July 2, 2015 eClips Supplemental Edition

  • Washington Legislature slashes tuition as much as 20%, boosts higher ed spending
  • U.S. needs more innovative, job-creating immigrants: Bloomberg View — Guest Opinion
  • What’s next for California’s contentious vaccine law
  • Homeless campers move across the street and may soon need to move again
  • Under new rules, trade schools must find graduates jobs or risk losing financial aid
  • Mercury rule gets mugged — Opinion
  • Communities Get A Lift As Local Food Sales Surge To $11 Billion A Year
  • Ilwaco port jumping with salmon business
  • Americans are once again on the move
  • Conservation agency can help landowners
  • Party Like Its 1934
  • Gamblers’ abuse claims test sovereignty of U.S. tribal casinos
  • Feds investigate price fixing among U.S. airlines
  • PF&R: Keep your home safe from fireworks
  • R.I. officials say dating apps contributing to rise in STDs
  • Fewer teens are working at traditional summer jobs
  • Marijuana-growing spikes Denver electric demand, challenges clean-power plan
  • FDA considering warning labels for liquid nicotine
  • Gov. Brown faces rough road in quest to repair state freeways
  • State issues toughest-in-the-nation fracking rules
  • Why another look at affirmative action? — Opinion
  • Historic tuition cut sets state apart from rest of U.S.
  • Pot now legal in Oregon; Vancouver shops reap benefit
  • How the Internet is ruining your memory
  • Extinction: Its not just for Dodos
  • When Maps Lie
  • Where Electric Vehicles Actually Cause More Pollution Than Gas Cars
  • Why Employment Protections Must Be the Next Step for LGBTQ Americans
  • How Much Are You Willing to Pay to Live in Americas Best Neighborhoods?
  • Wealth Doesn’t Trickle Down, But the Effects of Housing Discrimination Do

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WASHINGTON LEGISLATURE SLASHES TUITION AS MUCH AS 20%, BOOSTS HIGHER ED SPENDING

(Portland Oregonian) A decision this week to cut tuition for Washington state’s public universities by 15 to 20 percent over the next two years is a rare move that national experts believe could influence other states as they come out from under the recession.
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U.S. NEEDS MORE INNOVATIVE, JOB-CREATING IMMIGRANTS: BLOOMBERG VIEW — GUEST OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) Here’s a name to remember: Yet-Ming Chiang. It’s the name of an American hero.

Yet-Ming Chiang is a professor of materials science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Materials science is an unglamorous-sounding field, but Chiang is doing glamorous things. His quest is much the same as Elon Musk’s — to bring cheap, reliable batteries to humankind and to free us from the tyranny of oil.
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WHAT’S NEXT FOR CALIFORNIA’S CONTENTIOUS VACCINE LAW

(Salem Statesman Journal) Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a hotly contested California bill to impose one of the strictest school vaccination laws in the country in the wake of an outbreak of measles at Disneyland late last year.
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HOMELESS CAMPERS MOVE ACROSS THE STREET AND MAY SOON NEED TO MOVE AGAIN

(Eugene Register-Guard) Homeless people previously camping on state Department of Transportation property on the south side of North Game Farm Road just off Interstate 5 have moved to a new site right across the street.

And they may soon be on the move again.

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UNDER NEW RULES, TRADE SCHOOLS MUST FIND GRADUATES JOBS OR RISK LOSING FINANCIAL AID

(Eugene Register-Guard) Exotic dancers hired as admissions counselors. Recruiters told to seek out impatient individuals who have few people in their lives who care about them. Military personnel still recovering from brain damage told to sign on the dotted line.

In the two decades since trade schools started popping up on U.S. stock exchanges to maximize profits, allegations of misconduct have been rampant.
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MERCURY RULE GETS MUGGED — OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) -Court blocks Obama’s limits on power plants-

Justice Antonin Scalia and his like-minded colleagues on the U.S. Supreme Court seem to have forgotten that Congress designed the Clean Air Act to protect public health and welfare from air pollution, not to protect the coal industry from the costs of government regulation.
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COMMUNITIES GET A LIFT AS LOCAL FOOD SALES SURGE TO $11 BILLION A YEAR

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) There’s a renaissance in local and regional food, and its not just farmers markets in urban areas that are driving it.

On this map, the U.S. Department of Agriculture pinpoints more than 4,000 local and regional food businesses and projects from food hubs to farm-to-school programs to initiatives to expand healthy food access to low-income communities in every state around the country.
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ILWACO PORT JUMPING WITH SALMON BUSINESS

(Daily Astorian) -Business is brisk down at the Port of Ilwaco as sport fishermen flock to the area hoping to bag big fish.-

If the past month is any indication, charter boat owners in Ilwaco say they could be looking at the start of another good year.

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AMERICANS ARE ONCE AGAIN ON THE MOVE

(Bend Bulletin) Jen Dunlap took a lot of ribbing from her friends in Michigan when she decided to move to North Tampa, Florida, with her husband and six children.

Friends said, Its so hot But the Dunlaps were tired of shoveling snow and ready for the warmth they had enjoyed on Florida vacations.

The Dunlaps reflect a trend: Americans are picking up and moving again as the recession fades and housing markets recover.

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CONSERVATION AGENCY CAN HELP LANDOWNERS

(The World) USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service has $17.5 million in financial and technical assistance nationwide to help eligible conservation partners voluntarily protect, restore and enhance critical wetlands on private and tribal agricultural lands.
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PARTY LIKE ITS 1934

(Willamette Week) -A look back at the other ill-fated experiment in prohibition.-

People like to get high. Almost all humans seek to alter their reality in some way, be it with a few beers, a bong rip, or good, old-fashioned OxyContin overprescribed by a doctor.

And yet, some people dont like other people getting high. In America, various intoxicants have been deemed illegal over the years, succeeding only in changing the list of who gets to make money off the substance.
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GAMBLERS’ ABUSE CLAIMS TEST SOVEREIGNTY OF U.S. TRIBAL CASINOS

(KATU) For gamblers skilled at counting cards, it can be especially risky to play at America’s tribal casinos: Those who have gotten caught tell stories of seized winnings, wrongful detentions, or worse.

Casino bosses everywhere have ways of making so-called “advantage players” feel unwelcome, regularly tossing and blacklisting them. But gamblers have limited options to press claims of mistreatment at Native American-owned properties, which generally are shielded from lawsuits in outside courts by laws recognizing tribes’ sovereignty.
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FEDS INVESTIGATE PRICE FIXING AMONG U.S. AIRLINES

(KOIN) -In the past two years, U.S. airlines earned a combined $19.7 billion-

Major airlines are now under the microscope, as the U.S. Department of Justice begins an investigation into price fixing allegations.

The government is looking into possible collusion among major airlines to limit available seats, which keeps airfares high.
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PF&R: KEEP YOUR HOME SAFE FROM FIREWORKS

(KOIN) -If you are setting off fireworks yourself, light them on concrete or asphalt-

Given the hot and dry weather, there’s growing concern a stray spark from a firework could easily start a fire.

Portland Fire & Rescue said the concern is real, and there are ways homeowners can protect themselves this holiday weekend.
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R.I. OFFICIALS SAY DATING APPS CONTRIBUTING TO RISE IN STDS

(Boston Globe) Officials believe online dating services and apps that lead to casual romantic encounters are at least partially to blame for an increase in sexually transmitted diseases in Rhode Island, putting the state in the midst of an emerging debate over how the technology affects public health.
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FEWER TEENS ARE WORKING AT TRADITIONAL SUMMER JOBS

(Denver Post) -Summer employment isn’t the priority it was 20 years ago, says Colorado chief economist-

The traditional summer job is undergoing a transformation, and teenagers like Emma Menchaca are part of it.

Menchaca, 14, of Denver works for GreenLeaf, a nonprofit organization that engages youth in agriculture and farming. She earns minimum wage working 20 hours a week in the summer at Sustainability Park in Denver, growing, selecting and selling fruits and vegetables to the public.

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MARIJUANA-GROWING SPIKES DENVER ELECTRIC DEMAND, CHALLENGES CLEAN-POWER PLAN

(Denver Post) -Xcel Energy utility officials say lighting companies working with cannabis growers are testing LED lamps that require less electricity-

Surging electricity consumption by Colorado’s booming marijuana industry is sabotaging Denver’s push to use less energy just as the White House perfects a Clean Power Plan to cut carbon pollution.

Citywide electricity use has been rising at the rate of 1.2 percent a year, and 45 percent of that increase comes from marijuana-growing facilities, Denver officials said Wednesday.

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FDA CONSIDERING WARNING LABELS FOR LIQUID NICOTINE

(Los Angeles Times) The Food and Drug Administration is calling for public input on warning labels and child-resistant packaging for liquid nicotine packs used in electronic cigarettes and other non-traditional tobacco products.

The agency is to trying to determine whether labeling similar to that used on cigarette packs should be required for non-tobacco products containing nicotine.
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GOV. BROWN FACES ROUGH ROAD IN QUEST TO REPAIR STATE FREEWAYS

(Los Angeles Times) Every day, California drivers navigate an obstacle course of potholes and cracked pavement, and a wrong turn of the wheel can send them limping to a mechanic. Maintenance crews can’t keep up..

After years of neglect, state officials estimate it will cost $59 billion to fix the now-crumbling roads and freeways that Gov. Edmund G. “Pat” Brown championed more than five decades ago.
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STATE ISSUES TOUGHEST-IN-THE-NATION FRACKING RULES

(Los Angeles Times) State officials on Wednesday formally adopted new rules governing hydraulic fracturing in California, setting in motion some of the toughest guidelines in the nation for the controversial oil extraction practice. The oil and gas agency also released its environmental impact report that concluded fracking could have significant and unavoidable impacts on a number of fronts, including air quality, greenhouse gas emissions and public safety.

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WHY ANOTHER LOOK AT AFFIRMATIVE ACTION? — OPINION

(Los Angeles Times) Since 2003, when the Supreme Court last ruled that state universities may take race into account in their admissions policies without violating the Constitution, opponents of affirmative action have worked tirelessly to have the court revisit the issue.
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OBAMA OVERTIME RULE SCRATCHES THE SURFACE IN HELPING THE MIDDLE CLASS

(New York Times) For all the ambition of President Obama’s plan to significantly expand the number of Americans eligible for overtime pay, the proposal falls well short of helping substantially increase middle-class wages, its chief advertised benefit.
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E.P.A. WARNS OF HIGH COST OF CLIMATE CHANGE

(New York Times) In the absence of global action to curb greenhouse gas emissions, the United States by the end of the century may face up to $180 billion in economic losses because of drought and water shortages, according to a report released Monday by the White House and Environmental Protection Agency.
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DATA SHOW HEALTHY JOB GROWTH BUT ALSO SIGNS OF WEAKNESS

(New York Times) The economy added a healthy 223,000 jobs last month, the Labor Department reported Thursday, but other indicators, showing wages growing slowly and jobless Americans remaining on the sidelines, painted a grayer picture.
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IS WEED THE NEW ALMOND?– BLOG

(New York Times) Broccoli, beef, and perhaps most notably almonds have all come under fire in the past year for sucking up too much of California’s scarce water. Now you can add another crop to the tally of alleged water-guzzlers: marijuana.
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COLLEGES BRACE FOR SUPREME COURT REVIEW OF RACE-BASED ADMISSIONS

(New York Times) The Supreme Courts decision to reconsider a challenge to affirmative action at the University of Texas at Austin has universities around the country fearing that they will be forced to abandon what remains of race-based admission preferences and resort to more difficult and expensive methods if they want to achieve student diversity.
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HISTORIC TUITION CUT SETS STATE APART FROM REST OF U.S.

(Seattle Times) For years, Washington college students have been arguing that the best form of financial aid is low tuition. This year, Washington legislators agreed with them.

In its 2015-17 budget, the Legislature cut four-year college tuition costs by 15 to 20 percent by 2016 making Washington the only state in the country to lower tuition for public universities and colleges next year. Community-college tuition will drop by 5 percent.
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POT NOW LEGAL IN OREGON; VANCOUVER SHOPS REAP BENEFIT

(Seattle Times) When recreational marijuana possession became legal Wednesday in Oregon, Vancouver pot shops reaped the benefits, as Oregonians flocked across the border to get their fix.
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HOW THE INTERNET IS RUINING YOUR MEMORY

(Washington Post) When was the last time you memorized a phone number?

No really, think about it. Besides your own number, how many can you even remember by heart now?

It’s probably fewer than you’d like — and you’re not alone.
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EXTINCTION: ITS NOT JUST FOR DODOS

(Washington Post) Scientists have identified five times when a huge portion of Earths species died out relatively rapidly. Each time, something created an upheaval that altered the planet faster than those species could adapt. A growing number of scientists think we are a few hundred years into a sixth mass extinction, possibly the fastest one yet.
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WHEN MAPS LIE

(CityLab) -Tips from a geographer on how to avoid being fooled.-

Maps are big these days. Blogs and news sites including this one frequently post maps and those maps often go viral40 maps that explain the world, the favorite TV shows of each U.S. state, and so on.
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WHERE ELECTRIC VEHICLES ACTUALLY CAUSE MORE POLLUTION THAN GAS CARS

(CityLab) -If you think EV’s are always greener, these county-level maps will take you by surprise.-

The idea that gasoline cars might cause less environmental harm than electric vehicles seems impossibly backwards. But consider the following thought experiment before you dismiss it out of hand.
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WHY EMPLOYMENT PROTECTIONS MUST BE THE NEXT STEP FOR LGBTQ AMERICANS

(CityLab) -After 40 years of efforts, there is still no federal law protecting queer and trans workers from job discrimination. This failure is keeping those communities in poverty.-

Last Friday, The U.S. Supreme Court made same-sex marriage equality the law of the land. And though political leaders in several states are vowing to fight the decision, the ruling is a victory for gay and lesbian couples all over the country who want to marry.
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HOW MUCH ARE YOU WILLING TO PAY TO LIVE IN AMERICAS BEST NEIGHBORHOODS?

(CityLab) -A new, expansive index measures and maps the quality of life for 2,000 U.S. neighborhoods.-

Location, location, location. When choosing where to live, we all make choices and tradeoffs between housing costs, commutes, and the kinds of amenities we need and want from communitiesfrom better schools, safer streets, and warmer climates, to access to mountains or waterfronts, restaurants, and bars.
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WEALTH DOESN’T TRICKLE DOWN, BUT THE EFFECTS OF HOUSING DISCRIMINATION DO

(CityLab) -From 1990 to 2010, wealth has accumulated in ever-richer neighborhoods, thanks in part to exclusionary housing practices.-

The opinion with the greatest impact from the Supreme Courts latest term may very well be the case that decided the future of fair housing. The Courts decision last week in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project affirms that it is unconstitutional to set housing policies that discriminate implicitly against a protected minority.
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July 2, 2015 eClips

  • Retired Beaverton Fire Chief Oscar “Sox” Lee known for firefighter training, dies
  • Think twice before you inhale: Marijuana is only legal in about half of Oregon
  • How might Oregon spend $1 billion in borrowed money? Read the Legislature’s project list
  • Senate passes bill on chemicals in kids’ products, but not without a fight
  • $20,000 fine cut to $0 in high-profile helicopter herbicide spray case
  • Weekend warriors? Hopes fade for quick end to legislative session
  • Inclusionary zoning bill dies in Oregon Senate
  • Kate Brown signs final ethics reforms, mentions ‘chaos and confusion’ of Kitzhaber’s last days
  • U.S. Labor Secretary says bill backed by Terminal 6 operator is unnecessary
  • Oregon business officials plan state tour to help exporters after Hanjin, Hapag-Lloyd loss
  • Bill to combat police profiling sails through Oregon Senate
  • A bong on the Oregon Senate floor? A lawmaker’s unusual gift
  • More than 220,000 Oregonians face higher prices for 2016 health coverage
  • Kate Brown signs sweeping marijuana regulatory bill that also lowers several pot crime sentences
  • Political knives out for $337 million plan to quake-proof Oregon Capitol
  • How a bootlegger’s grandson helped shape the new marijuana market in Oregon
  • Supreme Court, not ballot initiative, may save public employees from compelled union contributions — Opinion
  • Oregon employers free to fire workers for off-duty marijuana use, national expert says
  • Oregonians go against state advice to buy pot across the border July 1 – Video
  • Riverfront Park to Minto Island bridge project in full swing
  • Marijuana remains illegal on federal lands in Oregon
  • Oregon’s Toxic Free Kids Act heading to final vote
  • Willamette National Forest tightens fire restrictions
  • Wyden hears concerns at visit to Crater Lake
  • House passes bill for task force to reduce class size
  • Woodburn interchange builds lanes, community hope
  • Lead-foot drivers are the real problem — Opinion
  • Fish Passage Task Force has public-at-large vacancies
  • June 2015 hottest on record in Salem
  • Uncertainties abound on first day of legal pot
  • Forest restrictions amplified in Santiam Canyon
  • Oregon dairies expanding
  • A new kind of bust as era of legal pot begins
  • Legislature wise to keep clean fuels bill intact — Guest Opinion
  • Pot prohibition ends — Opinion
  • Gardner enlarged his role — Opinion
  • Teacher of the Year fires back at Multnomah Education Service District
  • Kotek plan expands subsidies for child care
  • Tax break proposal tries to head off partisan fight
  • Anti-profiling bill gets final OK
  • BOLI: ‘Substantial evidence’ of discrimination, retaliation against Oregon Teacher of the Year
  • Panel adds anti-gentrification planks to city comprehensive plan
  • Voters support fixing campaign finance potholes — Guest Opinion
  • 7 Fascinating Things About ‘The Blob’ Forming Off The Pacific Coast
  • Health Insurance Prices To Be Much Higher in 2016
  • State House Backs Eastern Oregon Speed Limit Hike
  • Crews Stretch Resources To Suppress Oregon Fires
  • ODOT Launches Program That Could Replace Gas Tax
  • Oregon adds century, sesquicentennial farms and ranches
  • Drought reduces hydroelectric output
  • Impeachment better than recall — Opinion
  • Salmon season good on Columbia, not so much in mountains
  • Financial shenanigans in state government — Opinion
  • State-imposed property tax not so far-fetched — Opinion
  • Consumers will have to wait for retail sales of marijuana
  • $15 minimum wage campaign qualifies for ballot title
  • Make your building net zero
  • How did we get to marijuana legalization?
  • Insurance Division approves rate hikes for individual policies in 2016
  • Advisory lifted for Lake Billy Chinook
  • Oregon hunting, fishing fees may rise
  • Lawmakers advance tax credit extensions
  • Don’t put workers and employers in a bind — Opinion
  • Take back control of education from the government — Guest Opinion
  • Road fund usage deadline repealed
  • Marijuana measure becomes law, but much remains up in the air
  • State Capitol reconstruction should proceed as approved — Guest Opinion
  • Legislators scramble day before pot becomes legal
  • ODOT Test Drives New Funding System
  • Marijuana Dispensaries Face Limitations
  • Apartment owners can prohibit tenant cannabis use
  • Bill: Give undocumented students access to grants
  • Oregon House OKs McLane bill to aid wildfire victims
  • As big day arrives, pot giveaway trips up Bend dispensary
  • Columbia River water temperature is hottest since 1950

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RETIRED BEAVERTON FIRE CHIEF OSCAR “SOX” LEE KNOWN FOR FIREFIGHTER TRAINING, DIES

(Portland Oregonian) Retired Beaverton Fire Chief Oscar “Sox” Lee, one of the people responsible for Oregon’s modern day firefighting techniques, died June 24 at age 92.
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THINK TWICE BEFORE YOU INHALE: MARIJUANA IS ONLY LEGAL IN ABOUT HALF OF OREGON

(Portland Oregonian) Oregonians who plan to smoke, cultivate or carry cannabis under the state’s new recreational marijuana law should make sure they do it in the roughly 47 percent of Oregon where it’s strictly legal.
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HOW MIGHT OREGON SPEND $1 BILLION IN BORROWED MONEY? READ THE LEGISLATURE’S PROJECT LIST

(Portland Oregonian) Gov. Kate Brown will apparently fall short of the $100 million she wanted to borrow for an ambitious plan that would put Oregon on the vanguard of housing policy by building thousands of its own affordable units.
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SENATE PASSES BILL ON CHEMICALS IN KIDS’ PRODUCTS, BUT NOT WITHOUT A FIGHT

(Portland Oregonian) A bill targeting chemicals in children’s products triumphed in the Oregon Senate on Wednesday but not without a fight from Republican senators, who fueled nearly an hour of impassioned floor debate.
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$20,000 FINE CUT TO $0 IN HIGH-PROFILE HELICOPTER HERBICIDE SPRAY CASE

(Portland Oregonian) A helicopter pilot who repeatedly flew over Curry County homes while spraying herbicides on clear cuts in 2013, drawing 20 complaints of illness, will not face any monetary fine from the state.
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WEEKEND WARRIORS? HOPES FADE FOR QUICK END TO LEGISLATIVE SESSION

(Portland Oregonian) One legislative office joked about getting a “freedom keg” if floor votes this week stretched over the July 4 holiday.
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INCLUSIONARY ZONING BILL DIES IN OREGON SENATE

(Portland Oregonian) Advocates of legislation meant to expand Oregon’s supply of affordable housing conceded defeat Wednesday despite last-ditch efforts by House Speaker Tina Kotek to strike a compromise with Senate leadership.
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KATE BROWN SIGNS FINAL ETHICS REFORMS, MENTIONS ‘CHAOS AND CONFUSION’ OF KITZHABER’S LAST DAYS

(Portland Oregonian) Gov. Kate Brown took a bow as she signed the rest of her ethics reforms into law Wednesday saying she helped Oregon move past the “chaos and confusion” of Gov. John Kitzhaber’s last days by “responding to the legal and regulatory conundrums” that his administration “brought to light.”
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U.S. LABOR SECRETARY SAYS BILL BACKED BY TERMINAL 6 OPERATOR IS UNNECESSARY

(Portland Oregonian) Federal Labor Secretary Tom Perez has come out in opposition of a trio of bills in Congress, including one pushed by ICTSI Oregon, that would weaken the power of longshoremen in labor negotiations.
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OREGON BUSINESS OFFICIALS PLAN STATE TOUR TO HELP EXPORTERS AFTER HANJIN, HAPAG-LLOYD LOSS

(Portland Oregonian) Oregon’s business-development agency is starting a campaign to build new infrastructure for shippers now that the Port of Portland’s container terminal is useless for most Asian and European exports.
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BILL TO COMBAT POLICE PROFILING SAILS THROUGH OREGON SENATE

(Portland Oregonian) A bill aimed at combating profiling by law enforcement soundly passed the Oregon Senate on Wednesday.
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A BONG ON THE OREGON SENATE FLOOR? A LAWMAKER’S UNUSUAL GIFT

(Portland Oregonian) State Sen. Ginny Burdick’s new bong would be the envy of even the most seasoned stoners.
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MORE THAN 220,000 OREGONIANS FACE HIGHER PRICES FOR 2016 HEALTH COVERAGE

(Portland Oregonian) More than 220,000 Oregonians who buy their own health insurance will face higher premiums next year, and Portlanders could see some of the biggest hikes in the country.
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KATE BROWN SIGNS SWEEPING MARIJUANA REGULATORY BILL THAT ALSO LOWERS SEVERAL POT CRIME SENTENCES

(Portland Oregonian) Gov. Kate Brown, making her first big decision on marijuana policy, has signed a sweeping cannabis regulation bill that also reduces penalties for several crimes still associated with the drug.
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POLITICAL KNIVES OUT FOR $337 MILLION PLAN TO QUAKE-PROOF OREGON CAPITOL

(Portland Oregonian) A controversial plan to borrow $161 million for seismic and other upgrades to the state Capitol is on life support as legislative leaders hustle to finish Oregon’s next budget.
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HOW A BOOTLEGGER’S GRANDSON HELPED SHAPE THE NEW MARIJUANA MARKET IN OREGON

(Portland Oregonian) Senate Minority Leader Ted Ferrioli could have been the worst nightmare of every marijuana advocate in the Oregon Legislature this year.

The conservative Republican from John Day comes from an eastern Oregon district that voted resoundingly against legalizing the drug. And in his GOP leadership role, he has no reason to make the Democrats who dominate the Legislature look good.
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SUPREME COURT, NOT BALLOT INITIATIVE, MAY SAVE PUBLIC EMPLOYEES FROM COMPELLED UNION CONTRIBUTIONS — OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) The U.S. Supreme Court announced this week that it will consider a challenge to public-sector unions’ practice of extracting fees from workers who choose not to become members. Perhaps no one in Oregon is as relieved as Jill Gibson, a Portland-area lawyer who seeks to pose the same question to the state’s voters.
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OREGON EMPLOYERS FREE TO FIRE WORKERS FOR OFF-DUTY MARIJUANA USE, NATIONAL EXPERT SAYS

(Portland Oregonian) As Oregonians adjust to the new recreational marijuana law taking effect today, a national legal expert notes that state courts have come down squarely on the side of employers who’ve fired workers for off-duty use of the drug, even when it’s been prescribed for medicinal purposes
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OREGONIANS GO AGAINST STATE ADVICE TO BUY POT ACROSS THE BORDER JULY 1 – VIDEO

(Portland Oregonian) An Oregon customer at The Herbery in Vancouver says he’s been waiting 40 years for this day: legalization of pot in his home state.

