July 28, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* In a first, Oregon State Fair to feature marijuana plants
* Boaters beware: Low water levels increase risks
* Will the new federal overtime rule affect you?
* Hiring begins for about 400 Oregon State Fair jobs
* Oregon Legislature hires top researcher
* $220.8 million price tag put on Elliott State Forest
* Mysteries surround death of man at Salem prison
* Behind bars: Willamette class goes to prison
* State: ACA benefits hospitals, but rates rising
* New plan helps disabled save without penalty
* Bottom line: Rain fills the lake
* Educators embrace school gardens as multidisciplinary teaching tool
* Oracle’s ethics face court scrutiny
* Endangered species initiative qualifies for ballot
* Milwaukie delegation backs state trails grant
* Washington County bike-ped projects await state aid
* Outdoor School initiative qualifies for ballot
* State sends landfill expansion decision back to the county
* Editorial: Improving Oregon roads and bridges just got tougher — Opinion
* Hospital profits soar under ACA
* More health insurers expected to return to Central Oregon in 2017
* Where firefighters aren’t paid to fight
* Traces of Valley Fever fungus found in Central Oregon
* Two arrested in alleged real estate and mortgage fraud
* Oregon Upgrades From ‘F’ To ‘B’ For Transparent Health Care Costs
* Politics Of Trade: The Northwest’s Complicated Relationship To The TPP
* Oregon Comes Up With A Pricetag For Its Forest For Sale
* Salmon Reintroduction
* Cities pan county’s bid to change zoning of ag land
* Oregon farmer challenging order to confine hogs
* Historic bridge near the Ashland Plaza will be reinforced, ODOT says
* Cities around West turn to local action to block oil trains
* Eagle numbers soar while murrelets mope
* Editorial: As fire season comes, its time for self defense — Opinion
* ODFW Reports Great Whale Sightings, Crabbing on Oregon Coast
* Oregon hospitals’ profit is way up– Blog
* Oregon health insurers reconsider fleeing rural Oregon– Blog
* Oregon hospitals rosy financials good news for some, concerning to others– Blog
* Tourism and Oregon’s Economy– Blog
* Rural Oregon’s Potential Labor Force– Blog
* Oregon’s State Fair Will Have Pot Plants This Year
* New restrictions on Oregon flood plain development

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IN A FIRST, OREGON STATE FAIR TO FEATURE MARIJUANA PLANTS (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon State Fair celebrates oddities like the “curviest vegetable” and the “most misshapen fruit.” Fairgoers can marvel over award-winning onions and pumpkins and snap photos of the top pig and llama.

This year, the state fair is adding a new attraction: prize-winning marijuana plants.

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BOATERS BEWARE: LOW WATER LEVELS INCREASE RISKS (Portland Oregonian)

Warm weather is finally here: On Thursday and Friday, temperatures will reach into the 90s making for perfect conditions to go boating.

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WILL THE NEW FEDERAL OVERTIME RULE AFFECT YOU? (Portland Oregonian)

Are you a salaried employee who makes less than $47,476 a year? If so, your pay structure may change Dec. 1. That’s when the new federal overtime rule goes into effect, which updates the threshold at which salaried “white collar” employees are eligible for overtime from $23,660 to $47,476.

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HIRING BEGINS FOR ABOUT 400 OREGON STATE FAIR JOBS (Salem Statesman Journal)

The Oregon State Fair is now accepting applications for about 400 jobs, including admissions, parking, food stand and janitorial positions, for the 2016 season.

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OREGON LEGISLATURE HIRES TOP RESEARCHER (Salem Statesman Journal)

Christopher Reinhart has been hired as the first director of a new legislative agency in Oregon, the Office of Legislative Policy and Research. He currently is chief attorney at the Connecticut General Assembly’s Office of Legislative Research.

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$220.8 MILLION PRICE TAG PUT ON ELLIOTT STATE FOREST (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon has put a $220.8 million price tag on the Elliott State Forest.

That’s much less than the $300 million to $400 million value estimated in August, when the State Land Board decided to sell the 82,500-acre property near Coos Bay.

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MYSTERIES SURROUND DEATH OF MAN AT SALEM PRISON (Salem Statesman Journal)

A 27-year-old Salem man is one of nearly 20 inmates who died unexpectedly in Oregon state prisons since 2015.

James Emerson Howland III, died July 18 after being found unresponsive in his cell at the Oregon State Penitentiary.

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BEHIND BARS: WILLAMETTE CLASS GOES TO PRISON (Salem Statesman Journal)

A politics class at Willamette University spent every other Monday this spring in the Oregon State Penitentiary.

They worked with inmates on such topics as clemency, juvenile rights and prison condition during the spring semester “Reforming Criminal Justice” politics class taught by professor Melissa Michaux.

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STATE: ACA BENEFITS HOSPITALS, BUT RATES RISING (Salem Statesman Journal)

Even while personal health care plans in Oregon get more expensive, hospitals statewide are showing bumps in financial health and revenue.

A report released this week by the Oregon Health Authority shows that in 2015, the same year state regulators announced a notable gap between what insurers collected and what they spent on claims, a statewide compilation of 60 out of 62 of Oregon community hospitals showed record increases in net incomes and large operating margins.

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NEW PLAN HELPS DISABLED SAVE WITHOUT PENALTY (Salem Statesman Journal)

Individuals with disabilities and their families will no longer have to live in poverty or limit their savings to receive state and federal benefits.

The Oregon 529 Savings Board announced Monday that the Oregon ABLE Savings Plan will launch by the end of 2016.

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BOTTOM LINE: RAIN FILLS THE LAKE (Salem Statesman Journal)

While there’s plenty of engagement with the issue, problems emerging from a comparative dearth of water in Detroit Lake draw few answers.

The engagement was clear July 20 at Gates Fire Hall, when more than 150 people turned out to the discuss consequences of low water levels.

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EDUCATORS EMBRACE SCHOOL GARDENS AS MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEACHING TOOL (Eugene Register-Guard)

Gardening is, for many, a passion to be indulged in on weeknights and weekends  a solace from the day-to-day work world.

But for 11 schoolteachers this past week, gardening was something to study up on  with the goal of creating some lesson plans and passing their new knowledge on to their future students.

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ORACLE’S ETHICS FACE COURT SCRUTINY (Portland Tribune)

Oracle billed the state of Oregon for millions of dollars on the Cover Oregon project even after the software giant secretly determined its own poor work had already cost the state millions, a state lawyer said Monday.

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ENDANGERED SPECIES INITIATIVE QUALIFIES FOR BALLOT (Portland Tribune)

An initiative petition that seeks to prohibit the sale of items made from 10 endangered species has qualified for the November general election ballot.

The IP 68 campaign turned in 151,544 signatures, and 113,121 were found valid, according to the Secretary of State’s Office.

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MILWAUKIE DELEGATION BACKS STATE TRAILS GRANT (Portland Tribune)

Led by mayor, supporters say Kronberg Park link is vital.

A delegation led by Mayor Mark Gamba came to Salem to ensure a state grant for completion of a multiuse trail through Robert Kronberg Nature Park in Milwaukie.

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WASHINGTON COUNTY BIKE-PED PROJECTS AWAIT STATE AID (Portland Tribune)

Connect Oregon money would complete two trails.

State bond proceeds, awaiting action by the Oregon Transportation Commission, will enable the completion of two long-awaited pedestrian/bicycle corridors in Washington County.

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OUTDOOR SCHOOL INITIATIVE QUALIFIES FOR BALLOT (Portland Tribune)

An initiative petition to fund a statewide outdoor education program with Oregon Lottery revenue has qualified for the November general election ballot.

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STATE SENDS LANDFILL EXPANSION DECISION BACK TO THE COUNTY (Portland Tribune)

Texas-based Waste Managements efforts to expand Riverbend Landfill, the primary repository for not only most of Yamhill County’s garbage but much of the Portland metropolitan area, took another hit recently thanks to a ruling by a state agency.

