers, ranchers and forest managers must continue to be protected by the Oregon Legislature.-

A bill in the Oregon Legislature is sure to draw the attention of the states farmers, ranchers and forest managers.

It would gut the states Right to Farm and Forest law.

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CHECKOFF DEBATE EXPOSES ORGANIC SPLIT — OPINION (Capital Press)

-Until all organic producers are on the same page, trying to have a checkoff is pointless.-

A proposal to create a checkoff to finance production research and promotion for organic producers and handlers has exposed a rift in the industry.

The checkoff is being pushed by the Organic Trade Association, a trade group that represents 8,500 organic growers, processors and shippers.

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STATEWIDE CAMPAIGN AIMS TO GET MORE PEOPLE TO RUN FOR SCHOOL BOARDS (East Oregonian)

-About three-quarters of education seats go uncontested or unfilled-

Each year, hundreds of volunteers from across the state raise their hands to coach, mentor, teach and campaign for their communitys schools.

But when it comes to volunteering for Oregon’s school boards, fewer hands get raised.

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ARLINGTON LANDFILL WORKING TO KEEP PORTLANDS TRASH (East Oregonian)

-The Columbia Ridge Landfill and Recycling Centers waste disposal contract with Metro is set to expire in 2019.-

For nearly 30 years, trash day in Portland has meant payday in rural Gilliam County.

A fleet of 50 garbage trucks arrives every day from the big city to a remote, windswept plateau south of Arlington, home of Waste Managements Columbia Ridge Landfill and Recycling Center. The 12,00-acre dump employs 90 people  roughly 5 percent of the countys population  and kicks in millions of dollars annually to local coffers.

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MARINE BOARD LOOKS TO SMOOTH CHETCO STEELHEADING CONFLICTS (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Oregon State Marine Board is headed to Brookings later this month to help smooth a rift between boat and bank anglers fishing for steelhead on the Chetco River.

The Marine Board will convene an open house from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, at Southwestern Oregon Community College’s Curry Campus, 96082 Lone Ranch Parkway.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: ODOT WILL SWEEP CINDERS OFF INTERSTATE 5 (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q:Last week, my windshield got hit on two separate days by small rocks flying up from I-5 in the area around Gold Hill and the town of Rogue River. There are now two chips in my windshield. Did ODOT lay down sand and gravel in that area during our recent icy, snowy weather? If so, does ODOT plan to sweep up the material?

A: Oregon Department of Transportation Spokesman Gary Leaming said the agency did in fact spread material on Interstate 5 to help combat the dangerous road conditions in that area.

“We did use cinder on the freeway last month,” he said……

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BATTLE BREWING OVER OREGON HEALTH PLAN (Medford Mail Tribune)

A battle over health care is brewing after Oregon’s expansion of health insurance coverage blew a $1 billion hole in the state’s budget.

Democratic Gov. Kate Brown is proposing more spending on health care, while Democratic lawmakers are saying cuts to the Oregon Health Plan and other programs are inevitable without additional taxes and other revenue increases.

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KEEPING YOUR GRADUATES CLOSE — OPINION (Herald and News)

One of the more perplexing problems that Klamath Falls faces is how can the city welcome more college students downtown and can it lead to convincing students to stick around after graduation and create jobs here?

Its safe to say that nearly every small college town has this issue, as the degrees students are obtaining dont match with the availability of careers in the same burg.

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HATCHING A NEW FISH PLAN (Daily Astorian)

-Big Creek Hatchery to reduce salmon production-

Nestled in the hills south of Knappa and Svensen is the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlifes Big Creek Hatchery, which on average releases 3.8 million hatchery fish a year into the Columbia River.

Big Creek fits into a larger network of approximately 160 hatcheries producing more than 100 million salmon in the Columbia River Basin.

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EDITORIAL: THERE’S MORE WORK TO BE DONE TO IMPROVE GRADUATION RATES — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-State remains woefully behind the national average-

The state Department of Education released its newest data on four-year graduation rates last week, and the news came with mixed blessings.

Statewide, the Class of 2016 had a graduation rate of 74.8 percent, up a full percentage point from 2015, and three points more than 2014. State officials, including Gov. Kate Brown, lauded the continued improvement.

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SEN. GELSER URGES ATTENDANCE AT WYDEN TOWN HALL (Albany Democrat Herald)

Citing a spike in interest for national political issues, State Sen. Sara Gelser wants her constituents to make it out to U.S. Senator Ron Wyden’s 11 a.m. town hall meeting at Linn-Benton Community College on Saturday. Further, she encourages both red and blue voters to attend.

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EDUCATORS DISCUSS FUNDING, LEGISLATIVE FIXES FOR RURAL SCHOOLS (Blue Mountain Eagle)

-Despite great intentions, requirements difficult to implement at small schools.-

Education officials from across Eastern Oregon converged in John Day last week for an education forum with state legislators before the legislative session.

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COUNTY TO BE HIT HARD BY LOSS OF FOREST SERVICE PAYMENTS (Douglas County News-Review)

Douglas County government and local schools will be hit hard this year by a loss of funding from U.S. Forest Service timber receipts.

Counties across the country will be affected by a 90 percent reduction in timber payments in the wake of the loss of Secure Rural Schools funds. Logging has all but halted on federal forests since the 1990s. The Secure Rural Schools program was passed in 2000 to help alleviate the pain for the 700 counties and 4,000 school districts impacted by the loss in funds. But Douglas and other counties received their last SRS payments in 2015, and theres no indication that Congress will authorize the payments again.

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DESPITE INCREASE, DOUGLAS COUNTY STILL AMONG THE WORST IN GRADUATION RATES (Douglas County News-Review)

The Oregon Department of Education has released a list of graduation rates for all Oregon public schools. The list indicates the state graduation rate increased by nearly 1.4 percent to 74.83 percent for the 2015-16 school year.

Douglas County saw a higher graduation rate increase than the state, with a 3.5 percent increase up to 65.96 percent. But despite the increase, Douglas County still ranks among the bottom five counties, having the 32nd worst grad rate out of Oregons 36 counties.

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UCC SHOOTING VICTIM AID, EDUCATION REFORM AMONG LOCAL LEGISLATORS’ TOP ISSUES (Douglas County News-Review)

The Oregon State Legislature convened Wednesday, and Douglas County’s legislators are already setting their priorities for the coming session.

Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, told The News-Review he anticipates a long year ahead. He expects a special session in September to finish the budget, given the level of uncertainty around funding, both because of the Affordable Care Act’s repeal and an unknown number of upcoming executive orders from the president.

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MORNING ROUNDUP (OregonBusiness)

Oregon files lawsuit against immigration order, Legislature considers PERS reform and records show Bottle Bill largely benefits distributors.

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STATE AGENCY LOOKING INTO HIGH POWER BILLS (Kobi5)

Oregon’s Public Utilities Commission is looking into unusually high bills submitted by local Pacific Power customers.

Some customers complained after receiving December and January bills that were two to three times higher than normal.

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GOV. KATE BROWN SIGNS EXECUTIVE ORDER ON IMMIGRATION (mycentraloregon.com)

Governor Kate Brown signed an executive order Thursday she says will protect civil and human rights of all Oregonians.

In the order, Gov. Brown put policies in place that instruct state employees to perform their duties while being mindful of Oregon’s welcoming and inclusive position toward all, including immigrants and refugees.

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OREGON LEGISLATURE BEGINS 2017 SESSION (mycentraloregon.com)

The Oregon Legislature began its 2017 session Wednesday, facing a $1.7 billion deficit that threatens to increase tensions between Republicans and Democratic lawmakers who have the majority in both chambers.

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OREGON STRENGTHENS ITS IMMIGRANT SANCTUARY STATUS (Governing)

Gov. Kate Brown on Thursday issued an executive order that forbids all state agencies and employees from helping federal immigration officials locate or apprehend undocumented immigrants.

“We will not retreat,” she said.

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OREGON GOVERNOR EXPANDS PROTECTIONS FOR IMMIGRANTS (The Hill)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown D prohibited state agencies from cooperating with federal immigration officials Thursday, becoming the latest blue state official to act against President Trumps early moves against undocumented immigrants.

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OREGON GOVERNOR URGES LEGAL ACTION AGAINST TRUMP DIRECTIVE (San Francisco Chronicle)

Gov. Kate Brown urged Oregon’s attorney general on Thursday to quickly take legal action against the federal government over President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration.

Brown also broadened a 1987 law that prevents law enforcement from detaining people who are in the United States illegally but have not broken other laws.

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HEALTHCARE BUDGET DEFICIT AND TURMOIL IN D.C. LOOM OVER OREGON SESSION (The Lund Report)

The Senate Democrats unveiled their 2017 agenda, and healthcare budgetary issues dominated the conversation. The state must find revenue sources to pay for its share of the Oregon Health Plan, which could be further imperiled by attempts to scrap or decimate Medicaid funding in Congress.

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ADVICE FOR PROGRESSIVES FROM AMERICA’S RADICAL FEMINIST GOVERNOR (New Yorker)

How to resist Trump? Early the other morning, I put the question to Oregon’s Kate Brown, who in November became the first L.G.B.T. person to be elected governor of an American state, after being appointed to the position in 2015.

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SCHOOLS LOOK TO LEGISLATURE (My Columbia Basin)

The state of Oregon faces a $1.8 billion dollar budget deficit. InterMountain Education Service District Superintendent Mark Mulvihill says that probably means public education will spend another biennium just scraping by and trying to make ends meet.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on February 03, 2017 OSL eClips

February 02, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Oregon lawmakers to consider money-saving PERS proposals
* Oregon lawmakers propose upping tobacco age to 21
* Oregon Promise: Colleges try new things to welcome students
* What public policymakers lack is sound research — Guest Opinion
* Steve Duin: A transformative use of our fear and frustration — Opinion
* Oregon lawmakers want to raise tobacco purchase age from 18 to 21
* Protesters want state action for immigrants, refugees
* Constituent files complaint over vitriolic letter from Sen. Brian Boquist
* Big return of sockeye salmon to Deschutes River
* Lawmaker withdraws bill to sell 70,000 acres of Oregon public land
* States are taking different actions in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order threatening to withhold federal funding from communities that don’t cooperate with federal immigration authorities
* Analysis: Oregon governments need $1.3 billion more each year for transportation work
* President Donald Trump’s promised crackdown on “sanctuary cities” has triggered divergent actions from blue and red states
* Talk of NAFTA repeal raises big questions
* Sources: Lawmakers meet in Salem without a road map
* Trump fuels anxiety at start of state legislative session
* Lawmakers backing pesticide restrictions poised to shape farm policy
* Legislation would raise Oregon’s smoking age to 21
* Our Opinion: Racial disparities will continue without better information — Opinion
* Analysis of 5.5 million court records shows sweeping disparities
* Editorial: ODOT needs a plan for improvement — Opinion
* Diverse group unites around drug prices
* Study finds no increased rate of cancer among soccer players
* Flu cases declining after December spike
* Editorial: ODOT needs a plan for improvement — Opinion
* Editorial: Bottle bill may be ready for retirement — Opinion
* Opening Bell In Salem, Oregon Farmers & Immigration Changes and Sea Lion Control
* Oregon Lawmakers Consider Measure To Raise Smoking Age To 21
* Oregon Schools Prepare For Possible ICE Visits
* Oregon Way Behind On Its Goals For Reducing Carbon Emissions: Report
* Report looks at childrens health
* Pot shops say testing rules are hurting extract sales
* Jackson County inmates can sign up for health insurance
* Oregon legislative session to kick off amid budget question
* Legislature told to target transportation to get Oregon on course to meet failing emissions goals
* Portland Economist: New ODOT Audit “Worse than Useless”
* Portland residents on state legislative session start: ‘If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’
* Bill would make police get warrant before tracking phones
* Lawmakers to decide Oregon’s state dog
* Oregon to launch affordable housing pilot program
* The Incredible Shrinking Incomes of Young Americans
* Proposed cougar legislation challenges voter-approved measure
* Raising Oregon Smoking Age to 21 Has Bipartisan Support
* Legislature debut bad for farmers — Opinion

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OREGON LAWMAKERS TO CONSIDER MONEY-SAVING PERS PROPOSALS (Portland Oregonian)

Lawmakers settled at least one question about Oregon’s troubled public pension system on the opening day of the 2017 legislative session: They will be delving into its problems and looking at their money-saving options.

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OREGON LAWMAKERS PROPOSE UPPING TOBACCO AGE TO 21 (Portland Oregonian) A bipartisan pair of state lawmakers have announced their plans to introduce a bill to raise the tobacco sales and possession age to 21.

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OREGON PROMISE: COLLEGES TRY NEW THINGS TO WELCOME STUDENTS (Portland Oregonian)

In Astoria and Bend, community colleges are trying new ways to keep Oregon Promise students engaged in campus life.

The idea is the new programs will keep students engaged and enrolled. They’re also required by the state.

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WHAT PUBLIC POLICYMAKERS LACK IS SOUND RESEARCH — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Portland and Oregon have a lot to be proud of: Oregon is at the top of the list for in-migration, Fast Company recently ranked Portland a top city for job-seekers, and innovative environmental policies have garnered international attention. Still, many Oregonians are left behind.

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STEVE DUIN: A TRANSFORMATIVE USE OF OUR FEAR AND FRUSTRATION — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

For Portlanders familiar with the trauma and “extreme vetting” that refugees have already endured, Donald Trump’s executive order suspending refugee resettlement is dark, petty and unnecessary.

“I’ve never seen an administration or a president act like this,” says Mike McDonald, a founding board member of the Refugee Care Collective and a guy who works in five of the seven Muslim-majority countries on the White House banned list.

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OREGON LAWMAKERS WANT TO RAISE TOBACCO PURCHASE AGE FROM 18 TO 21 (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon would become the third state to raise the age of sale for tobacco products from 18 to 21 if lawmakers pass legislation backed by the American Cancer Society.

Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, D-Beaverton, announced Wednesday morning that she will soon introduce a bill that would prohibit retailers from selling any tobacco product  including e-cigarettes  to anyone younger than 21.

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PROTESTERS WANT STATE ACTION FOR IMMIGRANTS, REFUGEES (Salem Statesman Journal)

Hundreds of people gathered on the Capitol steps Wednesday afternoon urging the Oregon State Legislature to take action to protect and defend immigrants and refugees.

The organization released a list of six demands.

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CONSTITUENT FILES COMPLAINT OVER VITRIOLIC LETTER FROM SEN. BRIAN BOQUIST (Salem Statesman Journal)

Dayton resident Jim Maguire has formally requested that Sen. Brian Boquist, R-Dallas, be censured for sending Maguire a vitriolic letter in response to his request for legislation.

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BIG RETURN OF SOCKEYE SALMON TO DESCHUTES RIVER (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon’s Deschutes River saw a large number of native sockeye salmon return to its waters in 2016.

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LAWMAKER WITHDRAWS BILL TO SELL 70,000 ACRES OF OREGON PUBLIC LAND (Salem Statesman Journal)

After public outcry, the lawmaker who introduced a bill to sell 3.3 million acres of public land nationwide  including 70,000 acres in Oregon  has decided to reverse course.

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STATES ARE TAKING DIFFERENT ACTIONS IN RESPONSE TO PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP’S EXECUTIVE ORDER THREATENING TO WITHHOLD FEDERAL FUNDING FROM COMMUNITIES THAT DON’T COOPERATE WITH FEDERAL IMMIGRATION AUTHORITIES (Eugene Register-Guard)

A look at what some states have done or are considering after President Donald Trump signed an executive order threatening to withhold federal funding from communities that don’t cooperate with federal immigration authorities:

STATES CONSIDERING PRO-SANCTUARY STATUS & STATES CONSIDERING ANTI-SANCTUARY LAWS

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ANALYSIS: OREGON GOVERNMENTS NEED $1.3 BILLION MORE EACH YEAR FOR TRANSPORTATION WORK (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Lawmakers suggest paying for the large increase with toll roads and bicycle taxes, among other options-

The Oregon Department of Transportation and the states cities and counties estimate they need an extra $1.3 billion a year to preserve roads and bridges, ease congestion and bolster public transportation, according to an analysis state lawmakers released Wednesday.

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PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP’S PROMISED CRACKDOWN ON “SANCTUARY CITIES” HAS TRIGGERED DIVERGENT ACTIONS FROM BLUE AND RED STATES (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Some are moving to follow his order and others are breaking with the U.S. government to protect immigrants in the country illegally-

California, the nation’s largest state, is pushing for a statewide sanctuary that would prohibit law enforcement from cooperating with federal immigration authorities, while a fellow U.S.-Mexico border state, Texas, is seeking to withhold funding from cities with the policies.

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TALK OF NAFTA REPEAL RAISES BIG QUESTIONS (Portland Tribune)

Canada and Mexico are both important trading partners for Oregon. Canada was Oregon’s number two destination for exports in 2015, while Mexico was number 11, according to Business Oregon, the state’s economic development agency. A trade war with either country has big implications for many Oregon companies.

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SOURCES: LAWMAKERS MEET IN SALEM WITHOUT A ROAD MAP (Portland Tribune)

-2017 Oregon Legislature began without negotiations over the major issues confronting it-

The 2017 Oregon Legislature was in trouble before it even started. The session convened Wednesday without bipartisan agreement on how to handle any of the major problems facing the state, from the $1.8 billion shortfall to the need for a new transportation funding package.

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TRUMP FUELS ANXIETY AT START OF STATE LEGISLATIVE SESSION (Portland Tribune)

-State lawmakers convene their 79th legislative assembly facing an uncertain future under the Trump administration.-

President Donald Trump was omnipresent as state lawmakers commenced their 160-day legislative session at the State Capitol Wednesday, Feb. 1.

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LAWMAKERS BACKING PESTICIDE RESTRICTIONS POISED TO SHAPE FARM POLICY (Portland Tribune)

-Proposed changes to Oregon’s ‘right to farm’ law would remove protections for pesticides. –

Lawmakers with strong track records of supporting pesticide restrictions are chairing two Senate committees that are positioned to affect Oregon agricultural policies in 2017.

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LEGISLATION WOULD RAISE OREGON’S SMOKING AGE TO 21 (Portland Tribune)

-The bill by Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, D-Beaverton, has bipartisan support in the House and Senate.-

An Oregon lawmaker who also is a family physician plans to reintroduce legislation this week that would raise the legal smoking age from 18 to 21.

Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, D-Beaverton, announces legislation that would raise the legal smoking age to 21, during a news conference Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, at the State Capitol in Salem.

The proposal by Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, D-Beaverton, is intended to limit teen access to tobacco.

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OUR OPINION: RACIAL DISPARITIES WILL CONTINUE WITHOUT BETTER INFORMATION — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

-Our analsyis of court records shows that Oregon has a problem. But it doesn’t explain why.-

In July 1945 members of the City Club of Portland issued a 17-page report on “The Negro in Portland.”