Although it’s legal to smoke marijuana in Oregon as of July 1, there’s nowhere for him to legally buy it here.
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RIVERFRONT PARK TO MINTO ISLAND BRIDGE PROJECT IN FULL SWING

(Salem Statesman Journal) Contractors working on the Peter Courtney Minto Island Bridge have to make something special before building the bridge: another bridge.
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MARIJUANA REMAINS ILLEGAL ON FEDERAL LANDS IN OREGON

(Salem Statesman Journal) The U.S. Forest Service put out a reminder that while recreational marijuana is legal in Oregon, it is prohibited on federal lands.
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OREGON’S TOXIC FREE KIDS ACT HEADING TO FINAL VOTE

(Salem Statesman Journal) After six years of debate, the Oregon Legislature may move to regulate toxic chemicals in children’s products.
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WILLAMETTE NATIONAL FOREST TIGHTENS FIRE RESTRICTIONS

(Salem Statesman Journal) Because of soaring fire potential, the Willamette National Forest has joined the Mt. Hood and Siuslaw forests in imposing recreational fire restrictions.
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WYDEN HEARS CONCERNS AT VISIT TO CRATER LAKE

(Salem Statesman Journal) Crater Lake National Park was stop No. 1 on Sen. Ron Wyden’s week-long tour of the Seven Wonders of Oregon, but a proposed change in the designation for Lava Beds National Monument, located just south of the Oregon-California state line, was an item that drew Wyden’s interest.
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HOUSE PASSES BILL FOR TASK FORCE TO REDUCE CLASS SIZE

(Salem Statesman Journal) The Oregon House of Representatives passed a bill that aims to alleviate the issue of large class sizes across the state.
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WOODBURN INTERCHANGE BUILDS LANES, COMMUNITY HOPE

(Salem Statesman Journal) It’s said that Oregon’s four seasons are rain, rain, rain and construction.
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LEAD-FOOT DRIVERS ARE THE REAL PROBLEM — OPINION

(Salem Statesman Journal) A lot of dumb bills make it into the legislative hopper. Some even become law.
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FISH PASSAGE TASK FORCE HAS PUBLIC-AT-LARGE VACANCIES

(Salem Statesman Journal) You have until July 31 to apply for vacancies on the Fish Passage Task Force.

There are two openings for volunteer representatives for public-at-large slots on the group that administers the laws and regulations related to the passage of native migratory fish in Oregon’s rivers and streams.
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JUNE 2015 HOTTEST ON RECORD IN SALEM

(Salem Statesman Journal) If this summer feels like its already mid-August, there’s a reason: June was the warmest on record for Salem and several surrounding areas, according to the National Weather Service.
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UNCERTAINTIES ABOUND ON FIRST DAY OF LEGAL POT

(Salem Statesman Journal) -Marijuana remains both legal and illegal.-

And so it came to pass on the first day of the seventh month that the evil weed was legal. Sort of.

Lo, it was what the citizens of Oregon had decreed months ago.

Yet questions abounded.
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FOREST RESTRICTIONS AMPLIFIED IN SANTIAM CANYON

(Salem Statesman Journal) Significantly less-than-average precipitation in the early months of 2015 coupled with increasing temperatures of recent weeks has led to more restrictions in Oregon’s forests, including those here in Santiam Canyon.

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OREGON DAIRIES EXPANDING

(Salem Statesman Journal) A Keizer dairy with a history of problems is among five Oregon confined animal feeding operations CAFOs seeking to expand.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture regulates manure discharges from the state’s approximately 516 CAFOs, which include dairies and feedlots.
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A NEW KIND OF BUST AS ERA OF LEGAL POT BEGINS

(Eugene Register-Guard) By one measure, a day for the history books was a bust in Eugene.

The scene was sedate in a city steeped in counterculture when the clock struck midnight with nary a gathering to celebrate the new legal right of Oregonians 21 years and older to use recreational marijuana.

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LEGISLATURE WISE TO KEEP CLEAN FUELS BILL INTACT — GUEST OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) Oregonians deserve clean air and they also deserve safe, reliable roads, bridges and transit. Both are important for keeping our state a great place to live, work and do business. Odd political shenanigans have pitted these two objectives against one another in the state Capitol, presenting legislators and Oregonians with a false choice: clean air or good infrastructure. We can and should have both.
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POT PROHIBITION ENDS — OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) -New freedom for marijuana brings responsibility-

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, about one in eight Oregonians smoke marijuana at least once a month. That means more than 300,000 Oregonians are free of a cause for fear today. Those people no longer have to worry about being arrested for marijuana possession.
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GARDNER ENLARGED HIS ROLE — OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) -Departing DA was more than a prosecutor-

The district attorneys office is one element of the criminal justice system where a high degree of discretion comes into play, which makes controversy a constant companion for whoever holds the position. Alex Gardner’s tenure as Lane County district attorney has been no exception.
_________________________________________

TEACHER OF THE YEAR FIRES BACK AT MULTNOMAH EDUCATION SERVICE DISTRICT

(Portland Tribune) -Threats of a recall election for Giusto, Johnson and Acosta-

A statement released by Oregon’s 2014 Teacher of the Year reveals his fight with the Multnomah Education Service District is not over, despite a $140,000 settlement agreement signed last Friday.
_________________________________________

KOTEK PLAN EXPANDS SUBSIDIES FOR CHILD CARE

(Portland Tribune) Between 700 and 800 more low-income working families will gain access to state subsidies for child care under an expansion hailed by House Speaker Tina Kotek.

Kotek, a Democrat from Portland, was one of two chief sponsors of the legislation that revises the program known as Employment Related Day Care.

The program serves about 8,000 families per month, but there is a waiting list of about 1,600
_________________________________________

TAX BREAK PROPOSAL TRIES TO HEAD OFF PARTISAN FIGHT

(Portland Tribune) A revamped proposal to renew tax breaks removes some controversial provisions that critics said amount to revenue-raising, but also raises new issues.

A joint House-Senate committee approved the changes without dissent Wednesday.
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ANTI-PROFILING BILL GETS FINAL OK

(Portland Tribune) -Gov. Brown gets measure affecting interactions between police, public.-

A bill on its way to Gov. Kate Brown will bar police from profiling, the broad use of race or other specified characteristics to identify criminal suspects.
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BOLI: ‘SUBSTANTIAL EVIDENCE’ OF DISCRIMINATION, RETALIATION AGAINST OREGON TEACHER OF THE YEAR

(Portland Tribune) BOLI: ‘Substantial evidence’ of discrimination, retaliation against Oregon Teacher of the Year
_________________________________________

PANEL ADDS ANTI-GENTRIFICATION PLANKS TO CITY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

(Portland Tribune) The Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission agreed last week to start adding a series of provisions to the city’s comprehensive land-use plan to ward off the ill effects of gentrification.
_________________________________________

VOTERS SUPPORT FIXING CAMPAIGN FINANCE POTHOLES — GUEST OPINION

(Portland Tribune) You think they would want to start filling the potholes.
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7 FASCINATING THINGS ABOUT ‘THE BLOB’ FORMING OFF THE PACIFIC COAST

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Since the fall of 2013, an unusually warm patch of water has been noticed in the Pacific Ocean. Scientists have taken to calling the abnormality The Blob. And they have a lot of questions about what is causing it, and what effect its having on our region.
_________________________________________

HEALTH INSURANCE PRICES TO BE MUCH HIGHER IN 2016

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The Oregon Insurance Division released final 2016 health insurance rates Wednesday. And they’re significantly higher.

Last year was tough for Oregon’s health insurance companies. They spent about $130 million dollars more than they collected.
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STATE HOUSE BACKS EASTERN OREGON SPEED LIMIT HIKE

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The Oregon House is getting behind a plan to boost speed limits on Eastern Oregon highways.

The House approved the hike in a 52-5 vote on Wednesday, sending it to the Senate.
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CREWS STRETCH RESOURCES TO SUPPRESS OREGON FIRES

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Fire fighting resources are stretched between two wildfires burning in Central Oregon.

Firefighters made good progress on the 4,802-acre Sugarloaf Fire, near the John Day Fossil Beds.
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ODOT LAUNCHES PROGRAM THAT COULD REPLACE GAS TAX

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Oregonians interested in ditching the gas tax can enroll in the Oregon Department of Transportation’s pay-per-mile program Wednesday.

Through the OReGO program, volunteers will pay 1.5 cents per mile while driving on public streets and highways, which is tracked through an ODOT-issued device that can either have GPS or not.
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OREGON ADDS CENTURY, SESQUICENTENNIAL FARMS AND RANCHES

(Capital Press) -Oregon farms that have been in continuous family operation for 100 or 150 years will be honored at the state fair in August.-

Eleven farms and ranches that have been in continuous operation by the same family for 100 years have been added to the states list of Century Farms, the Oregon Farm Bureau announced.

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DROUGHT REDUCES HYDROELECTRIC OUTPUT

(Capital Press) -Drought lowers river flows, electrical power output.-

A drought doesn’t just mean less water. It also means less power.

On the Columbia and Snake rivers, where infrequent rains and an almost nonexistent snowpack have led to parched waterways and dangerous fire conditions, the amount of hydroelectric energy generated by government dams has dropped by almost one-third.
_________________________________________

IMPEACHMENT BETTER THAN RECALL — OPINION

(East Oregonian) In the wake of Gov. John Kitzhaber’s resignation, Oregonians learned we are the only state without an impeachment clause in our Constitution. Our state representatives rightly responded by approving a measure to put a constitutional amendment on the ballot, allowing Oregon voters to enact an impeachment clause.

But a funny thing happened on the way to the ballot. Senate President Peter Courtney blocked the amendment, ruling that he would not bring it to the Senate floor for a vote.

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SALMON SEASON GOOD ON COLUMBIA, NOT SO MUCH IN MOUNTAINS

(East Oregonian) -Returns higher than expected in Columbia, but warm water harmful in mountain streams.-

Recreational anglers will have more time to reel in a summer Chinook or sockeye salmon on the Columbia River, thanks to improved forecasts for both runs. But warm water and waning interest has prompted ODFW biologists to close the season on salmon on the Grande Ronde River next week.

_________________________________________

FINANCIAL SHENANIGANS IN STATE GOVERNMENT — OPINION

(East Oregonian) Oregon state government is a vast enterprise larger than giant private employers. But if you read the recent articles from our Capital Bureau, you notice a theme. There seems to be no common standard among state agencies for enforcing financial control over your tax dollars.

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STATE-IMPOSED PROPERTY TAX NOT SO FAR-FETCHED — OPINION

(Medford Mail Tribune) A proposed amendment to the Oregon Constitution setting a minimum property tax rate for all counties isn’t as outlandish as it might seem at first glance. It’s unlikely to see a vote in this legislative session, which is rapidly approaching adjournment, but residents of low-tax counties flirting with bankruptcy should take note.
_________________________________________

CONSUMERS WILL HAVE TO WAIT FOR RETAIL SALES OF MARIJUANA

(Daily Astorian) -Recreational marijuana became legal today. Good luck buying it.-

Recreational marijuana became legal to possess and use in Oregon today.

Where do you get it? Nowhere legally for at least another three months, but medical marijuana dispensaries are poised to become the states one-stop pot shops.

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$15 MINIMUM WAGE CAMPAIGN QUALIFIES FOR BALLOT TITLE

(Daily Astorian) Supporters of an Oregon ballot measure that would increase the state’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2019 have gathered enough petition signatures to qualify for a ballot title, the first step in getting the measure on next year’s general election ballot.
_________________________________________

MAKE YOUR BUILDING NET ZERO

(Daily Astorian) -Energy Trust offers a new program to help commercial property owners become net zero on energy usage.-

A new energy efficiency program from Energy Trust of Oregon is helping Oregon building owners design and construct some of the most energy-efficient new commercial buildings in the nation.

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HOW DID WE GET TO MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION?

(Bend Bulletin) -A timeline of Oregon’s attempts to legalize pot-

1973: The Oregon legislature scrapped criminal penalties for the possession of less than 1 ounce of marijuana, instead adopting a fine similar to those levied for traffic offenses.
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INSURANCE DIVISION APPROVES RATE HIKES FOR INDIVIDUAL POLICIES IN 2016

(Bend Bulletin) -Most individual policies will see double-digit percentage increases-

People buying health insurance on their own next year meaning they don’t get it through an employer or a government-run plan can expect to pay a lot more than they did this year: up to nearly 47 percent more.
_________________________________________

ADVISORY LIFTED FOR LAKE BILLY CHINOOK

(Bend Bulletin) The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the health advisory for Lake Billy Chinook, located 26 miles southwest of Madras, that was issued on June 25.

Water monitoring has confirmed the level of blue-green algae toxins are well below guideline values for human exposure.

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OREGON HUNTING, FISHING FEES MAY RISE

(Bend Bulletin) -ODFW might otherwise be forced to cut back services-

Oregon hunters and anglers will likely be on the hook for higher license and tag fees starting next year as the Legislature this week moved closer to approving a wide array of price hikes on required tags, stamps and endorsements.
_________________________________________

LAWMAKERS ADVANCE TAX CREDIT EXTENSIONS

(Bend Bulletin) Expiring tax credits that primarily benefit working-class taxpayers will be saved from expiration under a deal that cleared a legislative committee Wednesday.
_________________________________________

DONT PUT WORKERS AND EMPLOYERS IN A BIND — OPINION

(Bend Bulletin) Employees can be worn thin by last-minute shifts in work schedules, having to remain on call and by widely fluctuating work hours. It can make earning a secure income tenuous and having a second job impossible. It can create difficult scenarios for getting to work, arranging child care and going back to school or training.
_________________________________________

TAKE BACK CONTROL OF EDUCATION FROM THE GOVERNMENT — GUEST OPINION

(Bend Bulletin) Your June 11 editorial you state that there is a, nationwide effort to sabotage Common Core, and persuading large numbers of families to opt out of the exams

The saboteurs you criticize are parents and teachers who want to take back control of children’s education from state and federal governments run wild. You claim that State Sen. Tim Knopp, a supporter of the Opt Out Bill, should know better.

_________________________________________

ROAD FUND USAGE DEADLINE REPEALED

(Herald and News) Over the last four years Klamath County has used $6.25 million in funds originally dedicated to the road department to fund sheriffs office patrols.

Up until last month, that option of using road funds for public safety had a deadline of January 2016. Now that deadline is gone.

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MARIJUANA MEASURE BECOMES LAW, BUT MUCH REMAINS UP IN THE AIR

(The World) -OLCC offers web help in keeping track of new law-

A part of Oregon’s voter-approved Measure 91 is taking effect, but the nuts and bolts of how the new law will be implemented remains a work in progress.

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STATE CAPITOL RECONSTRUCTION SHOULD PROCEED AS APPROVED — GUEST OPINION

(The World) -3 editorials republished from original sources-

State Capitol reconstruction should proceed as approved
No need to fret over impending marijuana legality
Closing the reporting gap on last-minute campaign contributions
_________________________________________

LEGISLATORS SCRAMBLE DAY BEFORE POT BECOMES LEGAL

(OregonBusiness) The Oregon Legislature churned through a package of measures Tuesday that would implement the new legal recreational marijuana system.

Two bills were sent to Gov. Kate Brown for a final signature, another three advanced through House and Senate.
_________________________________________

ODOT TEST DRIVES NEW FUNDING SYSTEM

(kdrv.com Medford) The Oregon Department of Transportation ODOT is starting to test drive a new system that could help fund road repairs.

It’s called OreGO, and it’s testing if paying at the pump is the best way to pay for road and bridge maintenance.
_________________________________________

MARIJUANA DISPENSARIES FACE LIMITATIONS

(kdrv.com Medford) July first marks a big day for Oregon, but for other companies in the industry, this day doesn’t change much.

There are still a lot of restrictions facing the medical marijuana industry when it comes to their relationship with the federal government and local banks.
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APARTMENT OWNERS CAN PROHIBIT TENANT CANNABIS USE

(KGW) Many have questions about apartment tenants and Oregon’s new marijuana law. Can you use cannabis or grow it in an apartment?
_________________________________________

BILL: GIVE UNDOCUMENTED STUDENTS ACCESS TO GRANTS

(KOIN) -Some lawmakers have already come forward saying they don’t like the plan-

Some Oregon lawmakers are working to give undocumented students access to state-funded education grants. Its a controversial plan that has some wondering if its fair to students who are citizens and may soon have more competition for this money.
_________________________________________

OREGON HOUSE OKS MCLANE BILL TO AID WILDFIRE VICTIMS

(KTVZ Bend) -Relief account would make $5,000 grants-

The Oregon House on Wednesday unanimously passed House Bill 3148-A, legislation that seeks to provide critical relief to low-income wildfire victims through the creation of the Wildfire Damage Housing Relief Account.
_________________________________________

AS BIG DAY ARRIVES, POT GIVEAWAY TRIPS UP BEND DISPENSARY

(KTVZ Bend) -OLCC asks them to stop; issue points to hazy rules-

Bend medical marijuana dispensaries and residents alike celebrated legal recreational cannabis Wednesday with private parties, informational booths and free joints that were, at one celebration, apparently gifted out of compliance with state rules.

“We gave away about 1,000 joints before the state called us at 4 p.m. and asked us to stop,” Diamond Tree owner Sam Stapleton said Wednesday evening. “They weren’t mad — they were really nice, and we stopped giving them out right away.”
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COLUMBIA RIVER WATER TEMPERATURE IS HOTTEST SINCE 1950

(Seattle Times) Not only is the weather unusually hot, but the water of the Columbia River is also much hotter than normal.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on July 2, 2015 eClips

July 1, 2015 eClips

  • Snowy plover nesting season means stay out of designated dry beach sands
  • How much pot can lawmakers receive as a gift? Oregon Democrat has some advice
  • Oregon employers free to fire workers for off-duty marijuana use, national expert says
  • Idaho senator tries to stop labor slowdowns after Port of Portland container terminal woes
  • How a bootlegger’s grandson helped shape the new marijuana market in Oregon
  • Marijuana and driving: What you need to know
  • Marijuana is legal in Oregon — to possess and grow, but not to buy
  • ‘Left-lane hog’ reprieve? Passing-lane bill fails in return trip to House
  • Governor signs law that expands access to post-conviction DNA testing
  • Child care in Oregon insufficient, costly, says new report
  • Democratic shakeup? Val Hoyle, weighing state run, unlikely to return as House majority leader
  • Pot’s here with a little help from friends: Editorial Agenda 2015 — Opinion
  • Bipartisan pot committee weathered disagreements and produced results — Guest Opinion
  • Marijuana tax, early sales and regulatory bills handily pass Oregon Senate
  • Earl Blumenauer: Oregon’s marijuana law could ‘loom large’ nationally
  • A big moment for OHSU and for Oregon — Opinion
  • Forgotten soul: A volunteer dedicates herself to reuniting Jennie Fisher with family
  • Oregon Democrats sucker-punch the voters — Guest Opinion
  • Last-minute legislation for marijuana’s legalization
  • Senate advances bill publishing school’s vaccination rates
  • Gov. Brown signs English language learner bill
  • Burns Airport stocks up on fuel for firefighting planes
  • The day that ‘Reefer Madness’ became legal in Oregon — Opinion
  • Seminar gives insight on working with youth with challenging behavior
  • Warm-water mass off West Coast is focus of Oregon State University climate-change research
  • Group takes minimum wage fight to ballot
  • Fire Marshal Warns Illegal Fireworks Can Carry Big Fines
  • Wildfire ‘Reburns’ Offer Signals Of Forest Recovery
  • Oregonians Celebrate Legalization With Midnight Pot Party
  • ODOT Launches Program That Could Replace Gas Tax
  • Water utility teams up with farmers to fight hazelnut worms
  • S. Oregon pear growers take steps to keep fruit cool
  • EPA to propose banning chlorpyrifos insecticide
  • Cities, counties prepare for marijuana sales
  • BMRC Hail Mary falls incomplete
  • Hot weather prompts forest use restrictions
  • Dont do drugs — Opinion
  • Warmest June on record for much of Oregon
  • Fish passage project
  • Let Mississippi, not Oregon, decide on flag — Opinion
  • Talking about sexuality: Adolescent Sexuality Conference, Teen Coalition plan next steps
  • DEQ continues vapor investigation
  • Legal marijuana is here, but questions abound
  • Oregon Legislature takes aim at slow drivers in left lane
  • Portland’s auto theft rate jumps, but Medford drivers have it worse
  • Sweet Releaf
  • Paying by the Mile
  • Oregon Legislature’s Joint Committee Approves Weed Sales to All Adults Starting Oct. 1
  • Oregon growers look forward to new era of retail marijuana
  • Oregon Medical Cannabis: One Family’s Search for Seizure Relief
  • Part 2: Oregon Medical Cannabis: One Family’s Search for Seizure Relief
  • Bunker Hill Complex of wildfires grows to 328 acres
  • Wildfire near Dayville aces across 6,000 acres as heat lingers
  • Bill would create special license plates for Trail Blazers
  • Senate Votes to Stop Using Tobacco Prevention Dollars to License Smoke Shops
  • Oregon Physicians Lining Up for Employment Opportunities

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SNOWY PLOVER NESTING SEASON MEANS STAY OUT OF DESIGNATED DRY BEACH SANDS

(Portland Oregonian) Visitors and residents headed to the Oregon coast for the Fourth of July holiday, and at any time until Sept. 15, are reminded that Western snowy plover nesting season restrictions remain in place.
_________________________________________

HOW MUCH POT CAN LAWMAKERS RECEIVE AS A GIFT? OREGON DEMOCRAT HAS SOME ADVICE

(Portland Oregonian) Hours before marijuana’s date with legal destiny Wednesday, one of the lawmakers who helped shape Oregon’s looming recreational market offered some friendly advice to colleagues who often find themselves offered gifts from enthusiastic or grateful constituents.
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OREGON EMPLOYERS FREE TO FIRE WORKERS FOR OFF-DUTY MARIJUANA USE, NATIONAL EXPERT SAYS

(Portland Oregonian) As Oregonians adjust to the new recreational marijuana law taking effect today, a national legal expert notes that state courts have come down squarely on the side of employers who’ve fired workers for off-duty use of the drug, even when it’s been prescribed for medicinal purposes.
_________________________________________

IDAHO SENATOR TRIES TO STOP LABOR SLOWDOWNS AFTER PORT OF PORTLAND CONTAINER TERMINAL WOES

(Portland Oregonian) Portland’s container terminal operator is working with an Idaho senator to stop unions from slowing down work as a negotiation tactic, following months of nearly stand-still conditions at West Coast container ports.
_________________________________________

HOW A BOOTLEGGER’S GRANDSON HELPED SHAPE THE NEW MARIJUANA MARKET IN OREGON

(Portland Oregonian) Senate Minority Leader Ted Ferrioli could have been the worst nightmare of every marijuana advocate in the Oregon Legislature this year.
_________________________________________

MARIJUANA AND DRIVING: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

(Portland Oregonian) Possessing marijuana may be legal in Oregon now, but driving under the influence is not.
_________________________________________

MARIJUANA IS LEGAL IN OREGON — TO POSSESS AND GROW, BUT NOT TO BUY

(Portland Oregonian) As of today, if you are 21 or older, you can legally possess and grow cannabis in Oregon. That’s right, a pretty historic day.
_________________________________________

‘LEFT-LANE HOG’ REPRIEVE? PASSING-LANE BILL FAILS IN RETURN TRIP TO HOUSE

(Portland Oregonian) You might call it a detour. But it’s looking more like a crash.
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GOVERNOR SIGNS LAW THAT EXPANDS ACCESS TO POST-CONVICTION DNA TESTING

(Portland Oregonian) The governor has signed a bill that would expand access to DNA testing for people hoping to prove they were wrongly convicted.
_________________________________________

CHILD CARE IN OREGON INSUFFICIENT, COSTLY, SAYS NEW REPORT

(Portland Oregonian) Newly released data confirm what Oregon parents have long sensed: There isn’t enough child care to go around, and the child care that does exist is expensive.
_________________________________________

DEMOCRATIC SHAKEUP? VAL HOYLE, WEIGHING STATE RUN, UNLIKELY TO RETURN AS HOUSE MAJORITY LEADER

(Portland Oregonian) House Democrats are bracing for a major leadership change in light of next year’s elections.
_________________________________________

POT’S HERE WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM FRIENDS: EDITORIAL AGENDA 2015 — OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) Oregon takes its first steps into the new marijuana day with glee and some trepidation.
_________________________________________

BIPARTISAN POT COMMITTEE WEATHERED DISAGREEMENTS AND PRODUCED RESULTS — GUEST OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) As Oregon ends cannabis prohibition, the Legislature is finalizing a package of bills to support common-sense regulation.
_________________________________________

MARIJUANA TAX, EARLY SALES AND REGULATORY BILLS HANDILY PASS OREGON SENATE

(Portland Oregonian) Three key bills aimed at shaping the emerging legal market for marijuana easily passed the Oregon Senate on Tuesday, just one day before possession of the drug becomes legal in the state.