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EDITORIAL: IMPROVING OREGON ROADS AND BRIDGES JUST GOT TOUGHER — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Politicians on all sides agree that the states roads and bridges need money badly. But getting it never was going to be easy, and a recent move by the state will make it harder to get approval from the Legislature.

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HOSPITAL PROFITS SOAR UNDER ACA (Bend Bulletin)

-Drop in uninsured leads to lower demand for charity care and bad debt-

Oregon hospitals, including those in the St. Charles Health System, enjoyed a banner year in 2015 as the Affordable Care Act drove down the number of uninsured patients and boosted hospital profits to their highest levels in more than a decade.

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MORE HEALTH INSURERS EXPECTED TO RETURN TO CENTRAL OREGON IN 2017 (Bend Bulletin)

-State is promising reasonable rates on policies-

Bend residents might have more than two health insurance carriers to choose from next year after all.

Currently, Health Net Health Plan of Oregon and PacificSource Health Plans have agreed to sell 2017 individual policies  those people buy for themselves or family members  in Deschutes County. State regulators announced Wednesday four other carriers have expressed interest in expanding the number of counties they sell those policies in.

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WHERE FIREFIGHTERS AREN’T PAID TO FIGHT (Bend Bulletin)

-Recent house fire has Juniper Acres residents turning to neighbors for help-

When a fire engine and an ambulance pull up in front of a burning house, most people would assume firefighters are about to take on the blaze.

But for Kelley and Roy Duval, who live 25 miles southwest of Prineville in the 5,000 acre, off-grid community of Juniper Acres, this wasnt the case. Residents in Juniper Acres dont pay fire taxes, and the Duvals house, which caught fire after midnight last week, is located outside of the Crook County Fire Protection District.

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TRACES OF VALLEY FEVER FUNGUS FOUND IN CENTRAL OREGON (Bend Bulletin)

-Efforts to grow fungus from soil sample would confirm local infection risk-

Public health officials have thought for decades the coccidioides fungus that causes Valley Fever was found only in the Southwest. The vast majority of cases have been diagnosed in residents of Arizona, California or neighboring states, or in individuals who had recently traveled to those regions. Then, in 2014, the confirmation of three cases of Valley Fever acquired in Washington state launched a search for the fungus throughout the Pacific Northwest.

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TWO ARRESTED IN ALLEGED REAL ESTATE AND MORTGAGE FRAUD (Bend Bulletin)

-More than $5 million in property in Deschutes County allegedly involved in one case-

Two people allegedly involved in real estate fraud in Central Oregon are facing several felony counts after a monthslong investigation by the Deschutes County District Attorneys Office and other agencies.

Mark Franklin Broeg, 59, was arrested after a Deschutes County grand jury indicted him on a number of felony charges including racketeering, mortgage fraud and other theft-related charges, according to a news release Wednesday from the county DAs office.

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OREGON UPGRADES FROM ‘F’ TO ‘B’ FOR TRANSPARENT HEALTH CARE COSTS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon’s rating for transparency in its health care system has gone up substantially this year, according to one trade group.

The reason: Last year, the Oregon Legislature passed a bill to publicize pricing information.

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POLITICS OF TRADE: THE NORTHWEST’S COMPLICATED RELATIONSHIP TO THE TPP (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon and Washington are home to a long list of large and small companies that rely on international trade  from Nike and Boeing to the huge wheat farms east of the Cascades.

So its not surprising that Pacific Northwest members of Congress traditionally support and promote trade agreements that benefit the regions powerhouse export economy.

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OREGON COMES UP WITH A PRICETAG FOR ITS FOREST FOR SALE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The State of Oregon has come up with a pricetag for a forest in Southern Oregon that it wants to sell.

The Elliott State Forest is worth $221 million, according to the Oregon Department of State Lands. That figure is based on a review process that included appraisals by three independent firms.

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SALMON REINTRODUCTION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

After almost a hundred years, salmon have returned to the upper Malheur River. Fisheries program manager Erica Maltz and Tribal Coucil Chairperson Charlotte Rodrique explain what this means for the Burns Paiute Tribe.

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CITIES PAN COUNTY’S BID TO CHANGE ZONING OF AG LAND (Capital Press)

Clackamas County’s bid to review the status of three land parcels now set aside for agriculture is a concern to farm groups, and the cities that would have to service new development aren’t hot for the idea either.

Charlotte Lehan, a former county commissioner, former Wilsonville mayor and now member of the city council, said it would be very difficult and very expensive for the city to provide water and sewer to new development south of the Willamette River.

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OREGON FARMER CHALLENGING ORDER TO CONFINE HOGS (Capital Press)

A pig breeder is challenging the Oregon Department of Agriculture’s order to build a confinement facility for his hogs, arguing it would hurt their health.

Luther Clevenger and his wife, Julie, raise Gloucestershire Old Spots pigs and other livestock on their 15-acre property near Aumsville, Ore., which has experienced water drainage problems during heavy winter rains.

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HISTORIC BRIDGE NEAR THE ASHLAND PLAZA WILL BE REINFORCED, ODOT SAYS (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Ashland Main Street Bridge is in good shape, but after some tests Tuesday, the Oregon Department of Transportation said its going to get some steel reinforcement rods to stretch out its life.

The bridge, a 105-year-old, two-lane, arched span over Ashland Creek on Highway 99 near the Ashland Plaza, was built of concrete and rests on gravel and bedrock.

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CITIES AROUND WEST TURN TO LOCAL ACTION TO BLOCK OIL TRAINS (Medford Mail Tribune)

As crude oil trains began rolling through its downtown a few years ago, Spokane was among the first cities to pass a resolution calling for stronger federal safety regulations.

But when a mile-long train derailed in the scenic Columbia River Gorge along the Oregon-Washington border last month  after earlier passing through this major railroad hub in eastern Washington  some city leaders said they couldn’t wait for tougher federal protections.

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EAGLE NUMBERS SOAR WHILE MURRELETS MOPE (Daily Astorian)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is proposing to take one bird species off Washingtons list of endangered and threatened species  and upgrade the status of another to endangered.

Wildlife officials say marbled murrelets  small seabirds native to coastal Oregon and Washington and other states in the West  are doing worse now in Washington than when they were first listed by Washingtons Fish and Wildlife Commission in 1993. Bald eagles, however, have made a huge comeback and are on track to hit strong population numbers in the years to come.

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EDITORIAL: AS FIRE SEASON COMES, ITS TIME FOR SELF DEFENSE — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

The driest place in the U.S.  that’s what the Pacific Northwest is between now and, typically, sometime in September. Even here in this normally damp coastal zone where we measure seasonal rainfall in feet rather than inches, this means residents need to manage property with an eye to fire safety.

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ODFW REPORTS GREAT WHALE SIGHTINGS, CRABBING ON OREGON COAST (Oregon Coast Beach Connection)

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife ODFW just released its weekly report on outdoor recreation and animals around the state, with some especially good news for the ocean beaches. Crabbing is quite good in most spots and your chances of spotting whales are great.

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OREGON HOSPITALS’ PROFIT IS WAY UP— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon hospitals are rolling in dough, according to newly released financial statements for 2015.

Net hospital income in Oregon increased $367 million, or nearly 54 percent. Operating margins increased to 7 percent, up from 5.2 percent the year before.

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OREGON HEALTH INSURERS RECONSIDER FLEEING RURAL OREGON— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

Stung by losses, Oregon health insurers planned to exit much of rural Oregon next year and stop selling policies to people who buy their own insurance.

Now it looks like a handful of carriers have reconsidered their decisions to withdraw.

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OREGON HOSPITALS ROSY FINANCIALS GOOD NEWS FOR SOME, CONCERNING TO OTHERS— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

The reason hospital profit margins are up is the same reason their charity care and bad debt are down: More people have insurance, and theyre using it.

Two years ago, after the Medicaid expansion, 975,000 Oregonians were in the program. Today, almost 1.1 million are. Medicaid accounts for about 20 percent of hospitals overall payer mix, up from less than 10 percent in 2013.