The club looked at various issues, including their own research showing that black residents, who made up less than 2 percent of Multnomah County’s population at the time, represented 13.2 percent of those sent to the state penitentiary.

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ANALYSIS OF 5.5 MILLION COURT RECORDS SHOWS SWEEPING DISPARITIES (Portland Tribune)

-Research shows that equal justice remains an elusive goal for the state’s black and Latino residents.-

The data shocked even those who deal with numbers on a daily basis.

“I’m surprised at the size of the disparity,” said former Oregon State Supreme Court Justice Edwin Peterson. “I had no idea that the disparities are so great.”

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EDITORIAL: ODOT NEEDS A PLAN FOR IMPROVEMENT — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

A long-awaited performance audit of the Oregon Department of Transportation paints a decidedly mixed picture: On one hand, ODOT is a standout compared with other states in the West. At the same time, its above average compared with all states departments of transportation, but below average when compared with similar private companies.

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DIVERSE GROUP UNITES AROUND DRUG PRICES (Bend Bulletin)

-Coalition members will lobby Oregon lawmakers-

Increasing concern over high drug prices has triggered an uncommon collaboration of unions, advocacy organizations and health insurance carriers. The new coalition calling itself Oregonians for Affordable Drug Prices Now plans to push the issue heavily during this years legislative session, which began Wednesday.

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STUDY FINDS NO INCREASED RATE OF CANCER AMONG SOCCER PLAYERS (Bend Bulletin)

-Cluster of cases is not larger than would be expected-

An investigation into a suspected cancer cluster among soccer players in Washington state found fewer than expected cases in the 5 to 24 age group, casting doubt on a theory that playing on artificial turf fields could increase the risk for cancer.

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FLU CASES DECLINING AFTER DECEMBER SPIKE (Bend Bulletin)

-Season picked up earlier than usual-

When flu diagnoses began climbing rapidly in Deschutes County in December  a full month before they usually do  health department officials grew worried. Did this herald a disastrous season?

We were concerned, said Heather Kaisner, communicable disease supervisor for Deschutes County Health Services.

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EDITORIAL: ODOT NEEDS A PLAN FOR IMPROVEMENT — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

A long-awaited performance audit of the Oregon Department of Transportation paints a decidedly mixed picture: On one hand, ODOT is a standout compared with other states in the West. At the same time, its above average compared with all states departments of transportation, but below average when compared with similar private companies.

Its not a mess, but things could be much better.

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EDITORIAL: BOTTLE BILL MAY BE READY FOR RETIREMENT — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

When Oregon’s pioneering bottle deposit bill was passed in 1971, its advocates wanted to control litter and have industry pick up the cost. They probably didn’t envision industry getting a windfall from consumers who don’t redeem their bottles.

As the state prepares to double the deposit from a nickel to a dime in April, Willamette Week newspapers Nigel Jaquiss discovered that beverage distributors have been keeping about $30 million annually in uncollected deposits. When the rate doubles in April, that could mean theyre keeping $60 million.

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OPENING BELL IN SALEM, OREGON FARMERS & IMMIGRATION CHANGES AND SEA LION CONTROL (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Chris Lehman and Gordon Friedman with The Oregonian/Oregonlive join us to preview the work lawmakers will be undertaking in the 2017 legislative session, which begins today.

John Zielinski with the Oregon Farm Bureau joins us to talk about what farmers are hoping for from the Federal government in terms of immigration. Also, we check in with local lawyer Bradley Maier, who says its likely worker visa programs may be changed in a forthcoming executive order.

Since the 1990s, sea lion predation on protected fish species has been a problem at dams throughout the Pacific Northwest. A new study suggests we could start to solve that problem by thinking about sea lion behavior through the lens of epidemiology. We talk to Zach Shackner with the National Marine Fish Services Office.

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OREGON LAWMAKERS CONSIDER MEASURE TO RAISE SMOKING AGE TO 21 (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The legal age to purchase and use tobacco in Oregon would rise from 18 to 21 under a measure under consideration in the state Legislature.

High school senior Mason Thurman speaks at a state capitol press conference in Salem on behalf of a bill that would raise the legal limit to purchase tobacco products from 18 to 21.

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OREGON SCHOOLS PREPARE FOR POSSIBLE ICE VISITS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon school districts are crafting guidelines for teachers and office staff in the event officials with Immigration and Customs Enforcement show up at Oregon public schools, looking for students, families or information.

Several districts, including Portland Public Schools, David Douglas and North Clackamas confirmed to OPB theyre drafting advice on how to respond to immigration officers, should they come knocking.

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OREGON WAY BEHIND ON ITS GOALS FOR REDUCING CARBON EMISSIONS: REPORT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

In a new report, the Oregon Global Warming Commission says the state isn’t expected to come within striking distance of its 2020 or 2050 goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

The commission says the latest numbers show a perilous reversal in the downward trend of emissions from cars and trucks over the past few years. In short, people are driving more  and in bigger vehicles.

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REPORT LOOKS AT CHILDREN’S HEALTH (East Oregonian)

A recently released childrens health report reveals interesting factoids about the nearly 20,000 children who live in Umatilla, Morrow and Union counties.

They sleep an average of 10.1 hours a night. Each day, they spend on average 1.84 hours watching television, 1.33 hours reading, 0.84 hours on the computer and 0.84 hours playing video games. They miss an average of 3.9 days of school a year because of illness or injury. A third of children are overweight, with a fifth classified as obese.

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POT SHOPS SAY TESTING RULES ARE HURTING EXTRACT SALES (Medford Mail Tribune)

Local cannabis dispensaries have denounced strict new state testing standards for extracts that have cut sales by up to 50 percent and reduced the amount of product on the shelves.

“They took a robust industry, and they’ve killed it with massive overregulation,” said Michael Monarch, owner of Green Valley Wellness in Talent.

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JACKSON COUNTY INMATES CAN SIGN UP FOR HEALTH INSURANCE (Medford Mail Tribune)

Low-income inmates leaving the Jackson County Jail will have better access to Oregon Health Plan insurance coverage because of a new agreement between the state and county.

Jackson County commissioners on Wednesday approved an agreement for trained county workers to help inmates enroll or re-enroll in OHP. The Oregon Health Authority provides the training for the county workers.

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OREGON LEGISLATIVE SESSION TO KICK OFF AMID BUDGET QUESTION (Douglas County News-Review)

The 2017 session of the Oregon Legislature kicked off today. Talk of how to bridge a budget gap of roughly $1.8 billion will dominate this years session.

And the answer to that question likely wont be known for months.

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LEGISLATURE TOLD TO TARGET TRANSPORTATION TO GET OREGON ON COURSE TO MEET FAILING EMISSIONS GOALS (Oregon Business Journal)

A state commission is pointing to a potential transportation funding package in the Legislature as a key tool for getting Oregon on track to meeting its carbon emissions goals.

In a draft report to the Legislature set to be issued today  the day the 2017 legislative session opens in Salem  the Oregon Global Warming Commission writes that a key takeaway is that rising transportation emissions are driving increases in statewide emissions.

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PORTLAND ECONOMIST: NEW ODOT AUDIT “WORSE THAN USELESS” (Willamette Week)

-Transportation agency’s compentence in question as Brown, lawamkers seek big funding package.-

There’s one thing on which Gov. Kate Brown and legislative leaders in both parties agree they all badly want to pass a transportation-funding package in the 2017 legislative session that opened today.

“Our economy and the safety of our communities cannot wait,” Brown said in a statement of her agenda last month.

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PORTLAND RESIDENTS ON STATE LEGISLATIVE SESSION START: ‘IF IT AIN’T BROKE, DON’T FIX IT’ (KATU)

The 2017 Oregon Legislative Session began Wednesday morning in Salem.

Ahead of the session, KATU News spoke with several Portland residents about issues that matter to them that they’d like to see discussed in the state legislature.

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BILL WOULD MAKE POLICE GET WARRANT BEFORE TRACKING PHONES (KOIN) \

-Senate Bill 571 comes as more states are looking at legislation to limit the ability of law enforcement to track phones-

A bill filed by Sen. Tim Knopp, R-Bend, would require authorities in Oregon to get a warrant before tracking a suspects cell phone or getting information from it via a cell-site simulator device like a Stingray.

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LAWMAKERS TO DECIDE OREGON’S STATE DOG (KOIN)

-Bills propose either a shelter dog or a Border Collie-

Now that the Oregon Legislature is back in session, lawmakers can decide between a shelter dog and a Border Collie as the state dog.

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OREGON TO LAUNCH AFFORDABLE HOUSING PILOT PROGRAM (KTVZ Bend)

-Two cities to get to develop projects outside UGB-

The Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission said Wednesday it has approved administrative rules to launch an affordable housing pilot program .

The rules adopted at the LCDC’s meeting in St. Helens last Thursday implement House Bill 4079, which allows two cities to develop affordable housing on up to 50 acres outside their urban growth boundaries without going through the normal urban growth boundary expansion process.

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THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING INCOMES OF YOUNG AMERICANS (The Atlantic)

-It’s repetitive for some to hear, but important for everybody to know: You can’t explain Millennial economic behavior without explaining that real wages for young Americans have collapsed.-

American families are grappling with stagnant wage growth, as the costs of health care, education, and housing continue to climb. But for many of America’s younger workers, “stagnant” wages shouldn’t sound so bad. In fact, they might sound like a massive raise.

Since the Great Recession struck in 2007, the median wage for people between the ages of 25 and 34, adjusted for inflation, has fallen in every major industry except for health care.

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PROPOSED COUGAR LEGISLATION CHALLENGES VOTER-APPROVED MEASURE (Eugene Weekly)

In 1994, Oregonians voted to ban the use of dogs to hunt cougars and bears. In legislative sessions following the passage of that ballot measure, however, lawmakers have introduced bills aiming to dismantle and weaken Measure 18.

Since 2008, Senior Oregon Director and Rural Outreach Director of the Humane Society of the United States Scott Beckstead says hes been fighting these efforts during every legislative session.

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RAISING OREGON SMOKING AGE TO 21 HAS BIPARTISAN SUPPORT (The Lund Report)

The American Cancer Society, OHSU and others concerned about stamping out early addiction to carcinogenic tobacco took the first day of the legislative session to renew their push to increase the legal age of tobacco to the same age as alcohol and marijuana.

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LEGISLATURE DEBUT BAD FOR FARMERS — OPINION (naturalresourcereport.com)

The 2017 Legislative Session officially kicks off today. The even year long session is slated to run through early July. But with a $1.7 billion budget shortfall to deal with, there has already been talk of a Special Session after that.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on February 02, 2017 OSL eClips

February 01, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Gov. Brown names new economic policy advisor
* Oregon won’t hit greenhouse gas emissions goals, report says
* Oregon governor creates Trump resistance team
* Oregon Promise’s future not guaranteed heading into legislative session
* 14 things to know about the Oregon Legislature
* Officials investigate possible avian cholera outbreak after hundreds of ducks found dead
* Renters relocation assistance measure is short-sighted: Editorial Agenda 2017 — Opinion
* PERS reform hearings start Oregon legislative session
* GOP bill would sell 70,000 acres of Oregon public land
* Oregon legislators from Lane County area focus on pet projects and peeves in upcoming Salem session
* Legislative leaders seek compromise act on tax reform
* GOP wants cost cuts in exchange for revenue hikes
* Help for unpaid workers
* Landlords warns of unintended consequences of required renter relocation assistance
* Our Opinion? 2017 Oregon Legislature’s to-do list — Opinion
* My View: Sensible property tax reform has merit — Guest Opinion
* Central Oregon mule deer migrations in crisis
* Sockeye salmon return to Deschutes in droves
* Prineville Airport grant to add jobs, reduce congestion
* Land Owners, Oregon Want Very Different Things Within Bend’s Borders
* Oregon Legislative Session To Kick Off Amid Budget Questions
* Oregon sees major hazelnut crop upswing
* County to reimburse livestock producers for wolf problems
* ODFW investigating possible avian cholera outbreak
* New director seeks to stabilize OnTrack
* Trying to get a handle on homelessness
* Rare snakes from south Cascades part of illegal trade
* Session will begin with a Budget Bang — Guest Opinion
* English Language Learning program gets $90,000 from state
* Warrenton grad rates on the rise
* Detox: Lack of local options an obstacle to recovery
* Johnson, Boone to discuss fire assessments at town hall
* Editorial: Lawmakers head into a difficult session — Opinion
* Were specialized in detoxing them
* New Albany liquor store gets nod from OLCC
* Editorial: It’s time for the Legislature to get to work — Opinion
* Legislators announce budget-focused town hall meetings across Oregon
* Oregon right, WA wrong on gillnetting — Opinion
* Lone Rock sees long-term view of forest management
* Sands will fight for city street money at the capital
* Digital divide in rural America — Guest Opinion
* Corporate Lobbyists Turned Oregon’s Iconic Bottle Bill Into a Sweet Payday For Their Clients
* United Streetcar is About to Get Its Tax Break Cancelled. Here Are Five Other Tax Giveaways That Oregon Could Scrap.
* EPA cutbacks and Oregon’s environment: What we know
* Legislation would raise OR’s tobacco sales age to 21
* ‘Lane County is a sanctuary county within the State of Oregon’
* Oregon, Washington Named in Insulin Price-Gouging Lawsuit
* SafeOregon School Safety Tip Line Now Available
* The Secret Benefits of Sharing Government Services — Opinion
* USDA Agrees to Not Regulate Genetically Modified Grass On the Loose In Oregon
* Oregon Legislative Session To Kick Off Amid Budget Questions
* Republicans move to sell off 3.3m acres of national land, sparking rallies

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GOV. BROWN NAMES NEW ECONOMIC POLICY ADVISOR (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown on Tuesday announced the latest addition to her office: Jason Lewis-Berry, a former official at the U.S. Department of State, will advise the governor on economic and jobs policy.

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OREGON WON’T HIT GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS GOALS, REPORT SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon is not reducing carbon dioxide emissions fast enough to meet its goals for 2020 and beyond, a new report finds. In fact, it’s not even close.

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OREGON GOVERNOR CREATES TRUMP RESISTANCE TEAM (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown is trying to amass a group of volunteers to resist the Trump administration while promoting her.

In an email her campaign sent to supporters Tuesday, Brown said Donald Trump’s first actions as president “have attacked our values as Americans and as Oregonians.”

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OREGON PROMISE’S FUTURE NOT GUARANTEED HEADING INTO LEGISLATIVE SESSION (Portland Oregonian)

Madison Gaylin wakes up each weekday and makes the 45-minute drive from her parents’ home in Clatskanie to Clatsop Community College in Astoria.

Gaylin isn’t paying a dime for her tuition, fees, or books. That’s because the 18-year-old is one of 47 students attending the coastal school under Oregon Promise, a state program that acts as a last-dollar scholarship for qualified students to attend community colleges.

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14 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE OREGON LEGISLATURE (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s 79th Legislative Assembly convenes today. Here’s what you need to know about this year’s session, by the numbers.

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OFFICIALS INVESTIGATE POSSIBLE AVIAN CHOLERA OUTBREAK AFTER HUNDREDS OF DUCKS FOUND DEAD (Portland Oregonian)

State and federal wildlife managers are investigating a possible outbreak of avian cholera in the Stanfield and Milton-Freewater area after several hundred ducks were spotted dead on private wetlands there.

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RENTERS RELOCATION ASSISTANCE MEASURE IS SHORT-SIGHTED: EDITORIAL AGENDA 2017 — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

By now it is widely known Portland’s hot real estate and rental market can put the squeeze on household budgets. Few people, however, feel it more than apartment tenants whose incomes, in many cases fixed, fail to keep pace with rent increases.

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PERS REFORM HEARINGS START OREGON LEGISLATIVE SESSION (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Legislature will get right to work on what could be one of the most contentious issues of the 2017 session  trying to reduce costs associated with PERS, the Public Employees Retirement System.

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GOP BILL WOULD SELL 70,000 ACRES OF OREGON PUBLIC LAND (Salem Statesman Journal)

A lawmaker from Utah has introduced legislation that would dispose of 3.3 million acres of public land nationwide, including 70,300 acres in Oregon.

In what some have called the opening shot by Republicans to sell or transfer federal lands, U.S. Rep. Jason Chaffetz introduced H.R. 621 last week to free up resources for economic development in struggling rural communities.

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OREGON LEGISLATORS FROM LANE COUNTY AREA FOCUS ON PET PROJECTS AND PEEVES IN UPCOMING SALEM SESSION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Bills would give sales bonuses to sellers of electronic vehicles; impose higher taxes on logging; allow cities to use unmanned cameras to issue speeding tickets-

Oregon lawmakers return to Salem this week for a five-month session set to be dominated by a tough debate about how to close a $1.8 billion hole in the state budget.

But more quietly, legislators will pass  or kill  dozens of policy bills, with ideas big and small, that could touch almost every area of Oregonians lives.

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LEGISLATIVE LEADERS SEEK COMPROMISE ACT ON TAX REFORM (Portland Tribune)

-Opponents in record corporate sales tax measure have not met face-to-face to negotiate a compromise on reform-

The heads of the Oregon House and Senate announced last week they have been unable to bring together the opposing sides on how to fix the state’s unstable revenue system and a $1.8 billion shortfall in the next two years.

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GOP WANTS COST CUTS IN EXCHANGE FOR REVENUE HIKES (Portland Tribune)

-Republican leaders in the Legislature stand firm on budget stance-

Driving a hard bargain as the Legislature commences this week, Republican legislators say they’d be willing to consider revenue reform  but only if there are changes to the other side of the state’s ledger.

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HELP FOR UNPAID WORKERS (Portland Tribune)

-Bureau of Labor and Industries encourages unpaid film workers to make contact-

The Bureau of Labor and Industries directed $17,835 to 11 unpaid employees working on the V Force: New Dawn of V.I.C.T.O.R.Y. film set, Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian said Friday.

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LANDLORDS WARNS OF UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF REQUIRED RENTER RELOCATION ASSISTANCE (Portland Tribune)

-City Council will consider ordinance requiring landlords to pay relocation assistance ranging from $2,900 to $4,500 for no cause evictions and moves caused by high rent increases.-

Landlord lobbyist John DiLorenzo says there will be unintended consequences of the City Council requires landlord to pay the relocation costs of tenants subject to no-caused evictions.

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OUR OPINION? 2017 OREGON LEGISLATURE’S TO-DO LIST — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

-To do list for Legislature includes tackling budget cuts, financing transportation, reviewing savings with PERS and passing a plan to raise revenue.-

The 2017 Oregon Legislature won’t start until Wednesday, but lawmakers already are behind schedule.