_________________________________________

EARL BLUMENAUER: OREGON’S MARIJUANA LAW COULD ‘LOOM LARGE’ NATIONALLY

(Portland Oregonian) Hours before marijuana becomes legal in Oregon, U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer said the state’s rollout will “loom large” as other states and the federal government consider marijuana-related legislation
_________________________________________

A BIG MOMENT FOR OHSU AND FOR OREGON — OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) To the things for which Portland is known among them widespread anti-corporate sentiment, suspicion of the “1 percent” and opposition to water fluoridation add this: It’s a place in which science and staggering personal wealth are joining forces for the public good. Go figure.

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FORGOTTEN SOUL: A VOLUNTEER DEDICATES HERSELF TO REUNITING JENNIE FISHER WITH FAMILY

(Portland Oregonian) If anyone deserved a happy ending, it was Jennie Fisher.

She was 72 when she arrived at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem on Sept. 12, 1934, her straight gray hair cropped at the ears, her blue eyes dull.
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OREGON DEMOCRATS SUCKER-PUNCH THE VOTERS — GUEST OPINION

(Salem Statesman Journal) If you thought Democrats were leading the charge against the undue corruptive influence of unlimited campaign contributions unleashed by the Supreme Courts Citizen United decision, you just got sucker punched.
_________________________________________

LAST-MINUTE LEGISLATION FOR MARIJUANA’S LEGALIZATION

(Salem Statesman Journal) Lawmakers moved methodically Tuesday to ensure that when Oregonians take a drag on their first legal recreational-marijuana cigarettes or plant their first legal seeds today, that they have the full weight and force of the state behind them.
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SENATE ADVANCES BILL PUBLISHING SCHOOL’S VACCINATION RATES

(Salem Statesman Journal) In an effort to tackle the high number of students using nonmedical waivers to opt out of vaccinations, Oregon Senators approved a measure Tuesday requiring all schools to publish their immunization rates and to break out the rates by disease.
_________________________________________

GOV. BROWN SIGNS ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER BILL

(Salem Statesman Journal) Governor Kate Brown signed HB 3499 to cheers from legislators and citizens alike Tuesday morning, signaling a renewed bipartisan effort to close the achievement gap in Oregon schools.
_________________________________________

BURNS AIRPORT STOCKS UP ON FUEL FOR FIREFIGHTING PLANES

(Salem Statesman Journal) A 6,000 gallon military surplus tanker filled with fuel has arrived at Burns Municipal Airport in southeast Oregon, ready to supply airplanes during the wildfire season.
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THE DAY THAT ‘REEFER MADNESS’ BECAME LEGAL IN OREGON — OPINION

(Salem Statesman Journal) Eight hours before marijuana would become legal in Oregon, I time-tripped back to 1936, without benefit of any substance, herbal or otherwise.
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SEMINAR GIVES INSIGHT ON WORKING WITH YOUTH WITH CHALLENGING BEHAVIOR

(Salem Statesman Journal) Hundreds of participants looked on as a three-minute video of a young boy with dark hair played on two large screens at the front of a conference room.

The boy, who had a troubled childhood and, at the time of the video, was a member of a youth group home of some sort, was brought into an employees office to discuss a concern.
_________________________________________

WARM-WATER MASS OFF WEST COAST IS FOCUS OF OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY CLIMATE-CHANGE RESEARCH

(Eugene Register-Guard) Oregon State University scientists are looking for a link between the California drought, climate change and a mass of warm water lingering in the Pacific Ocean off the West Coast.

The events may be without connection but the blob and the drought, which is troubling Oregon, too, have one thing in common: They are extreme.

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GROUP TAKES MINIMUM WAGE FIGHT TO BALLOT

(Portland Tribune) Disappointed with legislative inaction, labor and other advocates took the first step Tuesday toward a 2016 ballot measure proposing a $15 statewide minimum wage by 2019.
_________________________________________

FIRE MARSHAL WARNS ILLEGAL FIREWORKS CAN CARRY BIG FINES

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The Oregon State Fire Marshal is encouraging people to use fireworks safely and legally this Fourth of July, warning that violators could face steep fines.

Officials can confiscate any illegal fireworks, and offenders can be fined up to $500 per violation for possession of illegal fireworks and endangering life and property. People could also face fees for damage caused by fireworks.
_________________________________________

WILDFIRE ‘REBURNS’ OFFER SIGNALS OF FOREST RECOVERY

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Wildfire season in the Northwest has started early this year. Crews are battling the Buckskin Fire right now.

Scientists refer to the Buckskin as a reburn because its on land that was scorched by wildfire in the recent past. These reburns are a positive indication that the forests are recovering from decades of fire suppression.
_________________________________________

OREGONIANS CELEBRATE LEGALIZATION WITH MIDNIGHT POT PARTY

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The clock struck midnight Wednesday and smoke began to pour from the Burnside Bridge as recreational marijuana became legalized for the first time in Oregon.
_________________________________________

ODOT LAUNCHES PROGRAM THAT COULD REPLACE GAS TAX

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Oregonians interested in ditching the gas tax can enroll in the Oregon Department of Transportations pay-per-mile program Wednesday.
_________________________________________

WATER UTILITY TEAMS UP WITH FARMERS TO FIGHT HAZELNUT WORMS

(Capital Press) -Using mating disruption techniques against moths helped hazelnut growers reduce pesticide use along the McKenzie River, which provides drinking water to 200,000 people.-

A three-year research project involving a water utility, growers and university researchers showed pheromone trickery can reduce the use of pesticides 60 to 75 percent in hazelnut orchards.

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S. OREGON PEAR GROWERS TAKE STEPS TO KEEP FRUIT COOL

(Capital Press) -Sunblock made from micronized calcium carbonate doesnt work for all varieties, but it can minimize sunburn and heat stress for two of Jackson Countys mainstay commercial crops, Red Anjous and Comice.-

Southern Oregon farmers might be suffering as temperatures soar, but theyre not the only ones several orchards are taking steps to protect the fruit theyre growing.

_________________________________________

EPA TO PROPOSE BANNING CHLORPYRIFOS INSECTICIDE

(Capital Press) The federal government said June 30 that its planning to ban chlorpyrifos, a common insecticide, but may change its mind based on consultations with the chemicals manufacturer.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys tentative decision to revoke all tolerances for residues of the insecticide on crops came in response to a request from environmental groups.

_________________________________________

CITIES, COUNTIES PREPARE FOR MARIJUANA SALES

(East Oregonian) -A reminder of the marijuana ordinances around Umatilla and Morrow County.-

Lighting up a joint after work may be legal in Oregon, but buying the marijuana to roll that joint still isnt

_________________________________________

BMRC HAIL MARY FALLS INCOMPLETE

(East Oregonian) In a history littered with eleventh hour saves and last minute extensions, it was fitting that the Blue Mountain Recovery Center was the subject of one last attempt at a reprieve.

_________________________________________

HOT WEATHER PROMPTS FOREST USE RESTRICTIONS

(East Oregonian) The Oregon Department of Forestry’s Northeast Oregon District, Umatilla National Forest and Wallowa-Whitman National Forest have all implemented use restrictions to lessen the chances of a human-caused wildfire.
_________________________________________

DONT DO DRUGS — OPINION

(East Oregonian) As of Wednesday, marijuana is legal to possess in Oregon without a prescription.

For years now, personal use amounts were nearly decriminalized in this state, a poorly regulated medical program was put in place, and an omnipresent black market allowed recreational users avenues to access the drug.

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WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD FOR MUCH OF OREGON

(Albany Democrat Herald) This June was the hottest on record for the mid-Willamette Valley, as well as much of the state, said Kathie Dello, deputy director of the Oregon Climate Service at Oregon State University.

And Oregonians should plan to get used to the relatively scorching weather.

_________________________________________

FISH PASSAGE PROJECT

(Albany Democrat Herald) It is hoped that a research project under way at Green Peter dam will shed light on whether 50-year-old technology may be used to resolve fish passage issues at Detroit Reservoir and possibly save taxpayers millions of dollars at the same time.
_________________________________________

LET MISSISSIPPI, NOT OREGON, DECIDE ON FLAG — OPINION

(Albany Democrat Herald) Momentum is growing for a legislative measure that calls for removing the Mississippi state flag from a display of state flags outside the Oregon Capitol.

But with legislators aiming to wrap up the session by the end of this week, a week or so ahead of their July 11 deadline, its not clear whether enough time remains in the session to push the bill through.

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TALKING ABOUT SEXUALITY: ADOLESCENT SEXUALITY CONFERENCE, TEEN COALITION PLAN NEXT STEPS

(Daily Astorian) -Adolescent Sexuality Conference organizers plan for the future, while the recently formed Clatsop Teen Wellness Coalition seeks to provide education on how to communicate with youth on topics of health, wellness, safety and sexuality-

Talking to teens about sex is still a hot topic even after the Adolescent Sexuality Conference was canceled this year.
_________________________________________

DEQ CONTINUES VAPOR INVESTIGATION

(Blue Mountain Eagle) The Department of Environmental Quality is continuing their investigation of the noxious fumes in southwest John Day.
_________________________________________

LEGAL MARIJUANA IS HERE, BUT QUESTIONS ABOUND

(Herald and News) -Public use of marijuana remains illegal-

Today marks a green-letter in Oregon history, as the possession and use of marijuana becomes legal. Despite the hoopla that has surrounded the issue for months, we expect the day itself will be relatively sedate no parades or rallies or daylong reggae-music festivals likely will break out spontaneously on the street.
_________________________________________

OREGON LEGISLATURE TAKES AIM AT SLOW DRIVERS IN LEFT LANE

(OregonBusiness) A measure moving through the Oregon Legislature would allow police to cite drivers that don’t yield to faster traffic.

It passed the Senate in a 23-6 vote and will head back to the House for concurrence.
_________________________________________

PORTLAND’S AUTO THEFT RATE JUMPS, BUT MEDFORD DRIVERS HAVE IT WORSE

(Oregon Business Journal) Auto theft rates in Portland and Salem were higher in 2014.

Yet the increases in those cities are nothing compared to Medford. The southern Oregon city experienced a 21.5 percent jump in auto theft, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureaus recent annual “Hot Spots Report.”
_________________________________________

SWEET RELEAF

(Willamette Week) It’s legal
_________________________________________

PAYING BY THE MILE

(Willamette Week) -A new Oregon program to replace the gas tax rewards Hummers over hybrids. Why did the state spend millions on this?-

Drivers of hybrid and electric cars enjoy lots of benefits.
_________________________________________

OREGON LEGISLATURE’S JOINT COMMITTEE APPROVES WEED SALES TO ALL ADULTS STARTING OCT. 1

(Willamette Week) Recreational weed is legal next Wednesday.
_________________________________________

OREGON GROWERS LOOK FORWARD TO NEW ERA OF RETAIL MARIJUANA

(KATU) On the third Thursday of each month, veteran medical marijuana growers and hopeful newbies gather in the old Williams Grange hall in a small rural Oregon valley long known for growing some of the best cannabis on the planet.
_________________________________________

OREGON MEDICAL CANNABIS: ONE FAMILY’S SEARCH FOR SEIZURE RELIEF

(KLCC) In 1998 Oregon voters approved a ballot measure to legalize medical marijuana. Today nearly half the states have passed similar laws. Another fifteen allow the limited use of cannabis to treat conditions like epilepsy.
_________________________________________

PART 2: OREGON MEDICAL CANNABIS: ONE FAMILY’S SEARCH FOR SEIZURE RELIEF

(KLCC) Baby Ellanor Blanchett of Texas her family travelled to Oregon this year to try a new medical marijuana treatment developed in Eugene. The parents were hopeful it could alleviate their daughters daily seizures.
_________________________________________

BUNKER HILL COMPLEX OF WILDFIRES GROWS TO 328 ACRES

(KPIC) The Bunker Hill Complex of wildfires in the Umpqua Forest closed down some nearby campsites, but firefighters are working hard and many of the campsites are reopening.

According to the Umpqua National Forest, the fire is 30% contained and has grown to 328 acres.
_________________________________________

WILDFIRE NEAR DAYVILLE ACES ACROSS 6,000 ACRES AS HEAT LINGERS

(KTVZ Bend) -Three blazes to be jointly managed; structure protection in place-

A fire near the Black Canyon Wilderness 11 miles south of Dayville grew quickly in the heat and low humidity Tuesday, racing across 6,000 acres as forecasters issued warnings of more heat and challenging fire weather in coming days,.
_________________________________________

BILL WOULD CREATE SPECIAL LICENSE PLATES FOR TRAIL BLAZERS

(KTVZ Bend) -Also for breast cancer awareness-

Portland Trail Blazers fans may soon be able to display their love for the team on their license plates.

The Oregon House voted Tuesday to create a new special plate commemorating Portland’s basketball team. Revenue from a $20 license plate surcharge would go to the Trail Blazers Foundation.
_________________________________________

SENATE VOTES TO STOP USING TOBACCO PREVENTION DOLLARS TO LICENSE SMOKE SHOPS

(The Lund Report) The Oregon Senate voted 16-13 to make smoke shops pay a user fee to cover the cost of their own licensure.
_________________________________________

OREGON PHYSICIANS LINING UP FOR EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

(The Lund Report) Recent polling by the Oregon Health Authority finds more and more physicians are taking the plunge, while the Oregon Medical Association seeks to redefine its role.
_________________________________________

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on July 1, 2015 eClips

June 30, 2015 eClips Supplemental Edition

  • Portland, US home prices climb in April
  • An Obamacare victory dance: Paul Krugman — Guest Opinion
  • Supreme Court to hear case threatening public employee unions
  • Oregon’s first apartment building for former foster youth planned for Eugene
  • Legislature passes marijuana reform – WA
  • Paying more to play — Opinion
  • Sewer capacity issues may put county construction on hold
  • Oregon Senator Ron Wyden: Same Sex Marriage Ruling Must Prompt New Federal Laws
  • When BLM manages for recreation, we all win — Guest Opinion
  • A fuel war at Redmond Airport?
  • COCC looks to bring more students on campus
  • Legal pot: Added DUIIs, possession citations expected
  • Merkley, Wyden seek protective status for 200K-plus acres of Oregon lands
  • Popular elsewhere, high-speed rail remains elusive in the US
  • As gang violence rises, where are the police?
  • Bend city survey: Voters would support 10-cent gas tax
  • Renting: Awful for Just About Everyone Right Now
  • Data from your home could cut insurance costs
  • Wildfires ravage American West: Which states have been affected?
  • Sugary drinks linked to 25,000 deaths in the U.S. each year
  • Google app to warn drivers about railroad crossings
  • California Legislature passes mandatory vaccination bill
  • California wins with Arizona in SCOTUS redistricting case — Opinion
  • Ride-sharing forces automakers to rethink how they sell cars
  • Early learning centers start expulsion in pre-K
  • Fear of longer commutes puts pressure on U.S. cities to act
  • How employers efforts to get more people to save for retirement may backfire
  • Why consumer groups want the government to do more about hotel fees– Blog
  • Distraught people, Deadly results
  • Always click the first Google result? You might want to stop doing that.
  • New research suggests nature walks are good for your brain
  • Whats wrong with going to a community college? How two-year colleges can be better than four-year universities.
  • One mind-blowing chart shows why the Supreme Court took on gerrymandering– Blog
  • How renting became the new homeownership– Blog

____________________

PORTLAND, US HOME PRICES CLIMB IN APRIL

(Portland Oregonian) Home-price increases appear to have hit a plateau in Portland area and major metros across the country, a welcome sign of stability from the whiplash of the last decade.
_________________________________________

AN OBAMACARE VICTORY DANCE: PAUL KRUGMAN — GUEST OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) Was I on the edge of my seat, waiting for the Supreme Court decision on Obamacare subsidies?

No – I was pacing the room, too nervous to sit, worried that the court would use one sloppily worded sentence to deprive millions of health insurance, condemn tens of thousands to financial ruin, and send thousands to premature death.
_________________________________________

SUPREME COURT TO HEAR CASE THREATENING PUBLIC EMPLOYEE UNIONS

(Salem Statesman Journal) The Supreme Court signaled Tuesday that it may be prepared to strike down laws forcing public employees to pay union dues, posing a major threat to organized labor.

The justices agreed to hear a California case next fall challenging the requirement that teachers contribute to unions, even if they don’t join them or agree with their positions on issues.

_________________________________________

OREGON’S FIRST APARTMENT BUILDING FOR FORMER FOSTER YOUTH PLANNED FOR EUGENE

(Eugene Register-Guard) These days, contractor Bob Virde is helping renovate a small apartment building in Eugene’s Whiteaker neighborhood.

But the work, which he started a few weeks ago, means more to Virde than most of his construction projects.

_________________________________________

LEGISLATURE PASSES MARIJUANA REFORM – WA

(Eugene Register-Guard) The Legislature on Saturday passed a measure that that makes several changes to Washington states new recreational marijuana law, ranging from revising the markets tax structure to zoning rules.
_________________________________________

PAYING MORE TO PLAY — OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) -Park Service hikes fees to help pay for maintenance-

Nearly a century ago, Congress passed the National Park Service Organic Act, creating a federal agency to manage the nations parks and monuments.
_________________________________________

SEWER CAPACITY ISSUES MAY PUT COUNTY CONSTRUCTION ON HOLD

(Portland Tribune) -Stakes high for development if deal isn’t reached soon-

Clackamas County commissioners worry the state of Oregon could impose a building moratorium on most of the county if they cannot expand the capacity of the wastewater treatment system they oversee within the next few years.
_________________________________________

OREGON SENATOR RON WYDEN: SAME SEX MARRIAGE RULING MUST PROMPT NEW FEDERAL LAWS

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Democratic Senator Ron Wyden says following the U.S. Supreme Courts ruling on same-sex marriage, there’s a need for new federal tax and housing laws.
_________________________________________

WHEN BLM MANAGES FOR RECREATION, WE ALL WIN — GUEST OPINION

(Medford Mail Tribune) How I love the Siskiyou Mountains I travel often, but I am always so grateful to return to the spaciousness of our region here in southwest Oregon.

Wherever I go, I seek out wild places and often end up on the eco-tourism circuit. In many of the remaining natural places found around the world, eco-tourism is fueling local economies and shifting mindsets from extractive industries like logging and mining to the benefits of sharing the intrinsic value of natural beauty.
_________________________________________

A FUEL WAR AT REDMOND AIRPORT?

(Bend Bulletin )-The possibility of competing FBO’s is welcomed-

On Tuesday night, the Redmond City Council is expected to approve an application for a second fixed-base operator known more commonly as an FBO in the aviation world at the Redmond Airport.
_________________________________________

COCC LOOKS TO BRING MORE STUDENTS ON CAMPUS

(Bend Bulletin) -New $21 million residence hall will house 330 this fall-

Juniper Hall was one of the first buildings on Central Oregon Community Colleges campus in Bend. Most agree: It has not withstood the test of time.
_________________________________________

LEGAL POT: ADDED DUIIS, POSSESSION CITATIONS EXPECTED

(Herald and News) -Plan: New K-9 dog, detection training-

The Klamath Falls Police Department said it is likely to see increases in DUII and public possession arrests, as well as use of marijuana by minors, after recreational marijuana becomes legal July 1.

Chief David Henslee said his department has been preparing for these changes by training additional Drug Recognition Experts DRE and a new drug detection dog, who should all be ready for patrol after the new law takes effect.

_________________________________________

MERKLEY, WYDEN SEEK PROTECTIVE STATUS FOR 200K-PLUS ACRES OF OREGON LANDS

(Oregon Business Journal) Oregon’s two U.S. senators say their new environmental bill would designated more than 200,000 acres of land as wilderness or national recreation areas.

Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley have rolled out the Oregon Wildlands Act, which would:
_________________________________________

POPULAR ELSEWHERE, HIGH-SPEED RAIL REMAINS ELUSIVE IN THE US

(KATU) Travelers easily whiz from city to city on high-speed trains in many parts of South America, Asia and Europe. Since the first high-speed lines began operating more than 50 years ago in Japan, they have become an essential part of transportation worldwide.

Yet the U.S. has never built a single mile of high-speed rail, which is generally defined as accommodating trains that go at least 200 mph. And proposals to do so have been thwarted for decades.

So what’s holding America back?
_________________________________________

AS GANG VIOLENCE RISES, WHERE ARE THE POLICE?

(KGW) -Portland police’s union say they don’t have enough officers to patrol neighborhoods, leaving the city vulnerable to crime.-

Recent reports of excessive police force have dominated media headlines and inspired protests in Portland. “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” rallies have blocked city streets as Rose City residents decried the killings of Michael Brown, Freddie Gray and others. Witnesses across the country now whip out cellphones during arrests. As a result, police in some cities report feeling hesitant to act.
_________________________________________

BEND CITY SURVEY: VOTERS WOULD SUPPORT 10-CENT GAS TAX

(KTVZ Bend) -But councilors split — and gas dealers’ poll has opposite result-

The city of Bend needs $80 million to clear a backlog and fix its roads.

“The roads in Bend have been deteriorating over the past eight years or so since the recession,” city Streets Director David Abbas said Monday.
_________________________________________

RENTING: AWFUL FOR JUST ABOUT EVERYONE RIGHT NOW

(The Atlantic) -Twenty-five percent of Americans are spending more than half of their income just to keep a roof over their head.-

If you’ve gone through the painstaking process of renting a new apartment in the past few years, you probably faced some sticker-shock. Vacancy rates are low, really low. And despite ever-present scaffolding, construction in many cities is still slow, as new tenants move in but few move out. The result is that in almost every major metro area, the rent is, in fact, too damn high.
_________________________________________

DATA FROM YOUR HOME COULD CUT INSURANCE COSTS

(Boston Globe) -Liberty Mutual starts offering discount for access to customers smart smoke detectors-

Insurance companies are tapping into the onboard computers of automobiles to monitor how customers drive and setting car insurance premiums based on that information. Now, they want to do the same thing in Internet-connected homes.
_________________________________________

WILDFIRES RAVAGE AMERICAN WEST: WHICH STATES HAVE BEEN AFFECTED?

(Christian Science Monitor) -Firefighters race to contain wildfires spreading across the US west.-

Wildfires have ravaged parts of Alaska, California, Idaho, and Oregon this week as firefighters struggled to extinguish the blazes.
_________________________________________

SUGARY DRINKS LINKED TO 25,000 DEATHS IN THE U.S. EACH YEAR

(Los Angeles Times) By contributing to obesity and, through that, to diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks appears to claim the lives of about 25,000 American adults yearly and is linked worldwide to the deaths of 180,000 each year, new research says..
_________________________________________

GOOGLE APP TO WARN DRIVERS ABOUT RAILROAD CROSSINGS

(Los Angeles Times) Google has agreed to add audio and visual alerts in its navigation app to warn drivers about railroad crossings.

Google is partnering with the Federal Railroad Administration after deaths at railroad crossings jumped last year. The number of deaths had been steadily declining over the past decade until spiking 9% in 2014, according to the agency, which oversees the nations railroads.

_________________________________________

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE PASSES MANDATORY VACCINATION BILL

(Los Angeles Times) Gov. Jerry Brown must now decide whether to sign into law a bill that would require mandatory vaccinations for nearly all California schoolchildren..

The measure, spawned by an outbreak of measles at Disneyland that ultimately infected more than 150 people, cleared its final legislative hurdle Monday in the state Senate. Brown has not said publicly whether he would sign it.
_________________________________________

CALIFORNIA WINS WITH ARIZONA IN SCOTUS REDISTRICTING CASE — OPINION

(Los Angeles Times) Who supports gerrymandering? Not voters, who regularly prefer to give independent commissions the power to set voting boundaries. Not the Supreme Court, which ruled Monday in favor of Arizona’s voters and their redistricting commission.
_________________________________________

RIDE-SHARING FORCES AUTOMAKERS TO RETHINK HOW THEY SELL CARS

(Los Angeles Times) For at least 22 hours a day most cars sit parked, sucking up their owners’ money while waiting to be driven. For most people, it’s one of their most underutilized but most expensive assets.