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TOURISM AND OREGON’S ECONOMY— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

-Earlier this month Mark and I had the opportunity to discuss tourism and its impact on the Oregon economy to the Transient Lodging Tax Workgroup, setup following the passage of HB 4146 which raised the statewide lodging tax. Our slides are below. However first I wanted to provide a few summarizing thoughts.-

Travel and tourism has been booming in recent years. Nationally the share of consumer spending spent on travel and tourism really has never been higher. Hotel occupancy across the country is at or near record highs. Hotels also have more pricing power today given the strong demand even as new hotel construction picks up.

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RURAL OREGON’S POTENTIAL LABOR FORCE— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

In our offices Rural Oregon report we mention that much of the discussion focuses on data and trends that are backward looking. They indicate how many jobs were lost in the 1980s or how old the typical resident is and the like. While these statistics help describe the current lay of the land, they do not necessarily tell us what tomorrow may bring. To be sure, many of the more forward-looking indicators are also less bright in much of rural Oregon than in urban Oregon, but not all hope is lost. In fact, if anything, some of pessimism about rural Oregon today may be a bit overdone. The reason? Demographics. Yes, thats right, demographics.

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OREGON’S STATE FAIR WILL HAVE POT PLANTS THIS YEAR (Willamette Week)

The motto of this year’s Oregon State Fair is “Here Comes the Fun.”

This could be pointing to the Milk Chug-A-Lug or the Art of Non-Shaving contest.

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NEW RESTRICTIONS ON OREGON FLOOD PLAIN DEVELOPMENT (High Country News)

-Some see the changes as reform of a troubled program, and others as an example of bureaucratic overreach.-

Last winter, Oregon survived a nightmare of flooding. A state of emergency was declared for 13 counties across Oregon, and heavy rains in Portlands downtown Pearl District submerged cars under brown water tainted with sewage. Towns were evacuated as rivers swelled. The deluge softened the ground, causing landslides and sinkholes. Two people died and the total damages amounted to $25 million.

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July 27, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Tension behind study of $3 billion corporate tax measure, records show
* Troubled Oregon 217 flyover ramp to close for resurfacing
* Schools, not nostalgic voters, should make the call on Outdoor School: Editorial — Opinion
* Preference points for Oregon hunters still available
* Report: Corporate tax measure won’t boost prices
* Port of Astoria fined $36,916 for stormwater violations
* ABLE to save — Opinion
* Familiar face hired to review ODOT efficiency
* Look closely at IP28; a bad idea can never help a good cause — Guest Opinion
* Most new jobs will be outside Portland, forecast shows
* Changes could help more undocumented students pay for college
* Horse group sues BLM over plan to sterilize horses
* Central Oregon job growth slowing
* Rattlesnake Fire grows, but largely contained at 9,200 acres
* Editorial: Don’t exile arts east of the Cascades — Opinion
* Union Pacific Stands Out For Track-Caused Derailments But Not Oil Spills
* Cannabis Testing
* Camelina, quinoa studied as alternative crops in E. Oregon
* Oregon House speaker supports efforts to help Malheur County economy
* Stripe rust pressure severe in Northwest wheat, expert says
* Rain, temperatures increase falling number concerns
* Study: Common pesticide appears to reduce live bee sperm
* Hearing scheduled for proposed 30,000 cow dairy farm in Boardman
* Our view: We must do more to help foster children — Opinion
* Student loan relief lures mental health workers to Jackson County
* Our View: Water Commission credibility in question — Opinion
* Report: Over-production of medical pot feeds black market in Oregon
* Our View: Black market threatens a legal industry — Opinion
* Construction hires add to job growth in June
* Proposed 200-room hotel on former Box R Ranch sidesteps the rules, state says
* Since You Asked: You can call ODOT to get potholes fixed
* Oregon ballot measure aims to increase graduation rate
* Klamath River stakeholders may sue federal agencies
* Congress should listen to local government on public lands — Guest Opinion
* City misses deadline, faces DEQ’s daily $1,600 fines
* Port awards million-dollar stormwater bid
* Lead found in Astoria, Seaside school water
* Clinton highlights lack of women in office
* Unemployment climbs in mid-valley
* Air quality monitor installed in Ashland
* Vancouver bans future oil refineries, storage facilities in the city
* Crews contain wildfire near Condon Monday
* Herrera Beutler to BPA on wires: Get it done
* Burn ban? No problem, no smoke, if you have a burn box
* Guest Column: Creating a future that includes healthy forests — Guest Opinion
* Lead tests show nearly 70 samples exceed EPA levels at Roseburg Public Schools
* Oregon raises its grade for health care price transparency
* 2017 eclipse has Oregon getting ready for the dark
* Why Oregon’s timber harvest fell below the 4B board feet mark– Blog
* Oregon’s Dry Counties Still Living Under Cannabis Prohibition, Mapped
* Discover the bounty of Oregon crops

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TENSION BEHIND STUDY OF $3 BILLION CORPORATE TAX MEASURE, RECORDS SHOW (Portland Oregonian)

Backers of a $3 billion corporate tax measure on the November ballot repeatedly pushed for changes in a Portland State University economic review of the proposal, delaying the report for several months.

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TROUBLED OREGON 217 FLYOVER RAMP TO CLOSE FOR RESURFACING (Portland Oregonian)

Resurfacing work will close a troubled flyover ramp connecting northbound Interstate 5 and Oregon 217 over at least the next three weekends.

The ramp is the subject of a lawsuit that alleges the Oregon Department of Transportation failed to address a faulty metal expansion joint that it claims created a dangerous driving surface.

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SCHOOLS, NOT NOSTALGIC VOTERS, SHOULD MAKE THE CALL ON OUTDOOR SCHOOL: EDITORIAL — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

It’s hard to resist jumping on the bandwagon for “Outdoor School for All,” the initiative that would spend lottery money to send Oregon fifth- and sixth-graders for a week of hands-on learning in a camp setting. The idea of Outdoor School is so wholesome and nostalgically driven that the initiative easily qualified for the November ballot.

But here’s what voters should remember. As worthwhile as Outdoor School programs may be, the ballot measure relies on a flawed funding strategy that lays claim to dollars currently going to job creation programs and the State School Fund, the pot of money that is divvied among the state’s 197 school districts for general educational needs.

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PREFERENCE POINTS FOR OREGON HUNTERS STILL AVAILABLE (Portland Oregonian)

Miss this year’s May 15 controlled hunt deadline? Kicking yourself because it not only meant you didn’t get a chance at a big game hunt, but also missed out on accumulating more preference points?

You’re still in the game  at least for points toward next year’s draw.

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REPORT: CORPORATE TAX MEASURE WON’T BOOST PRICES (Salem Statesman Journal)

A report published Tuesday by supporters of a corporate tax ballot measure concludes that the price of consumer goods is not dependent on corporate tax rates. Business advocates disagree, saying consumption taxes are paid for through price increases.

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PORT OF ASTORIA FINED $36,916 FOR STORMWATER VIOLATIONS (Salem Statesman Journal)

State environmental regulators have fined the Port of Astoria $36,916 for violating its stormwater discharge permits.

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ABLE TO SAVE — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

With the launch of the ABLE Savings Plan at the end of this year, Oregon will take a big step forward, allowing hundreds of thousands of Oregonians with disabilities to build some financial security.

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FAMILIAR FACE HIRED TO REVIEW ODOT EFFICIENCY (Portland Tribune)

-John L. Craig, who has close ties to agency, will be paid $350,000 for his work –

When a long-awaited management review assesses the readiness of the Oregon Department of Transportation for a massive influx of funds, the effort will be led by a familiar face.

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LOOK CLOSELY AT IP28; A BAD IDEA CAN NEVER HELP A GOOD CAUSE — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Oregon consumers and small businesses should be very concerned about Initiative Petition 28, a proposed $6 billion tax increase that will be on the November ballot.

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MOST NEW JOBS WILL BE OUTSIDE PORTLAND, FORECAST SHOWS (Portland Tribune)

For many years, Multnomah County had the two largest residential and employment centers in the region, Portland and Gresham.