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MY VIEW: SENSIBLE PROPERTY TAX REFORM HAS MERIT — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

-Oregon is the only state not to reassess taxable value on a property when it is sold or transferred.-

More than two decades have passed since voter approval of Oregon’s property tax reform Measure 5 and the Measure 47/50 couplet. While Measure 5 capped the overall property tax rate, Measures 47/50 limited the annual rate of reassessment. Thanks to these initiatives, property tax bills became more predictable and fewer homeowners were taxed out of their own homes.

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CENTRAL OREGON MULE DEER MIGRATIONS IN CRISIS (Bend Bulletin)

-Help assist with safe passage to maintain population-

We had not seen a deer in our yard for three weeks, and I guessed they had gone into the Paulina unit east of U.S. Highway 97, but then they showed up. It was the same crippled doe we had seen for three straight years, her fawn of the year and another female.

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SOCKEYE SALMON RETURN TO DESCHUTES IN DROVES (Bend Bulletin)

-Fall return at Round Butte Dam was way above average-

A complex of dams along the Deschutes River saw a massive return of native sockeye salmon in 2016.

A total of 536 sockeye salmon returned to the Pelton Round Butte Hydroelectric Project, a complex of three hydroelectric dams and reservoirs that stretch about 20 miles along the Deschutes River just west of Madras.

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PRINEVILLE AIRPORT GRANT TO ADD JOBS, REDUCE CONGESTION (Bend Bulletin)

-$2 million ODOT grant will expand firefighting operations-

Prineville will use a $2 million state grant to help pay for improvements that will bring jobs to the Prineville Airport, relieve aviation congestion and make it easier for the U.S. Forest Service to fight fires from the Central Oregon facility.

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LAND OWNERS, OREGON WANT VERY DIFFERENT THINGS WITHIN BEND’S BORDERS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Back in 2008, the city of Bend asked Oregon for permission to expand its urban growth boundary. The state said no.

First, it said the city needed to fill in some of the empty space inside the existing boundary.

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OREGON LEGISLATIVE SESSION TO KICK OFF AMID BUDGET QUESTIONS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The 2017 session of the Oregon Legislature kicks off Wednesday. Talk of how to bridge a budget gap of roughly $1.8 billion will dominate this years session.

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OREGON SEES MAJOR HAZELNUT CROP UPSWING (Capital Press)

-Oregon’s hazelnut crop increased about 40 percent, to 43,300 tons, in 2016 compared to the previous year.-

Oregon saw a major upswing in hazelnut production in 2016, with growers harvesting 40 percent more nuts than the previous year.

At 43,300 tons, the states hazelnut crop also outperformed the USDAs projection by 14 percent.

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COUNTY TO REIMBURSE LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS FOR WOLF PROBLEMS (East Oregonian)

County attorney Doug Olsen said most of the grants would pay for methods to keep livestock safe from wolves but some would cover the cost of livestock that wolves killed. He explained the money comes from the Oregon Department of Agricultures wolf depredation fund.

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ODFW INVESTIGATING POSSIBLE AVIAN CHOLERA OUTBREAK (East Oregonian)

-The Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife is investigating a possible outbreak of avian cholera in northeast Oregon.-

Avian cholera may be spreading among waterfowl in northeast Oregon after several hundred dead ducks were found over the weekend on private land near Stanfield and Milton-Freewater.

Wildlife officials in Washington have already confirmed an outbreak of avian cholera around the Tri-Cities, where more than 1,200 dead ducks were reported last week.

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NEW DIRECTOR SEEKS TO STABILIZE ONTRACK (Medford Mail Tribune)

OnTrack’s new interim executive director wants to focus on stabilizing families that have been torn apart by drug addiction as well as reorienting an organization that is working its way through its own crisis.

Kerri Hecox, 44, is taking over for former director Rita Sullivan as OnTrack confronts greater scrutiny from state agencies over “deplorable conditions” at the group’s recovery housing.

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TRYING TO GET A HANDLE ON HOMELESSNESS (Medford Mail Tribune)

When 57-year-old Mitchell Brent came back to the Rogue Valley after a three-year stint of teaching English in Thailand, he figured he could get a job and get back to his life.

“I thought I’d work it out, no problem. But the longer it went on, the more I went through money,” says Brent, who is living in a motel and working part-time in human resources.

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RARE SNAKES FROM SOUTH CASCADES PART OF ILLEGAL TRADE (Medford Mail Tribune)

Three men have been sentenced in federal court for illegally collecting and trading wild snakes caught in 11 states and Canada – including Southern Oregon – following a three-year investigation called Operation Kingsnake.

The men captured hundreds of wild snakes, including seven California mountain kingsnakes in the south Cascades during 2011, and transported them across state lines illegally, violating the federal Lacey Act.

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SESSION WILL BEGIN WITH A BUDGET BANG — GUEST OPINION (The World)

Oregon’s Legislative Session starts on tomorrow, and the biggest topic will certainly be the budget. Gov. Kate Brown released a recommended budget last month that has everyone in media gasping for breath because of a $1.7 billion shortfall.

The governor is quoted as saying, “The budget includes significant cuts at a level I find absolutely unacceptable”

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING PROGRAM GETS $90,000 FROM STATE (The World)

-Coos Bay School District to use money to hire translators-

The Coos Bay School District made the target list for poor English Language Learning graduation rates, meaning the district will now receive $90,000 from the Oregon Department of Education to improve the program, something that special programs director Lisa DeSalvio said is both good and bad.

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WARRENTON GRAD RATES ON THE RISE (Daily Astorian)

Over the past five school years, Warrenton High School has steadily climbed from the worst to nearly the best in Clatsop County at graduating students in four years.

Since 57.9 percent of the class of 2012 graduated in four years, the worst mark in the county, the school has seen continual gains, with more than 63 percent in 2013, 66 percent in 2014 and more than 69 percent in 2015. Last year, more than 74 percent of Warrenton students graduated on time, nearly the highest rate among the countys three larger school districts.

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DETOX: LACK OF LOCAL OPTIONS AN OBSTACLE TO RECOVERY (Daily Astorian)

-The closest medical detox center on the list is in St. Helens, 66 miles away in Columbia County.-

Doctors and nurses at Columbia Memorial Hospital can treat acute conditions and symptoms of chronic drug or alcohol abuse, but patients who need to go through the painful withdrawal of detoxification get a card with a list of local rehabilitation facilities.

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JOHNSON, BOONE TO DISCUSS FIRE ASSESSMENTS AT TOWN HALL (Daily Astorian)

-Additional lots considered forestland-

State Sen. Betsy Johnson, state Rep. Deborah Boone and the Oregon Department of Forestry will host a town hall Saturday in Seaside to discuss the Astoria Districts assessments for wildfire protection.

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EDITORIAL: LAWMAKERS HEAD INTO A DIFFICULT SESSION — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-Acrimony, silliness and obstructionism mark the legislative opening.-

The 2017 Oregon Legislature will convene Wednesday amid acrimony, political silliness and dire predictions.

This is all part of the ritual dance that launches each legislative session, as the Republicans and Democrats, House and Senate, and individual lawmakers jockey for political leverage.

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WE’RE SPECIALIZED IN DETOXING THEM (Daily Astorian)

-St. Helens center a resource for Clatsop County-

The basement rooms of a medical detox center may seem like a universe away from the world of Harry Potter and Harvard. The message on the bulletin board Monday afternoon, drawn in red marker, brought them closer together: Rock bottom became the solid foundation in which I rebuilt my life.

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NEW ALBANY LIQUOR STORE GETS NOD FROM OLCC (Albany Democrat Herald)

Albany is getting a new liquor store, but Corvallis is not.

An application for a new retail outlet at 828 Pacific Blvd. S.E. is one of three proposed for Linn, Benton and Lane counties that have been granted preliminary approval by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, the state agency announced. The other two are in Eugene.

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EDITORIAL: IT’S TIME FOR THE LEGISLATURE TO GET TO WORK — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

All the preliminaries are over. The first batch of bills has been filed. A pair of early budgets already have been written. Legislators have gone through their training about treating each other with respect. This is true.

So there’s nothing left except for the 2017 legislative session to officially begin.

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LEGISLATORS ANNOUNCE BUDGET-FOCUSED TOWN HALL MEETINGS ACROSS OREGON (LaGrande Observer)

-Eastern Oregon meetings scheduled for Madras, Hermiston-

The Oregon Legislative Assemblys budget-writing Joint Ways and Means Committee will hold a series of public hearings in seven cities across the state beginning Feb. 10.

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OREGON RIGHT, WA WRONG ON GILLNETTING — OPINION (Chinook Observer)

-States should join in scrapping Kitzhaber scheme-

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission is to be commended for recognizing that a 2013 policy dictated by former Gov. John Kitzhaber to kick commercial salmon fishing off the Columbia River has failed.

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LONE ROCK SEES LONG-TERM VIEW OF FOREST MANAGEMENT (Douglas County News-Review)

Roseburg-based business Lone Rock Timber Management Company has operated in Oregon forests for four generations. Now, the family-owned company and partner Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians hope to acquire the Elliott State Forest to keep the land in local ownership and manage the forest for timber harvest while meeting conservation and public access requirements.

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SANDS WILL FIGHT FOR CITY STREET MONEY AT THE CAPITAL (Wallowa.com)

Joseph Mayor Dennis Sands is about to take the condition of Josephs roads to the state house.

Sands is one of the regional representatives for small cities with populations of 5,000 or less in Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties.

In an October meeting sponsored by the League of Oregon Cities in Elgin, Sands met with two representatives from Oregon Department of Transportation. It was an opportunity for the small cities to talk about their transportation and infrastructure issues.

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DIGITAL DIVIDE IN RURAL AMERICA — GUEST OPINION (Wallowa.com)

Access to the Internet. The Internet is now considered a basic human right; it is how people find employment, handle their finances, receive an education, work, and receive medical care.

However, not everyone is able to use the Internet to its full potential, due primarily to slow speeds. Rural areas are at a disadvantage when it comes to accessing broadband.

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CORPORATE LOBBYISTS TURNED OREGON’S ICONIC BOTTLE BILL INTO A SWEET PAYDAY FOR THEIR CLIENTS (Willamette Week)

-When the deposit for returnable cans and bottles goes up, the environment may not win. But private companies will.-

On April 1, the deposit for returnable cans and bottles in Oregon will increase for the first time in history.

Now, when you buy a bottle of Black Butte Porter or a can of LaCroix, you’ll pay a dime instead of a nickel.

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UNITED STREETCAR IS ABOUT TO GET ITS TAX BREAK CANCELLED. HERE ARE FIVE OTHER TAX GIVEAWAYS THAT OREGON COULD SCRAP (Willamette Week)

-Watchdogs say elected officials should scrutinize the $12.1 billion a year of state and local tax breaks on the books.-

When lawmakers convene Feb. 1 for the 2017 legislative session, the most pressing question will be how to fill a $1.8 billion budget gap.

One answer, say budget watchdogs: Look to the example of United Streetcar.

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EPA CUTBACKS AND OREGON’S ENVIRONMENT: WHAT WE KNOW (KGW)

-What we know about changes at the EPA, and how they could impact Oregon’s environmental quality.-

As the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality works to rebound from a tumultuous 2016, the agency now faces an uncertain future in light of the Trump administrations planned cutbacks at the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

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LEGISLATION WOULD RAISE ORS TOBACCO SALES AGE TO 21 (KOIN)

-A poll from the American Cancer Society found 64% of Oregonians support the idea-

Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, D-Beaverton, will introduce new legislation on Wednesday to raise the age of sale for all tobacco products to 21 across Oregon, according to the American Cancer Society.

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‘LANE COUNTY IS A SANCTUARY COUNTY WITHIN THE STATE OF OREGON’ (KVAL)

Citizens asked the Lane County Commission to follow Benton County’s lead and become a sanctuary county to support undocumented people and their families.

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OREGON, WASHINGTON NAMED IN INSULIN PRICE-GOUGING LAWSUIT (KXL)

A federal lawsuit filed this week against drug companies that make insulin names Oregon and Washington as potential beneficiaries. It accuses those companies of intentionally price gouging the life-saving diabetes drug to make a bigger profit.

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SAFEOREGON SCHOOL SAFETY TIP LINE NOW AVAILABLE (KXL)

Oregon State Police say there’s a new school safety tip line students can use to report a potential threat. Its called Safe Oregon and was created under a bill passed by state lawmakers. Schools need to complete a sign up process in order for their students to use the tip line.

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THE SECRET BENEFITS OF SHARING GOVERNMENT SERVICES — OPINION (Governing)

-They may not show up in the bottom line.-

Each September, Umatilla County, Ore., hosts the Pendleton Round-Up, a massive rodeo that draws 50,000 people, nearly doubling the county’s population. Cowboys and cowgirls from across the country bring their broncos to compete, while guests line up to watch them battle bulls and rope steers, among other things, over the three-day affair.

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USDA AGREES TO NOT REGULATE GENETICALLY MODIFIED GRASS ON THE LOOSE IN OREGON (Newsweek)

-Farmers worry the rogue weed will harm their livelihoods and hurt the environment-

This is the story of an Oregon weed that nobody’s high on.

In two areas of the state, and in nearby Idaho, a genetically modified, weedy grass has spread beyond fields where it was grown by contractors affiliated with the Scotts Miracle-Gro Co., which developed it beginning in the 1990s in collaboration with Monsanto. Over more than a decade, Scotts has spent millions trying and failing to eradicate the plant, known as creeping bentgrass, which is genetically modified to be resistant to the herbicide Roundup, also known as glyphosate.

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OREGON LEGISLATIVE SESSION TO KICK OFF AMID BUDGET QUESTIONS (NW News Network)

The 2017 session of the Oregon Legislature kicks off Wednesday. Talk of how to bridge a budget gap of roughly $1.8 billion will dominate this year’s session.

And the answer to that question likely won’t be known for months.

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REPUBLICANS MOVE TO SELL OFF 3.3M ACRES OF NATIONAL LAND, SPARKING RALLIES (The Guardian UK)

-Land totaling the size of Connecticut has been targeted in a new bill in the Republican House, uniting hunters and conservationists in opposition-

Now that Republicans have quietly drawn a path to give away much of Americans public land, US representative Jason Chaffetz of Utah has introduced what the Wilderness Society is calling step two in the GOPs plan to offload federal property.

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PER CAPITA PERSONAL INCOME IN OREGON’S COUNTIES— BLOG (Oregon Employment Department – Research Div)

In 2015, Oregon had a per capita personal income PCPI of $43,783. The PCPI ranked 29th in the United States and was 91 percent of the national average, $48,112, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. In Oregon, the 2015 PCPI increased by 5.0 percent from 2014, faster than the nationwide PCPI growth rate of 3.7 percent. In 2005, Oregon’s PCPI was $32,421 and ranked 32nd in the United States.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on February 01, 2017 OSL eClips

January 31, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Audit finds ODOT excels at road building but fails to strategize, wastes money
* Burn victim in Astoria explosion sues butane hash oil makers
* U.S. immigration says it’s not increasing crackdown at courthouses, but fear lingers
* Landlords promise lawsuit over proposed Portland tenant protections
* Oregon school success story: How Oregon City High got 94 percent of students to graduation
* Oregon’s largest colleges and universities blast Trump travel ban
* Here’s your chance to weigh in on Oregon’s two-year spending plan
* Treasurer: State may borrow $5.4 billion over next 8 years
* Mid-Willamette loses advocate as Oregon lawmaker steps down
* A premature surrender — Opinion
* Thousands of refugees have come to Oregon in recent years under program Trump has suspended
* Powers balanced in criminal justice system — Guest Opinion
* Audit finds ODOT culture lacks accountability, strategic vision
* Certification before graduation
* Editorial: Gov. Kate Brown forgets rural Oregon — Opinion
* Editorial: OSU-Cascades should buy the landfill and build the future on it — Opinion
* ICE Confirms Portland Officials’ Fears About Immigration Arrests At Courthouse
* More Sign Up For Obamacare, But It’s Unclear What They’ll Do If The Law Is Repealed
* Grazing Halted In Oregon National Forest To Study Impacts On Spotted Frog
* Oregon State Rep. Vic Gilliam Steps Down
* AG Rosenblum Threatens Legal Action In Response To Executive Order
* Snowpack in Owyhee River Basin far above normal
* New ODA director eyes issues ranging from farm bill to GMOs
* Tillamook pledges $1.5 million to OSU dairy facility
* Commission to consider proceeding with plan to re-do I-84 interchange
* Legislators to talk budget in Hermiston
* OUR VIEW: Too much at stake to bog down legislative session with silliness — Opinion
* OnTrack hires interim director, submits corrective plan
* Esquivel suggests sales tax
* Traps would be checked more often under bill
* Testimony opens in ‘takings’ trial in D.C.
* Lighting up: Tobacco shops may need new license
* Change filing deadline and play square with the voters of Oregon — Opinion
* ODOT appeals Love’s truck stop
* Editorial: Legislators must tackle PERS costs — Opinion
* Editorial: Speed bumps on the road to legalization — Opinion
* Editorial: Will we pay the price of sanctuary? — Opinion
* Governor lets us down — Opinion
* Oregon, Diversity and the Middle East– Blog
* Bend gallery owner named to Oregon Arts Commission
* As More Voters Legalize Marijuana, States Left With Regulatory Hurdles
* States Expected to Continue Course Toward Clean Energy Future

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AUDIT FINDS ODOT EXCELS AT ROAD BUILDING BUT FAILS TO STRATEGIZE, WASTES MONEY (Portland Oregonian)

An independent review of the Oregon Department of Transportation shows that while the agency’s overall performance is at par with other states, there’s room to improve and prevent taxpayer money from being left on the table.

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BURN VICTIM IN ASTORIA EXPLOSION SUES BUTANE HASH OIL MAKERS (Portland Oregonian)

A construction worker who spent a month in a Portland burn unit after being injured in a butane-fueled explosion in Astoria last fall has filed a lawsuit against the company that made the cannabis extract, the property owner and the company that sold the flammable gas used to make the product.

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U.S. IMMIGRATION SAYS IT’S NOT INCREASING CRACKDOWN AT COURTHOUSES, BUT FEAR LINGERS (Portland Oregonian)

U.S. immigration officials said Monday that they haven’t undertaken any new initiatives to arrest immigrants who show up to Oregon’s courthouses for possible deportation.

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LANDLORDS PROMISE LAWSUIT OVER PROPOSED PORTLAND TENANT PROTECTIONS (Portland Oregonian)

Portland Commissioner Chloe Eudaly’s proposed tenant protection rule up for vote Thursday could entangle Portland in a lawsuit that could block or delay some or all its provisions, attorney John DiLorenzo says.

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OREGON SCHOOL SUCCESS STORY: HOW OREGON CITY HIGH GOT 94 PERCENT OF STUDENTS TO GRADUATION (Portland Oregonian)

In August 2014, just before the school year launched, Oregon City High School principal Tom Lovell asked the faculty gathered before him to guess how many F’s they’d collectively given the previous year.