Now, some companies are devising ways to help people profit from their vehicles.
_________________________________________

WITH SUMMER SUN COME SIGNS OF DANGER– BLOG

(New York Times) With summer sun shining brightly across the United States at least on most days, there is no better time to review the latest sobering findings on the damage that ultraviolet radiation can inflict on ones skin and then take steps to prevent it.
_________________________________________

OBAMA MAKING MILLIONS MORE AMERICANS ELIGIBLE FOR OVERTIME

(New York Times) President Obama announced Monday night a rule change that would make millions more Americans eligible for overtime pay.

The rule would raise the salary threshold below which workers automatically qualify for time-and-a-half overtime wages to $50,440 a year from $23,660, according to an op-ed article by the president in The Huffington Post.

_________________________________________

LONG TAUGHT TO USE FORCE, POLICE WARILY LEARN TO DE-ESCALATE

(New York Times) Officer Corey Papinsky was recently showing a group of Seattle police officers how to reduce the chance of using force against a citizen during a suddenly antagonistic encounter.
_________________________________________

STATE MARIJUANA LAWS COMPLICATE FEDERAL JOB RECRUITMENT

(New York Times) For all the aspiring and current spies, diplomats and F.B.I. agents living in states that have liberalized marijuana laws, the federal government has a stern warning: Put down the bong, throw out the vaporizer and lose the rolling papers.
_________________________________________

SUPREME COURT BLOCKS OBAMA’S LIMITS ON POWER PLANTS

(New York Times) The Supreme Court on Monday blocked one of the Obama administrations most ambitious environmental initiatives, an Environmental Protection Agency regulation meant to limit emissions of mercury and other toxic pollutants from coal-fired power plants.
_________________________________________

WHEN A COMPANY IS PUT UP FOR SALE, IN MANY CASES, YOUR PERSONAL DATA IS, TOO

(New York Times) The privacy policy for Hulu, a video-streaming service with about nine million subscribers, opens with a declaration that the company respects your privacy.

That respect could lapse, however, if the company is ever sold or goes bankrupt.

_________________________________________

EARLY LEARNING CENTERS START EXPULSION IN PRE-K

(Seattle Times) -A national study of preschoolers finds that while their overall numbers are smaller, they are expelled at three times the rate of K-12 kids.-

For most adults, the idea of preschool is characterized mainly by Tonka trucks and sing-alongs. But the pre-kindergarten years can present a thicket of dilemmas for teachers facing difficult children.
_________________________________________

FEAR OF LONGER COMMUTES PUTS PRESSURE ON U.S. CITIES TO ACT

(Seattle Times) At 4:35 a.m. each weekday, Stan Paul drives out of his Southern California suburb with 10 passengers in a van, headed to his job as an undergraduate counselor at the University of California, Los Angeles. Some 80 miles and 90 minutes later, the vanpoolers finally arrive to start their workday.
_________________________________________

HOW EMPLOYERS EFFORTS TO GET MORE PEOPLE TO SAVE FOR RETIREMENT MAY BACKFIRE

(Washington Post) One of the biggest hurdles people face when it comes to saving for retirement is inertia they want to save but they just haven’t gotten to it yet.

Companies are tackling that by automatically enrolling workers in retirement plans and giving them the option to cut back if they feel they cant afford it. Still, the efforts might be backfiring in a key way, retirement experts say.
_________________________________________

WHY CONSUMER GROUPS WANT THE GOVERNMENT TO DO MORE ABOUT HOTEL FEES– BLOG

(Washington Post) Booking a room at the Bellagio on the Las Vegas Strip for July 4 will run you right around $351 a night, before taxes. But look it up online, and youll see something closer to $319.
_________________________________________

DISTRAUGHT PEOPLE, DEADLY RESULTS

(Washington Post) -Officers often lack the training to approach the mentally unstable, experts say-

It was not yet 9 a.m., and Gary Page was drunk. The disabled handyman had a long history of schizophrenia and depression and, since his wife died in February, he had been struggling to hold his life together.
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ALWAYS CLICK THE FIRST GOOGLE RESULT? YOU MIGHT WANT TO STOP DOING THAT.

(Washington Post) When you go to Google for anything, be it a weather report or a phone number or an explanation of string theory, you assume that the top results will always be the very best. Those are, at least, the only ones you click: Studies suggest its a rare, rare Googler who bothers scrolling past search result number five.
_________________________________________

NEW RESEARCH SUGGESTS NATURE WALKS ARE GOOD FOR YOUR BRAIN

(Washington Post) In the past several months, a bevy of studies have added to a growing literature on the mental and physical benefits of spending time outdoors. That includes recent research showing that short micro-breaks spent looking at a nature scene have a rejuvenating effect on the brain boosting levels of attention and also that kids who attend schools featuring more greenery fare better on cognitive tests.
_________________________________________

WHATS WRONG WITH GOING TO A COMMUNITY COLLEGE? HOW TWO-YEAR COLLEGES CAN BE BETTER THAN FOUR-YEAR UNIVERSITIES.

(Washington Post) The United States is largely segregated along education lines. Those who went to college usually know mostly other people who went to college, so they tend to think their experience is universal. Yet only three in ten Americans age 25 and older have a bachelors degree.
_________________________________________

ONE MIND-BLOWING CHART SHOWS WHY THE SUPREME COURT TOOK ON GERRYMANDERING– BLOG

(Washington Post) Partisan gerrymandering is often seen as a significant problem for U.S. democracy. The chart above shows how it works — say you have 50 different people, and you want to slice them up into five different districts.
_________________________________________

HOW RENTING BECAME THE NEW HOMEOWNERSHIP– BLOG

(Washington Post) The majority of American households still own their homes, a fact that will remain true as far into the future as demographers and economists can see. But the balance of homeowners and renters has been shifting in the U.S. in ways that have already altered the demographics of renting, the affordability of rental housing and the kind of new housing we build.
_________________________________________

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on June 30, 2015 eClips Supplemental Edition

June 30, 2015 eClips

  • Kids starting school will be required to have dental screenings
  • OSU researchers need volunteers to track drought, effects of ‘the blob’
  • Clogged pipe kills 400,000 spring Chinook at Umpqua River hatchery
  • Sen. Wyden begins listening tour based on 7 Wonders of Oregon, outdoor recreation
  • Oregon House unanimously approves salmon license plate money fix
  • Where are medical marijuana dispensaries in Oregon? Hint: Starbucks are about as common
  • House speaker: Minimum wage hike ‘unlikely’ to pass this session
  • Recreational pot and the workplace: Q&A on Oregon’s new marijuana law
  • ‘Left-lane hogs': Bill for passing-only lanes almost to Kate Brown
  • Portland, US home prices climb in April
  • Supreme Court to hear case threatening public employee unions
  • Legislature looks to speed up traffic on highways
  • Video-voyeurism bill passes, awaits governor’s signature
  • Community college tuition waiver bill moves forward
  • Marijuana in Oregon is only MOSTLY legal — Guest Opinion
  • Slow path to wilderness — Opinion
  • Science leads foresters to fish-friendly practices — Guest Opinion
  • State energy credits pay off for investors, not taxpayers
  • Anti-profiling bill a step away from final OK
  • Recreational marijuana due for rocky rollout?
  • Lawmakers ask Congress to reclassify marijuana
  • Olympia And Salem Wind Down Sessions
  • New Oregon Law Could Lead To More Testing Opt-Outs
  • No New Wells In Harney County
  • New Oregon Law Could Lead To More Testing Opt-Outs
  • Forestry officials, woodland owners prepare for fire season
  • OSU poised to expand research, extension
  • Study highlights investments in Columbia River ports
  • Forestry officials, woodland owners prepare for fire season
  • Lawmakers ask Congress to reclassify pot
  • Local group to try last-minute BMRC save
  • Questions abound as legalization draws near — Opinion
  • Legislation on police cameras misses the mark — Opinion
  • Deschutes County to review two proposed solar farms
  • Higher speed limits, free community college still on table toward end of session
  • Sugarloaf Fire now 20 percent contained
  • Fire burning in Ochoco National Forest
  • Solar near Bend is good for Oregon — Opinion
  • Mill hopes to process problematic juniper — Guest Opinion
  • Last Legislative bills to watch– Blog
  • Oregon Severe Recession Update– Blog
  • Mult. Co. leads U.S. in illegal tobacco sales to kids
  • Central Oregon crews tackling several new wildfires
  • Fireworks-caused Round Butte fire sparks familiar debate
  • Longtime Oregon Health Executive Heads Back to Louisiana

____________________

KIDS STARTING SCHOOL WILL BE REQUIRED TO HAVE DENTAL SCREENINGS

(Portland Oregonian) Oregon children who are starting public school and are 7 years old or younger will be required to have dental screenings, or show proof they’ve had one, under legislation signed by Gov. Kate Brown.
_________________________________________

OSU RESEARCHERS NEED VOLUNTEERS TO TRACK DROUGHT, EFFECTS OF ‘THE BLOB’

(Portland Oregonian) Scientists want to get to the bottom of this drought, and they need your help.
_________________________________________

CLOGGED PIPE KILLS 400,000 SPRING CHINOOK AT UMPQUA RIVER HATCHERY

(Portland Oregonian) Hundreds of thousands of juvenile spring Chinook salmon died Monday at an Umpqua River fish hatchery after a clogged intake pipe blocked their access to water.
_________________________________________

SEN. WYDEN BEGINS LISTENING TOUR BASED ON 7 WONDERS OF OREGON, OUTDOOR RECREATION

(Portland Oregonian) Sen. Ron Wyden launched a statewide tour this week by meeting with outdoor recreation representatives in Portland, then will do the same with stops at each of the 7 Wonders of Oregon.
_________________________________________

OREGON HOUSE UNANIMOUSLY APPROVES SALMON LICENSE PLATE MONEY FIX

(Portland Oregonian) The Oregon House of Representatives unanimously approved a bill Monday that will ensure revenue from the state’s salmon license plates is used to directly help the fish.
_________________________________________

WHERE ARE MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARIES IN OREGON? HINT: STARBUCKS ARE ABOUT AS COMMON

(Portland Oregonian) Wednesday marks the day that it becomes legal for adults in Oregon to possess marijuana.
_________________________________________

HOUSE SPEAKER: MINIMUM WAGE HIKE ‘UNLIKELY’ TO PASS THIS SESSION

(Portland Oregonian) House Speaker Tina Kotek said Monday it’s “unlikely” that her proposal to raise Oregon’s minimum wage to $13 an hour has enough support to pass before the end of session, all but confirming the Legislature won’t vote on the issue until at least next year.
_________________________________________

RECREATIONAL POT AND THE WORKPLACE: Q&A ON OREGON’S NEW MARIJUANA LAW

(Portland Oregonian) July 1 is nearly upon us, the day Oregon’s voter-approved recreational marijuana law starts taking effect.
_________________________________________

‘LEFT-LANE HOGS': BILL FOR PASSING-ONLY LANES ALMOST TO KATE BROWN

(Portland Oregonian)  Legislation that would reserve the left lane of Oregon’s high-speed state highways and interstates for passing slower traffic on the verge of reaching Gov. Kate Brown’s desk.
_________________________________________

PORTLAND, US HOME PRICES CLIMB IN APRIL

(Portland Oregonian) Home-price increases appear to have hit a plateau in Portland area and major metros across the country, a welcome sign of stability from the whiplash of the last decade.
_________________________________________

SUPREME COURT TO HEAR CASE THREATENING PUBLIC EMPLOYEE UNIONS

(Salem Statesman Journal) The Supreme Court signaled Tuesday that it may be prepared to strike down laws forcing public employees to pay union dues, posing a major threat to organized labor.
_________________________________________

LEGISLATURE LOOKS TO SPEED UP TRAFFIC ON HIGHWAYS

(Salem Statesman Journal) Slow-poke drivers in passing lanes on Oregon freeways would sometimes have to make way for motorists with heavier right feet under a bill approved Monday in the state Senate.
_________________________________________

VIDEO-VOYEURISM BILL PASSES, AWAITS GOVERNOR’S SIGNATURE

(Salem Statesman Journal) After unanimously making its way through both the House and the Senate, a bill prohibiting video voyeurism is awaiting the signature of Gov. Kate Brown.
_________________________________________

COMMUNITY COLLEGE TUITION WAIVER BILL MOVES FORWARD

(Salem Statesman Journal) A year from now, recent Oregon high school graduates who maintain a 2.5 GPA, and who accept available state and federal grants, could be eligible for a tuition waiver at an Oregon community college.
_________________________________________

MARIJUANA IN OREGON IS ONLY MOSTLY LEGAL — GUEST OPINION

(Salem Statesman Journal) -Oregonians who use marijuana should know what they risk from their employer and from the federal government.-

In the brilliant 1987 movie “The Princess Bride,” Billy Crystal’s character Miracle Max tells some people asking for his help “your friend here is only MOSTLY dead.”
_________________________________________

SLOW PATH TO WILDERNESS — OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) -Lawmakers propose Oregon additions again-

Patience is an essential virtue for members of Congress seeking to create new wilderness areas.

Lawmakers often introduce and re-introduce the same wilderness proposal for years before it gains traction, wins committee approval and makes it to the floor of the House or Senate for a vote.
_________________________________________

SCIENCE LEADS FORESTERS TO FISH-FRIENDLY PRACTICES — GUEST OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) In 1975, a hallmark study on Oregons Alsea River watershed analyzed the effect of then-standard logging practices on stream temperatures. The results were disturbing, and helped drive four decades of research and reform that dramatically altered timber harvest practices and restored habitat for fish.
_________________________________________

STATE ENERGY CREDITS PAY OFF FOR INVESTORS, NOT TAXPAYERS

(Portland Tribune) Oregon has given hundreds of millions of dollars worth of tax credits to help developers kick-start investment in renewable energy and efficiency projects around the state. The credits were meant to either offset the taxes of the energy project owners, or to be sold to provide them with project capital.
_________________________________________

ANTI-PROFILING BILL A STEP AWAY FROM FINAL OK

(Portland Tribune) -Oregon House passes measure on interactions between police, public-

The Oregon Legislature is only a step away from barring police from profiling, the broad use of race or other specified characteristics to identify criminal suspects.
_________________________________________

RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA DUE FOR ROCKY ROLLOUT?

(Portland Tribune) The new state law to legalize recreational marijuana has remained controversial throughout its implementation and across the state, including in Clackamas.
_________________________________________

LAWMAKERS ASK CONGRESS TO RECLASSIFY MARIJUANA

(Portland Tribune) -Measure would list pot as lower-tier drug, open banking options-

Oregon lawmakers want to call on the U.S. Congress to remove marijuana from a national list of the most dangerous narcotics and work out a solution that would give state-legalized pot businesses access to banks.

_________________________________________

OLYMPIA AND SALEM WIND DOWN SESSIONS

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The legislatures in Washington and Oregon are still struggling to pass the final bills of their respective sessions.
_________________________________________

NEW OREGON LAW COULD LEAD TO MORE TESTING OPT-OUTS

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Its unclear what kinds of consequences the state could face now that Governor Kate Brown has signed a bill making it easier for parents to opt their kids out of standardized tests.
_________________________________________

NO NEW WELLS IN HARNEY COUNTY

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) For much of the state, just how much groundwater is available is not very well understood. The Oregon Water Resources Department has stopped issuing permits for new wells in southern Oregons Harney County, pending a more detailed study of water resources.
_________________________________________

NEW OREGON LAW COULD LEAD TO MORE TESTING OPT-OUTS

(Jefferson Public Radio) It’s unclear what kinds of consequences the state could face now that Governor Kate Brown has signed a bill making it easier for parents to opt their kids out of standardized tests.
_________________________________________

FORESTRY OFFICIALS, WOODLAND OWNERS PREPARE FOR FIRE SEASON

(Capital Press) -Wildfires were on the minds of forest land owners during a recent Oregon meeting.-

Most of the 165 small-woodland owners who recently gathered at a McCully Mountain tree farm had wildfire season on their minds.

The wildfire forecast for Northwest forests is not good, said Joe Arbow, stewardship forester with the Santiam Unit of the Oregon Department of Forestry in Mehama

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OSU POISED TO EXPAND RESEARCH, EXTENSION

(Capital Press) -$14 million included in a higher education bill would allow Oregon State University to hire new research and extension employees, reversing a years-long reduction in manpower. The Oregon Senate still must pass the full funding package.-

Oregon State University is poised to hire new agricultural research and extension employees with a $14 million funding increase recently passed by the Oregon House.

The hike is part of broader higher education legislation, House Bill 5024, that must still be approved by the Senate.

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STUDY HIGHLIGHTS INVESTMENTS IN COLUMBIA RIVER PORTS

(Capital Press) Businesses using the Columbia River have invested hundreds of millions of dollars since a 2010 project to deepen the 110-mile lower navigation channel from 40 feet to 43 feet, according to a study by the Pacific Northwest Waterways Association and the Port of Portland.
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FORESTRY OFFICIALS, WOODLAND OWNERS PREPARE FOR FIRE SEASON

(Capital Press) Wildfires were on the minds of forest land owners during a recent Oregon meeting.
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LAWMAKERS ASK CONGRESS TO RECLASSIFY POT

(East Oregonian) -Legislators hope Congress will remove marijuana from the list of Schedule 1 narcotics and make it possible for banks to accept cash from legal pot businesses.-

Oregon lawmakers want to call on the U.S. Congress to remove marijuana from a national list of the most dangerous narcotics and work out a solution that would give state-legalized pot businesses access to banks.

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LOCAL GROUP TO TRY LAST-MINUTE BMRC SAVE

(East Oregonian) Although the wheels have already been set in motion to demolish the Blue Mountain Recovery Center, a community group is trying to appeal to the city to stop it.
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QUESTIONS ABOUND AS LEGALIZATION DRAWS NEAR — OPINION

(Albany Democrat Herald) Wednesday marks a green-letter in Oregon history, as the possession and use of marijuana becomes legal. Despite the hoopla that has surrounded the issue for months, we expect the day itself will be relatively sedate no parades or rallies or daylong reggae-music festivals likely will break out spontaneously on the street.
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LEGISLATION ON POLICE CAMERAS MISSES THE MARK — OPINION

(Albany Democrat Herald) The Legislature has passed, and Gov. Kate Brown has signed, a bill that spells out standards for police agencies that choose to equip their officers with body cameras.

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DESCHUTES COUNTY TO REVIEW TWO PROPOSED SOLAR FARMS

(Bend Bulletin) -More solar facilities could be coming to the region-

The abundance of sunshine east of the Cascade Mountains makes Central Oregon a prime location for generating solar power.

Two adjoining solar facilities have been proposed east of Bend and others could soon follow. Installation costs have dropped in recent years, and requirements for Oregon utilities to use renewable energy increased this year.

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HIGHER SPEED LIMITS, FREE COMMUNITY COLLEGE STILL ON TABLE TOWARD END OF SESSION

(Bend Bulletin) -A look at the bills affecting Central Oregon that could pass before July 11-

After Gov. Kate Brown and legislative leaders announced the end of a last-ditch effort to piece together a deal to raise taxes and fees and improve Oregons road and transit infrastructure, the pace of the session has increased as lawmakers look to tie up loose ends and finish their work in coming weeks.

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SUGARLOAF FIRE NOW 20 PERCENT CONTAINED

(Bend Bulletin) A wildfire burning near the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument has grown to 4,612 acres and is now 20 percent contained, according to the Oregon Department of Forestry.
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FIRE BURNING IN OCHOCO NATIONAL FOREST

(Bend Bulletin) Firefighters attacked several new wildfires fueled by windy conditions Monday afternoon, according to an evening update from the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center.
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SOLAR NEAR BEND IS GOOD FOR OREGON — OPINION

(Bend Bulletin) Oregonians want clean energy. Hydro is clean, but its unlikely to be expanded dramatically in the years ahead. Wind is also clean, though commercial wind power generation requires great expanses of land.

Then theres solar. Developers can get a relatively large amount of power out of a fairly small space; it doesnt hurt birds, make much of any noise or endanger fish.

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MILL HOPES TO PROCESS PROBLEMATIC JUNIPER — GUEST OPINION

(Herald and News) -Converting chips to fuel logs of 100 percent juniper-

Jack LeRoy held up a log-shaped object about a foot-and-a-half long, made of compressed wood chips, formed into a cylinder.

I gotta tell ya, this is a fantastic fuel log, he said.

And it is made of 100 percent juniper.

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LAST LEGISLATIVE BILLS TO WATCH– BLOG

(Oregon Business Report) As the 2015 Legislative Session struggles to the finish, several bills important to the business community remain on the table. Rather than an in-depth look at just a few bills, this weeks Leading Issues provides an overview of unfinished business. Some bills are good, some are bad, but all of them will impact your ability run a business and provide jobs in Oregon.
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OREGON SEVERE RECESSION UPDATE– BLOG

(Oregon Office of Economic Analysis) Unlike the nation, unfortunately, Oregons Great Recession does have a modern peer: the early 1980s. Our office has documented the similarities numerous times over the years, from the unemployment rate to total jobs and from housing starts to manufacturing jobs and the like.
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MULT. CO. LEADS U.S. IN ILLEGAL TOBACCO SALES TO KIDS

(KGW) Dozens of Oregon gas stations and stores continue to sell cigarettes to kids, even after getting busted by federal and state investigators. It is this type of leniency, critics say, that allows Oregon to continually lead the country in illegal tobacco sales to minors.

“It’s deplorable,” said Charles Tauman of Tobacco Free Coalition of Oregon.
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CENTRAL OREGON CREWS TACKLING SEVERAL NEW WILDFIRES

(KTVZ Bend) -Two near Dayville, where larger fire now 20 pct. contained-

More than 200 firefighters worked Monday to contain a lightning-sparked fire north of Dayville that has blackened over 4,600 acres, as crews tackled several new blazes spotted after a weekend of thunder and lightning over much Central Oregon.
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FIREWORKS-CAUSED ROUND BUTTE FIRE SPARKS FAMILIAR DEBATE

(KTVZ Bend) -Many think fireworks sales should be banned due to high fire danger-

The Fourth of July holiday is all about the red, white and blue — and unfortunately, on Round Butte, black, too.

On Monday, BLM crews continued mopping up a two-acre blaze sparked Sunday by kids playing with fireworks.
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LONGTIME OREGON HEALTH EXECUTIVE HEADS BACK TO LOUISIANA

(The Lund Report) -Oregon Health Co-ops Prows reflects on Oregons past, future-

Dr. Ralph Prows, who had been CEO of the Oregon Health CO-OP, has left Oregon after 22 years, with his wife, Susan, to head back to their roots in New Orleans. Hell become president of Ochsner Health Network on July 8.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on June 30, 2015 eClips

June 29, 2015 eClips Weekend Edition

State Library eClips
* Anatomy of an implosion: No one wins in Oregon road-funding collapse
* Remaining marijuana offenses are being reduced by Oregon Legislature
* State ousts Clackamas property manager after thousands of dollars go missing
* Cause unknown in spate of Portland bee die-offs
* Legalized pot: Hazy future awaits OSU
* Supreme Court decisions; Oregon heat wave: Editorial peaks and valleys — Opinion
* Governor showed courage in signing test opt-out bill — Guest Opinion
* A victory for equality, but much work remains — Guest Opinion
* Sick leave, self-service gas and police body cameras: This week in new Oregon laws
* Sand Lake, Whalen Island to be joined by new state park in Tillamook County
* Wildfire near John Day Fossil Beds grows to 5,500 acres in hours
* Confederate imagery in Oregon: Now 20 lawmakers want Mississippi flag taken down
* Wyden legislation is not what the Klamath refuges need — Guest Opinion
* A coastal golf course for most anyone’s use makes par — Opinion
* Marijuana regulations must cover pesticide use — Guest Opinion
* David Sarasohn: How Oregon and Greece are alike — Opinion
* Gay marriage: Decision ends any doubts for same-sex couples in Oregon
* Warm water kills fish across region; anglers should give them a break
* Lessons from last week’s failure in Oregon leadership — Opinion
* Increased congestion threatens Oregon economy
* In Oregon, how to reconcile views over gay marriage? — Opinion
* Pot will be legal in Oregon but you can’t buy it
* Veteran mechanic, now blind, back on the job
* Marijuana in Oregon is only MOSTLY legal — Guest Opinion
* Ron Wyden to tour Oregon’s Seven Wonders, tout tourism
* Groundwater worries stop new well permits in SE Oregon
* Nehalem anglers need to be aware of bag-limit changes
* Algae bloom triggers Lake Billy Chinook health advisory
* Campgrounds near Diamond Lake closed as precaution, as crews battle Bunker Hill Complex of fires
* Westfirs state-ordered water restriction rescinded after city finds forgotten water right
* Lawmakers fail state in climate policy debacle — Guest Opinion
* Oak savanna, prairie deserve our protection — Guest Opinion
* Political pileup on transportation — Opinion
* A marijuana primer: Dos, donts, maybes
* State energy credits pay off for investors, not taxpayers
* Why You Can’t Buy Marijuana On July 1 And Other Answers About Legal Pot
* Rule Would Put New Mining Claims On Hold In Southwest Oregon Hot Spot
* Oregon Governor Praises Supreme Court’s Marriage Decision
* New Report Says Oregon Health Reform Is Working
* State Wrangles With Measuring Hospital Performance
* Fire Officials Urge Target Shooting Safety For Summer
* Top Things To Know About Legal Pot Before July 1
* New Machines Boost Oregon Lottery Numbers
* What Decision On Same-Sex Marriage Means For Oregon
* Warming Northwest Rivers Raise Risk Of Fish Kills
* Death of transportation bill costs Jackson County $10 million
* Too little logging has consequences, too — Opinion
* State report lists Kairos shortcomings
* Marijuana DUIIs expected to increase
* Transportation deal falls apart in Legislature — Opinion
* Pay-by-mile test program rolls out
* Nehalem Chinook salmon season nears
* Not that long ago … — Opinion
* Minimum wage bill misses our diversity
* Several Clatsop County bridges are structurally deficient, report finds
* Critter cams meant for science are a smash with the curious
* Opponents appeal OSU-Cascades site
* Fireworks spark blaze at Round Butte
* Blue-green algae dissipates at Suttle Lake
* Oregons own CSI Wolf — Opinion
* Quit picking on the Independent Party — Opinion
* Mid-valley CCO does poorly in state check-up — Opinion
* Dispensaries conflicted on legal weed
* DA says no big changes expected after July 1
* Officials: Stop ‘Fawn-Napping’ from Oregon’s Inland, Coastal Forests
* Gov. Brown abandons $343.5M transportation deal
* Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Against Oregon Lottery, but the Plaintiff Vows to Appeal — Blog
* Elisa Dozono Resigns From Oregon Lottery Commission: Updated — Blog
* Oregon weed legal soon, but not legally sold
* 200-plus firefighters called to 5,500-acre blaze near Dayville
* ZOOM+ Encourages Insurance Division to Consider Innovation When Setting Rates
* Policy Allowing Pharmacists to Prescribe Birth Control Heads to Governor

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ANATOMY OF AN IMPLOSION: NO ONE WINS IN OREGON ROAD-FUNDING COLLAPSE (Portland Oregonian)

The battle lines over a road-funding deal in the Oregon Legislature were drawn even before legislators began this year’s session.