Although Portland was much larger than Gresham, they both had more residents and more jobs than any other city in Multnomah, Washington or Clackamas counties. That helped justify opening the first MAX line in the region to connect them.

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CHANGES COULD HELP MORE UNDOCUMENTED STUDENTS PAY FOR COLLEGE (Bend Bulletin)

-Eligibility for Oregon Promise, Opportunity grants starts this year-

Students who are undocumented immigrants will have more options this year when it comes to paying for college in Oregon, including a new state grant designed to cover the cost of community college.

In 2015 lawmakers included undocumented students among those eligible for Oregon Promise grants, which will be offered for the first time this fall.

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HORSE GROUP SUES BLM OVER PLAN TO STERILIZE HORSES (Bend Bulletin)

-Agency cites need for research; group calls proposal inhumane-

A nonprofit horse group has sued the Bureau of Land Management over the BLMs plan to sterilize wild horses in Oregon, calling the procedures  such as the removal of mares ovaries  risky and barbaric.

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CENTRAL OREGON JOB GROWTH SLOWING (Bend Bulletin)

-More workers entering the labor force-

Unemployment levels rose slightly in Central Oregon in June, but the numbers may conceal good news, according to a monthly report Tuesday.

The number of people actively looking for work increased, a significant factor in the uptick in unemployment rates, said Damon Runberg, economist with the Oregon Labor Department. June typically unleashes a new crop of graduates looking for work, which increases the labor force and consequently also raises the unemployment rate, he said.

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RATTLESNAKE FIRE GROWS, BUT LARGELY CONTAINED AT 9,200 ACRES (Bend Bulletin)

A fire in Warm Springs burning since Sunday grew to about 9,200 acres as of Tuesday evening, and firefighters had it about 80 percent contained.

They could have it fully contained by Wednesday, depending on weather conditions, said Bill Fish, spokesman for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. Fish noted Tuesdays low humidity, high temperatures and increasing winds.

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EDITORIAL: DON’T EXILE ARTS EAST OF THE CASCADES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The Oregon Arts Commission says it knows what art is, and the High Desert Museum is not arty enough. But its the commission that is not doing enough for the arts.

The museum will no longer get funding from two grants it has received for several years, totaling about $20,000 per year. The commission did approve $6,178 in phase-out funding, which does help.

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UNION PACIFIC STANDS OUT FOR TRACK-CAUSED DERAILMENTS BUT NOT OIL SPILLS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

After last months fiery oil train derailment in the Columbia River Gorge, federal regulators put the blame on Union Pacific Road for failing to maintain its track.

Soon questions arose about the railroads safety record. Watchdog groups compared Union Pacific’s track maintenance standards to those employed by BNSF Railway, the Wests other major carrier, which also runs oil trains through the Columbia Gorge. BNSFs tracks run  along the Washington side of the river.

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CANNABIS TESTING (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Starting October 1, all cannabis products in Oregon must be tested by a state licensed lab. As of now, no labs have yet been licensed by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. Eric Wendt, chief science officer at GreenLeaf Lab, tells us what it takes to test cannabis.

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CAMELINA, QUINOA STUDIED AS ALTERNATIVE CROPS IN E. OREGON (Capital Press)

Eastern Oregon researchers are looking at camelina and quinoa as possible alternative crops that might not necessarily make farmers a lot of money but could prove helpful during drought years or as a second crop.

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OREGON HOUSE SPEAKER SUPPORTS EFFORTS TO HELP MALHEUR COUNTY ECONOMY (Capital Press)

Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek says she supports efforts to help Malheur Countys economy, including improving the transportation infrastructure to reduce the cost of shipping agricultural products.

The Portland Democrat visited the Eastern Oregon county last month at the invitation of Rep. Cliff Bentz, R-Ontario, and agricultural industry leaders concerned about the impact the states new minimum wage law will have on farmers and others here.

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STRIPE RUST PRESSURE SEVERE IN NORTHWEST WHEAT, EXPERT SAYS (Capital Press)

Stripe rust pressure this year is severe to extremely severe in Pacific Northwest wheat, but most farmers have been able to control it by growing resistant varieties or by applying fungicides.

USDA Agricultural Research Service plant geneticist Xianming Chen blames the mild winter, which allowed the rust to survive and develop in winter wheat.

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RAIN, TEMPERATURES INCREASE FALLING NUMBER CONCERNS (Capital Press)

Rain and temperature fluctuations are worrying some in the Pacific Northwest wheat industry about sprout damage that could reduce the price farmers receive for their crop.

If the weather clears up without additional storms, then maybe its not going to be that big a disaster, said Camille Steber, USDA ARS research plant molecular geneticist in Pullman, Wash.

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STUDY: COMMON PESTICIDE APPEARS TO REDUCE LIVE BEE SPERM (Capital Press)

A new study finds that a commonly used insecticide kills much of the sperm created by male drone honey bees, one reason why the bees are dwindling.

The class of insecticide called neonicotinoids didnt kill the drones. But bees that ate treated pollen produced 39 percent less live sperm than those that didnt, according to a controlled experiment by Swiss researchers published Wednesday in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

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HEARING SCHEDULED FOR PROPOSED 30,000 COW DAIRY FARM IN BOARDMAN (East Oregonian)

Morrow County could soon be home to another giant dairy farm with tens of thousands of milking cows near Boardman.

Willow Creek Dairy, run by Greg te Velde of California, was established in 2002 on land leased from nearby Threemile Canyon Farms. Now, te Velde is looking to relocate and expand his operation onto 7,288 acres purchased last year from the former Boardman Tree Farm.

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OUR VIEW: WE MUST DO MORE TO HELP FOSTER CHILDREN — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Oregons foster care system for children in the midst of family crises is in serious trouble. Oregon Public Broadcasting has been shining a bright list at problems with foster care and finding situations that demand redress.

 

This is no new thing. OPB reported cracks in foster care five years ago. But by almost any reckoning, things have gotten worse. There are hundreds fewer foster care beds in Oregon this year compared to last. Children sometimes have to spend nights in state offices and motel rooms, with a couple of state workers detailed to watch them.

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STUDENT LOAN RELIEF LURES MENTAL HEALTH WORKERS TO JACKSON COUNTY (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Loan forgiveness helps Jackson County attract mental health professionals-

Saddled with $75,000 in student loans, Chy Porter looked for an employer that offered a loan-forgiveness program when she hunted for a job in the mental health field.

She chose to go to work as a mental health therapist for Jackson County Health and Human Services  which is competing for mental health workers amid a nationwide shortage.

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OUR VIEW: WATER COMMISSION CREDIBILITY IN QUESTION — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

The continuing saga of the Medford Water Commission’s handling of lead contamination is less about public health than about public disclosure.The potential harm to water customers from ingesting lead is certainly a concern, but so far, there is no evidence that anyone’s health has been affected. The commission’s credibility, on the other hand, is on life support.

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REPORT: OVER-PRODUCTION OF MEDICAL POT FEEDS BLACK MARKET IN OREGON (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Critics call the assertion an ‘opinion,’ and author admits it’s a ‘guess’-

Medical marijuana growers in Oregon are producing far more product than they or their customer-patients can consume, feeding a black market that doesn’t appear to be going away soon, according to a controversial new report.

An estimated 70 percent of the crop will be distributed illegally next year, according to a draft report from the Portland consulting firm ECONorthwest, which has been hired by Josephine County and the city of Grants Pass to study the local economy, including the marijuana industry.

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OUR VIEW: BLACK MARKET THREATENS A LEGAL INDUSTRY — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

It’s been suspected for some time that a lot more marijuana was being produced by medical growers than could be consumed by patients, and now the evidence is beginning to surface.

First came the arrest of a Jackson County dispensary owner in Siskiyou County for allegedly hauling marijuana across the California line for illegal sale.

Now an economic analysis has concluded that a huge percentage of marijuana ostensibly grown in Josephine County for medical patients is instead feeding the black market.