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OREGON’S LARGEST COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES BLAST TRUMP TRAVEL BAN (Portland Oregonian)

The presidents of Oregon’s three largest public universities criticized President Donald Trump’s temporary ban on travelers from seven majority Muslim nations as a blow to global scholarship, research and diversity at their respective campuses.

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HERE’S YOUR CHANCE TO WEIGH IN ON OREGON’S TWO-YEAR SPENDING PLAN (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Legislature will kick off a statewide series of public hearings on the 2017-19 budget in Salem next week.

They’ll take input on the existing resources framework budget released by the Joint Ways and Means Committee co-chairmen Jan. 19.

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TREASURER: STATE MAY BORROW $5.4 BILLION OVER NEXT 8 YEARS (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon Legislature could issue up to $1.14 billion in new general-fund backed debt and up to $209 million in Lottery-backed debt over each of the next four 2-year budget cycles, State Treasurer Tobias Read announced Monday. That’s $5.4 billion over the next eight years.

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MID-WILLAMETTE LOSES ADVOCATE AS OREGON LAWMAKER STEPS DOWN (Salem Statesman Journal)

As word of Rep. Vic Gilliam’s resignation spread through the state capital Monday, there was a common lament: who’s going to watch out for seniors and veterans now?

Resignations are never easy. But this one was difficult to hear. With just two days until the start of the 79th session of the Oregon Legislature, Gilliam announced on Facebook that he was stepping down for reasons including “fairness to his constituents.”

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A PREMATURE SURRENDER — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Dennis Richardson was elected secretary of state partly on the strength of his promise to ensure that the office operates in a nonpartisan manner. Oregonians should expect no less from their chief elections officer. But Richardson is taking his pledge too far by asking the Legislature to consider a bill that would limit his authority to investigate violations of election rules or laws. He shouldn’t disarm until hes sure he wont need a weapon.

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THOUSANDS OF REFUGEES HAVE COME TO OREGON IN RECENT YEARS UNDER PROGRAM TRUMP HAS SUSPENDED (Eugene Register-Guard)

The U.S. refugee program that President Trump temporarily suspended has brought thousands of refugees into Oregon in recent years, says the Portland-based nonprofit Immigrant Refugee & Community Organization.

In federal fiscal year 2016, the refugee program brought into Oregon 96 people from Syria, 156 from Somalia, 212 from Iraq and 41 from Iran, as well as hundreds from Africa and former territories of the Soviet Union, for a total of 1,780, according to the Portland group. That year ran from Oct. 1, 2015, to Sept. 30, 2016.

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POWERS BALANCED IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Lane County Public Defender Brook Reinhards Jan. 25 guest viewpoint reminds us what a treasure we lost with the retirement of his predecessor, Greg Hazerabedian. Greg recognized and valued the roles each of his partners in the criminal justice system played, including prosecutors.

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AUDIT FINDS ODOT CULTURE LACKS ACCOUNTABILITY, STRATEGIC VISION (Portland Tribune)

-The audit by New York-based McKinsey and Co. found ODOT’s organizational health is still better than average in western states.-

A long-awaited performance audit of the Oregon Department of Transportation found the agency has a familial culture that is lacking in dissent and accountability and needs a clearer and more coordinated strategic vision for its future.

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CERTIFICATION BEFORE GRADUATION (Portland Tribune)

-Newberg High aims to train welders to go directly into the workforce-

Construction companies desperate for more source of skilled young workers should look out to Willamette Valley wine country.

In early January, Portland Community College joined forces with Newberg High School to reactivate a program to give students a running start in a healthy job market  welding.

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EDITORIAL: GOV. KATE BROWN FORGETS RURAL OREGON — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Gov. Kate Brown promised Oregonians all sorts of things when she was sworn in following her first elected term in office in early January. That’s pretty common: No governor wants to stand up and announce that the status quo is fine.

Yet the speed with which Brown backed away from her promises to rural Oregonians is downright dizzying. A single action, which can, to some extent, be traced back to the governor herself, proves the depth of her commitment to rural Oregonians.

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EDITORIAL: OSU-CASCADES SHOULD BUY THE LANDFILL AND BUILD THE FUTURE ON IT — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon State University’s Cascades Campus is due for a major growth spurt. And one of the best places for it to happen is right next to the campus  the 76 acres of a former Deschutes County landfill.

The expansion is essential to secure the future of a great public asset.

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ICE CONFIRMS PORTLAND OFFICIALS’ FEARS ABOUT IMMIGRATION ARRESTS AT COURTHOUSE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents made 58 arrests in Portland in January, including five foreign nationals, at or near courthouses in Multnomah County, according to an official with the federal government.

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MORE SIGN UP FOR OBAMACARE, BUT IT’S UNCLEAR WHAT THEY’LL DO IF THE LAW IS REPEALED (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Last year about 130,000 Oregonians enrolled in individual health insurance. So far this year more than 150,000 have signed up with healthcare.gov. That’s a 14 percent increase.

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GRAZING HALTED IN OREGON NATIONAL FOREST TO STUDY IMPACTS ON SPOTTED FROG (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A federal judge has prohibited cattle grazing on 68,000 acres in Oregon’s Fremont-Winema National Forest until federal officials reconsider its impacts on Oregon spotted frogs.

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OREGON STATE REP. VIC GILLIAM STEPS DOWN (Jefferson Public Radio)

Oregon state Rep. Vic Gilliam, a Republican from Silverton who is battling ALS, announced Monday that he’s stepping down. His resignation is effective Wednesday, the first day of the 2017 legislative session.

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AG ROSENBLUM THREATENS LEGAL ACTION IN RESPONSE TO EXECUTIVE ORDER (Northwest Public Radio)

Political leaders in Oregon are reacting defiantly to President Donald Trumps executive order strictly limiting who can enter the United States. Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum condemned President Trumps executive order that freezes immigration from seven mostly Muslim countries.

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SNOWPACK IN OWYHEE RIVER BASIN FAR ABOVE NORMAL (Capital Press)

-Snowpack in the Owyhee River Basin is at 164 percent of normal, which bodes well for area farmers, who have 118,000 acres of irrigated farmland.-

The Owyhee River Basin is holding an unusually large amount of snow right now, a good sign for the 1,800 farms that depend on irrigation water from the Owyhee Reservoir.

The Owyhee looks really, really good. Its incredible, said Malheur County farmer Bruce Corn, a member of the Owyhee Irrigation Districts board of directors.

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NEW ODA DIRECTOR EYES ISSUES RANGING FROM FARM BILL TO GMOS (Capital Press)

-Alexis Taylor said the 2018 Farm Bill was expected to be a prime subject of conversation at the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture meeting Jan. 30 to Feb. 1.-

With the 2014 Farm Bill expiring next year, agriculture leaders are already preparing for the struggle over its successor.

Alexis Taylor, the Oregon Department of Agriculture’s new director, is no stranger to farm bill negotiations.

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TILLAMOOK PLEDGES $1.5 MILLION TO OSU DAIRY FACILITY (Capital Press)

-The dairy plant will be part of a planned food and beverage center at Oregon State University.-

The Tillamook County Creamery Association has pledged $1.5 million to help build a new dairy science center at Oregon State University.

The facility is part of a planned food and beverage center that will include wine and beer making and other food made through fermentation.

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COMMISSION TO CONSIDER PROCEEDING WITH PLAN TO RE-DO I-84 INTERCHANGE (East Oregonian)

-Even if plan approved, no changes likely in the near future-

At a meeting Thursday, the Pendleton Planning Commission will take another look at a plan that could significantly change how Pendleton drivers navigate the area surrounding the Southgate exit on Interstate 84.

In 2010, the commission approved an interchange area management plan that is meant to ease congestion along the off-ramp and on-ramp at exit 209.

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LEGISLATORS TO TALK BUDGET IN HERMISTON (East Oregonian)

The Oregon Legislatures Joint Ways and Means Committee will visit Hermiston Feb. 17 as a part of a series of town hall meetings to discuss the state budget for the 2017-2019 biennium.

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OUR VIEW: TOO MUCH AT STAKE TO BOG DOWN LEGISLATIVE SESSION WITH SILLINESS — OPINION (East Oregonian)

The 2017 Oregon Legislature will convene Wednesday amid acrimony, political silliness and dire predictions.

This is all part of the ritual dance that launches each legislative session, as the Republicans and Democrats, House and Senate, and individual lawmakers jockey for political leverage.

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ONTRACK HIRES INTERIM DIRECTOR, SUBMITS CORRECTIVE PLAN (Medford Mail Tribune)

OnTrack announced Monday it has hired Dr. Kerri Hecox as its interim executive director to help the organization regroup after state investigators uncovered serious problems at housing provided to recovering drug addicts and their families.

The OnTrack board also announced it hired Hammonds Construction Friday to remodel crisis housing apartments at 11th and 12th streets in Medford after “deplorable” conditions were found by Department of Human Services and Oregon Health Authority investigators in January.

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ESQUIVEL SUGGESTS SALES TAX (Medford Mail Tribune)

Oregonians typically recoil at any mention of a state sales tax, but Republican Rep. Sal Esquivel is floating the idea in exchange for getting rid of property taxes for most residents.

“I was originally trying to figure out a way people wouldn’t pay property taxes when they retire,” Esquivel said.

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TRAPS WOULD BE CHECKED MORE OFTEN UNDER BILL (Medford Mail Tribune)

Animal welfare advocates are championing a new Oregon Senate bill that would require all traps set for furbearers and predators to be checked daily and have signs posted near them to warn people away.

Senate Bill 6 would alter the current requirement that furbearer traps be checked every 48 hours and kill traps set for cougars and other predators be checked every 30 days.

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TESTIMONY OPENS IN ‘TAKINGS’ TRIAL IN D.C. (Herald and News)

-Irrigators lay out their case-

The federal courtroom chambers were full on Monday for opening arguments kicking off the takings case hearing in Washington, D.C.

More than 25 Basin irrigators  or those who represent them  are scheduled to testify in the consolidated case at the U.S. Federal Court of Claims over the course of the next three weeks. Testimony may also be heard from Bureau of Reclamation officials from Klamath Falls and Sacramento.

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LIGHTING UP: TOBACCO SHOPS MAY NEED NEW LICENSE (Herald and News)

-Klamath County Public Health to implement ordinance on tobacco-

Klamath County Public Health is proposing a tobacco retail licensing ordinance to county commissioners, which, if implemented, would require all businesses that sell tobacco products to obtain a license in exchange for selling those products to consumers.

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CHANGE FILING DEADLINE AND PLAY SQUARE WITH THE VOTERS OF OREGON — OPINION (Herald and News)

It took a political battle in rural Oregon to generate significant state-wide effort to eliminate the flaw in the states election system that lets incumbent politicians play games with filing deadlines and choose their successors.

It wasn’t the first time Oregon incumbents filed for re-election then unexpectedly to most voters, anyway withdrew and let last-minute candidates become the only ones in the running for party nominations.

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ODOT APPEALS LOVE’S TRUCK STOP (Albany Democrat Herald)

The Oregon Department of Transportation last week appealed a proposed Loves Travel Stop and Country Store that is planned in the city of Millersburg, asking that a planning commission approval of a site plan review be overturned.

The state agency, in a letter to the city, said there is insufficient evidence to determine whether the business will have a significant impact to Interstate 5 and Linn County road systems.

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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATORS MUST TACKLE PERS COSTS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

One of the biggest question marks surrounding the 2017 legislative session is this one: Will proposals to try to rein in the costs of the state’s Public Employees Retirement System finally get a full and fair hearing this year?

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EDITORIAL: SPEED BUMPS ON THE ROAD TO LEGALIZATION — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald) Recent events in Brownsville and Salem suggest that, while the state of Oregon has made considerable progress in legalizing the recreational use of marijuana, wrinkles remain.

Some of these wrinkles won’t be ironed out until the federal government takes a couple of sensible steps on the issue, in part to accommodate the increasing number of states that have voted to legalize.

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EDITORIAL: WILL WE PAY THE PRICE OF SANCTUARY? — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

With President Donald Trump’s signing last week of an executive order to strip federal money away from sanctuary cities, the question of what might be at stake for Corvallis and the other entities that have declared themselves sanctuaries for illegal immigrants became a touch less academic.

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GOVERNOR LETS US DOWN — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown in her inaugural address this month offered predictable platitudes about how the state can help revive the economy in rural counties.

But the governors actions suggest to us that her words reflect political expediency rather than a genuine commitment to that goal.

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OREGON, DIVERSITY AND THE MIDDLE EAST— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

People have been moving to Oregon in droves ever since Lewis and Clark. This fact is a foundational statement in our offices presentations and one of the key reasons Oregons economy outperforms the typical state over the business cycle. As our office has pointed out in the past, Oregon is essentially a 50-50 state when it comes to Oregon-born residents vs those born elsewhere in the country. Focusing only on adults children dont get to decide where they want to live shows that just 38% of adult Oregon residents were born in the state.

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BEND GALLERY OWNER NAMED TO OREGON ARTS COMMISSION (KTVZ Bend)

Jenny Green, a gallerist and art historian from Bend, has been appointed to the Oregon Arts Commission by Gov. Kate Brown. Green fills the position previously held by Lawrence Fong of Portland, who completed his term in October.

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PROTECTING BIRTH CONTROL ACCESS IN OREGON (New York Times)

If the Affordable Care Act is repealed, coverage of birth control with no co-payment is one of many benefits that Americans could lose. Now legislators in Oregon have introduced a bill intended to protect access to birth control in the state, along with a broad range of other reproductive health care services, including abortion.

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AS MORE VOTERS LEGALIZE MARIJUANA, STATES LEFT WITH REGULATORY HURDLES (Stateline)

The battle to legally grow, sell, buy and smoke pot in California has been a long one.

Voters in the state ushered in medical marijuana 20 years ago, but took until last fall to approve a plan to legalize and regulate recreational marijuana.

Now, California officials are faced with setting rules for a product that has been outlawed by the federal government since the 1930s  a challenge that lawmakers and regulators in the other states that chose some form of marijuana legalization in the November election also are confronting.

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STATES EXPECTED TO CONTINUE COURSE TOWARD CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE (Stateline)

In Wyoming, Republican Gov. Matt Mead is counting on a state-funded research center set to open this year to find a way to produce energy from coal without releasing carbon dioxide into the environment. In Kansas, Republican Gov. Sam Brownback is eyeing new wind farms to bring jobs and economic growth. And in Ohio, Republican Gov. John Kasich says the state needs to support renewable energy to stay competitive and reduce electricity costs.

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State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

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newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 31, 2017 OSL eClips

January 30, 2017 Weekend Edition

State Library eClips

* Oregon lawmakers pay their businesses with campaign funds – it’s legal, but is it ethical?
* How advertising claims keep Oregon from salting winter roads
* Oregon details its Columbia River fee expenditures
* A $1.8 billion deficit in a time of record revenue — Opinion
* Trump’s campaign promises won’t create jobs, but Oregon manufacturers still can — Guest Opinion
* Will the real leader in the Oregon statehouse please rise? — Opinion
* Oregon left off early list of Trump infrastructure priorities
* Secretary of State Dennis Richardson asks for legislation to limit his own powers
* Oregon truffle industry goes global: Boosters hope locally grown French black truffles take off
* ‘Sanctuary city’ means Portland will remain welcoming to all — Guest Opinion
* The wealthiest place in each of Oregon’s 36 counties, according to Census data
* Oregon bill would make it illegal to fire someone for off-duty marijuana use
* Peter Courtney honors retiring K-9 dog
* Governor Kate Brown on 2017 legislative session
* Oregon State Capitol Tour: Process
* Oregon State Capitol Tour: Extras
* Oregon ACLU, Attorney General respond to Trump refugee ban
* Oregon officials increase ACA ads despite Trump’s cuts
* State recommends allowing beach parking in Lincoln City
* Oregon lawmakers will have to make tough budget cuts in 2017 — Opinion
* Valuing care in Oregon — Guest Opinion
* Air stagnation in Eugene-Springfield, around Oregon, deteriorates air quality
* Difficult legislative session ahead — Opinion
* The bully myth — Guest Opinion
* Program gave our rural communities a big lift — Guest Opinion
* For Lane County unauthorized immigrants and their advocates, Trump era spawns anxiety
* Oregon leaders react to immigration ban, arrest rumors
* Greenhouse gas emissions rising from vehicles
* Superfund cleanup now in hands of politicians, lobbyists
* How rising temperatures are affecting Oregon
* Legislators must dig in or face long session
* State seeks cannabis grower input
* State to end rural call center contract, expand Salem call center
* A day in court: Landlords and tenants negotiate before eviction
* Editorial: Transparent government is not supposed to be optional — Opinion
* Editorial: The dirt in Oregons clean fuel standard — Opinion
* Editorial: State progress in graduation rates is no triumph — Opinion
* Editorial: No pretend cops on COCC campus — Opinion
* Erik Lukens column: Oregon landlords could use a Dorothy English — Opinion
* Graduation Rates & Health Equity Act – OPB’s Think Out Loud
* Trump’s EPA Moves Create Uncertainty For Future Of Northwest Environmental Work
* Foster Parent Recruitment Initiative To Expand Statewide In Oregon
* Oregon Earthquake Anniversary Prompts Preparedness
* Snow damage to Idaho-Oregon onion industry nears $100 million
* Grazing halted to study impacts on Oregon spotted frog
* Unsecured pesticides cause costly mishaps, expert says
* SAGE Center eyes long-term visibility entering fourth year
* Umatilla County done frittering away economic development money
* Our view: Harsh winter cracks thin ice schools are skating on — Opinion
* Lewis: Lead hunting ban on federal land at odds with tradition — Guest Opinion
* Safe for staff, inmates
* State board: no avenue to close new high school
* Grad rates up 2 percent in 2 districts
* OSHA official: no action needed in snow-removal complaint
* Following collapse, company beefs up safety measures, works with local officials, OSHA
* Aid starts locally
* Oregon governor, lawmakers worry about budget gap
* Trump’s immigration actions worry local Latinos, could threaten Oregon’s sanctuary law
* Since You Asked: State ‘kicker’ tied to revenue predictions, not revenue
* Yreka meeting attendees say no to dam removal
* Guest Opinion: Groups stood up to protect farm land — Guest Opinion
* Basin graduation rates seeing gains, losses
* Homeless gather to be counted as South Coast communities struggle for answers
* South Coast seaweed entrepreneurs receive sizable investment
* You can’t ‘take back’ what you never owned — Opinion
* Disaster declared for storms in Josephine and Lane counties
* Bridging the gaps
* Bridges of Linn County
* Guest Opinion: Grateful for expanded monument — Guest Opinion
* Calling For Action
* Debating about deer — Opinion
* ODOT warns depositing snow on highways illegal
* The long road to a transportation package
* Profiling: Police Departments sound off on proposed legislation
* Oregon lawmakers concerned hiring freeze could hamper wildfire fighting efforts
* OUR VIEW: Giving credit when due
* EPA considers impaired quality listings for Hood River
* Gorge jobs pick up in December
* Sex offender out of Oregon State Hospital after decades
* Uncertainty ahead for Oregon’s economy
* Sanctuary Status: What it Means in Oregon
* Oregon Sheriffs release statement on immigration enforcement
* Mexico import tax threatens Oregon economy, officials warn
* Trump cancels Obamacare ads, so Oregon will pick up the slack
* Oregon Workplace Watchdog Agency Provides Back Pay to Unpaid Portland Movie Crew
* Repeat bill would prohibit Sharia law in Oregon courts
* The future of voter registration is here in Oregon — Blog
* These California and Oregon farmers lost water in 2001. Now they want to be paid.
* In California, the Future Is Still Electric
* Oregon Hospital Data Reveals Growing Reliance on Government Payments
* OHSU Responds to Penalties from CMS
* Legislature Should Consider a Surtax on Healthcare Executive Pay — Guest Opinion
* Federal Legislation Prevents Oregon from Solving its Healthcare Crisis — Guest Opinion

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OREGON LAWMAKERS PAY THEIR BUSINESSES WITH CAMPAIGN FUNDS – IT’S LEGAL, BUT IS IT ETHICAL? (Portland Oregonian)

Eighteen times in the last decade state Sen. Kim Thatcher’s campaign account has written checks to businesses she owns.