Republicans made clear they wouldn’t bargain if Democrats extended a controversial clean-fuels program. Top Democrats insisted they could have both with plans to pass clean fuels in a flash, then get serious about transportation once things calmed down.
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REMAINING MARIJUANA OFFENSES ARE BEING REDUCED BY OREGON LEGISLATURE (Portland Oregonian)

Is it any worse to sell a teenager a joint than a six-pack of beer?

That question is at the heart of the debate in the Oregon Legislature over how far to go in lowering marijuana penalties now that voters have approved recreational use of the drug for adults.
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STATE OUSTS CLACKAMAS PROPERTY MANAGER AFTER THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS GO MISSING (Portland Oregonian)

State authorities have put a receiver in charge of a large Clackamas property management firm, ousted its owner and are hunting for thousands of dollars in missing rents and deposits.

The Oregon Real Estate Agency, which regulates property managers, fear losses from Cascade Community Management could run to several hundred thousand dollars.

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CAUSE UNKNOWN IN SPATE OF PORTLAND BEE DIE-OFFS (Portland Oregonian)

Corinne Fletcher stepped outside her apartment building Friday morning to find a pollinator genocide in the park that serves as her backyard.

Dead and dying bumblebees littered the sidewalk near the Market Street entrance to downtown Portland’s Pettygrove Park. The carcasses were so thick, the Lewis & Clark College law student said, “you had to step carefully to not step on any
bees.”
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LEGALIZED POT: HAZY FUTURE AWAITS OSU (Portland Oregonian)

In a bustling Corvallis coffee shop, Brock Binder’s eyes light up when he talks about weed.

The 24-year-old Oregon State University senior said the legalization of marijuana on July 1 could mean a booming industry that will provide jobs and improve access to medicine for sick people.
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SUPREME COURT DECISIONS; OREGON HEAT WAVE: EDITORIAL PEAKS AND VALLEYS — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

-Peaks-

Big week for the Supreme Court: Regardless of your views of the Affordable Care Act and gay marriage, the Supreme Court’s rulings on those subjects this week should help the nation move forward.
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GOVERNOR SHOWED COURAGE IN SIGNING TEST OPT-OUT BILL — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown showed great leadership this week when she signed important legislation to create the Student Assessment Bill of Rights, which will engage students in their own learning.
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A VICTORY FOR EQUALITY, BUT MUCH WORK REMAINS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The freedom to marry is the law of the land across the United States. It is a moment that many of us never thought we’d see in our lifetimes, especially after the painful passage of the “Defense of Marriage Act” in 1996.
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SICK LEAVE, SELF-SERVICE GAS AND POLICE BODY CAMERAS: THIS WEEK IN NEW OREGON LAWS (Portland Oregonian)

Welcome to our rundown updated weekly of the bills Gov. Kate Brown signed into law or let become law. We’ll also keep tabs on which notable bills if any are sitting on or headed to the governor’s desk. Under the Oregon Constitution, bills delivered to the governor must be vetoed within five business days or they become law automatically.
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SAND LAKE, WHALEN ISLAND TO BE JOINED BY NEW STATE PARK IN TILLAMOOK COUNTY (Portland Oregonian)

Tucked between Cape Kiwanda and Cape Lookout, the Sand Lake area on the Tillamook County coast will soon have another reason for visitors to spend some time.
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WILDFIRE NEAR JOHN DAY FOSSIL BEDS GROWS TO 5,500 ACRES IN HOURS (Portland Oregonian)

A wildfire near the headquarters of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument mushroomed to 5,500 acres in just hours Saturday, burning in a sparsely populated area.
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CONFEDERATE IMAGERY IN OREGON: NOW 20 LAWMAKERS WANT MISSISSIPPI FLAG TAKEN DOWN (Portland Oregonian)

Eighteen more lawmakers have joined calls this week by two Democrats, Rep. Lew Frederick of Portland and Rep. Tobias Read of Beaverton, to remove Mississippi’s Confederate-marked state flag from a decade-old promenade outside the Oregon Capitol.
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WYDEN LEGISLATION IS NOT WHAT THE KLAMATH REFUGES NEED — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In a recent guest column, Jason A. Atkinson and Michael Sutton assert that those eager to restore fish and wildlife habitat in the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge should support Sen. Ron Wyden’s stalled Klamath legislation.
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A COASTAL GOLF COURSE FOR MOST ANYONE’S USE MAKES PAR — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Reasonable people could argue about whether Bandon needs another golf course. Reasonable people also could argue about whether Oregon has any right to cede public park property with an ocean view to a wealthy developer who wishes to build one.
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MARIJUANA REGULATIONS MUST COVER PESTICIDE USE — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The recent Oregonian/OregonLive investigation, “A Tainted High,” brought needed awareness on illegal use of pesticides in the medical marijuana industry.
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DAVID SARASOHN: HOW OREGON AND GREECE ARE ALIKE — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Last week, Oregon did not seem that far from Greece.
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GAY MARRIAGE: DECISION ENDS ANY DOUBTS FOR SAME-SEX COUPLES IN OREGON (Portland Oregonian)

Most Oregon legal experts were confident — even before Friday’s landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision on gay marriage — that the 2014 federal judicial ruling bringing same-sex weddings to the state would stand no matter how the high court ruled.
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WARM WATER KILLS FISH ACROSS REGION; ANGLERS SHOULD GIVE THEM A BREAK (Portland Oregonian)

In 1990, the late Charlie White brought his then-innovative underwater cameras to Oregon, filming fish in numerous locations as we dangled baits and lures for them to bite.
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LESSONS FROM LAST WEEK’S FAILURE IN OREGON LEADERSHIP — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

Broken promises. Vote trading and deal-making run amok. Angry words. Backstabbing. Failed leadership.

Last week was among the Oregon Legislature’s worst. That environment caused Gov. Kate Brown to abruptly pull the plug on an important transportation-financing package.

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INCREASED CONGESTION THREATENS OREGON ECONOMY (Salem Statesman Journal)

If it seems like you’re spending more time commuting, you are. Oregon’s improving economy means there are more cars and trucks on the road and they’re gumming up I-5.

Businesses have been seeing some improvement since the economy leveled off after the recession, and since much of Oregon’s GDP comes from the exportation and transportation of goods, that means there are more vehicles on the highway.

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IN OREGON, HOW TO RECONCILE VIEWS OVER GAY MARRIAGE? — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

It’s a great day for marriage in America. The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld same-sex marriage as the law of the land.

And now my thoughts turn to reconciliation. How can we as a country come together, politically and socially, so we don’t spend the next several generations and millions or billions of dollars fighting over marriage in the same way we have fought over abortion since Roe v. Wade?

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POT WILL BE LEGAL IN OREGON BUT YOU CAN’T BUY IT (Salem Statesman Journal)

It’s being called the second immaculate conception.

Come Wednesday, adults 21 and older will legally be allowed to possess and use recreational marijuana in Oregon.

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VETERAN MECHANIC, NOW BLIND, BACK ON THE JOB (Salem Statesman Journal)

Chris Goodman can’t see well enough to drive, but with his sense of smell he can know that a car is leaking coolant or its power steering fluid is getting old.

Goodman was an auto mechanic for 20 years before he began losing his sight. Now, legally blind, he is working in an auto repair shop again through a trial work experience supported by the Oregon Commission for the Blind.

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MARIJUANA IN OREGON IS ONLY MOSTLY LEGAL — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

-Oregonians who use marijuana should know what they risk from their employer and from the federal government.-

In the brilliant 1987 movie “The Princess Bride,” Billy Crystal’s character Miracle Max tells some people asking for his help “your friend here is only MOSTLY dead.”
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RON WYDEN TO TOUR OREGON’S SEVEN WONDERS, TOUT TOURISM (Salem Statesman Journal)

When American families sit down for Thanksgiving dinner in the Midwest, East Coast and Deep South, Sen. Ron Wyden wants them talking about Oregon’s Seven Wonders.
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GROUNDWATER WORRIES STOP NEW WELL PERMITS IN SE OREGON (Salem Statesman Journal)

Water regulators have largely stopped permitting new agricultural wells in Oregon’s Harney Basin due to concerns about groundwater depletion.
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NEHALEM ANGLERS NEED TO BE AWARE OF BAG-LIMIT CHANGES (Salem Statesman Journal)

With the summer Chinook salmon season in the Nehalem Bay and river set take off in July, fish biologists with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are reminding anglers of changes in daily and seasonal bag limits for 2015.
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ALGAE BLOOM TRIGGERS LAKE BILLY CHINOOK HEALTH ADVISORY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Because of a bloom of toxin-producing blue-green algae, a health advisory has been issued to avoid water contact at Lake Billy Chinook Reservoir, a popular fishing destination 26 miles southwest of Madras in Jefferson County.
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CAMPGROUNDS NEAR DIAMOND LAKE CLOSED AS PRECAUTION, AS CREWS BATTLE BUNKER HILL COMPLEX OF FIRES (Eugene Register-Guard)

The Bunker Hill, Inlet and Crystal Springs campgrounds have been closed as a safety precaution as crews continue to fight the Bunker Hill Complex of fires located about 15 miles north of Diamond Lake in the Umpqua National Forest.
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WESTFIRS STATE-ORDERED WATER RESTRICTION RESCINDED AFTER CITY FINDS FORGOTTEN WATER RIGHT (Eugene Register-Guard)

Westfir has been able to ease a month-old state-ordered water restriction and shield itself against a future curb thanks to a forgotten remnant of the citys past and a three-week research project by a city employee.
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LAWMAKERS FAIL STATE IN CLIMATE POLICY DEBACLE — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

This legislative session has been a monumental flop on climate stability policy. Any lingering illusions that Oregon is an environmental policy leader may now be laid to rest.

At least two groups should face some accountability questions.

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OAK SAVANNA, PRAIRIE DESERVE OUR PROTECTION — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Weve received questions about prairie and oak savanna restoration at the Howard Buford Recreation Area often called Buford Park or Mt. Pisgah, and want to provide context and specific information.

Willamette Valley grasslands and oak savannas are considered globally endangered and are a statewide priority for restoration under the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlifes 2006 Oregon Conservation Strategy.
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POLITICAL PILEUP ON TRANSPORTATION — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Legislators, governor couldnt deliver a plan they all said they wanted-

Everyone in Salem said they wanted to approve a transportation package this year. But the 2015 Legislature will adjourn without one. No one won in this highway-clogging multi-car pileup.

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A MARIJUANA PRIMER: DOS, DONTS, MAYBES (Eugene Register-Guard)

Marijuana.

Pot.

Cannabis.

Mary Jane.
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STATE ENERGY CREDITS PAY OFF FOR INVESTORS, NOT TAXPAYERS (Portland Tribune)

-One company’s story illustrates how selling credits helps bottom line-

Oregon has given hundreds of millions of dollars worth of tax credits to help developers kick-start investment in renewable energy and efficiency projects around the state.
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WHY YOU CAN’T BUY MARIJUANA ON JULY 1 AND OTHER ANSWERS ABOUT LEGAL POT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Starting next week, Oregonians will be able to carry, share and consume recreational marijuana, but with no stores opening on the first day of legalization, a lot of people are still hazy on how Measure 91 will affect their lives.
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RULE WOULD PUT NEW MINING CLAIMS ON HOLD IN SOUTHWEST OREGON HOT SPOT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

About 100,000 acres of federal land in southwest Oregon would be off-limits to new mining claims under a proposal expected Monday.

The area is in Josephine and Curry counties near the Chetco River. Conservation groups have been trying to protect the area from nickel mining and other types of mineral extraction.
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OREGON GOVERNOR PRAISES SUPREME COURT’S MARRIAGE DECISION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Governor Kate Brown praised Fridays U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized gay marriage in a video statement.
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NEW REPORT SAYS OREGON HEALTH REFORM IS WORKING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregons health care reform efforts appear to be working, according to a new report on outcomes and finances.

The report looks at how Oregons system of Coordinated Care Organizations are doing under the Oregon Health Plan.
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STATE WRANGLES WITH MEASURING HOSPITAL PERFORMANCE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

An effort to gauge the success of Oregons hospitals is proving harder than expected, and now the state is thinking about changing the way its performance is measured.
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FIRE OFFICIALS URGE TARGET SHOOTING SAFETY FOR SUMMER (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Oregon Department of Forestry is asking target shooters to help reduce wildfires in the state.

Mike Cafferata, a district forester in Forest Grove, said hot bullet fragments can fall onto the forest debris and smolder.
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TOP THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT LEGAL POT BEFORE JULY 1 (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Starting next week, Oregonians will be able to carry, share and consume recreational marijuana, but with no stores opening on the first day of legalization, a lot of people are still hazy on how Measure 91 will affect their lives.
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NEW MACHINES BOOST OREGON LOTTERY NUMBERS (Jefferson Public Radio)

New is apparently better for Oregon gamblers, at least in one sense.

The Oregon Lottery began installing new video lottery machines VLMs last year, and its revenues are up ten percent since that time.
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WHAT DECISION ON SAME-SEX MARRIAGE MEANS FOR OREGON (Jefferson Public Radio)

In a 5-4 decision today, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the U.S. Constitution grants same-sex couples the right to marry.

The decision, Obergefell v. Hodges, invalidates the marriage bans that remain in 14 states, and upholds the many recent rulings by federal court judges in favor of same sex marriage, including that of U.S. District Court Judge Michael McShane in Oregon and U.S. District Magistrate Judge Candy Dale in Idaho.
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WARMING NORTHWEST RIVERS RAISE RISK OF FISH KILLS (Jefferson Public Radio)

Its been a one-two punch of low snowpack last winter and not enough rain this spring for many Northwest rivers. Warm temperatures and low river flows are causing problems for salmon making the return migration.
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DEATH OF TRANSPORTATION BILL COSTS JACKSON COUNTY $10 MILLION (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Foothill Road expansion study put off by lack of funds-

The death of a transportation bill in the Oregon Legislature last week also killed off hopes for about $10 million in road projects in Jackson County.

Among the biggest losses was $4 million for a study of Foothill Road intended to pave the way for securing federal and state dollars to create an alternative to Interstate 5 for north-south travel through the Medford-Central Point area.
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TOO LITTLE LOGGING HAS CONSEQUENCES, TOO — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

For decades, timber harvests on public forest land in western Oregon have been curtailed in the interest of protecting the environment from the excesses of the unsustainable logging that took took place in the 1970s and 1980s. Now, however, the pendulum has swung too far in the opposite direction, to the point that limitations on logging have led to their own set of environmental consequences.
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STATE REPORT LISTS KAIROS SHORTCOMINGS (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Youth treatment program operates in Josephine and Jackson counties-

A Kairos residential treatment program for youths with mental health issues in Grants Pass broke state rules in more than a dozen ways, the Oregon Health Authority has found.
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MARIJUANA DUIIS EXPECTED TO INCREASE (Albany Democrat Herald)

Oregon will have more driving under the influence of intoxicants cases once marijuana becomes legal on Wednesday, which will put additional stress on police and the local judicial system, law enforcement and court sources say.
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TRANSPORTATION DEAL FALLS APART IN LEGISLATURE — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Reports from the Legislature on Thursday suggested that a plan to invest $345.5 million in badly needed statewide transportation improvements was dead.

Lets hope that the obituary for the transportation plan is premature. After all, the final weeks of the Oregon Legislature are known for surprising, and sudden, resurrections

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PAY-BY-MILE TEST PROGRAM ROLLS OUT (Argus Observer)

Paying by the mile is coming this week in lieu of gas taxes, but only on 5,000 cars and light commercial vehicles in the state of Oregon.
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NEHALEM CHINOOK SALMON SEASON NEARS (Daily Astorian)

-Bag limit jumps from one to two per day starting mid September-

The summer Chinook salmon season approaches for the Nehalem Bay and River, prompting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to remind anglers about this seasons bag limits.

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NOT THAT LONG AGO … — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

-Not that long ago, Oregon twice tore its guts out over gay rights-

Oregon tore its guts out thrice over homosexuality

When change comes swiftly, we tend to forget what preceded it. Last Fridays momentous Supreme Court decision on the rights of homosexuals to marry obscures a relatively recent moment in Oregons public life.

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MINIMUM WAGE BILL MISSES OUR DIVERSITY (Daily Astorian)

-Speaker Kotek’s last-minute tax initiative is too much, too late.-

After an initial derailment, a proposal to raise Oregons minimum wage is back on track in the waning days of the state Legislature

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SEVERAL CLATSOP COUNTY BRIDGES ARE STRUCTURALLY DEFICIENT, REPORT FINDS (Daily Astorian)

-Quite a few bridges are in need of a lot of work in Clatsop County.-

Many of Clatsop Countys bridges are in need of significant maintenance and repair, a new report shows, and federal and state transportation spending has not kept up with the demand for improvements.
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CRITTER CAMS MEANT FOR SCIENCE ARE A SMASH WITH THE CURIOUS (Bend Bulletin)

-In the age of the ubiquitous cat video, footage of wild animals is having a moment-

A rare kit fox sporting GPS bling recently led wildlife biologists to the little-critter mother lode theyve sought for four years while crawling through the sagebrush of Eastern Oregons unforgiving Coyote Lake Basin.
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OPPONENTS APPEAL OSU-CASCADES SITE (Bend Bulletin)

-Truth in Site files petition with Oregon Court of Appeals-

The attorney for a group trying to block OSU-Cascades west-side campus told The Bulletin on Friday he has filed a petition for judicial review to the Oregon Court of Appeals to try to stop the development.
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FIREWORKS SPARK BLAZE AT ROUND BUTTE (Bend Bulletin)

-Crews still battling fire near Dayville-

Firefighters responded to three new wildfires around Central Oregon Sunday, including a small blaze late Sunday afternoon sparked by juveniles playing with fireworks 5 miles southwest of Madras.
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BLUE-GREEN ALGAE DISSIPATES AT SUTTLE LAKE (Bend Bulletin)

A blue-green algae bloom at Suttle Lake has dissipated, prompting the Deschutes National Forest to remove caution signs at the lake west of Sisters.
_________________________________________

OREGONS OWN CSI WOLF — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Naturalists couldnt be happier about the growing number of wolves in Oregon. For them, the return of wolves restores a missing piece of the ecosystem. But almost in inverse proportion, ranchers are not so pleased.
_________________________________________

QUIT PICKING ON THE INDEPENDENT PARTY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The Independent Party of Oregon is less than two months away from becoming the states third major political party, and thats troublesome to leaders of the current Big Two, Democrats and Republicans.

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MID-VALLEY CCO DOES POORLY IN STATE CHECK-UP — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

The coordinated care organization that administers health care coverage for Medicaid recipients in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties lagged well behind the states other CCOs last year and lost out on a substantial amount of potential incentive payments, according to a report released this week by the Oregon Health Authority.
_________________________________________

DISPENSARIES CONFLICTED ON LEGAL WEED (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Dont expect to see mid-valley dispensaries handing out free joints or medicated brownies on Wednesday, when recreational marijuana use for people 21 and over becomes legal in Oregon it would be a violation of their dispensary license, according to the Oregon Health Authority.
_________________________________________

DA SAYS NO BIG CHANGES EXPECTED AFTER JULY 1 (Herald and News)

-‘business as usual’ for prosecutors-

Klamath County District Attorney Rob Patridge said he does not foresee significant changes for his office after recreational marijuana use and consumption becomes legal Wednesday, July 1.

_________________________________________

OFFICIALS: STOP ‘FAWN-NAPPING’ FROM OREGON’S INLAND, COASTAL FORESTS (Oregon Coast Beach Connection)

Much like the temptation to help a stranded baby seal on the Oregon coast, trying to help a newborn fawn found by itself in the woods is an equally bad idea. State wildlife officials say that while picking up one and taking it home to care for it might seem like the right thing to do.
_________________________________________

GOV. BROWN ABANDONS $343.5M TRANSPORTATION DEAL (OregonBusiness)

Gov. Kate Brown on Thursday called off negotiations to salvage a transportation-funding proposal by the end of the legislative session.

The talks centered on a plan to repeal the clean fuels program and replace it with an initiative that would both raise money for infrastructure improvement as well as carbon reduction measures.
_________________________________________

JUDGE DISMISSES LAWSUIT AGAINST OREGON LOTTERY, BUT THE PLAINTIFF VOWS TO APPEAL — BLOG (Willamette Week)

-Justin Curzi says he found fraud within the Lottery’s video poker “auto hold” feature.-

The case against the Oregon Lottery for allegedly deceptive practices concerning its video poker machines continues.

Last week, plaintiff Justin Curzi filed a notice of his plans to appeal Multnomah County Circuit Judge Judith Matarazzo’s decision last month to dismiss Curzi’s lawsuit primarily on technical grounds.
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ELISA DOZONO RESIGNS FROM OREGON LOTTERY COMMISSION: UPDATED — BLOG (Willamette Week)

Decision comes a week after her law firm a filed lawsuit against the Lottery.

Gov. Kate Brown announced this morning that Portland lawyer Elisa Dozono will step down from her position as chairwoman of the five-member Oregon Lottery Commission.
_________________________________________

OREGON WEED LEGAL SOON, BUT NOT LEGALLY SOLD (KATU)

Come Wednesday, the pot stashes in Oregon are legal – up to 8 ounces. So is the homegrown, up to four plants a household.