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CONSTRUCTION HIRES ADD TO JOB GROWTH IN JUNE (Medford Mail Tribune)

Activity in the plan room at the Medford Builders Exchange may be the clearest evidence of a robust construction industry in Jackson County.

“We’re a lot busier than we were a year ago,” said plan room manager Rachel Fullenwider, whose firm assists the building industry. “There are more jobs flowing through right now, whether they’re going out to bid or through the pre-application phase.”

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PROPOSED 200-ROOM HOTEL ON FORMER BOX R RANCH SIDESTEPS THE RULES, STATE SAYS (Medford Mail Tribune)

The potential development of a 200-room hotel on former Box R Ranch land in the Greensprings has been kicked back to Jackson County because land-use procedures were “sidestepped,” a state agency ruled.

In 2013, the county entered into an agreement with Box R Ranch founders Donald and Jean Rowlett allowing the development of the hotel “in a manner that entirely sidestepped land use proceedings, the Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals said in its ruling, issued July 14. LUBA also noted a lack of public hearings for the development.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: YOU CAN CALL ODOT TO GET POTHOLES FIXED (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: I’ve been running over three potholes lined up like divots on Highway 99 just south of Garfield Street for years now. Who is supposed to fix them, and do they have any plans to do so?

A: Good question, Walter. Potholes are the bane of many a driver’s existence, and the Oregon Department of Transportation is the place to call when you’ve got a request for maintenance. Gary Leaming, ODOT spokesman, says he’s not familiar with potholes on this particular stretch of road, so as of now, there is no scheduled maintenance, but it will be added to the ODOT work schedule to check it out.

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OREGON BALLOT MEASURE AIMS TO INCREASE GRADUATION RATE (Herald and News)

Some Oregonians have decided the states high school graduation rate is just not good enough. To that end, advocates gathered more than 13,000 signatures to get Measure 98 formerly Initiative Petition 65 on the November ballot.

On election day voters statewide will decide if they want to spend an extra $800 per student on specific programs aiming to get more students to graduation day and beyond.

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KLAMATH RIVER STAKEHOLDERS MAY SUE FEDERAL AGENCIES (Herald and News)

Commercial fishing and conservation groups announced Thursday they may file a lawsuit to compel federal agencies to do more to protect juvenile coho salmon in the Klamath River.

Klamath River coho salmon are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

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CONGRESS SHOULD LISTEN TO LOCAL GOVERNMENT ON PUBLIC LANDS — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

No matter our politics, most of us watched with rapt attention earlier this year as news reports flooded in from the standoff at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. I certainly did.

The people behind this takeover demanded that public lands be handed over to the locals, despite the fact that most locals wanted nothing to do with their bombastic claims and flaunting of the law.

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CITY MISSES DEADLINE, FACES DEQ’S DAILY $1,600 FINES (The World)

-Law firm: cannot ‘definitively’ lay out financial feasibility of privatization-

The City of Coos Bay has reached the point where it cannot avoid the specter of $1,600 daily fines by state regulators because the city will fail to meet the state’s deadline to start site work on its proposed new wastewater treatment plant.

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PORT AWARDS MILLION-DOLLAR STORMWATER BID (Daily Astorian)

Over the objections of two commissioners calling the bidding process unfair, the Port of Astoria Commission awarded a multimillion-dollar contract for stormwater improvements to Conway Construction Co. on Monday.

The company will build a system to pump stormwater from much of the Ports central waterfront to a series of settling ponds and bioswales. The state Department of Environmental Quality required the system after the Ports stormwater tests in 2014 showed high levels of copper entering the Columbia River from drains at the end of Pier 3, under a dock near Bornstein Seafoods and another at the base of the agencys western slip.

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LEAD FOUND IN ASTORIA, SEASIDE SCHOOL WATER (Daily Astorian)

Several water taps have been switched off in Astoria and Seaside as lead-testing results for local school districts start to trickle in.

Superintendent Craig Hoppes of the Astoria School District said two fountains at Astoria High School tested at 17 and 74 parts of lead per billion, respectively, and were shut off.

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CLINTON HIGHLIGHTS LACK OF WOMEN IN OFFICE (Daily Astorian)

-This story is part of Divided America, APs ongoing exploration of the economic, social and political divisions in American society.-

Hillary Clinton and Mary Thomas have little in common, except for this: They both hope to add to the meager ranks of Americas female elected officials come January.

Ed. Note – Content about Oregon Attorney General, Ellen Rosenblum, ca be found near the end of story.

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UNEMPLOYMENT CLIMBS IN MID-VALLEY (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Unemployment rose last month across the mid-valley, in part because of an influx of workers into the labor market.

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AIR QUALITY MONITOR INSTALLED IN ASHLAND (Ashland Daily Tidings)

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality DEQ has installed an air quality monitor in Ashland, the city of Ashland has announced. Real-time data collected is reported to the air quality index page on the DEQ website and can be viewed at www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/index.aspx.

The city has been advocating for an air quality monitor to be located in Ashland given the wildfire smoke levels over the past few summers.

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VANCOUVER BANS FUTURE OIL REFINERIES, STORAGE FACILITIES IN THE CITY (Hood River News)

The Vancouver City Council has voted to prohibit new or expanded crude oil storage facilities in the city.

The Columbian newspaper reported that the unanimous vote 7-0 last Monday night wont affect a massive crude-by-rail facility proposed at the Port of Vancouver. A state energy panel is currently reviewing the project by Tesoro Corp. and Savage Cos.

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CREWS CONTAIN WILDFIRE NEAR CONDON MONDAY (Hood River News)

A fire near Condon burning 33,587 acres was fully contained Monday, officials reported.

The fire, which broke out last Thursday about nine miles northwest of the town in Gilliam County, was burning in light grassy fuels in nearby canyons, and threatening wheat fields on the flat ground above the canyon rims.

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HERRERA BEUTLER TO BPA ON WIRES: GET IT DONE (Hood River News)

At a meeting Monday in White Salmon, U.S. Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler bluntly told the Bonneville Power Administration BPA it should immediately get safety marker balls placed on its new transmission lines across the Columbia River.

The BPA completed multiple transmission lines last year near Wishram as part of its Big Eddy Knight Project. The lines have resulted in a safety hazard to aircraft due to its lack of visibility balls, with special concern on two thin ground wires above the main transmission lines.

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BURN BAN? NO PROBLEM, NO SMOKE, IF YOU HAVE A BURN BOX (Hood River News)

Hood River valley grower Cindy Collins is featured in a United States Department of Agriculture blog post by Tracy Robillard the Natural Resources Conservation District on July 20. It reads in part:

Like her neighbors, Cindy believes in preserving the beauty and vitality of the Hood River Valley. That’s why shes teaming up with 20 fruit growers to adopt cleaner ways to operate their orchards.

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GUEST COLUMN: CREATING A FUTURE THAT INCLUDES HEALTHY FORESTS — GUEST OPINION (Douglas County News-Review)

Recently I read the, A few ideas for improving our county article in the News-Review opinions. Many of the suggestions were interesting and not without merit, but the most intriguing aspect of the article for me, was that which was sadly not included.

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LEAD TESTS SHOW NEARLY 70 SAMPLES EXCEED EPA LEVELS AT ROSEBURG PUBLIC SCHOOLS (Douglas County News-Review)

Roseburg Public Schools, the largest school district in Douglas County, released Monday preliminary lead testing results that reported almost 70 samples exceeded lead limits.

We are very much in the initial phases of this, but we want people to know where we stand and whats going on, said Roseburg Superintendent Gerry Washburn.

Ed. Note – Related Story, Same title but earlier date: Lead tests show nearly 70 samples exceed EPA levels at Roseburg Public Schools

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OREGON RAISES ITS GRADE FOR HEALTH CARE PRICE TRANSPARENCY — BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

A national organization has recognized Oregon’s efforts to increase health care transparency by raising the states grade to a B from an F.

The 2016 Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws, developed by the Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute and Catalyst for Payment Reform, had previously given most states a failing grade.