It’s all perfectly legal, and Thatcher, a Republican from Keizer, says she was given approval by elections officials to make the payments.

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HOW ADVERTISING CLAIMS KEEP OREGON FROM SALTING WINTER ROADS (Portland Oregonian)

As Portland’s roads quickly morphed from picturesque, snowy throughways into rutted, icy hellscapes earlier this month, a collective cry went up from frustrated motorists: Salt the roads

Oregon and Portland transportation officials were quick to explain why they don’t: The environment.

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OREGON DETAILS ITS COLUMBIA RIVER FEE EXPENDITURES (Portland Oregonian)

Since 2014, Oregon has spent $2.4 million it collected from a $9.75 Columbia River Endorsement sportfishing tag on largely recreational fishing enhancements and research.

The fee was intended to both fund the transition of gill-nets off the mainstem lower Columbia River and increase salmon and steelhead sportfishing opportunities.

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A $1.8 BILLION DEFICIT IN A TIME OF RECORD REVENUE — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

If lawmaking doesn’t work out for the Legislature’s chief budget writers, they have a solid future in horror flicks. The budget framework released earlier this month by Sen. Richard Devlin, D-Tualatin, and Rep. Nancy Nathanson, D-Eugene, is nothing short of terrifying for the dystopian picture it paints if the state fails to raise additional revenue.

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TRUMP’S CAMPAIGN PROMISES WON’T CREATE JOBS, BUT OREGON MANUFACTURERS STILL CAN — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Donald J. Trump is our president because of jobs. Despite other forces at play in the November election, I believe many Americans were swayed primarily by Trump’s promise to put them to work.

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WILL THE REAL LEADER IN THE OREGON STATEHOUSE PLEASE RISE? — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The legislative session opening this week carries with it higher stakes than ever. A failure by lawmakers to recognize harsh financial realities and then to act decisively to set Oregon on a safe course ahead will bring pain to many and, down the line, damage to public education and basic services. Oregon must get this right, and it will require steadfast leadership to do so.

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OREGON LEFT OFF EARLY LIST OF TRUMP INFRASTRUCTURE PRIORITIES (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon, a sanctuary state where Hillary Clinton won and where President Donald Trump spent little time during his campaign, has been left off an early list of 50 infrastructure priorities to receive federal dollars.

The snub comes on the eve of a particularly challenging legislative session, in which Republicans and Democrats must agree how to address a $1.8 billion deficit and how to put together a transportation funding package.

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SECRETARY OF STATE DENNIS RICHARDSON ASKS FOR LEGISLATION TO LIMIT HIS OWN POWERS (Portland Oregonian)

Politicians generally don’t try to curb their own power, but that’s exactly what Oregon’s second-highest official is mulling over.

In one of his first moves to create new policy, Secretary of State Dennis Richardson has tasked lawyers within the Legislature to draft a bill that would roll back his authority to order elections investigations, said Richardson’s spokesman, Michael Calcagno.

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OREGON TRUFFLE INDUSTRY GOES GLOBAL: BOOSTERS HOPE LOCALLY GROWN FRENCH BLACK TRUFFLES TAKE OFF (Portland Oregonian)

Nose to the ground, Dante races through the hazelnut orchard. The fluffy Lagotta Romagnolo is trained to search for truffles – a pungent mushroom that expert dogs can sniff out 100 yards away.

After a few minutes, Dante beelines toward a tree and scratches at its base. Pat Long rushes over, flicks out his pocketknife and starts digging. He unearths a gumball-sized Perigord truffle, named for the region where they were first commercially cultivated in France.

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‘SANCTUARY CITY’ MEANS PORTLAND WILL REMAIN WELCOMING TO ALL — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

For centuries, America has been a destination for those wanting to apply their hard work to the purpose of creating a better life for themselves and their families. We are a nation built on immigration.

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THE WEALTHIEST PLACE IN EACH OF OREGON’S 36 COUNTIES, ACCORDING TO CENSUS DATA (Portland Oregonian)

Where in Oregon will you find the highest median incomes?

We set off to find out by scouring Census data and pinpointing which city–or town–in each of Oregon’s 36 counties earns the most.

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OREGON BILL WOULD MAKE IT ILLEGAL TO FIRE SOMEONE FOR OFF-DUTY MARIJUANA USE (Portland Oregonian)

A bill introduced in the Oregon senate would mean no more tests for cannabis use as a condition for employment and no more fear that casual use of the now-legal-in-Oregon substance could cost you your job.

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PETER COURTNEY HONORS RETIRING K-9 DOG (Salem Statesman Journal)

Sen. Peter Courtney has delivered many retirement letters thanking officials and officers for their work. Friday was the first time the recipient had four legs, a wagging tail and a penchant for light-up chew toys.

The letter of gratitude was addressed to “Donja the Dog,” who is retiring after seven years on patrol with the Marion County Sheriff’s Office.

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GOVERNOR KATE BROWN ON 2017 LEGISLATIVE SESSION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon Governor Kate Brown speaks to the media ahead of the 2017 legislative session, due to start Feb. 1.

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OREGON STATE CAPITOL TOUR: PROCESS (Salem Statesman Journal)

-Get to know the Oregon State Capitol- video

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OREGON STATE CAPITOL TOUR: EXTRAS (Salem Statesman Journal)

-Get the know the Oregon State Capitol- video

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OREGON ACLU, ATTORNEY GENERAL RESPOND TO TRUMP REFUGEE BAN (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon’s attorney general and branch of the ACLU are publicly opposing President Donald Trump’s ban on refugees entering the United States.

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum issued a statement opposing the ban on the day following the order, stating it reinstates national origin discrimination.

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OREGON OFFICIALS INCREASE ACA ADS DESPITE TRUMP’S CUTS (Salem Statesman Journal)

In light of the Trump administration’s decision to halt federal spending on advertising and outreach for health care, Oregon officials are spending an additional $100,000 in advertising to encourage residents to sign up for health care coverage the final days of open enrollment.

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STATE RECOMMENDS ALLOWING BEACH PARKING IN LINCOLN CITY (Salem Statesman Journal)

-Concerns about access for elderly, disabled keep access point open to cars-

State officials have decided to continue allowing parking on the beach from a controversial access point in Lincoln City.

Strong opposition to a proposal banning vehicle access from N. 35th Court, on the north side of town, prompted the decision, officials said.

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OREGON LAWMAKERS WILL HAVE TO MAKE TOUGH BUDGET CUTS IN 2017 — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Baseball, football and basketball fans should be familiar with the game, “You Make the Call.”

It’s where armchair athletes second-guess rulings made by umpires, officials and referees.

In February, Oregon’s Democratic lawmakers will offer residents their own version of the game as they host six or seven town halls around the state.

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VALUING CARE IN OREGON — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

In early January, SEIU 503 and Family Forward Oregon launched a new project called Oregon CareWorks, aimed at raising the value of care in Oregon.

Care is universal and fundamental to our lives. So much so that we often take it for granted and rarely step back to examine the systems we have in place. However, recent demographic and economic shifts have forced us to take a hard look at our care systems, and what we found is appalling.

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AIR STAGNATION IN EUGENE-SPRINGFIELD, AROUND OREGON, DETERIORATES AIR QUALITY (Eugene Register-Guard)

Air worsened Friday in Eugene-Springfield as low-hanging wood smoke mixed with fog, the Lane Regional Air Protection Agency reported.

The agency’s Air Quality Index found the metro areas air pollution reached levels unhealthy for sensitive groups, including the young, old and sick.

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DIFFICULT LEGISLATIVE SESSION AHEAD — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Republicans have the power to extract concessions in exchange for tax increases-

Oregon’s 79th Legislative Assembly convenes Wednesday, one day before Groundhog Day, and Senate President Peter Courtney is already seeing shadows.

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THE BULLY MYTH — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Prevention programs based on major misconceptions-

Last November, the top administrators of Lane County’s three largest school districts made public statements related to bullying. In part, they stated: Regardless of the uncertainty associated with the election, schools still are safe places.

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PROGRAM GAVE OUR RURAL COMMUNITIES A BIG LIFT — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

When I was asked by the Obama administration to lead the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development program in Oregon, I set out on a journey that would lead me to small communities across the state grappling with infrastructure and economic development needs, into the homes of people struggling to make ends meet, and through the doors of businesses just getting off the ground or searching for resources to expand.

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FOR LANE COUNTY UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANTS AND THEIR ADVOCATES, TRUMP ERA SPAWNS ANXIETY (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Although there are people, like Jim Ludwick, spokesman for Oregonians for Immigration Reform, who remain opposed to illegal immigration because its illegal-

Jan Carlos Valle says he was 13 when he and a friend left Valles hometown of Mexico City on a beat-up motorcycle. They crossed into the United States in 1982 at a small town on the California border between Tecate and Mexicali.

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OREGON LEADERS REACT TO IMMIGRATION BAN, ARREST RUMORS (Portland Tribune)

Oregon leaders are pushing back against President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration.

The president’s order freezes immigration from seven mostly Muslim nations and bars admittance of all refugees into the United States. The White House said the order also applies to green card-holders and visa-holders from those seven countries who are not currently in the U.S., the Associated Press reported.

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GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS RISING FROM VEHICLES (Portland Tribune)

Oregon Global Warming Commission notes worrisome rise as lawmakers return to Salem to consider greater road funding

Greenhouse gas emissions from Oregon’s transportation sector grew significantly from 2014 to 2105, according to a new report by the Oregon Global Warming Commission.

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SUPERFUND CLEANUP NOW IN HANDS OF POLITICIANS, LOBBYISTS (Portland Tribune)

-Scientists weighed in on best way to clean up Portland Harbor, but intense lobbying now will dominate discussion-

Cleanup debates about the Portland Harbor Superfund site along the Willamette River are now moving to a different body of water  the Washington D.C. “swamp” of lobbyists.

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HOW RISING TEMPERATURES ARE AFFECTING OREGON (Portland Tribune)

-Leading academics release third assessment to the legislature on how changing climate is affecting the state-

The Oregon Climate Change Research Institute, which combines the state’s leading scientists in the field based at Oregon State University, has released its third assessment of how a changing climate is affecting the state.

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LEGISLATORS MUST DIG IN OR FACE LONG SESSION (Portland Tribune)

The 2017 Oregon Legislature won’t start until next week, but lawmakers already are behind schedule.

Don’t think so? Then you haven’t spent an hour, as we did this week, with Senate President Peter Courtney, who already is warning his colleagues that they shouldn’t make any plans for Disneyland until well after the Legislature’s scheduled adjournment in early July. He thinks they could be there much longer.

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STATE SEEKS CANNABIS GROWER INPUT (Bend Bulletin)

-Gap identified in best pesticide practices-

The three state agencies that share oversight of marijuana production in Oregon made a public request Thursday for information on growers use of two common pesticides.

The aim, according to spokespeople at two of those agencies, is to gather information on what practices work best to keep levels of pesticides below limits set by the state.

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STATE TO END RURAL CALL CENTER CONTRACT, EXPAND SALEM CALL CENTER (Bend Bulletin)

-Baker City positions cost state less than new public workers-

A Baker City couple who employ 54 people at a call center under a state contract are lobbying Gov. Kate Brown to have the state renew their contract to avoid the loss of those jobs next week, but a state official said there are no plans to continue the deal.

Richard and Kathleen Chaves, who own Chaves Consulting Inc., are nearing the end of the first year under contract with the Oregon Health Authority.

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A DAY IN COURT: LANDLORDS AND TENANTS NEGOTIATE BEFORE EVICTION (Bend Bulletin)

-The second Tuesday in January saw more eviction cases filed than any day in 2016-

Everyone in Courtroom A on Wednesday was there for the same reason: an eviction notice.

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EDITORIAL: TRANSPARENT GOVERNMENT IS NOT SUPPOSED TO BE OPTIONAL — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon law promises its citizens that the public’s business will be conducted in public, and the records government collects will be available, barring compelling reasons for secrecy, to anyone who wishes to see them.

Oregon public agencies too often see those two rights from a wildly different perspective: Some of the public’s business will be conducted in public, but public officials and their lawyers will seek to shut the public out whenever discussions are likely to make officials uncomfortable. Public records, too, are often kept secret for as long as possible.

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EDITORIAL: THE DIRT IN OREGON’S CLEAN FUEL STANDARD — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s low carbon fuel standard wont make any measurable difference in global warming. What it will do, on the other hand, is cost Oregon drivers money.

The state estimates that the standard could drive up fuel prices by up to 19 cents per gallon. A study commissioned by a group opposed to the standard  the Western States Petroleum Association  says the cost will be even greater, perhaps as much as a dollar a gallon.

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EDITORIAL: STATE PROGRESS IN GRADUATION RATES IS NO TRIUMPH — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s graduation rate rose incrementally for the class of 2016. While this certainly isnt bad news, its hardly reason for wild celebration. The state still has a long way to go.

The state Department of Educations announcement tried to stay positive.

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EDITORIAL: NO PRETEND COPS ON COCC CAMPUS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The public safety officers at Central Oregon Community College should stop pretending to be cops. Its altogether unclear they have any such authority.

Deschutes County District Attorney John Hummel says COCCs officers do not possess lawful police powers. From his analysis of Oregon law, the officers can enforce campus traffic regulations, but thats about it. Hummel has told the college that he would initiate criminal charges against it if the officers continue to act without lawful authority.

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ERIK LUKENS COLUMN: OREGON LANDLORDS COULD USE A DOROTHY ENGLISH — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

-Lawmakers tee up the takings in the name of renter-protection-

A dozen years ago, Oregonians staged a property-rights rebellion. It went by the name of Measure 37, and it passed in 35 of the states 36 counties. It even won in famously liberal Multnomah County despite opposition from a who’s who of public employee unions, environmental groups and Democratic politicians.

The measure was a crude weapon aimed at uncompensated property takings, which in plain English means regulations that reduce a property’s value for which the owner isn’t compensated.

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GRADUATION RATES & HEALTH EQUITY ACT – OPB’S THINK OUT LOUD (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The latest high school graduation rates for Oregon were just released, and were still near the bottom of the list when compared to other states. But some schools are doing relatively well. We speak to the principal of Jefferson High School, Margaret Calvert.

We talk with one of the Oregon lawmakers sponsoring a bill that would preserve the Affordable Care Acts requirement for insurers to provide free birth control even if Congress repeals the ACA. It would also go a step further, requiring coverage for abortion procedures.

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TRUMP’S EPA MOVES CREATE UNCERTAINTY FOR FUTURE OF NORTHWEST ENVIRONMENTAL WORK (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A temporary freeze on grants and a halt on communications at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have left Northwest tribes, state agencies and nonprofits uncertain about the future of their environmental programs, which rely on hundreds of millions of federal dollars.

That freeze was in place for several days before the Trump administration lifted it Friday.

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FOSTER PARENT RECRUITMENT INITIATIVE TO EXPAND STATEWIDE IN OREGON (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A Portland outreach program meant to recruit more foster parents will expand statewide over the next five years.

Called Embrace Oregon in Portland, the program will be known across the state as Every Child.

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OREGON EARTHQUAKE ANNIVERSARY PROMPTS PREPAREDNESS (Jefferson Public Radio)

Thursday 1/26 marks 317 years since the last recorded Cascadia Quake. As KLCC’s Franziska Monahan reports, the date is being honored with emergency preparedness reminders and new legislation.

On January 26, 1700 an orphan tsunami hit the coast of Japan. The term orphan tsunami refers to the absence of a parent earthquake. Unknown to the Japanese at the time, there had been a quake. On the other side of the world. At the Cascadia subduction zone. The Oregon’s Office of Emergency Managements Althea Rizzo says they’re using the anniversary to promote disaster readiness.

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SNOW DAMAGE TO IDAHO-OREGON ONION INDUSTRY NEARS $100 MILLION (Capital Press)

-Dozens of onion storage sheds and packing facilities collapsed under the weight of several feet of snow.-

As much as $100 million in damages were caused when dozens of onion storage sheds and packing facilities collapsed under the weight of deep snows that have buried Idaho and Eastern Oregon.

About 50 onion buildings collapsed under the weight of up to 40 inches of snow that has fallen during the harshest winter in memory.

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GRAZING HALTED TO STUDY IMPACTS ON OREGON SPOTTED FROG (Capital Press)

-Grazing in Oregon’s Fremont-Winema National Forest has been halted until the impacts to Oregon spotted frogs are reviewed.-

A federal judge has prohibited cattle grazing on 68,000 acres in Oregon’s Fremont-Winema National Forest until federal officials reconsider its impacts on Oregon spotted frogs.

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UNSECURED PESTICIDES CAUSE COSTLY MISHAPS, EXPERT SAYS (Capital Press)

-While farmers aren’t required to secure pesticide containers during transport in Oregon, spills can lead to costly clean-ups.-

Oregon farmers aren’t legally required to secure pesticide containers during transport but doing so anyway can prevent financial calamity, according to a safety expert.

Currently, Oregon traffic rules prohibit dealers from traveling with unsecured pesticides, but the regulation doesn’t apply to farmers, said Garnet Cooke, pesticide coordinator with the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

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SAGE CENTER EYES LONG-TERM VISIBILITY ENTERING FOURTH YEAR (East Oregonian)

-Heading into its fourth year of operation, the SAGE Center in Boardman continues to search for ways to bring visitors in the doors.-

The story of agriculture and energy production in Eastern Oregon is an increasingly high-tech narrative, replete with GPS-driven tractors, wind and solar power and irrigation pivots powered by the touch of a smartphone.