The legalization of recreational marijuana on July 1 makes the state the fourth to do so, following Colorado, Washington state and Alaska. The nation’s capital, Washington, D.C., also allows possession of personal amounts, though not sales.
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200-PLUS FIREFIGHTERS CALLED TO 5,500-ACRE BLAZE NEAR DAYVILLE (KTVZ Bend)

-Car, outbuilding burn; one of over 20 C.O. blazes; Redmond temp record falls-

Central Oregon firefighters reported no new fires overnight after a busy Saturday tackling 21 mostly small wildfires sparked by Friday night’s thunderstorms, the largest near Dayville quickly racing across 5,500 acres, burning a vehicle and outbuilding and prompting evacuations of area residents.
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ZOOM+ ENCOURAGES INSURANCE DIVISION TO CONSIDER INNOVATION WHEN SETTING RATES (The Lund Report)

-Early next week, the Oregon Insurance Division is expected to announce the final rates for the individual and small group market.-

Oregons insurance market is crippled by waste, marred by friction and overpriced thats the conclusion reached by Dr. Dave Sanders, CEO of ZOOM+, who urged the Oregon Insurance Division to lower its individual rates at a hearing in Salem yesterday.
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POLICY ALLOWING PHARMACISTS TO PRESCRIBE BIRTH CONTROL HEADS TO GOVERNOR (The Lund Report)

-House Bill 2879 was a late session addition to the Legislatures docket, but the persistence of Bend surgeon and Republican Rep. Knute Buehler, joined by the other physician legislators, has cleared the way for women to get the pill without needing a doctors visit.-

Easy access to birth control is coming to a pharmacy near you.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on June 29, 2015 eClips Weekend Edition

June 29, 2015 eClips

  • Fire-prone conditions arrive early, state Forestry Department says
  • Public nudity in Oregon: Where you can and can’t legally be naked in the open
  • Past Tense Oregon: Wildfires — and fighting them — are part of life in the Pacific Northwest
  • Travel Oregon bike scavenger hunt takes week break before hiding Painted Hills bike
  • Tillamook State Forest offers recreation opportunities galore in Tillamook County
  • Driving with marijuana in Oregon: Reader questions
  • ‘Toxics’ bill is an unnecessary overreach: Editorial — Opinion
  • Death of a statesman in 1947 plane crash
  • Pot will be legal in Oregon but you can’t buy it
  • How Salem-area law enforcement is prepping for pot
  • Marijuana in Oregon is only MOSTLY legal — Opinion
  • Thousands of dollars missing from Portland area property management firm Cascade Community Management
  • Lawmakers fail state in climate policy debacle — Guest Opinion
  • Oregon House bill would raise taxes in 13 cash-strapped counties
  • Wine Country license plates pay off
  • Local projects die with roads package
  • Using pot to be legal in Oregon but not selling it

____________________

FIRE-PRONE CONDITIONS ARRIVE EARLY, STATE FORESTRY DEPARTMENT SAYS

(Portland Oregonian) Exceptionally dry landscape, drought conditions, hot weather and forecasted lightning have escalated the risk of extreme fire activity through the weekend and into this coming week, the Oregon Department of Forestry emphasized Sunday.
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PUBLIC NUDITY IN OREGON: WHERE YOU CAN AND CAN’T LEGALLY BE NAKED IN THE OPEN

(Portland Oregonian) So you want to get naked in Oregon. You’ve got your sunscreen, a towel and a good pair of shoes on your feet. The only thing nagging you is the law where can you legally be naked anyway?

That’s a complicated question.
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PAST TENSE OREGON: WILDFIRES — AND FIGHTING THEM — ARE PART OF LIFE IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

(Portland Oregonian) As the fire season in the Pacific Northwest worsens, more and more firefighters will descend on Oregon, Washington, Idaho and other parts of the region to help fight the blazes that are likely to consume thousands of acres of forest and rangeland.
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TRAVEL OREGON BIKE SCAVENGER HUNT TAKES WEEK BREAK BEFORE HIDING PAINTED HILLS BIKE

(Portland Oregonian) Has Travel Oregon dug itself a hole it can’t get out of?

Maybe that’s what it should do with the next bike: dig a hole and hide the Painted Hills bike in it. Where else can they hide a bike in that rather small unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, that doesn’t really have any bike trails and hardly has a juniper bush to hide a bike behind?
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TILLAMOOK STATE FOREST OFFERS RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES GALORE IN TILLAMOOK COUNTY

(Portland Oregonian) East side Portland metro area residents have the Columbia River Gorge and Mount Hood National Forest for places to boogie into the woods for a quick getaway.

West side residents have the Tillamook State Forest. The Tillamook State Forest? Yes, the Tilly isn’t as bad as it once was, for hiking, mountain biking and horseback riding.
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DRIVING WITH MARIJUANA IN OREGON: READER QUESTIONS

(Portland Oregonian) Starting Wednesday, anyone 21 and older may possess and grow marijuana in Oregon. Readers want to know what that means for driving.

We asked Anthony Johnson, the chief petitioner of Measure 91, Oregon’s new marijuana law, about driving and cannabis.
_________________________________________

‘TOXICS’ BILL IS AN UNNECESSARY OVERREACH: EDITORIAL — OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) Many of Oregon’s notable policy failures are a consequence of overreach. Why do something simple, lawmakers seem to ask, when you can do something complex and hyper-ambitious instead? The answers to that question abound Cover Oregon, the Business Energy Tax Credit and most recently the low-carbon fuel standard. Lawmakers keep right on reaching anyway, and the impulse is driving Senate Bill 478 aka “the toxics bill” ever closer to the governor’s desk.
_________________________________________

DEATH OF A STATESMAN IN 1947 PLANE CRASH

(Salem Statesman Journal) -From our archives. This story originally was published as part of our Headstones of History series from mid-2002 to early 2007.-

Earl Snell, the 23rd governor of Oregon, loved to fish and hunt and he had a fox terrier named Picky that he found at the Humane Society.

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POT WILL BE LEGAL IN OREGON BUT YOU CAN’T BUY IT

(Salem Statesman Journal) It’s being called the second immaculate conception.

Come Wednesday, adults 21 and older will legally be allowed to possess and use recreational marijuana in Oregon.

But complicating this new, hard-fought-for freedom is one niggling detail: Potential users must receive their marijuana as a gift or get it on the illegal black market because there are still no licensed retail stores in Oregon where law-abiding residents can buy it.
_________________________________________

HOW SALEM-AREA LAW ENFORCEMENT IS PREPPING FOR POT

(Salem Statesman Journal) In just a couple of days, Oregon adults will be able to legally possess and grow marijuana, leaving local law enforcement agencies with a lot of questions.

While the Legislature is still drafting laws to determine how the overall process will work, under current laws, beginning July 1, people 21 and older will be allowed to:
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MARIJUANA IN OREGON IS ONLY MOSTLY LEGAL — OPINION

(Salem Statesman Journal) -Oregonians who use marijuana should know what they risk from their employer and from the federal government.-

In the brilliant 1987 movie “The Princess Bride,” Billy Crystal’s character Miracle Max tells some people asking for his help “your friend here is only MOSTLY dead.”
_________________________________________

THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS MISSING FROM PORTLAND AREA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT FIRM CASCADE COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT

(Eugene Register-Guard) State authorities have ousted the owner of a large Clackamas property management firm and are hunting for thousands of dollars in missing rents and deposits.

Regulators worry that losses from Cascade Community Management could be as high as several hundred thousand dollars, The Oregonian reports.
_________________________________________

LAWMAKERS FAIL STATE IN CLIMATE POLICY DEBACLE — GUEST OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) This legislative session has been a monumental flop on climate stability policy. Any lingering illusions that Oregon is an environmental policy leader may now be laid to rest.

At least two groups should face some accountability questions. The Democratic leadership, which includes the governor, tied the Legislature in knots attempting to get a 4-cent-per-gallon gas tax increase while putting the existing “clean fuels” law on the chopping block.
_________________________________________

OREGON HOUSE BILL WOULD RAISE TAXES IN 13 CASH-STRAPPED COUNTIES

(Medford Mail Tribune) -Jackson County is just above $2 minimum proposed by bill still in committee-

A potentially historic bill in the Oregon House would dramatically improve the financial landscape for Josephine County and a dozen other cash-strapped Oregon counties.
_________________________________________

WINE COUNTRY LICENSE PLATES PAY OFF

(Medford Mail Tribune) Travel Southern Oregon has received more than $37,000 from the sale of Oregon Wine Country license plates and has appointed a committee to determine disbursement of the funds to tourism-related efforts.
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LOCAL PROJECTS DIE WITH ROADS PACKAGE

(Argus Observer) With a transportation package failing to get traction in the Oregon Legislature, two projects impacting Malheur County were among those not included in funding.

State Rep. Cliff Bentz, R-Ontario, said Friday the package included $7 million to repair the Juntura Cutoff Road, mostly in Harney County. It was an important project in keeping jobs in Malheur County, as Eagle Picher is having difficulty moving trucks in and out of its mine west of Juntura because of the deterioration of the road. The company has looked at expanding its operations elsewhere.
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USING POT TO BE LEGAL IN OREGON BUT NOT SELLING IT

(Seattle Times) -Come Wednesday, it will be legal for Oregon residents to own up to eight ounces of marijuana; however, they won’t have a legal way to buy it-

Come Wednesday, the pot stashes in Oregon are legal up to 8 ounces. So is the homegrown, up to four plants a household.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on June 29, 2015 eClips

June 26, 2015 eClips Supplemental Edition

  • International School of Beaverton and Raleigh Hills K-8 rated by national organizations
  • Too much sugar could make you inflexible, study finds
  • Tiny Northwest fly could save East Coast hemlock forests, researchers say
  • Portland asks residents to ‘minimize the odor’ of legal pot
  • TriMet proposes raising taxes on Portland area businesses to improve service
  • Yearling black bear cub, found in Oregon, gets a name and new home in Pennsylvania
  • Path to finding first peoples leads through University of Oregon
  • Government back to the 1930s? — Guest Opinion
  • With 7 months to spare — Opinion
  • TriMet moves to raise payroll tax to expand regional service
  • New Climate Action Plan targets fossil fuels
  • Panel starts adding anti-gentrification planks in Portland comprehensive plan
  • Expiring Tax Break Jolts Electric Car Sales
  • U.S. Slips In World Well-Being Rankings; Panama Is No. 1
  • Genetically Modified Salmon: Coming To A River Near You?
  • Anti-Displacement Coalition Argues For City Changes
  • Public Input To End On Timber Sale Near Oregon Gulch Fire
  • Portland Police Bureau Proposes Changes To Aid Program For Homeless Drug Users
  • Warm temperatures a boon for stink bugs
  • Wash. ecology proposes rules for irrigating with reclaimed water
  • Proposed law would improve forest management — Guest Opinion
  • Some worry as more production moves outside U.S.
  • Going to extremes to get vaccinated
  • Why we still need public libraries — Guest Opinion
  • Some states are drowning in red ink — Guest Opinion
  • Knight Cancer Challenge No Biotech Dream
  • Aiming to Increase Affordable Housing, Dan Saltzman Proposes Streamlining Incentives– Blog
  • Riding Along with a Weed Dealer to Vancouver’s Marijuana Main Street
  • Farmers stressed about stink bugs
  • Supreme Court rejects challenge to Obama’s health law
  • Out-of-pocket costs put health care out of reach — Opinion
  • No, Obamacare is not reducing employees’ hours
  • What would the proposed California vaccine law do?
  • Tech problems may crimp launch of state’s new prescription drug database
  • EPA report cites benefits of limiting emissions, climate change
  • Creators frustrated with Copyright Office’s outdated technology, procedures
  • CDC – More than 1 in 8 Americans infected with HIV don’t know it
  • Most uses of medical marijuana wouldn’t pass FDA review, study finds
  • The case against Colorado’s pot law — Guest Opinion
  • Immigration reform: ‘The California Package’ — Guest Opinion
  • Measles carries risk of a terrifying, always-fatal and rare complication
  • Science inches closer to ‘home brew’ heroin
  • The Challenges Posed By An Aging Global Population
  • Legitimate medical-marijuana use should not get you fired — Opinion
  • Study: Weather patterns that bring heatwaves happening more
  • Maps: The state of broadband in the states– Blog
  • Forget almonds: Look at how much water California’s pot growers use– Blog
  • Where Americas worst roads are and how much they’re costing us– Blog
  • Millennials are actually more generous than anybody realizes– Blog

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INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF BEAVERTON AND RALEIGH HILLS K-8 RATED BY NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

(Portland Oregonian) For a second year, two Beaverton schools received national rankings from well-known organizations.
_________________________________________

TOO MUCH SUGAR COULD MAKE YOU INFLEXIBLE, STUDY FINDS

(Portland Oregonian) Studies have found that a diet high in fat and sugar can lead to fuzzy thinking and even Alzheimer’s disease. But now Oregon researchers have uncovered a clue about why that might be.

It has to do with the gut.
_________________________________________

TINY NORTHWEST FLY COULD SAVE EAST COAST HEMLOCK FORESTS, RESEARCHERS SAY

(Portland Oregonian) A tiny Northwest fly could be the key to saving the East Coast’s hemlock forests.

A team of researchers led by Oregon State University entomologist Darrell Ross believe the predatory silver fly could offer hope of controlling the hemlock woolly adelgid, an insect that has infested millions of acres of hemlocks from northern Georgia to Maine.

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PORTLAND ASKS RESIDENTS TO ‘MINIMIZE THE ODOR’ OF LEGAL POT

(Portland Oregonian) Portland officials will soon begin rolling out local regulations for Oregon’s legal marijuana industry — and smell isn’t on the list.

Recreational marijuana becomes legitimate July 1 and the City Council will consider two new rules the following week, said Theresa Marchetti, who oversees livability programs for Portland’s Office of Neighborhood Involvement.
_________________________________________

TRIMET PROPOSES RAISING TAXES ON PORTLAND AREA BUSINESSES TO IMPROVE SERVICE

(Portland Oregonian) Confident that the Great Recession is in the rearview mirror, TriMet appears ready to once again increase payroll taxes on Portland area employers and self-employed workers to help fund future transit expansion.

In 2009, the Oregon Legislature gave TriMet the authority to increase the employer payroll tax rate by one-tenth of 1 percent phased in over 10 years.
_________________________________________

YEARLING BLACK BEAR CUB, FOUND IN OREGON, GETS A NAME AND NEW HOME IN PENNSYLVANIA

(Portland Oregonian) An Oregon bear cub that’s a bit too comfortable around humans has found a new home in Hershey, Pennsylvania.

The cub, which had been living in Department of Fish and Wildlife captivity since being spotted interacting with people at Yellowbottom Recreation Site in Linn County on Memorial Day, was shipped across the country on an overnight
cargo flight last week.
_________________________________________

PATH TO FINDING FIRST PEOPLES LEADS THROUGH UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

(Eugene Register-Guard) A film crew hoping to explain how humans first set foot on North America came to Oregon to find the answers.

They landed on the doorstep of archaeologist Jon Erlandson at the University of Oregon because that’s where the evidence for the first peoples had led them.

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GOVERNMENT BACK TO THE 1930S? — GUEST OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) A recent Congressional Budget Office report The 2015 Long-Term Budget Outlook reminds us that the federal government is slowly becoming an agency for taking care of the elderly.
_________________________________________

WITH 7 MONTHS TO SPARE — OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) -OHSU matches Knights $500 million pledge-

Since 2013, Phil and Penny Knights names have appeared at the top of the Chronicle of Philanthropy’s list of the largest gifts ever given to a university or college $500 million to Oregon Health & Science University in Portland for cancer research, $100 million ahead of second place.
_________________________________________

TRIMET MOVES TO RAISE PAYROLL TAX TO EXPAND REGIONAL SERVICE

(Portland Tribune) -UPDATE: Board told 2015 Oregon Legislature could increase transit funds but final decision uncertain-

The regional transit agencys Board of Directors was briefed Wednesday on a proposal to raise the tax on most employers by one-tenth of 1 percent over 10 years. The first public hearing is scheduled for August, and the board could approve the increase at its September meeting.
_________________________________________

NEW CLIMATE ACTION PLAN TARGETS FOSSIL FUELS

(Portland Tribune) The Portland City Council voted unanimously Wednesday to approve an updated version of the joint city/county Climate Action Plan, and the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners is expected to follow suit Thursday.

The plan expands upon the prior joint Climate Action Plan enacted in 2009, calling for tough new policies to address fossil fuel use.
_________________________________________

PANEL STARTS ADDING ANTI-GENTRIFICATION PLANKS IN PORTLAND COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

(Portland Tribune) The Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission agreed Tuesday night to start adding a series of provisions in the city’s comprehensive land use plan to ward off the ill effects of gentrification.
_________________________________________

EXPIRING TAX BREAK JOLTS ELECTRIC CAR SALES

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Sales of expensive electric cars are getting a jolt from the impending expiration of a sales tax incentive in Washington state. It goes away June 30.
_________________________________________

U.S. SLIPS IN WORLD WELL-BEING RANKINGS; PANAMA IS NO. 1

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) As a region, the Americas fare quite well in Gallup’s new global index of personal well-being but the U.S. fell from No. 12 to No. 23 worldwide. The top 10 includes Costa Rica, Belize, and Mexico.
_________________________________________

GENETICALLY MODIFIED SALMON: COMING TO A RIVER NEAR YOU?

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) While the debate over whether to label foods containing GMO ingredients plays out across the country, another engineered food has long been waiting to hit grocery stores: genetically modified salmon.
_________________________________________

ANTI-DISPLACEMENT COALITION ARGUES FOR CITY CHANGES

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) An ad hoc coalition of more than 20 community organizations has been meeting with Portland’s Planning and Sustainability Commission to advocate for policies discouraging displacement in gentrifying neighborhoods.
_________________________________________

PUBLIC INPUT TO END ON TIMBER SALE NEAR OREGON GULCH FIRE

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The public comment period for the New Hayden Fox vegetation treatment project in southern Oregon ends Friday. The Bureau of Land Management field office in Klamath Falls is proposing commercial timber thinning, brush mowing and reducing overall fire hazards.
_________________________________________

PORTLAND POLICE BUREAU PROPOSES CHANGES TO AID PROGRAM FOR HOMELESS DRUG USERS

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) In 2011, an African-American man named Fletcher Nash walked up to Portland Police officer Stacey Dunn to ask for help. Years later, both of them can still recall the moment.
_________________________________________

WARM TEMPERATURES A BOON FOR STINK BUGS

(Capital Press) -Marmorated stink bugs pose threat to vineyards and orchards in the Northwest.-

On a hot June day, Joe Beaudoin ducked into the shade of his orchard to check for peaches with shallow dimples the telltale signs left by the brown marmorated stink bug.

_________________________________________

WASH. ECOLOGY PROPOSES RULES FOR IRRIGATING WITH RECLAIMED WATER

(Capital Press) The Washington Department of Ecology has proposed rules for irrigating with water that’s not quite up to drinking standards.

The rules also cover urban uses, such as watering golf courses or highway medians, for reclaimed water wastewater that’s been treated to remove most impurities, but doesn’t qualify as potable water.

_________________________________________

PROPOSED LAW WOULD IMPROVE FOREST MANAGEMENT — GUEST OPINION

(Capital Press) -HR 2647 would give the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management policy and legal tools to make federal forests less vulnerable to catastrophic wildfire, insects and disease.-

As wildfire season kicks off to an early start, Congress has an important opportunity this year to improve the management of federal forests.

_________________________________________

SOME WORRY AS MORE PRODUCTION MOVES OUTSIDE U.S.

(Daily Astorian) -Labor shortages and costs, regulatory burden, the Endangered Species Act, drought and desire for year-round produce are pushing U.S. agricultural production to other countries. Some worry it’s a food security risk.-

Ten years ago, Steve Scaroni looked south seven miles from his farm near El Centro, Calif., to Mexico and thought why not farm there since its so hard getting legal workers here.
_________________________________________

GOING TO EXTREMES TO GET VACCINATED

(Bend Bulletin) While half of University of Oregon undergraduates skipped the recommended vaccination against the deadly type B meningococcal disease, one Oregon father drove his son to Canada to get the vaccination last fall before he began attending Oregon State University.
_________________________________________

WHY WE STILL NEED PUBLIC LIBRARIES — GUEST OPINION

(The World) Younger Americans can hardly imagine a time when you had to visit a library to research the population of Phoenix in 1980. Google now does that in seconds.
_________________________________________

SOME STATES ARE DROWNING IN RED INK — GUEST OPINION

(The World) As Congress grapples with passing various appropriation bills before the end of the federal fiscal year in September, in most states of our Union, the fiscal year ends at the end of this month. There is reason to fret: In half of those states, a budget has yet to be passed.
_________________________________________

KNIGHT CANCER CHALLENGE NO BIOTECH DREAM

(Oregon Business) ‘The Knight challenge is an important instance of philanthropy. But we should not assume it will magically transform OHSU into a business- and job-spinning engine for the local economy.’
_________________________________________

AIMING TO INCREASE AFFORDABLE HOUSING, DAN SALTZMAN PROPOSES STREAMLINING INCENTIVES– BLOG

(Willamette Week) -City commissioner proposes changes to Portland’s “density bonus.”-

If you soon hear about the city awarding density bonuses, don’t get your hopes up that you’re getting a cash handout for putting up with an increasingly crowded city.
_________________________________________

RIDING ALONG WITH A WEED DEALER TO VANCOUVER’S MARIJUANA MAIN STREET

(Portland Monthly) -Peering into Oregon’s hazy, post-legalization future.-

Its noon on a Tuesday, but Vancouver’s Main Street Marijuana is thronged with shoppers.

My companion and I peer down into a glass display case that looks reclaimed from an old department store. Corie D, a 28-year-old with short, sandy hair who has sold marijuana in Portland for the past 10 years, is making his first trip to a legal weed store. So far hes not impressed.
_________________________________________

FARMERS STRESSED ABOUT STINK BUGS

(The Columbian) -Vancouver’s Joe Beaudoin among state’s farmers fighting invasive insects that damage valuable crops-

On a hot June day, Joe Beaudoin ducked into the shade of his orchard to check for peaches with shallow dimples the telltale signs left by the brown marmorated stink bug.
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SUPREME COURT REJECTS CHALLENGE TO OBAMAS HEALTH LAW

(Boston Globe) The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide tax subsidies underpinning President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, rejecting a major challenge to the landmark law in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans.
_________________________________________

OUT-OF-POCKET COSTS PUT HEALTH CARE OUT OF REACH — OPINION

(Boston Globe) Soon after a recent minor surgery, I began suffering from a painful complication it hurt to open the mail. Within weeks, I had accumulated a stack of envelopes related to the operation. Not a get well card in the bunch. Only demands for money. Now that Id been stitched up, it was time to pay up.
_________________________________________

NO, OBAMACARE IS NOT REDUCING EMPLOYEES’ HOURS

(CNN) -Looks like one of the major criticisms of Obamacare has not come to pass.-

Employers have not been cutting workers’ hours to escape having to provide them with health insurance, a new ADP Research Institute report has found.
_________________________________________

WHAT WOULD THE PROPOSED CALIFORNIA VACCINE LAW DO?

(Los Angeles Times) The California Assembly has passed a bill that would create one of the toughest mandatory vaccination laws in the nation and would require more children to be vaccinated as a condition of school enrollment.

_________________________________________

TECH PROBLEMS MAY CRIMP LAUNCH OF STATE’S NEW PRESCRIPTION DRUG DATABASE

(Los Angeles Times) As the state prepares to unveil an enhanced prescription drug database next week, some health providers say it will be incompatible with their computer systems, hobbling their access to a tool meant to combat drug abuse.

The database, called the Controlled Substances Utilization Review and Evaluation System, or CURES, tracks prescriptions for certain narcotics.
_________________________________________

EPA REPORT CITES BENEFITS OF LIMITING EMISSIONS, CLIMATE CHANGE

(Los Angeles Times) Reducing the greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change could prevent tens of thousands of deaths and hundreds of billions in economic losses in the United States, according to a new study by the Environmental Protection Agency.
_________________________________________

CREATORS FRUSTRATED WITH COPYRIGHT OFFICE’S OUTDATED TECHNOLOGY, PROCEDURES

(Los Angeles Times) Aviva Kempner just wanted to buy a song.

To find out who owned the song so she could buy the rights to use it, Kempner turned to the Copyright Office, an obscure, century-old federal bureau. It’s responsible for the legal underpinnings of the copyright industry, which includes those seeking to protect content as diverse as Hollywood movies and individual nature photographs.
_________________________________________

CDC – MORE THAN 1 IN 8 AMERICANS INFECTED WITH HIV DON’T KNOW IT

(Los Angeles Times) More than 1.2 million Americans are living with HIV including about 156,300 who don’t realize it, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention..

That means 13% of those who are infected with the virus that causes AIDS aren’t in a position to protect their health, or the health of others.

_________________________________________

MOST USES OF MEDICAL MARIJUANA WOULDN’T PASS FDA REVIEW, STUDY FINDS

(Los Angeles Times) If medical marijuana were a regular drug, it would need the blessing of the Food and Drug Administration before it could be prescribed to patients. And in most cases, those patients would be out of luck.

A comprehensive review of dozens of clinical trials that have tested medical marijuana for 10 conditions finds that there’s very little reliable evidence to support the drugs use
_________________________________________

THE CASE AGAINST COLORADO’S POT LAW — GUEST OPINION

(Los Angeles Times) As surely as presidential candidates promise to change Washington, nominees for attorney general pledge to uphold the law, not personal policy preferences. Loretta Lynch, now the 83rd attorney general of the United States, was no different when she made her case to Congress in January.
_________________________________________

IMMIGRATION REFORM: ‘THE CALIFORNIA PACKAGE’ — GUEST OPINION

(Los Angeles Times) While the federal government stalls on immigration reform, some states have begun acting on their own. Much attention in the last decade has focused on Republican-dominated areas that have tightened enforcement. Meanwhile, more quietly, California moved in the opposite direction, encouraging integration rather than deportation..
_________________________________________

MEASLES CARRIES RISK OF A TERRIFYING, ALWAYS-FATAL AND RARE COMPLICATION

(Los Angeles Times) Measles is commonly thought to be a one-time deal: Get it once, survive, and you’re immune for life..