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2017 ECLIPSE HAS OREGON GETTING READY FOR THE DARK — BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

The eclipse is coming, the eclipse is coming

Its more than a year away and will be over in a matter of minutes, but Oregonians are being told to gear up now for the solar eclipse that will cut a narrow west-to-east path of totality across the state on August 21, 2017.

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WHY OREGON’S TIMBER HARVEST FELL BELOW THE 4B BOARD FEET MARK— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon’s timber harvest fell by 8 percent in 2015, dipping below 4 billion board feet for the first time since 2012.

The Department of Forestry attributed the decline to a range of factors, but mostly to a drop in exports to Asia, where a slowing economy in China is reducing demand for Oregon logs.

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OREGON’S DRY COUNTIES STILL LIVING UNDER CANNABIS PROHIBITION, MAPPED (Willamette Week)

Last October, Oregon officially legalized the sale of recreational cannabis after a successful 56 percent “yes” vote on Measure 91.

However, the law allowed counties and cities to opt out of legalization. And some have: 87 cities and 19 counties chose not to legalize.

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DISCOVER THE BOUNTY OF OREGON CROPS (Coastweekend.com)

Oregon-grown specialty crops will be the focus of a special pop-up dinner and farmers market taking place Thursday, Aug. 4.

The event is part of the Crop Up Dinner Series and Market Showcase put on by the Oregon Department of Agriculture and Oregon State University.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on July 27, 2016 OSL eClips

July 26, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Pulling back the covers on Oracle lawsuit: State could spend $27 million in legal fees
* 33,500-acre fire near John Day River completely contained
* 3 national parks in Oregon that never happened
* Watch: Sasquatch stars in Oregon crosswalk PSA
* Second mega-dairy proposed for Oregon
* Report: Complaints against Oregon Lottery were baseless
* Firefighters work to contain Scott Canyon fire
* Park service to upgrade historic chateau to Oregon Caves
* Lottery commissioners didn’t show bias in probing Iranian-American managers promotion, investigation finds
* Oregon’s timber harvest dropped in 2015
* Outdoor School initiative qualifies for ballot
* Yakama Nation demands more rigorous cleanup of Superfund site in Portland Harbor
* Rattlesnake Fire reaches 5,000 acres
* No change in funding decision for Bend museum
* Editorial: Brown’s tax position should not be a mystery — Opinion
* Editorial: Grant sheriff should stop deleting emails — Opinion
* Editorial: Land use laws need an intervention — Opinion
* Some Oregon Voters Will Vote Again On Marijuana Legalization
* Social Workers Say What It’s Like To Deal With Foster Kids Living In The Office
* Weed sighted in Oregon for first time
* Parks & Litigation
* Firefighters contain Scott Canyon blaze near Condon
* Our view: Silent mass disaster demands nations attention — Opinion
* Prison leader ready to step into new role
* County boat ramp, access among concerns for reservoir
* Wyden: We must get this right
* Vale District BLM postpones wild horse gather
* Initiative makes ballot, but funding is questioned — Opinion
* Oregon Health Authority helps Coast Community Health Center outreach
* Indigenous powerhouse
* Editorial: Timber numbers reflect global trends — Opinion
* Editorial: Email causes big headache for sheriff — Opinion
* Mid-Valley InBusiness: Berries and nuts increasingly important to growers
* Mid-Valley InBusiness: Warm weather moves up harvest
* High Priority Plan
* Portion of pristine creek to be preserved for years to come
* Corridor project met with wide support
* Huntington cashes in on pot, wind farms windfall
* MY VOICE: The failure of wild horse policy — Guest Opinion
* MY VOICE: Valleys views, property endangered — Guest Opinion
* Guest column: An ounce of prevention may prevent unintentional injuries — Guest Opinion
* State seeks to add punitive damages to Oracle complaint– Blog
* Oregon Schools Set the Example for Healthy Lunches
* New Oregon Law Protects EV Charging Choice– Blog
* A Town Called Prineville Makes a Comeback

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PULLING BACK THE COVERS ON ORACLE LAWSUIT: STATE COULD SPEND $27 MILLION IN LEGAL FEES (Portland Oregonian)

The risk and the rhetoric continue to escalate in Oregon’s high-stakes legal battle against Oracle Corp.

According to the Oregon Legislative Fiscal Office, the state has spent nearly $16 million so far building its case that the giant software company badly bungled development of the Cover Oregon heath-care exchange. With the trial not set to begin until January, the Department of Justice has estimated the cost of the lawsuit could top $27 million by next April, making it one of the most expensive in department history.

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33,500-ACRE FIRE NEAR JOHN DAY RIVER COMPLETELY CONTAINED (Portland Oregonian)

The Scott Canyon fire, which has burned more than 33,500 acres near the John Day River in central Oregon, is completely contained.

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3 NATIONAL PARKS IN OREGON THAT NEVER HAPPENED (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon is no stranger to National Parks. Since 1902, the state has been home to Crater Lake National Park, and over the last century four other spots have won lesser designations from the National Park Service.

But in the mid-20th century, Oregon’s scenic beauty was prized by the park service, which proposed several sprawling national parks around the state.

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WATCH: SASQUATCH STARS IN OREGON CROSSWALK PSA (Portland Oregonian)

Why did Sasquatch cross the road?

Because every intersection is a crosswalk under Oregon law.

A new public safety campaign from from the Metro regional government and the Oregon Department of Transportation shows a driver slam on the brakes when he sees Bigfoot timidly trying to cross a neighborhood street.

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SECOND MEGA-DAIRY PROPOSED FOR OREGON (Salem Statesman Journal)

A second mega-dairy is planned for Eastern Oregon, close to Threemile Canyon Farms, one of the largest confined animal feeding operations in the nation.

The proposed Willow Creek Dairy would house 30,000 animals. It would be the second-largest Oregon dairy, after Threemile Canyon, with 70,000 animals, said Wym Matthews, who oversees confined animal feeding operations CAFOs for the state Department of Agriculture.

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REPORT: COMPLAINTS AGAINST OREGON LOTTERY WERE BASELESS (Salem Statesman Journal)

An investigation into allegations of civil rights violations against two Oregon Lottery Commission members found that the accusations were baseless, according to a report released Monday by the Lottery.

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FIREFIGHTERS WORK TO CONTAIN SCOTT CANYON FIRE (Salem Statesman Journal)

Crews say they’ve gotten the better of a wildfire that has scorched about 56 square miles and threatened homes in eastern Oregon.

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PARK SERVICE TO UPGRADE HISTORIC CHATEAU TO OREGON CAVES (Salem Statesman Journal)

A nonprofit organization says the National Park Service’s plan to upgrade a historic hotel at the Oregon Caves National Monument doesn’t go far enough.

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LOTTERY COMMISSIONERS DIDN’T SHOW BIAS IN PROBING IRANIAN-AMERICAN MANAGERS PROMOTION, INVESTIGATION FINDS (Eugene Register-Guard)

An outside investigation has cleared two Oregon Lottery commissioners accused of creating a hostile work environment for an Iranian-American lottery manager by investigating and ultimately opposing his promotion to an assistant director post.

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OREGON’S TIMBER HARVEST DROPPED IN 2015 (Eugene Register-Guard)

A slowdown in log exports to Asia, the end of a trade deal between the United States and Canada, and a busy fire season all contributed to a roughly 8 percent decline in Oregon’s timber harvest last year.

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OUTDOOR SCHOOL INITIATIVE QUALIFIES FOR BALLOT (Portland Tribune)

An initiative petition to fund a statewide outdoor education program with Oregon Lottery revenue has qualified for the November general election ballot.

The Secretary of States Office confirmed Friday that the campaign for IP 67 gathered 93,102 valid signatures, about 5 percent more than the 88,114 requirement. The campaign turned in 135,538 signatures, but not all of those could be verified.

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YAKAMA NATION DEMANDS MORE RIGOROUS CLEANUP OF SUPERFUND SITE IN PORTLAND HARBOR (Portland Tribune)

Representatives of the Yakama Nation met with EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy in Washington, D.C. on Monday, July 25, to urge the federal agency to adopt a more aggressive plan to clean up the Portland Harbor Superfund site.