So when the Port of Morrow set out to highlight these industries, it devised a modern museum with interactive features to show visitors where their food and electricity comes from.

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UMATILLA COUNTY DONE FRITTERING AWAY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT MONEY (East Oregonian)

-Commissioner says county looking for long-term investment out of state lottery money-

Umatilla County granted local organizations and projects $216,268 in economic and community development money since July 2015.

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OUR VIEW: HARSH WINTER CRACKS THIN ICE SCHOOLS ARE SKATING ON — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Eastern Oregonians have been snowed in for much of the winter, which means that local students have been snowed out of their classrooms.

Schools from Ione to Elgin have been hammered by ice and snow and freezing fog, causing them to cancel days of class time and shorten others.

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LEWIS: LEAD HUNTING BAN ON FEDERAL LAND AT ODDS WITH TRADITION — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

When I was 19 years old, a doctor told me I should only eat wild meat. He said it would be much easier to digest.

What the doctor didn’t tell me was the pursuit of the wild meat would be hard and the challenge would be good for me too.

I have been a conservationist since I was young, learning catch-and-release, learning to preserve places where fish and wildlife thrive. What I didnt know until later was the money I spent on fishing and, later, on hunting, also supported local jobs and conservation.

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SAFE FOR STAFF, INMATES (Argus Observer)

-Engineer recommends snow removal, roof repairs at prisons minimum facility-

The safety of staff, inmates and visitors at Snake River Correctional Institution have been in focus ever since winter storms hit, prompting the temporary closure of a couple of the prisons buildings, including a portion of the roof in its minimum facility. On Thursday, the prison also stopped visitation.

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STATE BOARD: NO AVENUE TO CLOSE NEW HIGH SCHOOL (Argus Observer)

After hearing rhetoric from both sides of the issue, the Oregon Department of Education recommended the state school board not close a local charter school or its new high school.

Officials from both the Ontario School District and Four Rivers Community School, an Ontario-based charter school, made their way once again in front of the Oregon State School Board in Salem, Thursday.

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GRAD RATES UP 2 PERCENT IN 2 DISTRICTS (Argus Observer)

The Oregon Department of Education released graduation rates for the state of Oregon on Thursday, showing an improvement for the third consecutive year, according to data released by the department.

Local school districts had mixed results, however, with two schools seeing an increase and two seeing a decrease in those rates.

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OSHA OFFICIAL: NO ACTION NEEDED IN SNOW-REMOVAL COMPLAINT (Argus Observer)

Questioned about ongoing rumors of Oregon OSHA inspectors checking on snow removal crews working throughout Malheur County, an agency spokesman said no one has been cited. Oregon OSHA also does not have open inspections involving snow removal, he said.

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FOLLOWING COLLAPSE, COMPANY BEEFS UP SAFETY MEASURES, WORKS WITH LOCAL OFFICIALS, OSHA (Argus Observer)

Safety is the primary concern at Kraft Heinz Ontario after a Jan. 19 incident resulted in the partial collapse of a dry storage facility.

Since the collapse, structural engineers have visited the Kraft Heinz facility to evaluate the safety of other buildings, according to an email to the Argus from Michael Mullen, spokesman for Kraft Heinz.

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AID STARTS LOCALLY (Argus Observer)

-With disaster, emergency declarations, recovery varies-

Disaster and emergency declarations have come to the forefront in Western Treasure Valley counties as heavy snowfall has impacted the area with extensive damage and many hours of clearing snow.

While there are variations between states about how to get the process rolling for state and federal relief, the processes are similar in Malheur, Washington or Payette counties.

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OREGON GOVERNOR, LAWMAKERS WORRY ABOUT BUDGET GAP (Argus Observer)

-Gov. Brown addresses Trumps immigration orders-

Oregon’s governor and legislative leaders predicted a tough legislative session this year on Thursday because of a budget deficits, while Democrats are also focused on insulating the state from President Donald Trumps executive orders on immigration, health care and other issues.

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TRUMP’S IMMIGRATION ACTIONS WORRY LOCAL LATINOS, COULD THREATEN OREGON’S SANCTUARY LAW (Medford Mail Tribune)

“Undocumented and Unafraid” may have read the sign Ricardo Lujan carried in downtown Ashland at the Women’s March, but it doesn’t discount his deep concerns that he could be deported at any time.

Lujan, a senior at Southern Oregon University, said his first thought when he wakes up in the morning is whether today’s the day he’ll lose protections under an Obama administration policy that allows undocumented immigrants who entered the U.S. as children to receive work permits and a reprieve on deportation.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: STATE ‘KICKER’ TIED TO REVENUE PREDICTIONS, NOT REVENUE (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: OK, so what say you Wise Ones over there: Since Oregon has gotten more than $60 million in revenue from taxes on pot sales do you see in our future an Oregon kicker check coming to us?

A: We don’t want to make you any madder, Max, but the kicker is not tied to increased revenue, it is tied to what the forecast is for that revenue.

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YREKA MEETING ATTENDEES SAY NO TO DAM REMOVAL (Medford Mail Tribune)

More than 100 people attended the last in a series of three meetings Thursday in Yreka seeking public comment on the planned removal of four dams along the Klamath River, and the overwhelming feeling expressed by Siskiyou County residents was outrage.

Many stated that the majority of the county had spoken in favor of leaving the dams in place and believe that the government entities involved in the decision were not listening to them.

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GUEST OPINION: GROUPS STOOD UP TO PROTECT FARM LAND — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

In the 1970’s through the early 1990’s many Jackson County rural landowners requested a rezoning of agriculturally zoned land that had what they called “poor soils.” A number of property owners argued that since pears, our main crop at the time, could not be easily grown on certain lands, those lands were not good for growing anything and therefore should be rezoned for housing or other uses.

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BASIN GRADUATION RATES SEEING GAINS, LOSSES (Herald and News)

The Oregon Department of Education released statewide graduation rates Thursday for the 2015-16 school year, including statistics for the Klamath County School District and the Klamath Falls City Schools.

While the state average for the four-year graduation rate is 74.83 percent, schools within the Klamath County School District averaged 76.38 percent, attaining higher than the state average for the second year in a row.

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HOMELESS GATHER TO BE COUNTED AS SOUTH COAST COMMUNITIES STRUGGLE FOR ANSWERS (The World)

-Local homeless say “There’s more of us now”-

Tiger, a homeless man who has spent the last four years living in Coos County, says things have changed dramatically since he first arrived.

There’s more of us now. People are coming from out of state, coming from everywhere, he said.

In an attempt to understand how big the homeless problem is in the county, Oregon Coast Community Action ORCCA has pulled local services together to do its annual Point In Time Count, otherwise known as the homeless count.

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SOUTH COAST SEAWEED ENTREPRENEURS RECEIVE SIZABLE INVESTMENT (The World)

Tim Foley’s hand emerges from a 1,300 gallon tank of bubbling seawater with a chunk of dripping-wet red algae.

The salty seaweed known as dulse, made waves across the internet when Oregon State University announced they had patented a variety of the protein-packed, fast-growing plant that allegedly tastes like bacon when fried.

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YOU CAN’T ‘TAKE BACK’ WHAT YOU NEVER OWNED — OPINION (The World)

The Republican Party platform has supported liquidation of federal land by giving it away, and on opening day of the new Congress, the House of Representatives began paving the way to do just that.

Buried in a package of House rule changes on Jan. 3, an obscure provision banned the Congressional Budget Office from considering lost federal revenue if public land is transferred to other entities.

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DISASTER DECLARED FOR STORMS IN JOSEPHINE AND LANE COUNTIES (Daily Astorian)

President Donald Trump has declared a disaster for the storms and flooding in two Oregon counties in December.

The declaration makes federal money available to help state and local governments with repairs in Josephine and Lane counties. Damage estimates are about $16 million.

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BRIDGING THE GAPS (Albany Democrat Herald)

Linn and Benton counties maintain more than 400 bridges throughout the mid-valley.

These spans  ranging from historic covered bridges to modern concrete and steel structures  are a vital part of the regional transportation network, connecting rural residents with population centers and linking lonely county roads to state highways and Interstate 5.

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BRIDGES OF LINN COUNTY (Albany Democrat Herald)

When Linn County Roadmaster Darrin Lane talks about backlogged bridge maintenance issues, its much like the old algebra equation of two trains leaving distant cities, each traveling at different speeds.

The question: How long will it take before the trains meet?

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GUEST OPINION: GRATEFUL FOR EXPANDED MONUMENT — GUEST OPINION (Ashland Daily Tidings)

As residents of Southern Oregon and Northern California, we are fortunate to live in one of the most biologically diverse regions in North America. Fortunately for us, and for all Americans, in June 2000 President Bill Clinton established the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, using the congressionally vested power of the Antiquities Act, to protect the natural values of this remarkable area.

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CALLING FOR ACTION (Baker City Herald)

-Baker City Couple Lobbies Governor to Save 54 Jobs at Local Call Center-

A Baker City couple who employ 54 people at a call center under a state contract are lobbying Gov. Kate Brown to have the state renew their contract to avoid the loss of those jobs next week, but a state official said there are no plans to continue the deal.

Richard and Kathleen Chaves, who own Chaves Consulting Inc., are nearing the end of the first year under contract with the Oregon Health Authority OHA.

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DEBATING ABOUT DEER — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

Its difficult for any person who has a smidgen of sympathy to watch a herd of deer standing in belly-deep snow, on a day when the temperature wont get out of the single digits, and not feel at least a twinge of concern.

Deer are vastly better equipped than we are to endure such conditions, of course. And hard winters are part of the natural cycle. Yet its instinctive that we ponder how awful it would be if we were in the same predicament.

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ODOT WARNS DEPOSITING SNOW ON HIGHWAYS ILLEGAL (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The state highway is not a good place to deposit snow from your driveway, according to a press release from the Oregon Department of Transportation.

It is against the law to deposit any object onto Oregon highways and highway right of way, including snow.

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THE LONG ROAD TO A TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE (Blue Mountain Eagle)

-Local governments call for more infrastructure funding.-

The Oregon Legislature is again trying to clear the roadblocks to a comprehensive transportation package after failed attempts in 2015.

State Rep. Cliff Bentz, R-Ontario, co-vice chair of the Joint Committee on Transportation Preservation & Modernization, has been working with Co-Vice Chair Sen. Brian Boquist, R-Dallas, and Democratic Co-Chairs Sen. Lee Beyer and Rep. Caddy McKeown to develop a framework to present to the entire 14-person committee in the upcoming legislative session.

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PROFILING: POLICE DEPARTMENTS SOUND OFF ON PROPOSED LEGISLATION (LaGrande Observer)

-Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum targets police profiling by introducing a draft legislation for upcoming 2017 session-

During a news conference in December, Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum introduced draft legislation for the upcoming 2017 session. Included was a requirement for police throughout Oregon to collect data on officer-initiated pedestrian and traffic stops, designed to thwart racial or other bias-based profiling by improving police accountability and addressing evidence of bias, Rosenblum said.

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OREGON LAWMAKERS CONCERNED HIRING FREEZE COULD HAMPER WILDFIRE FIGHTING EFFORTS (LaGrande Observer)

-Wyden, Merkley, DeFazio, Blumenauer, Bonamici say hiring freeze raises firefighting concerns-

Oregon lawmakers told the White House on Friday that its action freezing federal employee hiring for 90 days raises significant questions about having enough seasonal workers to fight forest fires in Oregon and nationwide.

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OUR VIEW: GIVING CREDIT WHEN DUE (LaGrande Observer)

We’ve taken space on this page before to praise the actions of the public works, Oregon Department of Transportation, emergency responders and many battling winter conditions. However, we would be remiss if we did not once again point out the terrific work these crews accomplished during the past few weeks as an epic series of snowstorms slammed the local area.

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EPA CONSIDERS IMPAIRED QUALITY LISTINGS FOR HOOD RIVER (Hood River News)

The Environmental Protection Agency has listed several local rivers  including sections of the Hood River and Columbia  as potentially impaired, or at a limited water quality due to pollution.

EPA staff and local volunteers gathered data, which led to the agency finding more than 1,055 waterways with limited quality in Oregon

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GORGE JOBS PICK UP IN DECEMBER (Hood River News)

Hood River Countys unemployment rate fell to an extremely low rate in December, ranked third best in the state, according to a report by Dallas Fridley, regional economist for the Oregon Employment Department.

The county’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by 0.3 percentage point in December to 4.0 percent. That puts Hood River behind only Washington County’s 3.8 percent and Benton County’s 3.7 percent. Over the year, Hood River County’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell by 0.6 percentage point.

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SEX OFFENDER OUT OF OREGON STATE HOSPITAL AFTER DECADES (Douglas County News-Review)

A sex offender who spent 31 years in the Oregon State Hospital was released Wednesday and plans to live in Aloha after officials say a change in criteria meant he could no longer be kept there.

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UNCERTAINTY AHEAD FOR OREGON’S ECONOMY (Douglas County News-Review)

-Economist John Mitchell predicts uncertainty in the age of Trump-

The nation and Oregon have both entered periods of uncertainty as a result of the November 2016 general election, well known local economist John Mitchell told the Portland Business Alliance at its annual economic forecast breakfast on Tuesday.

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SANCTUARY STATUS: WHAT IT MEANS IN OREGON (Tillamook County Pioneer)

Sheriff Andy Long said, The long and short of it is, all Oregon Sheriffs Offices cannot ask about someones immigration status, based on Oregon Law.  After President Trumps executive order I have been asked several times about sanctuary cities I have reaffirmed we would be following the statute, as we have always done since its inception.

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OREGON SHERIFFS RELEASE STATEMENT ON IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT (Tillamook Headlight Herald)

On the afternoon of Jan. 27, the Oregon State Sheriff’s Association released a statement regarding President Donald J. Trump’s executive order regarding sanctuary cities and undocumented immigrants.

“The rough draft was emailed to all sheriffs for approval or changes,” Sheriff Andy Long said, “I was good with it and made no changes.”

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MEXICO IMPORT TAX THREATENS OREGON ECONOMY, OFFICIALS WARN (OregonBusiness)

-Mexico is the No. 11 market for Oregon exported goods  and the No. 6 market for Oregon imported goods.-

President Trump triggered a new fight over trade yesterday as the White House proposed a 20% tax on imports from Mexico to pay for a wall on the U.S. Mexico border.

The tax would have a negative impact on Oregon trade and businesses, says Nathan Buehler, a spokesperson for Business Oregon, the state’s economic development agency.

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TRUMP CANCELS OBAMACARE ADS, SO OREGON WILL PICK UP THE SLACK (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon is stepping up its outreach efforts in response to the Trump administrations decision to scale back advertising that encourages people to sign up for health insurance before the close of open enrollment.

The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services plans to invest an additional $100,000 to expand its online marketing to reach people statewide ahead of the Jan. 31 deadline to enroll in plans

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OREGON WORKPLACE WATCHDOG AGENCY PROVIDES BACK PAY TO UNPAID PORTLAND MOVIE CREW (Willamette Week)

-Bureau of Labor and Industries taps fund to compensate film workers-

The Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries has salvaged a small payday for workers who got stiffed by a film production company in Portland last year.

BOLI, the state agency that regulates workplace issues, provided $17,835 in back wages for 11 unpaid employees who had worked on the film “V Force: New Dawn of V.I.C.T.O.R.Y.”

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REPEAT BILL WOULD PROHIBIT SHARIA LAW IN OREGON COURTS (KOIN)

-The bill was filed by Sen. Brian Boquist, R-Dallas-

A repeat bill being considered by the Oregon Legislature seeks to ban courts in Oregon from using Sharia law to make judicial decisions.

Senate Bill 479, filed by Sen. Brian Boquist, R-Dallas, reads as follows, A court of this state may not consider Sharia law in making judicial decisions.

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THE FUTURE OF VOTER REGISTRATION IS HERE IN OREGON — BLOG (The Hill)

Participation in our elections is a fundamental right for citizens in our democracy. As Oregon’s secretary of State, it was my obligation to ensure that all eligible citizens in the state that are members of a political party or no party at all can cast a ballot in our elections  the same obligation that all secretaries of state or commonwealth hold.

It is with this motivation that I hold up the success of Oregon Motor Voter  the first program of its kind in the country  as a model of automatic voter registration for the nation.

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THESE CALIFORNIA AND OREGON FARMERS LOST WATER IN 2001. NOW THEY WANT TO BE PAID (McClatchy)

Northern California and Oregon farmers who lost irrigation water in 2001 for the sake of fish are plunging into a climactic courtroom battle for tens of millions of dollars in compensation.

Years in the making, the trial set to start Monday in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims near the White House involves a lot of money, but thats not all. For other Westerners, too, it can have broader implications, clarifying what the government may owe for water steered away from crops toward environmental protection.

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IN CALIFORNIA, THE FUTURE IS STILL ELECTRIC (CityLab)

-At every level, the state is ramping up for widespread electric vehicle adoption. And its ready to throw down with President Trump.-

No question about it: The next four years will darken U.S. action on climate change.

In a meeting yesterday with automakers where he promised to roll back environmental regulations, President Donald Trump declared, I am, to a large extent, an environmentalist.

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OREGON HOSPITAL DATA REVEALS GROWING RELIANCE ON GOVERNMENT PAYMENTS (The Lund Report)

Please contact the State Library of access to this premium story from the Lund Report.  library.help@state.or.us , 503-378-8800

Medicare and Medicaid add up to more than two thirds of hospital charges in the most recent figures, with small coastal hospitals Peace Harbor and Lower Umpqua Hospital most reliant on these programs

Government programs pay a large and growing share of Oregons hospital bills, and were billed for two thirds of all medical charges in the first half of 2016, with insurance and individuals billed for only a third of those charges, according to a Lund Report analysis of hospital payment data.

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OHSU RESPONDS TO PENALTIES FROM CMS (The Lund Report)

-Statewide, six hospitals were penalized for high rates of patient injuries.-

Recently the federal government announced that Medicare payments are being cut to hospitals this year that have a high rate of patient injuries. Oregon Health & Science University was among them.

When The Lund Report published this story on Dec. 28, we had not yet received a response from OHSU.

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LEGISLATURE SHOULD CONSIDER A SURTAX ON HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE PAY — GUEST OPINION (The Lund Report)

-The author says its time to weed out the greed, particularly at Cambia which paid Mark Ganz, its CEO and president, $2.5 million.-

With healthcare prices out-of-control, the Oregon legislature should borrow an idea from Steve Novick’s playbook. Establish a state surtax on for-profit and “nonprofit” healthcare executive pay.