But like a Trojan horse, the virus can find a way to hide from a babys undeveloped immune system. The baby will survive, but within his or her body, a weakened form of the measles lurks, beginning to infect the brain.

_________________________________________

SCIENCE INCHES CLOSER TO ‘HOME BREW’ HEROIN

(Los Angeles Times) About a month ago, researchers and policymakers started fretting about a nightmare scenario for drug enforcement: the possibility that the impending invention of morphine-producing yeast could make it easy for many people to start manufacturing highly addictive opiates..
_________________________________________

THE CHALLENGES POSED BY AN AGING GLOBAL POPULATION

(National Public Radio) One-fifth of the U.S. population will be 65 or older in 15 years. NPR’s Ina Jaffe talks with NPR’s Scott Simon about the aging of the population worldwide and the challenges it presents.
_________________________________________

AT HOME, MANY SENIORS ARE IMPRISONED BY THEIR INDEPENDENCE

(New York Times) What she mourns most, says Solange DeLaPaz, are the mundane pleasures and rituals of her once-active life. A weekly manicure at the corner nail salon. Saturday excursions to Macy’s shoe department.

I miss going to Sunday brunch on Second Avenue with my friends, she said. I miss going to church.

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JUSTICES BACK BROAD INTERPRETATION OF HOUSING LAW

(New York Times) The Supreme Court on Thursday endorsed a broad interpretation of the Fair Housing Act of 1968, allowing suits under a legal theory that civil rights groups say is a crucial tool to fight housing discrimination.
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WORLDS AQUIFERS LOSING REPLENISHMENT RACE, RESEARCHERS SAY

(New York Times) From the Arabian Peninsula to northern India to California’s Central Valley, nearly a third of the worlds 37 largest aquifers are being drained faster than they are being replenished, according to a recent study led by scientists at the University of California, Irvine.
_________________________________________

SUPREME COURT ALLOWS NATIONWIDE HEALTH CARE SUBSIDIES

(New York Times) The Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that President Obama’s health care law allows the federal government to provide nationwide tax subsidies to help poor and middle-class people buy health insurance, a sweeping vindication that endorsed the larger purpose of Mr. Obama’s signature legislative achievement.
_________________________________________

TURNING THE GRANTING OF BAIL INTO A SCIENCE

(New York Times) Setting bail is a difficult task for judges. They must try to foretell whether the defendant is likely to commit another crime, hurt someone or skip out on the next court date.

Now comes help in a distinctly modern form: an algorithm.

_________________________________________

CALIFORNIA SET TO MANDATE CHILDHOOD VACCINES AMID INTENSE FIGHT

(New York Times) Schoolchildren in California would be required to be vaccinated unless there is a medical reason not to do so under a sweeping bill approved by the State Assembly on Thursday. The measure would end exemptions for personal or religious reasons, routinely requested by parents opposed to vaccines.
_________________________________________

WHO’S SPEAKING UP FOR THE AMERICAN WORKER? — OPINION

(New York Times)A woman came up to the book-signing table at an event at my local library Monday night. She did not have a copy of the newly released paperback of Factory Man, my book about what happened when 300,000 American furniture-making jobs were offshored to Asia.
_________________________________________

PURSUIT OF CASH TAINTS PROMISE OF GENE TESTS

(New York Times) Dr. Scott Wilson often participated in medical studies, so the one being proposed by the New Orleans laboratory Renaissance RX seemed reasonable.

An assistant would swab inside the cheeks of qualified patients and send the samples off to the company, which was doing research in the fast-growing arena of personalized genetic medicine.

_________________________________________

LEGITIMATE MEDICAL-MARIJUANA USE SHOULD NOT GET YOU FIRED — OPINION

(Seattle Times) -Medical marijuana is legal in most of the country, but it can still get you fired.-

Nearly two-thirds of Americans now live in a state that allows medical marijuana in some form. Just this year, five Southern states, including Texas, allowed limited access to therapies based on cannabis. The revolt against the blanket federal marijuana prohibition has now spread to at least 29 states.
_________________________________________

STUDY: WEATHER PATTERNS THAT BRING HEATWAVES HAPPENING MORE

(Seattle Times) Daily weather patterns have changed in recent decades, making eastern North America, Europe and western Asia more prone to nastier summer heatwaves that go beyond global warming, a new study finds.

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MAPS: THE STATE OF BROADBAND IN THE STATES– BLOG

(Washington Post) Does it feel like Web sites are loading a little faster? If so, it might be because broadband capacity grew across the country in the first quarter of this year.

Internet connections were strongest in Delaware, which posted an average peak of 85.6 megabits per second, according to the latest State of the Internet report from Akamai Technologies, which delivers a sizable share of all Web traffic for clients such as Yahoo, IBM and several federal agencies and departments.
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FORGET ALMONDS: LOOK AT HOW MUCH WATER CALIFORNIA’S POT GROWERS USE– BLOG

(Washington Post) One of the arguments against the liberalization of marijuana laws appeals to our environmental sensibilities: many illegal grow operations happen on public land, outside the regulatory purview of the Environmental Protection Agency, and they can have devastating consequences for the surrounding landscape.
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WHERE AMERICAS WORST ROADS ARE AND HOW MUCH THEYRE COSTING US– BLOG

(Washington Post) The shoddy state of the nation’s roads cost the average driver $515 in extra operation and maintenance costs on their car, according to the latest analysis from TRIP, a national transportation research group. Meanwhile, the Highway Trust Fund is about to become insolvent, and congressional lawmakers can’t agree on a temporary fix that experts say is nothing more than a band-aid, and an inadequate one at that.
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MILLENNIALS ARE ACTUALLY MORE GENEROUS THAN ANYBODY REALIZES– BLOG

(Washington Post) We know that millennials are different. They’re not working the same way as their parents. They aren’t marrying in the same way. And they aren’t motivated by work to give to charity or volunteer.

But that doesn’t mean they’re more selfish than their parents, according to a new report.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on June 26, 2015 eClips Supplemental Edition

June 26, 2015 eClips

  • Will legal marijuana in Oregon set off surge in robberies? Police wait to see
  • How the Legislature’s $343.5 million transportation deal fell apart
  • Health advisory issued for algae bloom in Jefferson County lake
  • Monarchs reappear in Portland, reinforce need for milkweed
  • Marijuana sales, taxes and key dates: Latest developments in the Legislature
  • ‘Banning the box’ doesn’t go far enough — Guest Opinion
  • Killing the hidden gas tax will now be up to voters — Opinion
  • Kate Brown, Senate Democrats abandon $343.5 million transportation funding deal
  • Marijuana sales tax approved — with some nervousness — in Oregon House
  • Early marijuana sales program approved by key Oregon legislative committee
  • The graying of Oregon: New Census numbers show state aging faster than the nation
  • Do your neighbors believe in global warming? New map has answer
  • Southern Oregon gets two new State Scenic Bikeways
  • As warm Willamette River water kills fish, dogs at risk too
  • Portland unlikely to stand in the way of early marijuana sales, official says
  • Denial, optimism or political cover? Portland still looking to Leg for road money
  • Wyden, Merkley introduce new Oregon wilderness bill
  • Oregon transportation package dead
  • Hatcheries releasing fish early because of drought
  • Wolves kill five domestic animals in two attacks
  • Hillcrest, MacLaren students earn high school diplomas
  • Oregon leaders acknowledge transportation funding/carbon emissions package is dead
  • State approves sale of Trillium Community Health Plan to Centene Corp.
  • Recreational marijuana bill passes key Oregon legislative committee
  • Standards and scores show us where we stand — Guest Opinion
  • Court saves Obamacare — Opinion
  • Oregon must embrace its growing diversity — Guest Opinion
  • Transportation funding plan hits a dead end
  • Undocumented student grant measure clears Senate
  • Two struggling Portland schools receive millions in federal grant dollars
  • WL-WV recognizes bilingual graduates
  • U.S. Supreme Court Upholds The ACA Again
  • Summer Meal Programs Struggle To Meet Demand
  • OHSU Achieves $500 Million Goal For Cancer Research, Phil Knight To Match
  • Pressed For Time, Senate Abandons Transportation Package
  • 5 Things To Know About The Push To Repeal Oregon’s Clean Fuels Bill
  • Summer Meal Programs Struggle To Meet Demand
  • Oregon Health Policy Experts Breathe Sigh Of Relief After Court Decision
  • Pressed For Time, Senate Abandons Transportation Package
  • Hydropower challenge could impact irrigators
  • Bill would allow dispensaries to sell recreational pot
  • Exercise extra care with fireworks — Opinion
  • Warm weather means more pests for some fruit farmers
  • Health advisory issued for Lake Billy Chinook
  • Find the answers on marijuana edibles — Opinion
  • Where is the evidence of pro-canola bias? — Opinion
  • Oregon transportation deal hits dead-end
  • Whooping cough reported in county
  • State mileage tax is an idea worth pursuing — Opinion
  • Oregon Legislature passes birth control access bill
  • Just in time: House advances pot implementation bill
  • Oregon Personal Income, 2015q1– Blog
  • Labor Force Participation and Unemployment by Race and Ethnicity in 2014– Blog
  • Watch the Testimony that Doomed Gov. Kate Brown’s Transportation Package– Blog
  • Gov. Kate Brown Pulls Plug On Attempt to Replace Low Carbon Fuel Standard with Transportation Package– Blog
  • Oregon Legislature’s Joint Committee Approves Weed Sales to All Adults Starting Oct. 1– Blog
  • Oregon Senate OKs bill giving aid to students here illegally
  • Josephine County Judge Rules that Marijuana is Not Legal
  • Legal marijuana raises questions for Oregon employers
  • Nestl bottling plant plan: Jobs vs Environment
  • High fire danger brings extra resources to High Desert
  • Dogs in hot cars can be deadly – but not always illegal
  • Effort aims to limit Oregonians’ tax-free shopping
  • Dirty Medicine

____________________

WILL LEGAL MARIJUANA IN OREGON SET OFF SURGE IN ROBBERIES? POLICE WAIT TO SEE

(Portland Oregonian) A word of advice to Oregonians who plan to grow marijuana in their backyards: Don’t brag about your new venture on Twitter or proudly post photos of your budding crop on Facebook.
_________________________________________

HOW THE LEGISLATURE’S $343.5 MILLION TRANSPORTATION DEAL FELL APART

(Portland Oregonian)  The death blow for Gov. Kate Brown’s best chance at a transportation package fell without warning.
_________________________________________

HEALTH ADVISORY ISSUED FOR ALGAE BLOOM IN JEFFERSON COUNTY LAKE

(Portland Oregonian) The Oregon Health Authority issued a health advisory Thursday for Lake Billy Chinook Reservoir in Jefferson County.

The reservoir is located 26 miles southwest of Madras.
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MONARCHS REAPPEAR IN PORTLAND, REINFORCE NEED FOR MILKWEED

(Portland Oregonian) Experts say Portlanders shouldn’t bother planting milkweed the monarch butterflies won’t come. But one woman found 30 eggs on her two plants this month, and she’s urging others: “If you plant it, they will come.”
_________________________________________

MARIJUANA SALES, TAXES AND KEY DATES: LATEST DEVELOPMENTS IN THE LEGISLATURE

(Portland Oregonian) Three marijuana-related bills advanced in the Oregon Legislature this week, bringing possible regulations into better focus. Here are the key things you need to know and where to find more coverage.
_________________________________________

‘BANNING THE BOX’ DOESN’T GO FAR ENOUGH — GUEST OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) Recently, the Oregon Senate approved the “ban the box” House Bill 3025. It’s unfortunate that the law will ultimately not accomplish that much in getting ex-offenders hired because “banning the box” the popular movement to prevent companies from asking on a job application whether you’ve ever been convicted of a crime doesn’t go far enough.
_________________________________________

KILLING THE HIDDEN GAS TAX WILL NOW BE UP TO VOTERS — OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) The small group of lawmakers who tried to rescue their colleagues and Gov. Kate Brown from the low-carbon fuel standard debacle deserves a great deal of credit.
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KATE BROWN, SENATE DEMOCRATS ABANDON $343.5 MILLION TRANSPORTATION FUNDING DEAL

(Portland Oregonian) Democratic leaders said Thursday that they are abandoning a $343.5 million transportation package to pay for road fixes and public transit upgrades, ending a bitter standoff between House and Senate Democrats.
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MARIJUANA SALES TAX APPROVED — WITH SOME NERVOUSNESS — IN OREGON HOUSE

(Portland Oregonian) The idea of a sales tax has long been regarded as the third rail of Oregon politics.

But the state House on Thursday approved a sales tax for the state’s soon-to-be-legal product of recreational marijuana on a 44-14 vote.
_________________________________________

EARLY MARIJUANA SALES PROGRAM APPROVED BY KEY OREGON LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE

(Portland Oregonian) A key legislative committee on Thursday approved a bill to create a program allowing temporary marijuana sales starting Oct. 1 to adult recreational consumers at existing medical marijuana dispensaries around Oregon.
_________________________________________

THE GRAYING OF OREGON: NEW CENSUS NUMBERS SHOW STATE AGING FASTER THAN THE NATION

(Portland Oregonian) The retirement-age boom is well underway in Oregon.

Oregon’s 65-and-older population grew by 18 percent between July 2010 and July 2014, according to newly released population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. That outpaces the country as a whole, which saw its senior population grow by 14.2 percent in the same time period.
_________________________________________

DO YOUR NEIGHBORS BELIEVE IN GLOBAL WARMING? NEW MAP HAS ANSWER

(Portland Oregonian) To Portland and Multnomah County’s government leaders, climate change poses an immediate threat the environment, the economy, and public health.
_________________________________________

SOUTHERN OREGON GETS TWO NEW STATE SCENIC BIKEWAYS

(Portland Oregonian) Cyclists have two new State Scenic Bikeways with this week’s approval of two more in southern Oregon by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission.

_________________________________________

AS WARM WILLAMETTE RIVER WATER KILLS FISH, DOGS AT RISK TOO

(Portland Oregonian) As hot weather and low streamflows continue to kill fish in the Willamette River watershed, aquatic lives aren’t the only ones at risk.

Dogs are also in danger.
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PORTLAND UNLIKELY TO STAND IN THE WAY OF EARLY MARIJUANA SALES, OFFICIAL SAYS

(Portland Oregonian) If state lawmakers pass a bill allowing medical marijuana dispensaries to sell recreational pot starting Oct. 1, Portland is unlikely to stand in the way.

_________________________________________

DENIAL, OPTIMISM OR POLITICAL COVER? PORTLAND STILL LOOKING TO LEG FOR ROAD MONEY

(Portland Oregonian) Now what, Portland?

The city’s street-fee controversy returned to center stage Thursday as Gov. Kate Brown and lawmakers conceded there will not be a transportation-funding solution before the Oregon Legislature adjourns this summer.
_________________________________________

WYDEN, MERKLEY INTRODUCE NEW OREGON WILDERNESS BILL

(Salem Statesman Journal) Oregon senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley introduced a bill today that would provide new environmental protections for 200,000 acres of land and 250 miles of river in the Beaver State.
_________________________________________

OREGON TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE DEAD

(Salem Statesman Journal) A controversial $343.5 million transportation funding package is dead, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced Thursday morning.
_________________________________________

HATCHERIES RELEASING FISH EARLY BECAUSE OF DROUGHT

(Salem Statesman Journal) State hatcheries in northwest Oregon are releasing fish ahead of schedule because of the drought.

The first week of June, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s North Nehalem Hatchery released 1,550 rainbow trout averaging about 1 pound apiece that had been on the stocking schedule for release in September at about 2 pounds a fish.
_________________________________________

WOLVES KILL FIVE DOMESTIC ANIMALS IN TWO ATTACKS

(Salem Statesman Journal) In a pair of attacks last week, wolves killed three sheep, one dog and one calf in eastern Oregon, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife confirmed Wednesday.

The attacks were the first confirmed by ODFW since last September.
_________________________________________

HILLCREST, MACLAREN STUDENTS EARN HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMAS

(Salem Statesman Journal) The students at Hillcrest Youth Correctional Facility were dressed in traditional caps and gowns, but the graduation ceremony for Robert S. Farrell High School was far from traditional.
_________________________________________

OREGON LEADERS ACKNOWLEDGE TRANSPORTATION FUNDING/CARBON EMISSIONS PACKAGE IS DEAD

(Eugene Register-Guard) -Governor now says carbon-emissions cuts need to be dealt with separately from transportation funding-

Gov. Kate Brown and Senate President Peter Courtney decisively pulled the plug on a mammoth, last-minute package of transportation funding and carbon emission reduction policies on Thursday, less than 48 hours after its full details were publicly unveiled.

_________________________________________

STATE APPROVES SALE OF TRILLIUM COMMUNITY HEALTH PLAN TO CENTENE CORP.

(Eugene Register-Guard) The state Insurance Division has approved the sale of the private local company that manages Medicaid services in Lane County to an out-of-state Fortune 500 company.
_________________________________________

RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA BILL PASSES KEY OREGON LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE

(Eugene Register-Guard) Oregonians over the age of 21 would be allowed to purchase recreational marijuana at existing medical marijuana dispensaries starting Oct. 1, under a bill approved Thursday by a key legislative committee.
_________________________________________

STANDARDS AND SCORES SHOW US WHERE WE STAND — GUEST OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) We’ve traded the curve for the cliff, in grading tests and much else. The short-term effect has to do with how were taught, but the long-term difference is about how and what we learn.
_________________________________________

COURT SAVES OBAMACARE — OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) -In a 6-3 ruling, justices uphold nationwide subsidies-

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling Thursday upholding subsidies that help millions of poor and middle-class Americans buy health insurance was a huge victory for President Obama, whose expansion of access to health care remains the signature accomplishment of his presidency.
_________________________________________

OREGON MUST EMBRACE ITS GROWING DIVERSITY — GUEST OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) Several weeks ago, after having a wonderful time at the Eugene Scottish Festival, my family and I passed a van with large, professionally printed signs stating: Diversity Equals White Genocide. My wife and I were absolutely dumbfounded.
_________________________________________

TRANSPORTATION FUNDING PLAN HITS A DEAD END

(Portland Tribune) -Lawmakers can’t overcome differences on gas tax, carbon standards-

One day after it surfaced, Oregon lawmakers gave up Thursday on a transportation funding plan linked with alternatives to recently approved standard for low-carbon fuels.
_________________________________________

UNDOCUMENTED STUDENT GRANT MEASURE CLEARS SENATE

(Portland Tribune) State grants could go to college students who were brought to the United States as children but lack immigration papers under a bill that cleared the Oregon Senate on Thursday.

The 17-11 vote, largely along party lines, moved Senate Bill 932 to the House.
_________________________________________

TWO STRUGGLING PORTLAND SCHOOLS RECEIVE MILLIONS IN FEDERAL GRANT DOLLARS

(Portland Tribune) -The schools will undergo an overhaul, including new principals-

Three elementary schools have picked up $5.1 million in federal School Improvement Grants, the Oregon Department of Education announced Thursday.
_________________________________________

WL-WV RECOGNIZES BILINGUAL GRADUATES

(Portland Tribune) -School district participates in pilot program from ODE, recognizes 7 members of class of 2015 with bilingual seal-

The West Linn-Wilsonville School District has helped Oregon Department of Education join a growing list of states offering a seal of biliteracy to high school graduates.
_________________________________________

U.S. SUPREME COURT UPHOLDS THE ACA AGAIN

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The U.S. Supreme Court released its ruling on insurance subsidies in the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.
_________________________________________

SUMMER MEAL PROGRAMS STRUGGLE TO MEET DEMAND

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) There may be more Oregon parks and schoolyards serving free lunches than ever this summer but the summer meal program is still struggling to keep up with demand.
_________________________________________

OHSU ACHIEVES $500 MILLION GOAL FOR CANCER RESEARCH, PHIL KNIGHT TO MATCH

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Oregon Health & Science University has reached its $500 million fundraising goal for the schools cancer research campaign.

Nike co-founder Phil Knight and his wife, Penny, pledged in September 2013 to match the raised funds for a total of $1 billion for the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute.
_________________________________________

PRESSED FOR TIME, SENATE ABANDONS TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The $343.5 transportation funding package to cover road and transportation updates has been abandoned by Oregon Senate leaders due to the looming end of session deadline.
_________________________________________

5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE PUSH TO REPEAL OREGON’S CLEAN FUELS BILL

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) -Update: Gov. Kate Brown on Thursday called for the repeal of Oregon’s clean fuels law and the passage of a transportation package to be considered separately. See below.-

Oregon lawmakers are considering a $343.5 million transportation package that would raise the gas tax and pay for a lot of highway and transit projects. It would also repeal the clean fuels requirement signed into law this year.
_________________________________________

SUMMER MEAL PROGRAMS STRUGGLE TO MEET DEMAND

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) There may be more Oregon parks and schoolyards serving free lunches than ever this summer but the summer meal program is still struggling to keep up with demand.
_________________________________________

OREGON HEALTH POLICY EXPERTS BREATHE SIGH OF RELIEF AFTER COURT DECISION

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Many health policy experts in Oregon are relieved Thursday, as the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld key aspects of the Affordable Care Act.

Sen. Alan Bates, D-Medford, said the court ruling was a huge sigh of relief.
_________________________________________

PRESSED FOR TIME, SENATE ABANDONS TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The $343.5 transportation funding package to cover road and transportation updates has been abandoned by Oregon Senate leaders due to the looming end of session deadline.
_________________________________________

HYDROPOWER CHALLENGE COULD IMPACT IRRIGATORS

(Capital Press) -Irrigators could be affected by the latest legal challenge against the Northwest’s hydropower system.-

The federal governments operation of Northwest hydropower dams is again under attack for allegedly jeopardizing fish, potentially impacting irrigators who rely on the Columbia and Snake rivers.

_________________________________________

BILL WOULD ALLOW DISPENSARIES TO SELL RECREATIONAL POT

(East Oregonian) -A bill under considerations would allow medical marijuana dispensaries to sell pot to recreational users until retail outlets are licensed next year.-

All adults in Oregon could purchase limited amounts of pot from medical marijuana dispensaries starting Oct. 1, under a bill on its way to the state Senate.

The marijuana industry pushed for lawmakers to allow earlier dispensary sales, since Oregonians age 21 and older can legally possess recreational marijuana starting on Wednesday.

_________________________________________

EXERCISE EXTRA CARE WITH FIREWORKS — OPINION

(Albany Democrat Herald) Fireworks stands around Oregon are open again for business as we approach the Independence Day holiday.

We understand that not everyone is a big fan of fireworks, but in years past, weve thought of them as reasonably harmless fun, presuming that you treated them with due respect for safety and weren’t dipping into your households food budget to treat the neighborhood to a Fourth of July spectacle

_________________________________________

WARM WEATHER MEANS MORE PESTS FOR SOME FRUIT FARMERS

(Bend Bulletin) Small plastic cups dot the perimeter of Norris Farms expansive blueberry fields. They are homemade traps, hanging from barbed wire in order to catch winged pests with a concoction made of equal parts apple cider vinegar and white wine.

The main target: the spotted wing drosophila or SWD a vinegar fly that infests valuable fruit crops. SWD are a relatively new pest to the area, having arrived in the region about six years ago.
_________________________________________

HEALTH ADVISORY ISSUED FOR LAKE BILLY CHINOOK

(Bend Bulletin) -Officials issue warning because of blue-green algae-

The Oregon Health Authority issued a health advisory Thursday, warning against coming in contact with water from Lake Billy Chinook in Jefferson County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of blue-green algae and the toxins they produce at concentrations potentially harmful to humans and animals.

_________________________________________

FIND THE ANSWERS ON MARIJUANA EDIBLES — OPINION

(Bend Bulletin) Among the thorny issues surrounding Oregon’s vote to legalize marijuana is what to do about so-called edibles, products like candies and cookies that include the drug. Writing rules for them is far more complex than for the smokable products.

With that in mind, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, which is charged with regulating weed, has decided to delay sales of marijuana edibles and extracts until sometime in 2016

_________________________________________

WHERE IS THE EVIDENCE OF PRO-CANOLA BIAS? — OPINION

(Bend Bulletin) Canola makes some farmers nervous. But the Legislature should not translate that nervousness into undermining the credibility of Oregon State University’s scientific research and the state Department of Agriculture.
_________________________________________

OREGON TRANSPORTATION DEAL HITS DEAD-END

(Bend Bulletin) -Lawmakers had proposed to repeal, replace low-carbon fuel standard-

Last-ditch efforts to appease both Democrats and Republicans and find a path to the first major transportation package passed in the Oregon Legislature since 2009 was thrown by the wayside Thursday when Gov. Kate Brown announced there was no way forward.
_________________________________________

WHOOPING COUGH REPORTED IN COUNTY

(Blue Mountain Eagle) The Grant County Health Department reports there are three confirmed cases of pertussis whooping cough in the county this month.