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RATTLESNAKE FIRE REACHES 5,000 ACRES (Bend Bulletin)

-Blaze burning northeast of Warm Springs started Sunday-

A fire that started Sunday afternoon on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation had burned about 5,000 acres by Monday morning and was still going.

The fire had caused no injuries or evacuations and was not threatening structures.

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NO CHANGE IN FUNDING DECISION FOR BEND MUSEUM (Bend Bulletin)

-State arts panel to consider future funding for High Desert Museum, others-

The Oregon Arts Commission is standing firm on its decision that the High Desert Museum does not meet eligibility requirements for two grants following its meeting Friday in Klamath Falls, according to commission Executive Director Brian Rogers.

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EDITORIAL: BROWN’S TAX POSITION SHOULD NOT BE A MYSTERY — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Gov. Kate Brown must have taken a mighty hard look at Measure 97, the corporate tax increase on the November ballot. She has proposed how the $3 billion in new revenue might be spent and how the law might be tweaked to minimize some of its negative impacts.

Isn’t it about time she tells Oregonians what she thinks of the measure?

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EDITORIAL: GRANT SHERIFF SHOULD STOP DELETING EMAILS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer apparently deletes every electronic copy of emails to and from a personal email account he uses to conduct government business.

The problem is: That’s wrong.

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EDITORIAL: LAND USE LAWS NEED AN INTERVENTION — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

After more than 10 years and millions of dollars, Bend is finally closer to getting more land for housing and businesses.

Bend needs it. But as good as Bends plan is to expand its urban growth boundary, the states land use laws are the very reason Bend is in this mess.

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SOME OREGON VOTERS WILL VOTE AGAIN ON MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Even though Oregon voters legalized recreational marijuana in 2014, you cant legally buy the stuff in more than 100 Oregon communities. That’s because some city and county governments have banned recreational marijuana businesses.

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SOCIAL WORKERS SAY WHAT IT’S LIKE TO DEAL WITH FOSTER KIDS LIVING IN THE OFFICE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Kelly Paluso has been a child welfare worker with the Oregon Department of Health for 10 years.

OPBs Kristian Foden-Vencil asked her what it’s like trying to find a home for a child when he or she is sitting right next to her in the Portland office.

It’s close to impossible, Paluso said.

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WEED SIGHTED IN OREGON FOR FIRST TIME (Capital Press)

A noxious weed never before seen in Oregon has been discovered in the northeastern corner of the state.

It is a carduus crispis, or welted thistle, which is also sometimes called a curley plumeless thistle.

It’s never been seen in Oregon before. The nearest its ever been reported is North Dakota and British Columbia, Wallowa County Vegetation Department Manager Ryan Oberhelman said. That’s an A-List, worst of the worst, thistle.

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PARKS & LITIGATION (East Oregonian)

An open hole in Portland led to three closed playgrounds in Pendleton.

State law has long protected cities from lawsuits that result from parks and recreation use, but that changed in March thanks to an Oregon Supreme Court decision.

The decision sprung from a case where Portland Parks & Recreation dug a hole at a park to fix a sprinkler head.

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FIREFIGHTERS CONTAIN SCOTT CANYON BLAZE NEAR CONDON (East Oregonian)

Firefighters expect to fully contain the Scott Canyon Fire in rural Gilliam County by Monday evening, according to a spokeswoman with the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center.

The blaze, which started Thursday on private land near the John Day River, has burned 33,587 acres between Condon and Arlington.

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OUR VIEW: SILENT MASS DISASTER DEMANDS NATIONS ATTENTION — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Viewers of television crime shows get the impression that discovery of human remains sets off an intense response, complete with FBI facial reconstruction experts, swift and accurate DNA tests and vast electronic databases that match subtle clues with lists of possible victims.

Reality is more like the situation the EO Media Group reported last in Wahkiakum County, Washington. The piece, titled Mystery on the Columbia ran in Fridays East Oregonian.

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PRISON LEADER READY TO STEP INTO NEW ROLE (Argus Observer)

In his 33-year career in department of corrections, Mark Nooth has held numerous titles and, soon, he will add another.

Nooth, the superintendent at Snake River Correctional Institution, will fill the position of Eastside Institution administrator, replacing Steve Franke.

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COUNTY BOAT RAMP, ACCESS AMONG CONCERNS FOR RESERVOIR (Argus Observer)

While there is much discussion about the county boat ramp and the fact that it been formally closed by the Bureau of Reclamation, issues at and around the Owyhee Reservoir continue to bubble as officials work to figure out how to provide the best experience for visitors.

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WYDEN: WE MUST GET THIS RIGHT (Argus Observer)

-Democratic senator calls mineral withdrawal proposal an economic development bill-

The proposed Owyhee Canyonlands national monument and a recently proposed bill to withdraw mineral exploration, both impacting more than 2 million acres of land in Malheur County, dominated a town hall meeting held by U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden Thursday.

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VALE DISTRICT BLM POSTPONES WILD HORSE GATHER (Argus Observer)

The Bureau of Land Managements Vale District is postponing a planned gather of wild horses in the Three Fingers Herd Management Area.

The gather was expected to start July 26, but that has been postponed to a tentative date of Aug. 23.

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INITIATIVE MAKES BALLOT, BUT FUNDING IS QUESTIONED — OPINION (Argus Observer)

A new education measure added to Novembers ballot could provide $1.3 million in funding to high schools across Malheur County, but its not clear yet where the money would come from.

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OREGON HEALTH AUTHORITY HELPS COAST COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER OUTREACH (The World)

Choosing the right health insurance plan is an important health decision for every individual. Coast Community Health Center is excited to announce continued funding by the Oregon Health Authority for insurance enrollment assistance for residents in southern Coos and northern Curry counties.

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INDIGENOUS POWERHOUSE (The World)

As a child, Sharon Parrish didn’t look much like an Indian. She was happy to keep her ethnicity a secret. Kids who looked like Indians got beat up, she said.

Those were dark times for Parrishs Coquille Indian Tribe. The tribe had no land, no money, and no official identity. Like other Western Oregon tribes, it was terminated  stripped of its federal recognition  by a 1954 act of Congress.

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EDITORIAL: TIMBER NUMBERS REFLECT GLOBAL TRENDS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

The Oregon Department of Forestry on Monday announced that timber harvests in the state declined about 8 percent in 2015 when compared to the year before.

It was the first time in three years that Oregon’s timber harvest had tumbled below 4 billion board feet.

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EDITORIAL: EMAIL CAUSES BIG HEADACHE FOR SHERIFF — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Federal and state government officials aren’t the only ones who can get into trouble for mixing their business and personal emails.

The Oregonian reported over the weekend about a lawsuit it’s filed against Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer. The newspaper seeks an order stopping Palmer from destroying official emails  as, apparently, the sheriff routinely does.

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MID-VALLEY INBUSINESS: BERRIES AND NUTS INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT TO GROWERS (Albany Democrat Herald)

As the mid-day July heat rises, overhead sprinklers irrigate rows of blueberry bushes along a fertile swath of land near the Santiam River.

Dozens of workers pluck ripe berries by hand into plastic buckets fastened around their waists. Nearby, two machine pickers slowly creep down neat rows, loosening fruit onto conveyors that carry the blueberries to a sorting table on the upper deck where theyre loaded in crates. Once the crates are filled, the berries are loaded in refrigerated truck trailers in the field.

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MID-VALLEY INBUSINESS: WARM WEATHER MOVES UP HARVEST (Albany Democrat Herald)

A warm and dry spring is affecting the harvest calendar for many crops grown in the Willamette Valley.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture recently noted that the harvest of blueberries, blackberries and raspberries began about two weeks early. Experts with Oregon State University Extension said the timing and yield of seed harvest has also been affected.