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FEDERAL LEGISLATION PREVENTS OREGON FROM SOLVING ITS HEALTHCARE CRISIS — GUEST OPINION (The Lund Report)

-The author contends that President Trumps States Rights super waiver executive order will allow Oregon to set the example.-

Oregon’s greatest obstacles to solving our healthcare crisis are neither special interests nor our President.

Federal legislation stops us cold.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 30, 2017 Weekend Edition

January 30, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* UO president ‘troubled’ by Trump immigration policy; forum planned for Monday
* Oregon attorney general, 14 others, call Trump’s order “unconstitutional”
* Local legislators: Here’s what you need to know about the upcoming session
* There could soon be more ways to help foster children
* Oregon Earthquake Anniversary Prompts Preparedness
* Quagga mussels a threat to irrigators, lawmaker warns – WA
* Ore. Legislatures budget paints a bleak picture — Opinion
* State-local ‘bridges’ still need some work — Opinion
* Klamath Promise: A different method in learning
* Road to Resolution: Irrigators press case this week
* Public records task force is off to encouraging start — Opinion
* Oregon faces 90 percent reduction in federal timber money
* Editorial: Washington state should follow Oregon on gillnetting — Opinion
* Think Too Much: Salem’s ready for a long, hot summer — Opinion
* Cow Creek Tribe takes holistic approach to forest management
* Your Voice, Your Vote: Previewing the next legislative session in Salem
* Latest: Future mining blocked around the Kalmiopsis

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UO PRESIDENT ‘TROUBLED’ BY TRUMP IMMIGRATION POLICY; FORUM PLANNED FOR MONDAY (Portland Oregonian)

The president and provost of the University of Oregon on Sunday issued a statement saying they are “troubled” by the Trump administration’s executive order on immigration, adding the institution is “proudly committed” to welcoming students from “all countries.”

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OREGON ATTORNEY GENERAL, 14 OTHERS, CALL TRUMP’S ORDER “UNCONSTITUTIONAL” (Portland Oregonian)

Fifteen attorneys general, including Ellen Rosenblum in Oregon, issued a joint statement Sunday condemning President Donald Trump’s executive order banning U.S. legal permanent residents and visa-holders from seven Muslim-majority countries from returning to the United States for 90 days.

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LOCAL LEGISLATORS: HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE UPCOMING SESSION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon’s 2017 Legislative session begins Wednesday. The stakes have perhaps never been higher:

Will lawmakers fill an unprecedented $1.7 million budget gap by cutting services or raising taxes? Will they ease congested highways and repair unsafe bridges, or punt again on a transportation package? Can they help residents struggling with high rents and low vacancy rates? And how will they deal with massive changes coming from the new administration in Washington D.C.?

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THERE COULD SOON BE MORE WAYS TO HELP FOSTER CHILDREN (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregonians who want to aid foster children but cant commit as full-time caretakers are getting a message while the state grapples with a deficit of foster parents: You don’t have to become a full-time parent to help.

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OREGON EARTHQUAKE ANNIVERSARY PROMPTS PREPAREDNESS (Jefferson Public Radio)

On January 26, 1700 an orphan tsunami hit the coast of Japan. The term orphan tsunami refers to the absence of a parent earthquake. Unknown to the Japanese at the time, there had been a quake. On the other side of the world. At the Cascadia subduction zone. The Oregon’s Office of Emergency Managements Althea Rizzo says they’re using the anniversary to promote disaster readiness.

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QUAGGA MUSSELS A THREAT TO IRRIGATORS, LAWMAKER WARNS – WA (Capital Press)

-Quagga mussels are a threat to irrigation systems, and Washington should be on guard, a state senator says-

Quagga mussels clog irrigation systems and are approaching the Pacific Northwest, warns a Washington state senator, who has proposed a tax on ships to fund a battle against the invasive species.

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ORE. LEGISLATURES BUDGET PAINTS A BLEAK PICTURE — OPINION (Argus Observer)

Oregon’s future looks bleak  at least per the Legislatures budget experts.

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STATE-LOCAL ‘BRIDGES’ STILL NEED SOME WORK — OPINION (Herald and News)

Gov. Kate Brown covered a lot of ground in her visit to Klamath County last week. She met with numerous Klamath County local and state officials including representatives of the Klamath Tribes.

She also listened to the need for economic development and rural healthcare.

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KLAMATH PROMISE: A DIFFERENT METHOD IN LEARNING (Herald and News)

-High school recognizes National Choice Week-

EagleRidge High School students, teachers and administrators gathered for an assembly Monday morning to discuss National Choice Week, the worlds largest annual celebration of opportunity in education.

Throughout the week, students at EagleRidge are encouraged to reflect on their time at the school and recognize that it is their choice to attend, not the schools, EagleRidge Director Donald Peterson said.

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ROAD TO RESOLUTION: IRRIGATORS PRESS CASE THIS WEEK (Herald and News)

Lon Baley isn’t nervous, even when he thinks about testifying for the first time before a federal judge this week in Washington, D.C.

Maybe its because the third-generation Merrill potato farmer has been preparing to share his story and struggle with the historic water shutoff to his crops since 2002.

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PUBLIC RECORDS TASK FORCE IS OFF TO ENCOURAGING START — OPINION (Herald and News)

If Oregonians have a shared self-image, its that we may see inside our state and local governments. These days that expectation is often thwarted, if not challenged.

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OREGON FACES 90 PERCENT REDUCTION IN FEDERAL TIMBER MONEY (Daily Astorian)

-Program has not been reauthorized-

A U.S. Forest Service program that infused rural communities with millions to make up for lost timber revenue is drying up, and that means Oregon will see a 90 percent reduction in the payments that have kept critical services afloat in many counties since environmental rules curtailed logging nearly 30 years ago.

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EDITORIAL: WASHINGTON STATE SHOULD FOLLOW OREGON ON GILLNETTING — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-Oregon did the right thing in backing off gillnet ban on the main Columbia River-

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission is to be commended for recognizing that a 2013 policy dictated by former Gov. John Kitzhaber to kick commercial salmon fishing off the Columbia River has failed.

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THINK TOO MUCH: SALEM’S READY FOR A LONG, HOT SUMMER — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The formalities are pretty much out of the way, and so the members of the Oregon Legislature will gather this week in Salem to begin the 2017 legislative session.

They gather amid warnings that this session will be particularly challenging, and certainly all indications point in that direction: Legislators must figure out ways to plug a $1.8 billion budget shortfall for the next two years, and that gap could grow considerably depending on what happens on the federal level with the Affordable Care Act and other initiatives.

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COW CREEK TRIBE TAKES HOLISTIC APPROACH TO FOREST MANAGEMENT (Douglas County News-Review)

-Editors Note: This is the first in a series about the forest management by the new partnership between the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians and Lone Rock Timber Management.-

The Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians teamed up with Lone Rock Timber Management Company to create the sole proposal to buy 82,500 acres of the Elliott State Forest from the state of Oregon.

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YOUR VOICE, YOUR VOTE: PREVIEWING THE NEXT LEGISLATIVE SESSION IN SALEM (KATU)

The Oregon Legislature starts February 1, and in this weeks edition of Your Voice, Your Vote KATU’s Steve Dunn heads to Salem to look at some of the big issues facing the state.

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LATEST: FUTURE MINING BLOCKED AROUND THE KALMIOPSIS (High Country News)

Southern Oregons Kalmiopsis Wilderness shelters unique plants and the headwaters of several wild and scenic rivers.  Oregon’s congressional representatives introduced bills to better protect adjacent roadless areas. Two proposed nickel mines could affect water quality in the North Fork of the Smith River, which flows out of the Kalmiopsis and harbors healthy wild steelhead and salmon populations.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on January 30, 2017 OSL eClips

January 27, 2017 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Drastic attempts in Portland schools to make up snow days worry students, principals
* Climate change poses multi-faceted threat to Oregon, report says
* Oregon senators: Give federal relief to Malheur County businesses, farmers after heavy snowfall
* Oregon leaders must reject Medicaid expansion — Guest Opinion
* New graduation rates: How Portland, Beaverton, other large districts fared
* Abandoned baby found dead in bag in 2013 died from father’s abuse, state review found
* OSU inching closer to buying 76-acre landfill for Bend expansion
* Oregon allows schools to cut hours lost to snow days
* Oregon counties face 90 percent cut in timber money
* Oregon legislative session poised to be ‘most challenging’
* Legislative leaders, governor discuss 2017 legislative session
* Eugene schools improve graduation rate; Springfield, Bethel rates fall
* With legislative session set to open next week in Salem, Oregon Democrats, Republicans far apart on taxes and spending
* Land-use commission tours development projects
* Legislative leaders, governor lay out session priorities
* State board allows schools to write off 14 hours of instructional time
* Agency still relies on dirty diesel fleet
* Metro venues pump big bucks into economy
* Oregon’s grad rate creeps up one percentage point
* Fifth cougar killed near La Pine
* Editorial: State would need to justify changing back to elected superintendents — Opinion
* EPA Restrictions & Mayor Wheeler
* In Wake Of Trump’s Executive Order, Oregon Governor Says State Will Protect ‘Everyone’
* Oregon Agriculture Officials Take Aim At Japanese Beetle
* Oregon Senators Request Federal Relief For SE Oregon Snow
* China’s economic outlook shrouded in mystery
* Buck stops with ag employer when it comes to pesticide safety
* Appeals court to decide future of California carbon auctions
* Pendleton’s focus on attendance linked to rise in graduation rate
* Hermiston graduation rate increases slightly, still below state average
* Reporting deadlines approach for 2016 hunt results
* Spout Springs owners to meet with forest supervisor
* Our view: Tips and kicks — Opinion
* Court hears proposal on firearm law
* Winter pretty rough for wildlife
* Official predicts great water year
* County has about 400 more residents since last census count
* 200 Jackson County workers to lose their jobs
* Medford celebrates graduation jump
* Our View: Monumental considerations — Opinion
* Jackson County commissioners want changes to Antiquities Act
* Fees considered for nonmotorized boats
* Our View: Paying to float is a reasonable change — Opinion
* DHS finds ‘serious safety risks’ to children at OnTrack
* Rail yard cleanup may start mid-year
* Entrepreneurship, healthcare tops Gov. Brown’s visit
* Gov. Brown talks OHP shortfall, tours Cascades East
* Legislation aims to outlaw ‘Whitsett’ maneuver
* State officials should build bridges needed with rural Oregon — Opinion
* Local water case could have widespread impact — Opinion
* EPA decree should not affect northridge cleanup
* Local foster system in a state of crisis
* Risking loss of federal funding, Powers issues wastewater engineer RFQ
* Graduation rates inch upward
* Water district hits back at Warrenton on dam
* Benton County has less unemployment, fewer jobs
* Linn County has more jobs, less unemployment
* Clean Fuels Program again stalks Legislature
* Ashland graduation rates hold firm
* Debate Over Deer
* Ranchers, others helping Idaho Power Co. feed elk
* Report drought or wildfire livestock losses by Jan. 30
* ATV committee seeks to fill vacancies
* Speed signs a work in progress
* Session will begin with a bang — Guest Opinion
* WCCF work crews help in emergency preparedness
* Oregon’s 158th birthday falls on Valentines Day; festivities start Feb. 11
* Cascade Siskiyou National Monument May Have Consequences For Douglas County
* December unemployment rate lowest in more than 15 years
* PERS cuts necessary to relieve state deficit — Opinion
* Soil Grant to aid county agriculture, economy
* Expansions Don’t Die of Old Age– Blog
* Bill would prevent firing workers for off-the-job pot use

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DRASTIC ATTEMPTS IN PORTLAND SCHOOLS TO MAKE UP SNOW DAYS WORRY STUDENTS, PRINCIPALS (Portland Oregonian)

One thing is clear as Portland Public Schools tries to dig out from underneath its lost snow days: There will be no easy answers.

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CLIMATE CHANGE POSES MULTI-FACETED THREAT TO OREGON, REPORT SAYS (Portland Oregonian)

The threat posed by climate change is real and the potential impacts if climate prediction models are correct will be acute in Oregon, a team of researchers said in a report to the state’s lawmakers.

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OREGON SENATORS: GIVE FEDERAL RELIEF TO MALHEUR COUNTY BUSINESSES, FARMERS AFTER HEAVY SNOWFALL (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley are asking the federal government to begin the process to bring relief money to farmers and businesses in Malheur County who have lost income and property due to extremely heavy snow in the past few weeks.

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OREGON LEADERS MUST REJECT MEDICAID EXPANSION — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Despite an 8 percent increase in general fund revenues, Gov. Kate Brown and some lawmakers say the state of Oregon is facing a $1.7 billion budget shortfall in the 2017-19 biennium. In her inaugural address, the governor blames more than $1 billion of the shortfall on the state’s choice to expand Medicaid and other taxpayer-funded insurance. The Census Bureau estimates that about one in four Oregonians are in the state’s Medicaid program.

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NEW GRADUATION RATES: HOW PORTLAND, BEAVERTON, OTHER LARGE DISTRICTS FARED (Portland Oregonian)

Here’s how some of the biggest Oregon districts fared at graduating the class of 2016.

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ABANDONED BABY FOUND DEAD IN BAG IN 2013 DIED FROM FATHER’S ABUSE, STATE REVIEW FOUND (Portland Oregonian)

A 5-month-old baby found dead inside a bag in an Estacada park in December 2013 died from physical abuse by his father, according to an assessment by the Oregon Department of Human Services.

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OSU INCHING CLOSER TO BUYING 76-ACRE LANDFILL FOR BEND EXPANSION (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon State University is inching closer to buying a 76-acre shuttered landfill in Bend, a move that would allow the school to more than double its footprint in Central Oregon.

Becky Johnson, the vice president who oversees the OSU-Cascades campus, said the school will reach capacity soon.

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OREGON ALLOWS SCHOOLS TO CUT HOURS LOST TO SNOW DAYS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon school districts now have a little leeway when it comes to coping with instructional hours lost to snow days and delays.

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OREGON COUNTIES FACE 90 PERCENT CUT IN TIMBER MONEY (Salem Statesman Journal)

A Forest Service program that pumped millions of dollars into rural communities has expired and with it the advent of sharply reduced revenue sharing timber harvest payments for more than 700 counties and 4,000 school districts.

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OREGON LEGISLATIVE SESSION POISED TO BE ‘MOST CHALLENGING’ (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon’s minority Republican legislators already are squabbling with Democrats, blaming them for the states budget woes and threatening to slow down the majority to get our point across.

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LEGISLATIVE LEADERS, GOVERNOR DISCUSS 2017 LEGISLATIVE SESSION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Legislative leaders, governor discuss 2017 legislative session _________________________________________

EUGENE SCHOOLS IMPROVE GRADUATION RATE; SPRINGFIELD, BETHEL RATES FALL (Eugene Register-Guard)

The Eugene School District was the only one of Lane County’s three major districts in 2016 to see a greater percentage of students graduate from high school in four years, compared with the previous year, newly released district data show.

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WITH LEGISLATIVE SESSION SET TO OPEN NEXT WEEK IN SALEM, OREGON DEMOCRATS, REPUBLICANS FAR APART ON TAXES AND SPENDING (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Gov. Brown says shes OK with keeping Junction City psychiatric hospital open if lawmakers can find the money to pay the staff-

Oregon lawmakers seemed far apart Thursday over possible tax increases and government cost curbs that might fill the projected $1.8 billion state budget hole between revenues and expenses.

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LAND-USE COMMISSION TOURS DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS (Portland Tribune)

State officials from the Land Conservation and Development Commission visited St. Helens this week for their bi-monthly meeting held over a three-day period from Wednesday to Friday, Jan. 25 to 27.

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LEGISLATIVE LEADERS, GOVERNOR LAY OUT SESSION PRIORITIES (Portland Tribune)

Oregon’s legislative leaders say they have a difficult session ahead of them.

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STATE BOARD ALLOWS SCHOOLS TO WRITE OFF 14 HOURS OF INSTRUCTIONAL TIME (Portland Tribune)

The temporary rule is meant to give schools flexibility after unusual snow and ice storms in December and January.

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AGENCY STILL RELIES ON DIRTY DIESEL FLEET (Portland Tribune)

-For the past seven years, TriMet has declined to apply for federal grants that could have covered the full cost of the clean-air retrofits, including labor.-

Despite its green credentials, TriMet has long operated one of the dirtiest big-city bus fleets on the West Coast, a review by the Portland Tribune shows.

Greater Portland’s transit agency has continued running the most polluting type of diesel motors long after other agencies added filters to their buses to curb cancer-causing emissions. Portland’s air is among the most diesel-polluted in the country, and the annual tally of diesel-related premature deaths statewide may run as high as 460.

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METRO VENUES PUMP BIG BUCKS INTO ECONOMY (Portland Tribune)

-Together, Metro’s venues contributed nearly $1 billion to the regional economy and supported nearly 10,000 jobs last year.-

Portland’5 is one of four venues managed by Metro, Portland’s regional government, along with the Oregon Convention Center, the Oregon Zoo and the Portland Expo Center. Combined, these publicly owned visitor venues supported nearly 10,000 jobs and generated about $969 million in economic activity in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties last fiscal year.

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OREGON’S GRAD RATE CREEPS UP ONE PERCENTAGE POINT (Bend Bulletin)

-Redmond School Districts graduation rate makes strides-

Oregon’s graduation rate inched forward in 2015-16, but the result still leaves the state miles from its goal.

The states graduation rate increased about 1 percentage point from last school year, to 74.83 percent, according to data released Thursday by the Oregon Department of Education. Oregon’s goal is to have a 100 percent graduation rate by 2025.

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FIFTH COUGAR KILLED NEAR LA PINE (Bend Bulletin)

Wildlife officials caught and killed a fifth cougar Thursday morning in La Pine, after it was reportedly seen earlier this week near the Corner Store off Burgess Road.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife received multiple reports this week of cougar sightings, cougar tracks and cougars attacking domestic animals.

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EDITORIAL: STATE WOULD NEED TO JUSTIFY CHANGING BACK TO ELECTED SUPERINTENDENTS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Starting in 1873, Oregon elected its superintendents of education. That changed in 2011, when the Legislature gave that title to then-Gov. John Kitzhaber and allowed him to appoint a deputy superintendent of education. The move was part of Kitzhabers grand reorganization of education.

Now with Kitzhaber gone, some lawmakers have considered reverting to an elected superintendent. The Senate Education Committee filed Senate Bill 219, which would make the superintendent an elected office and enlarge the State Board of Education with a mix of elected and appointed member.

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EPA RESTRICTIONS & MAYOR WHEELER (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

We talk to former Oregon Department of Environmental Quality director Dick Pedersen about the Trump administrations abrupt changes at the Environmental Protection Agency this week.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler joins us to discuss what it means to be a sanctuary city in a sanctuary state, especially in an era when the federal government has threatened to withhold funding from sanctuary cities.