In addition to the three cases, a number of other families with symptoms are being treated for whooping cough while awaiting test results.
_________________________________________

STATE MILEAGE TAX IS AN IDEA WORTH PURSUING — OPINION

(The World) Oregon’s highways need help. So, too, do city streets and county roads. All are funded, at least in part, by money from the state Highway Fund, and it’s taking in less than it used to.

It’s no wonder, then, that the Oregon Department of Transportation is looking for alternatives to the state fuel taxes motorists pay every time they fill their gas tanks.

_________________________________________

OREGON LEGISLATURE PASSES BIRTH CONTROL ACCESS BILL

(Oregon Business) The Oregon Senate passed a bill that will expand access to birth control for women.

HB 2879 is headed to Gov. Kate Brown, who is expected to sign the measure that allows women to get contraceptives from a pharmacist without a prescription.
_________________________________________

JUST IN TIME: HOUSE ADVANCES POT IMPLEMENTATION BILL

(Oregon Business) A week before Measure 91 goes into effect in Oregon, the state House passed a bill to implement the legal marijuana marketplace.

After months of negotiation, local jurisdictions that voted against the measure will be allowed to opt out of legalization. Counties or cities that had at least 55 percent of voters against the measure can ban sales.
_________________________________________

OREGON PERSONAL INCOME, 2015Q1– BLOG

(Oregon Office of Economic Analysis) The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis released the latest state income estimates this week, including revisions to 2014 data. Similar to our states overall economy and labor market, the data show strong growth that outpaces the nation. Again, the economy is on the upswing, during which time Oregon typically grows significantly faster than the average state.
_________________________________________

LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION AND UNEMPLOYMENT BY RACE AND ETHNICITY IN 2014– BLOG

(Oregon Workforce & Economic Information) Oregon’s unemployment rate was 7.1 percent in 2014, but the unemployment rate varies across race and ethnicity groups. The unemployment rate was 4.4 percent among Asians, 6.8 percent among Whites, and 13.6 percent among Blacks and African Americans. The unemployment rate among Hispanics and Latinos of any race was 9.6 percent.
_________________________________________

WATCH THE TESTIMONY THAT DOOMED GOV. KATE BROWN’S TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE– BLOG

(Willamette Week) Gov. Kate Browns first major initiative since taking office in February, a sweeping $344 million transportation package, blew up today after a state agency acknowledged it had miscalculated the numbers on which that initiative was built.

_________________________________________

GOV. KATE BROWN PULLS PLUG ON ATTEMPT TO REPLACE LOW CARBON FUEL STANDARD WITH TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE– BLOG

(Willamette Week) Gov. Kate Brown – State of Oregon

Gov. Kate Brown this morning put an end to negotiations with leading legislators aimed at repealing the low-carbon fuel standard, a controversial law she signed in March, and replacing it with a $343 million package of transportation improvements funded by a gas-0tax increase, higher vehicle fees and an increased transit tax.
_________________________________________

OREGON LEGISLATURE’S JOINT COMMITTEE APPROVES WEED SALES TO ALL ADULTS STARTING OCT. 1– BLOG

(Willamette Week) Recreational weed is legal next Wednesday. You can buy a quarter-ounce in October.

The Oregon Legislature’s joint committee on marijuana this morning amended a bill so that medical marijuana dispensaries can sell pot to all adults starting Oct. 1.
_________________________________________

OREGON SENATE OKS BILL GIVING AID TO STUDENTS HERE ILLEGALLY

(KATU) Some Oregon students living in the U.S. without legal permission could qualify for state financial aid under a measure advanced by the state Senate Thursday, despite criticism that the state can’t afford the additional grants.

Portland Democratic Sen. Michael Dembrow, the bill sponsor, said it creates a path to college for students who are already part of the state’s education system.
_________________________________________

JOSEPHINE COUNTY JUDGE RULES THAT MARIJUANA IS NOT LEGAL

(kdrv.com Medford) Less than a week before recreational marijuana becomes legal in Oregon, a judge said medical marijuana isn’t legal.

In the opinion released to Newswatch 12, Josephine County Circuit Court Judge Thomas Hull said federal marijuana law trumps state marijuana law.
_________________________________________

LEGAL MARIJUANA RAISES QUESTIONS FOR OREGON EMPLOYERS

(KGW) It’s about to become legal to smoke pot in Oregon, but be warned: Firing up can still get you fired.
_________________________________________

NESTLE BOTTLING PLANT PLAN: JOBS VS ENVIRONMENT

(KOIN) -Nestle wants to open a water bottling plant in the Gorge-

For years the Nestle Corporation has sought to build a water bottling facility on a 25-acre piece of industrial land at the Port of Cascade Locks. It involves a water exchange proposal where the city wells would replace water Nestle removes from a natural spring here.
_________________________________________

HIGH FIRE DANGER BRINGS EXTRA RESOURCES TO HIGH DESERT

(KTVZ Bend) -More equipment on the way; crews on high alert-

Heat, wind and chances of thunderstorms this weekend are prompting area fire officials to call extra resources into Central Oregon.
_________________________________________

DOGS IN HOT CARS CAN BE DEADLY – BUT NOT ALWAYS ILLEGAL

(KTVZ Bend) -Police say it happens to much; they have new power to intervene-

With temperatures soaring toward he triple digits, leaving your dog in a car can be deadly — but according to Oregon law, it’s not necessarily illegal.
_________________________________________

EFFORT AIMS TO LIMIT OREGONIANS’ TAX-FREE SHOPPING

(The Columbian) -Out-of-state shoppers would have to pay sales tax-

An effort underway in Olympia would limit the ability of Oregonians to shop tax-free in Washington.

The plan would require out-of-state residents to pay the sales tax at the register, but they could apply for a refund later if the amount spent exceeds $25.
_________________________________________

DIRTY MEDICINE

(Eugene Weekly) -Butane hash oil, illegal pesticides, unregulated labs and a looming public health threat-

Five years ago a friend handed Will Thysell a piece of shatter. The glossy golden marijuana extract immediately intrigued him.

I just had never seen anything like it, Thysell says. The look, the taste, the feel, was completely new. He tried the potent extract and knew it could help a loved one in chronic pain.
_________________________________________

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on June 26, 2015 eClips

June 25, 2015 eClips

  • Bill targeting chemicals in kids products moves to Senate floor
  • Questions linger after first Senate hearing on transportation package
  • Oregon marijuana regulation bill easily clears House and heads for Senate
  • Impasse over taxes adds to Oregon lawmakers’ late-session scramble
  • Gov. Brown says the right things, but makes the wrong call in signing opt-out bill — Opinion
  • Birth control access: Pharmacy prescriptions, after Senate vote, just shy of Kate Brown’s desk
  • On ‘clean fuels’ program, some Democrats lose commitment to transparency — Opinion
  • Vista House, Rooster Rock to host Song Circles
  • Wednesday’s ‘fast track’ trade vote is far from the end of this issue for Oregon’s Ron Wyden
  • Joseph Rose: What to do about the Oregon City Arch Bridge eating car tires? – Video
  • Special enforcement this weekend on boating while intoxicated
  • Legislative deal raises $200 million for transportation, repeals clean-fuels law
  • Tribes demand their water rights
  • Oregon Senate panel to hear from public about transportation
  • Oregon recruit makes National Guard history
  • Oregon health reform efforts improve
  • Dangerous root ball removed from Willamette River after two deaths
  • New transportation funding proposal in Legislature finding many bumps in the road
  • A cop out on opt out — Opinion
  • Sales tax could yield more revenue, cheaper pot
  • Sources Say: Calling for Hoyle to resign, Wehby talks, but few listen
  • Oregon paved the way in support of gay marriage
  • Wyden’s fast-track bill headed to President Obama
  • With a week to go, state pot rules near finish line
  • Senate committee wrangles possible transportation funding deal
  • Washington, Oregon Set To Harvest Record Blueberry Crops
  • Oregon Hopes To Sidestep US Supreme Court Health Care Decision
  • Fire Officials ‘Ramping Up’ Resources For Hot Weekend
  • Wolf-livestock management hinges on investigations
  • House stands in the way of transportation deal — Opinion
  • Oregon employment possibly at high-water mark
  • Oregon Legislature uses session to expand birth control access
  • Environmental groups air concerns over fuel program
  • Compromise on transportation is a better deal — Opinion
  • Gov. Brown fails the test — Opinion
  • New fishing regs proposed for Williamson
  • Butterfly known to Crater Lake region is denied protection
  • OSU scientists study stink bugs to save wine crops
  • What’s the richest town with fewer than 25,000 residents in Oregon?
  • Senate leaders agree on $343.5M transport deal
  • 10 things you need to know about Oregon’s paid sick leave law– Blog
  • Transgender & Oregon workplace laws– Blog
  • Health Insurance Covers Telehealth Services
  • New fishing regulation in Douglas County
  • Oregon Lawmakers Give Public First Look At Transportation Package
  • Should Oregonians pay sales tax in Washington?
  • Senate transportation panel to hear from public
  • Severe pollen count expected for Willamette Valley
  • C. Oregon, state officials warn of rising wildfire danger

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BILL TARGETING CHEMICALS IN KIDS PRODUCTS MOVES TO SENATE FLOOR

(Portland Oregonian) An Oregon bill aimed at keeping chemicals out of children’s products got a stamp of approval from a key legislative committee Wednesday. It now heads to the Senate floor.
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QUESTIONS LINGER AFTER FIRST SENATE HEARING ON TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE

(Portland Oregonian) Hours after Senate leaders unveiled a $343.5 million plan to pay for transportation improvements statewide, lawmakers, lobbyists and others met for the first time Wednesday to try to make sense of it all.
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OREGON MARIJUANA REGULATION BILL EASILY CLEARS HOUSE AND HEADS FOR SENATE

(Portland Oregonian) A sweeping bill that sets up the framework for Oregon’s upcoming legal marijuana market was handily passed by the state House on a 52-4 vote Wednesday.
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IMPASSE OVER TAXES ADDS TO OREGON LAWMAKERS’ LATE-SESSION SCRAMBLE

(Portland Oregonian) The fate of millions of dollars in tax breaks for working parents, low-income families and people with disabilities is suddenly up in the air, all because of a political impasse that may not be resolved in the Oregon Legislature’s waning days.
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GOV. BROWN SAYS THE RIGHT THINGS, BUT MAKES THE WRONG CALL IN SIGNING OPT-OUT BILL — OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) Gov. Kate Brown hit all the right themes in her statement regarding House Bill 2655, the controversial bill allowing students to opt out of statewide standardized tests for any reason.
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BIRTH CONTROL ACCESS: PHARMACY PRESCRIPTIONS, AFTER SENATE VOTE, JUST SHY OF KATE BROWN’S DESK

(Portland Oregonian) Bipartisan legislation that would open birth control pills and hormonal patches to on-demand pharmacy prescriptions cleared the Senate on Wednesday, leaving the measure just shy of reaching Gov. Kate Brown’s desk.
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ON ‘CLEAN FUELS’ PROGRAM, SOME DEMOCRATS LOSE COMMITMENT TO TRANSPARENCY — OPINION

(Portland Oregonian) Much has been written about government transparency since the demise of former Gov. John Kitzhaber, who will be remembered in part for his administration’s dogged refusal to release emails showing how he conducted the state’s business.
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VISTA HOUSE, ROOSTER ROCK TO HOST SONG CIRCLES

(Portland Oregonian) The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department invites visitors to enjoy campfire songs and stories this summer at a series of free Song Circle events on select Fridays at Vista House and Rooster Rock, both state parks in the Columbia River
Gorge just east of Portland.
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WEDNESDAY’S ‘FAST TRACK’ TRADE VOTE IS FAR FROM THE END OF THIS ISSUE FOR OREGON’S RON WYDEN

(Portland Oregonian) Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden on Wednesday cast the last in a series of crucial votes sending the “fast-track” trade bill to the president’s desk.
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JOSEPH ROSE: WHAT TO DO ABOUT THE OREGON CITY ARCH BRIDGE EATING CAR TIRES? – VIDEO

(Portland Oregonian) -The Oregon City-West Linn Arch Bridge’s tire-popping problem-

ODOT says the problematic curb extensions on the historic Arch Bridge are part of the structure and advice motorists to be more alert.

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SPECIAL ENFORCEMENT THIS WEEKEND ON BOATING WHILE INTOXICATED

(Portland Oregonian) Law enforcement around Oregon will be participating in Operation Dry Water this weekend, with the focus on reducing the number of accidents related to boating under the influence of intoxicants.
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LEGISLATIVE DEAL RAISES $200 MILLION FOR TRANSPORTATION, REPEALS CLEAN-FUELS LAW

(Salem Statesman Journal) The public got its first chance Wednesday to weigh in on a transportation package that lawmakers spent weeks working on behind closed doors.
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TRIBES DEMAND THEIR WATER RIGHTS

(Salem Statesman Journal) After riding horses on and off for about 250 miles from Chiloquin to the Capitol, tribal members and allies demanded their voices be heard on Wednesday.
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OREGON SENATE PANEL TO HEAR FROM PUBLIC ABOUT TRANSPORTATION

(Salem Statesman Journal) An Oregon Senate committee is scheduled to hear from the public Wednesday about a plan to raise gas taxes, fund transportation projects and repeal a carbon-reduction program.
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OREGON RECRUIT MAKES NATIONAL GUARD HISTORY

(Salem Statesman Journal) Swearing-in ceremonies take place all the time at the Military Entrance Processing Station MEPS in Portland, but this one was special.
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OREGON HEALTH REFORM EFFORTS IMPROVE

(Salem Statesman Journal) Oregon’s health care transformation efforts continued to make improvements in 2014, even while gaining nearly 400,000 members in the Oregon Health Plan, the state’s Medicaid program.
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DANGEROUS ROOT BALL REMOVED FROM WILLAMETTE RIVER AFTER TWO DEATHS

(Eugene Register-Guard) After claiming two lives in the past two weeks, the root ball in the Middle Fork of the Willamette River near Clearwater Landing was hauled out Wednesday morning to prevent further incidents.

Loggers worked at the site under the direction of county officials.
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NEW TRANSPORTATION FUNDING PROPOSAL IN LEGISLATURE FINDING MANY BUMPS IN THE ROAD

(Eugene Register-Guard) A complex package of transportation funding and policies to reduce carbon emissions, formally unveiled late Tuesday night, is already running out of gas.

Doubts about the deal, which was crafted primarily by a small group of Democratic and Republican legislators and Gov. Kate Browns office, abounded Wednesday as rank-and-file legislators learned more about its details.

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A COP OUT ON OPT OUT — OPINION

(Eugene Register-Guard) -Brown signs bill that undermines statewide testing-

If Gov. Kate Brown ever pens a memoir about the courageous decisions she made as an elected official, its a sure bet there wont be a chapter on her decision Monday to sign a bill making it easier for parents to opt their children out of taking the state standardized tests known as Smarter Balanced.
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SALES TAX COULD YIELD MORE REVENUE, CHEAPER POT

(Portland Tribune) -Recreational weed would cost $277 an ounce under proposal-

An economist for the Oregon Legislature offered two tempting reasons last week for lawmakers to pick a sales tax on marijuana instead of a harvest tax: Cheaper pot, and more tax revenue.
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SOURCES SAY: CALLING FOR HOYLE TO RESIGN, WEHBY TALKS, BUT FEW LISTEN

(Portland Tribune) Failed Republican U.S. Senate candidate Monica Wehby isnt getting much traction in her effort to get Oregon House Democratic Leader Val Hoyle D-Eugene to resign.
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OREGON PAVED THE WAY IN SUPPORT OF GAY MARRIAGE

(Portland Tribune) -State took national dialogue and mind-set beyond rights, to ‘love and commitment’-

As the nation waits to see if the U.S. Supreme Court legalizes same-sex marriage across the land, Oregon gay rights leaders are ready to take a bow.

Unbeknown to most Oregonians, the state became the national laboratory for crafting ways to change peoples minds about same-sex marriage. Many credit that effort for helping to shift national public opinion and bring about majority support for gay marriage.
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WYDEN’S FAST-TRACK BILL HEADED TO PRESIDENT OBAMA

(Portland Tribune) -Portland business leaders praise Wyden’s leadership-

The U.S. Senate passed the so-called fast track trade bill cosponsored by Oregon U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden on Wednesday, paving the way for President Obama to submit new trade treaties to the Senate for up or down votes without amendments.
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WITH A WEEK TO GO, STATE POT RULES NEAR FINISH LINE

(Portland Tribune) Lawmakers in the Oregon House easily passed a broad bill Wednesday to implement Oregon’s new legal marijuana system, after months of contentious debate over how to regulate the states existing medical pot program and whether to allow cities and counties to ban pot businesses.
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SENATE COMMITTEE WRANGLES POSSIBLE TRANSPORTATION FUNDING DEAL

(Portland Tribune) Although described as the equivalent to a Hail Mary pass in football, a Senate committee Wednesday heard voices for and against an 11th-hour effort to couple a transportation funding plan with alternatives for greenhouse-gas reductions.
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WASHINGTON, OREGON SET TO HARVEST RECORD BLUEBERRY CROPS

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The Northwest’s mild winter and warm spring has been good for blueberries. And now Washington and Oregon are on-track to harvest record crops this year.
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OREGON HOPES TO SIDESTEP US SUPREME COURT HEALTH CARE DECISION

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule soon on a key aspect of the Affordable Care Act. But Oregon has tried to immunize itself against the King v. Burwell decision.
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FIRE OFFICIALS ‘RAMPING UP’ RESOURCES FOR HOT WEEKEND

(Oregon Public Broadcasting) Hot weather is coming to the region this weekend, which concerns fire officials. As a precaution, fire managers say they’re ramping up resources in anticipation for more blazes.
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WOLF-LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT HINGES ON INVESTIGATIONS

(East Oregonian) Four new wolf predation investigation reports were posted by ODFW on Wednesday, bringing the total so far in 2015 to 10.

Its been a busy week for Greg Rimbach.

As acting assistant wolf coordinator for the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife, Rimbach reviewed three reports of livestock depredation over a span of three days from June 20-22.

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HOUSE STANDS IN THE WAY OF TRANSPORTATION DEAL — OPINION

(Medford Mail Tribune) Democrats were having things mostly their way this legislative session until minority Republicans played the only card they had, bringing the governor and Senate leaders to the table to hash out a compromise that could lead to a transportation funding bill everyone agrees is badly needed. Whether House Democrats will go along remains to be seen.
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OREGON EMPLOYMENT POSSIBLY AT HIGH-WATER MARK

(Daily Astorian) -Employment in Oregon might have reached a high-water mark, according to state unemployment data.-

After many months of slight decreases, seasonally adjusted unemployment rates stalled or slightly increased in all but 10 of Oregon’s 36 counties over May.
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OREGON LEGISLATURE USES SESSION TO EXPAND BIRTH CONTROL ACCESS

(Bend Bulletin) -Contraceptives without a prescription on the doorstep of Gov. Brown-

By passing a bill that would allow pharmacists to give birth control to women without a doctors prescription, Oregon lawmakers this year may show how far ahead of the country they are when it comes to expanding women’s access to contraceptives.
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ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS AIR CONCERNS OVER FUEL PROGRAM

(Bend Bulletin) Frustrated environmental groups implored Oregon lawmakers Wednesday not to eliminate a nascent carbon-reduction mandate that Senate Democrats have agreed to repeal in exchange for Republican votes to raise taxes for transportation projects.

Airing the proposal in public for the first time, senators on a special transportation committee heard from a bevy of environmental groups hoping to preserve the fuel mandate enacted just three months ago.

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COMPROMISE ON TRANSPORTATION IS A BETTER DEAL — OPINION

(Bend Bulletin) The climate in Salem is changing. To get a deal on funding transportation projects, there’s a possible deal to repeal Oregon’s clean fuels program.

Its a better deal for Oregon.

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GOV. BROWN FAILS THE TEST — OPINION

(Bend Bulletin) Gov. Kate Brown took her first big, visible misstep Tuesday when she signed Oregon House Bill 2655, which makes it easier for children to skip statewide standardized tests.

She should have vetoed the measure.
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NEW FISHING REGS PROPOSED FOR WILLIAMSON

(Herald and News) -Simiplifying rules a key goal of ODFW-

Basin fishery managers are proposing to roll out a new set of streamlined regulations for the Williamson River in 2016.

At a public meeting Tuesday, Mike Gauvin, a recreational fisheries manager for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, explained that the changes are in response to numerous complaints that the states fishing regulations are too complex and too hard to understand.

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BUTTERFLY KNOWN TO CRATER LAKE REGION IS DENIED PROTECTION

(Herald and News) -Threats don’t rise to level for ESA designation-

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Monday that a butterfly species only known to inhabit one small tract of land in Klamath County will not receive protection under the Endangered Species Act.

In May 2010, the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and Oregon Wild petitioned the USFWS to give Leonas little blue butterfly ESA protections.

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OSU SCIENTISTS STUDY STINK BUGS TO SAVE WINE CROPS

(Oregon Business) Warm temperatures have allowed stink bugs to prosper throughout the Northwest.

The problem is being addressed by Oregon State University scientists who are testing how the bugs affect grapes in the Willamette Valley.
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WHAT’S THE RICHEST TOWN WITH FEWER THAN 25,000 RESIDENTS IN OREGON?

(Oregon Business) A Portland-area town topped 24/7 Wall St.’s list of the richest towns in Oregon.

The Oregonian wrote that “the town at the top will likely surprise a lot of people.”

Happy Valley has more often been in the news for its unprecedented over-development just before the Great Recession, and subsequent real estate collapse.
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SENATE LEADERS AGREE ON $343.5M TRANSPORT DEAL

(Oregon Business) Senate leaders agreed on a transportation-funding deal worth $343.5 million. It includes the repeal of the Clean Fuels Program passed earlier this session.
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10 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT OREGON’S PAID SICK LEAVE LAW– BLOG

(Oregon Business Journal) Oregon’s paid sick leave measure is now law. Governor Kate Brown signed SB 454 on Monday. Now the real work begins for Oregon employers, who must familiarize themselves with the new requirements and be ready to comply by Jan. 1, 2016. Here are 10 things you need to know.
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TRANSGENDER & OREGON WORKPLACE LAWS– BLOG

(Oregon Business Report) Given the awkward questions, gossip, and perhaps outright discrimination that may occur when an individual comes out as transgender on the job, it would be understandable if an individual decided to resign rather than continue working through the transition.
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HEALTH INSURANCE COVERS TELEHEALTH SERVICES

(kdrv.com Medford) Patients in rural communities can now pay for telemedicine services with their insurance.

In the past few weeks, Governor Kate Brown signed Senate Bill 144 requiring insurance companies to cover the telehealth services.
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NEW FISHING REGULATION IN DOUGLAS COUNTY

(KEZI) Drought conditions in Douglas County are impacting fish in the Umpqua River.

A new regulation is now in effect, preventing anglers from fishing in certain areas.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife says that all tributaries along the Umpqua River starting at the River Forks Boat Ramp, extending to the Scottsburg Bridge, are off limits to fishers.
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OREGON LAWMAKERS GIVE PUBLIC FIRST LOOK AT TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE

(KLCC) Oregon drivers could pay an additional four cents per gallon in state taxes. That’s part of a massive transportation package unveiled Wednesday by Oregon lawmakers.
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SHOULD OREGONIANS PAY SALES TAX IN WASHINGTON?

(KOIN) -Sales tax exemption up for debate in Washington legislature-

Should Oregonians have to pay sales tax when they shop in Washington? Its a question that was up for debate Wednesday in the Washington legislature.

A proposed bill could raise revenue for schools and other services by eliminating exemptions from sales tax, and it could affect Oregonians who cross state lines to shop in Washington.
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SENATE TRANSPORTATION PANEL TO HEAR FROM PUBLIC

(KOIN) -Plan faces strong resistance from environmentalists-

A special committee of the Oregon Senate is preparing to hear from the public about a plan to raise gas taxes, fund transportation projects and repeal a carbon-reduction program.

The panels hearing Wednesday afternoon will be the first public airing of the plan.
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SEVERE POLLEN COUNT EXPECTED FOR WILLAMETTE VALLEY

(KPTV) On Wednesday, the pollen count in Portland was one of the highest in the country and it’s only going to get worse by Friday.

According to pollen.com, the worst cities in the U.S. for pollen are all located in the Willamette Valley.

Eugene has the highest pollen level in the nation, followed by Salem and Portland.

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C. OREGON, STATE OFFICIALS WARN OF RISING WILDFIRE DANGER

(KTVZ Bend) -Hot spell to boost threat; state has put out 301 fires – most human-caused-

With forecasters warning of an extended hot spell and the potential of dry thunderstorms, Central Oregon and state fire officials are girding for rising fire danger and pleading for the public to be very careful in the days leading up to the Fourth of July weekend.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on June 25, 2015 eClips