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IN WAKE OF TRUMP’S EXECUTIVE ORDER, OREGON GOVERNOR SAYS STATE WILL PROTECT ‘EVERYONE’ (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said Thursday its not clear what effect President Trumps executive order on sanctuary cities will have on state government.

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OREGON AGRICULTURE OFFICIALS TAKE AIM AT JAPANESE BEETLE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Oregon Department of Agriculture says its recorded the largest Japanese beetle infestation in the states history.

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OREGON SENATORS REQUEST FEDERAL RELIEF FOR SE OREGON SNOW (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley are asking the federal government to begin the process to bring relief money to farmers and businesses in Malheur County who have lost income and property due to extremely heavy snow in the past few weeks.

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CHINA’S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK SHROUDED IN MYSTERY (Capital Press)

-The answer is complicated, especially for U.S. farmers, who export $20 billion in crops to the Asian powerhouse-

China watchers agree that nations economic health is faltering.

With a slowing rate of growth and massive debt, China’s continued status as a global economic powerhouse is in doubt.

Investors and economists are split over the situations gravity, though. Is the patient merely under the weather  or is it on the verge of cardiac arrest?

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BUCK STOPS WITH AG EMPLOYER WHEN IT COMES TO PESTICIDE SAFETY (Capital Press)

-A pesticide expert speaking at the Northwest Agricultural Show explains how new EPA worker safety rules will play out for producers.-

Kaci Buhl cut through the technical jargon while talking to producers about pesticides and the EPAs new worker protection standards.

I can sum it up in a few words, Buhl said. Don’t spray people.

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APPEALS COURT TO DECIDE FUTURE OF CALIFORNIA CARBON AUCTIONS (Capital Press)

-Lawyers for the state and for environmental advocacy groups defended a program that has been closely watched around the world as a potential model for controlling carbon emissions.-

Businesses looking to invalidate California’s fee for carbon pollution took their arguments to a state appeals court Tuesday in a case that could determine the future of one of California’s signature efforts to combat climate change.

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PENDLETON’S FOCUS ON ATTENDANCE LINKED TO RISE IN GRADUATION RATE (East Oregonian)

-Districts seek ways to engage students and keep them on path to a diploma-

The Pendleton School District has a reason to throw its cap in the air.

According to data released by the Oregon Department of Education Thursday, Pendletons graduation rate for the 2015-2016 school year was 83.9 percent, a significant improvement from 74.5 percent in 2014-2015.

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HERMISTON GRADUATION RATE INCREASES SLIGHTLY, STILL BELOW STATE AVERAGE (East Oregonian)

-District closed alternative school after last school year, absorbed students into high school-

Hermiston’s graduation rate increased slightly in 2016, but not as much as in neighboring districts and it remains below the state average.

Hermiston School Districts overall graduation rate for the 2015-2016 school year is 65.7 percent, compared to the previous school years 64.1 percent graduation rate. The state average is 74.8 percent.

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REPORTING DEADLINES APPROACH FOR 2016 HUNT RESULTS (East Oregonian)

-Hunters who purchased a 2016 big game or turkey tag are reminded to report their hunt results by deadline.-

Hunters who purchased a 2016 big game or turkey tag need to report their hunt results to the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife by deadline, which is Jan. 31 for most tags.

There is a $25 fine for hunters who fail to report 2016 deer or elk tags on time, which will be assessed when they purchase their 2018 hunting license.

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SPOUT SPRINGS OWNERS TO MEET WITH FOREST SUPERVISOR (East Oregonian)

The owners of Spout Springs Ski Area will meet with Umatilla National Forest Supervisor Genevieve Masters to try to resolve concerns over the resorts parking lot.

John Murray announced in December he would close Spout Springs for the 2016-17 season, claiming that snowmobiles were creating an unsafe environment for skiers and snowboarders.

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OUR VIEW: TIPS AND KICKS — OPINION (East Oregonian)

A kick in the pants to the Hermiston School Districts attempted sleight of hand Thursday morning, as it once again tried to get us all to look over there while problems exist right here.

The Oregon Department of Education releases hard and fast graduation statistics each winter, breaking down how many diplomas were handed out in each district and individual school the previous year.

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COURT HEARS PROPOSAL ON FIREARM LAW (Argus Observer)

In a push-back against state policy on weapons in state workplaces and any Senate bill related to the Oregon Firearms Safety Act, there is a move for counties, including Malheur, to adopt Second Amendment Preservation ordinances.

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WINTER PRETTY ROUGH FOR WILDLIFE (Argus Observer)

Just as the deep snow this year is creating problems, it is creating hardship for wildlife  especially big game animals  which are struggling find places to be out of the snow.

Its pretty rough, said Scott Torland, acting district wildlife biologist, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Ontario Field Office.

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OFFICIAL PREDICTS GREAT WATER YEAR (Argus Observer)

Its a matter of wait, watch and see what the runoff will be after this spring following the recent snow storms across the region.

According to data from the Natural Resource Conservation Service the Owyhee River Basin currently holds the best snow water equivalent figure  how much water is in the snow  for Oregon and Idaho, based on data from automatic recording sites.

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COUNTY HAS ABOUT 400 MORE RESIDENTS SINCE LAST CENSUS COUNT (Argus Observer)

Communities in Malheur County have not shown a lot of growth. However, as a whole, the county has grown by about 400 people since 2010, according the Portland State University Population Research Center.

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200 JACKSON COUNTY WORKERS TO LOSE THEIR JOBS (Medford Mail Tribune)

Jackson County plans to lay off about 200 workers after it could not reach an agreement with AllCare Health to continue providing mental health services to the organization’s Oregon Health Plan members.

This is the second and final coordinated care organization to sever ties with Jackson County Mental Health. The other local CCO, Jackson Care Connect, began transitioning out of county services this month.

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MEDFORD CELEBRATES GRADUATION JUMP (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Medford School District’s graduation rate rose for the second consecutive year, reaching 77.15 percent for 2015-16 and surpassing the state’s graduation rate of 74.83 percent, according to data released Thursday.

This year’s graduation rate marks the district’s highest since the state began calculating graduation rates by cohort in 2008-09. In 2014-15, the district’s graduation rate was 74.95 percent, up from 65.21 percent in 2013-14.

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OUR VIEW: MONUMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Jackson County commissioners, smarting from the expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, are turning to the new Donald Trump administration, hoping to win changes in the Antiquities Act that allowed President Barack Obama to expand the monument. While some changes in the Antiquities Act may be warranted, there are good reasons to retain the monument and its expansion.

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JACKSON COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WANT CHANGES TO ANTIQUITIES ACT (Medford Mail Tribune)

Jackson County commissioners are hoping President Donald Trump’s new administration and the Republican-controlled Congress will be more sympathetic to their concerns about the recent expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument east of Ashland.

The commissioners plan to ask for a stay on the creation of a resource management plan for the monument, which was expanded by former President Barack Obama a week before he left office.

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FEES CONSIDERED FOR NONMOTORIZED BOATS (Medford Mail Tribune)

Driftboaters, kayakers, sailors and others running boats without motors may soon – for the first time – start paying toward their playing on Oregon’s public waterways.

The Oregon State Marine Board will ask the Oregon Legislature to create and fund a new nonmotorized boating program that would help pay for upkeep of boat ramps, other facilities and marine patrol programs heretofore paid largely by fees charged to motorized boaters.

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OUR VIEW: PAYING TO FLOAT IS A REASONABLE CHANGE — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

The state Marine Board’s proposal to treat nonmotorized boats the same as motorized ones, including assessing fees, is a reasonable response to the increasing popularity of floating the state’s waterways and will benefit floaters in tangible ways.

Nonmotorized water activity is now equal to or greater than motorized boating, and nonmotorized boaters account for half the boating fatalities in the state each year.

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DHS FINDS ‘SERIOUS SAFETY RISKS’ TO CHILDREN AT ONTRACK (Medford Mail Tribune) A scathing report by the Oregon Department of Human Services into OnTrack Inc. found children in the Medford-based organization living in “deplorable conditions,” prompting immediate referral of new clients to a different addiction recovery service.

DHS has required that 20 families at OnTrack crisis housing in Medford be moved out and into other living situations after finding instances of child abuse and neglect.

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RAIL YARD CLEANUP MAY START MID-YEAR (Medford Mail Tribune)

After more than a decade of reviews and consideration, a cleanup of the old Union Pacific rail yard north of A Street in Ashland is expected to start at mid-year.

The project is expected to take a year and will cost more than $1 million to excavate about 20 acres of contaminated land. Engineers and the Department of Environmental Quality presented the plan to residents last Thursday night at the Ashland Community Center.

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP, HEALTHCARE TOPS GOV. BROWN’S VISIT (Herald and News)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown spent Tuesday morning in Klamath Falls hearing from community leaders about the needs and concerns of those involved in rural entrepreneurship and economic development. Later in the day, her focus was on rural healthcare at Cascades East Family Medicine.

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GOV. BROWN TALKS OHP SHORTFALL, TOURS CASCADES EAST (Herald and News)

Challenges facing the Oregon Health Plan in 2017 and ensuring health care coverage for children and adults were key talking points for Gov. Kate Brown as she met with a roundtable of physicians at Cascades East Family Medicine in Klamath Falls Tuesday.

We are facing a shortfall in funding for the Oregon Health Plan, Gov. Brown said.

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LEGISLATION AIMS TO OUTLAW ‘WHITSETT’ MANEUVER (Herald and News)

When Oregon’s state House and Senate gather Wednesday to begin the 2017 legislative session, prime among bills to be debated is one on election reform. House Bill 2429 was inspired by perceived political maneuvering within Klamath and Lake counties for Senate District 28 and House District 56 seats during the 2016 primary.

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STATE OFFICIALS SHOULD BUILD BRIDGES NEEDED WITH RURAL OREGON — OPINION (Herald and News)

Along with much of the rest of rural Oregon, Klamath County often feels that its out of sight, out of mind when it comes to its relations with state government so Gov. Kate Browns visit to Klamath Falls today is welcome.

There’s plenty that could be discussed  the search for new jobs, major differences over social values, the future of state institutions such as Oregon Tech and Highway 97 along with problems shared by all Oregonians, such as the cost of Public Employee Retirement System and the impact that it has on state and local services, for example kindergarten-12th grade education.

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LOCAL WATER CASE COULD HAVE WIDESPREAD IMPACT — OPINION (Herald and News)

Hand to hand came the 51 buckets of water  one for each state and the District of Columbia  down Main Street in the ceremonial and techncially illegal transfer of water from Lake Ewauna to the A Canal near Klamath Union High School.

In two lines that stretched the length of downtown Klamath Falls and included U.S. Sen. Gordon Smith, U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, and many other political figures, the Bucket Brigade and thousands of others registered their protest May 7, 2001, against the federal governments refusal to supply irrigation water to the Klamath Reclamation Project for the 2001 irrigation season.

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EPA DECREE SHOULD NOT AFFECT NORTHRIDGE CLEANUP (Herald and News)

The recent announcement by President Donald Trumps administration that there has been a freeze on federal Environmental Protection Agency funding of projects has not filtered down to the NorthRidge Estates asbestos cleanup in Klamath Falls.

According to Jennifer Flynt of the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, the holdup on grants should not slow ongoing work in the state.

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LOCAL FOSTER SYSTEM IN A STATE OF CRISIS (The World)

-Lack of local housing impacts where kids can go-

On Jan. 1 of this year,  there were 274 foster children in Coos and Curry counties with only 136 foster homes available. In the past, creative placements have been made where children were put up in hotels with Oregon Department of Human Services workers, and on one occasion a child spent a couple nights at the DHS office with supervision.

The local foster care system is buckling.

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RISKING LOSS OF FEDERAL FUNDING, POWERS ISSUES WASTEWATER ENGINEER RFQ (The World)

The City of Powers sent out a request for qualifications RFQ Wednesday, looking for an engineering firm to upgrade its aging wastewater treatment plant.

Proposals for the project, which include negotiations with U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development, are due Feb. 13.

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GRADUATION RATES INCH UPWARD (Daily Astorian)

Oregon’s high school graduation rate improved in 2016, but the results in Clatsop County were mixed.

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WATER DISTRICT HITS BACK AT WARRENTON ON DAM (Daily Astorian)

-Asserts jurisdiction over structure-

Standing their ground against the city, the Skipanon Water Control District on Wednesday issued a statement describing the Eighth Street Dam as publicly owned and under the jurisdiction of the water district.

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BENTON COUNTY HAS LESS UNEMPLOYMENT, FEWER JOBS (Albany Democrat Herald)

Benton Countys unemployment rate dropped to 3.7 percent, down from its revised rate of 3.9 percent in November. That mark was the lowest in the state, according to the Oregon Employment Department, in data released this week.

However, Benton County had 140 fewer jobs than in December 2015, a 0.3 percent decrease in job growth. The bulk of those jobs came in the private sector, which shed 120 jobs.

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LINN COUNTY HAS MORE JOBS, LESS UNEMPLOYMENT (Albany Democrat Herald)

Linn County continues to recover from the recession, and its unemployment rate dropped to 5 percent in December, the lowest level ever recorded by the Oregon Employment Department, according to data released earlier this week.

The state has county-by-county unemployment information going back to 1990, but Linn County’s mark is likely the lowest for several years before then, dating back to the heyday of local mills, said Patrick O’Connor, regional economist with the Oregon Employment Department.

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CLEAN FUELS PROGRAM AGAIN STALKS LEGISLATURE (Albany Democrat Herald)

Will Oregon’s Clean Fuels Program throw a wrench yet again into the Legislature’s ability to approve a transportation package?

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ASHLAND GRADUATION RATES HOLD FIRM (Ashland Daily Tidings)

Ashland’s four-year graduation rate remained stable at 88.2 percent for the 2015-16 school year, down slightly from 89.1 percent for the class of 2015, according to figures released Thursday by the Oregon Department of Education.

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DEBATE OVER DEER (Baker City Herald)

-State Biologists Oppose Local Campaign To Feed The Animals-

The plight of mule deer in Baker County during this snowiest and coldest winter in more than two decades has prompted people to set out hay for the animals in several areas, mainly east of Baker City.

That’s a practice the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife ODFW discourages, but one which Bill Harvey, chairman of the Baker County Board of Commissioners, promotes.

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RANCHERS, OTHERS HELPING IDAHO POWER CO. FEED ELK (Baker City Herald)

-The goal is to avoid a repeat of Dec. 27 incident when 41 elk died after falling through the ice-

Idaho Power Company, with financial help from the public and donations of hay from Baker County ranchers, is feeding about 100 elk to try to avoid a repeat of the Dec. 27 incident when 41 elk died after falling through the ice while trying to cross Brownlee Reservoir near Richland.

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REPORT DROUGHT OR WILDFIRE LIVESTOCK LOSSES BY JAN. 30 (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The Department of Agriculture reminds livestock producers who suffered grazing losses that occurred throughout 2016 due to drought or wildfire to report their losses and to enroll in the Livestock Forage Disaster Program by Jan. 30.

The program provides compensation to eligible livestock producers who suffered grazing losses for covered livestock due to drought on privately-owned or cash-leased land or fire on federally-managed land, according to a USDA press release.

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ATV COMMITTEE SEEKS TO FILL VACANCIES (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department OPRD is seeking volunteers for four vacant positions on the All-Terrain Vehicle Advisory Committee, according to a OPRD press release.

The Oregon Legislature established the All-Terrain Vehicle Advisory Committee in 2010, outlined in SB578.

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SPEED SIGNS A WORK IN PROGRESS (LaGrande Observer)

The variable speed signs are working better than they were when first enacted, but they aren’t the end all, be all. People still need to drive according to the seasons conditions, said Tom Strandberg, an Oregon Department of Transportation public information officer out of La Grande.

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SESSION WILL BEGIN WITH A BANG — GUEST OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

Oregon’s legislative session starts on Feb. 1 and the biggest topic will certainly be the budget. Gov. Kate Brown released a recommended budget last month that has everyone in the media gasping for breath because of a $1.7 billion shortfall.

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WCCF WORK CREWS HELP IN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (Lake County Examiner)

Floods, big or small, can have devastating effects on our homes, families and communities. However, steps can be taken to reduce the harm caused by flooding through emergency preparedness.

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OREGON’S 158TH BIRTHDAY FALLS ON VALENTINES DAY; FESTIVITIES START FEB. 11 (Hood River News)

The State of Oregon is celebrating its 158th birthday this year and the event sponsor, the Oregon State Capitol Foundation, invites the community to the party. A celebration is planned 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11. All activities are free and the public is invited to attend.

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CASCADE SISKIYOU NATIONAL MONUMENT MAY HAVE CONSEQUENCES FOR DOUGLAS COUNTY (Douglas County News-Review)

When it was announced earlier this month, that President Obama would significantly increase the size of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Jackson and Klamath counties, Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley proclaimed, Today is a great day in southern Oregon.

But maybe not for everybody.

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DECEMBER UNEMPLOYMENT RATE LOWEST IN MORE THAN 15 YEARS (Douglas County News-Review)

Douglas County’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped from 6.5 percent in November to 6.1 percent in December, the lowest December rate in more than 15 years. December 2015 saw an unemployment rate of 7 percent.

I’ve been watching the unemployment rate, and even statewide its been nicely edging down and its an indication that employment is getting stronger, said Annette Shelton-Tiderman, a regional economist with the Oregon Employment Department.

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PERS CUTS NECESSARY TO RELIEVE STATE DEFICIT — OPINION (Douglas County News-Review)

Something needs to be done about Oregon’s looming $22 billion in unfunded pension liability to public workers and retirees.

Thats the general opinion iterated by local legislators, particularly Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, and Sen. Tim Knopp, R-Bend, who recently sponsored two bills intended to save the state money by cutting back future pension payouts.

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SOIL GRANT TO AID COUNTY AGRICULTURE, ECONOMY (Wallowa.com)

A 3.2 million grant from the Natural Resources Conservation Service to local land resource agencies could add more than $6 million with matching funds to the countys economy over the next few years while improving soil health and farm productivity.

The grant agencies are The Nature Conservancy, Wallowa Land Trust and Wallowa Resources.

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EXPANSIONS DON’T DIE OF OLD AGE— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

In a recent meeting someone mentioned that much of the current state budget discussion is based on structural issues  revenue growth not keeping up with expenditures  but at some point in the not-too-distant future we will be back to having cyclical budget issues.

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BILL WOULD PREVENT FIRING WORKERS FOR OFF-THE-JOB POT USE (KOIN)

-It would also prevent employers from not hiring someone for marijuana use-

A bill filed in the Oregon Legislature would prevent workers from being fired for off-the-clock marijuana use both recreational and medical.

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