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HIGH PRIORITY PLAN (Baker City Herald)

-Work Continues To Open Sumpter Dredge’s Top Floor To Visitors-

Rella Brown stands on the top center deck of the Sumpter Dredge, admiring the massive mining rig built in the Great Depression.

A ranger assistant of Oregon State Parks, Brown points to a large metal structure partially sticking out the ships front. It looks like a rusty Ferris wheel, featuring multiple spoon-shaped buckets that weigh a ton each.

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PORTION OF PRISTINE CREEK TO BE PRESERVED FOR YEARS TO COME (LaGrande Observer)

-The namesake of Lookingglass Creek was a Nez Perce chief known to early settlers for a small looking glass he carried.-

Chief Lookingglass, whose Indian name was Apash-wa-hay-ikt, according to the book Oregon Geographic Names, died many decades ago, but the stream named for him remains filled with life, an unblemished natural wonder.

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CORRIDOR PROJECT MET WITH WIDE SUPPORT (LaGrande Observer)

-Forest Service engages public regarding safety plan announced last winter-

The Lostine River corridor is one of Wallowa Countys treasures, complete with a wild and scenic river  home to native salmon and trout  and a gateway to the Eagle Cap Wilderness. Each summer thousands pack into the Wallowa Mountains from its trailheads and camp along the rivers bank.

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HUNTINGTON CASHES IN ON POT, WIND FARMS WINDFALL (LaGrande Observer)

-Only town in Baker County where pot sales legal-

The wind is blowing and pot is growing in Huntington.

Two green industries are bolstering the economy this summer in the town of 445 residents about 45 miles southeast of Baker City.

Oregon Windfarms is erecting 25 wind turbines, at five nearby sites, that will generate 50 megawatts of electricity to be sold to the Idaho Power Company.

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MY VOICE: THE FAILURE OF WILD HORSE POLICY — GUEST OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

The headline for a June 28 editorial by the Bend Bulletin was absolutely right and deserves some all-caps emphasis: Wild horse policy is NOT working.

This statement is true and has been for many years. The reasons for this are many but can be boiled down to a single underlying reason: We aren’t using science to determine appropriate numbers of wild horses on federal lands, nor to effectively and humanely manage them.

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MY VOICE: VALLEYS VIEWS, PROPERTY ENDANGERED — GUEST OPINION (LaGrande Observer)

Times running out. Idaho Powers proposed transmission line from Boardman to Hemingway, Idaho, will be a gargantuan industrial intrusion, scarring the Grande Ronde Valley landscape forever. Before the preferred route is formally announced this fall, we need to challenge the route or, ideally, stop the project. Its vital to make our voices heard right now.

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GUEST COLUMN: AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION MAY PREVENT UNINTENTIONAL INJURIES — GUEST OPINION (Wallowa.com)

What is the No. 4 overall cause of death in the U.S. and the leading cause of death for those under age 45?

You might think it was cancer or another illness, but the surprising answer is unintentional injuries and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that almost 40 percent of unintentional injury deaths are preventable.

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STATE SEEKS TO ADD PUNITIVE DAMAGES TO ORACLE COMPLAINT— BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

A state of Oregon attorney wants to seek punitive damages against Oracle America over the failure of the Cover Oregon health exchange site.

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OREGON SCHOOLS SET THE EXAMPLE FOR HEALTHY LUNCHES (kdrv.com Medford)

THE USDA announced Thursday that unhealthy snacks will be banned from schools.

But Oregon is actually ahead of the game. In 2007 House Bill 2650 was passed. This was later revised and became Oregon Revised Statute 336.423. It helped define nutrition standards in schools throughout the state.

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NEW OREGON LAW PROTECTS EV CHARGING CHOICE— BLOG (Huffington Post)

In my experience in energy politics, Ive seen many attempts around the country to undermine customer choice when it comes to new clean energy technology. Net metering advocates fought to defend solar choice. Cities battled for the ability to directly provide greener and more affordable power through customer choice aggregation. And now electric vehicle drivers, businesses, and innovators have succeeded in protecting charging choice, through legislation just signed into law in Oregon.

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MARIJUANA EDIBLES ARE GETTING INTO COLORADO CHILDREN’S HANDS, STUDY SAYS (New York Times)

To a child on the prowl for sweets, that brownie, cookie or bear-shaped candy left on the kitchen counter is just asking to be gobbled up. But in states that have legalized marijuana for recreational use, notably Colorado, that child may end up with more than a sugar high.

A study published on Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics says that in Colorado the rates of marijuana exposure in young children, many of them toddlers, have increased 150 percent since 2014, when recreational marijuana products, like sweets, went on the market legally.

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A TOWN CALLED PRINEVILLE MAKES A COMEBACK (U.S. News & World Report)

It was not long ago that Crook County had five major lumber mills. Timber was king, and the rural Oregon county was the nation’s top producer of ponderosa lumber.

But amid restrictions on harvesting from federal lands, logging started to freefall around 1990. The county’s mills began closing. The global recession hit a few years later. Unemployment soared to around 20 percent, the highest in Oregon.

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July 25, 2016 eClips Weekend Edition

State Library eClips

* New flood plain regulations hurt Oregon communities and lack common sense — Guest Opinion
* As candidates weigh in, Gov. Brown stays mum on corporate tax hike — Opinion
* The Oregonian seeks order stopping Grant County sheriff from destroying emails
* Rents in Seattle $2k and Portland $1,764 are fastest growing in nation
* Can a medical and mental health database save lives?
* Lead tests in Salem, Portland schools may be skewed
* National Guard soldiers head to Romania for training
* School for the Deaf helps students pursue work, college
* Gun activists disagree with Gov. Brown’s gun safety agenda
* Black bear sighted in Veneta front yard
* State board punishes UO counseling center director for releasing students records
* Lane County housing market hits uncharted territory as low supply pushes prices to all-time highs
* Oregon bottle deposit to rise to 10 cents starting Spring 2017
* Unemployment in Oregon increases in June
* Scappoose traffic could be state’s worst by 2035
* NW housing market still hot hot hot
* Grants would benefit Portland train movements, auto exports
* Editorial: Earn tax-exempt status — Opinion
* New money available for mortgage help
* Marines sharpen skills while sprucing up Deschutes forest sites
* Data shows power of hospital monopolies
* Passed Smarter Balanced? Colleges say skip placement tests
* Editorial: Bill aimed at oil trains might help — Opinion
* Outdoor School Initiative Qualifies For Oregon Ballot
* Enthusiasts, Policymakers Weigh How To Juice Electric Car Sales
* State Accepting Art Glass Comments For One More Week
* Oregon Timber Harvest Slips For 2nd Consecutive Year
* The rest of the story of a county’s threat to farmland — Guest Opinion
* Wyden: Obama administration well aware of local opposition to national monument
* Dialysis unit at TRCI saves taxpayers money
* Wildfire threatens homes in Gilliam County
* EOCI reopens visiting hours following fight
* More liquor stores coming to mid-valley
* As $40M in funding looms for Oregon, feds close in on wave energy site — Blog
* State votes to double bottle redemption rate to 10 cents
* Reprimand, fine for UO psychologist over record release
* Outdoor Enthusiasts Reminded To Prevent Wildfire
* The Racist History of Portland, the Whitest City in America
* Protect Wolves or Hunt Them? Western States Are in the Crosshairs

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NEW FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS HURT OREGON COMMUNITIES AND LACK COMMON SENSE — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

In their recent opinion piece “A common sense approach to reforming development in Oregon flood plains,” July 19, Bob Sallinger, Mike Houck, and Travis Williams inaccurately described my opposition to recent changes to the National Flood Insurance Program, or NFIP.

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AS CANDIDATES WEIGH IN, GOV. BROWN STAYS MUM ON CORPORATE TAX HIKE — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

The corporate-tax hike proposal aimed at the November ballot has already generated plenty of attention from the public employee unions that are pushing it, the business community that opposes it, and the economists who are studying what the massive increase might mean for Oregonians.

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THE OREGONIAN SEEKS ORDER STOPPING GRANT COUNTY SHERIFF FROM DESTROYING EMAILS (Portland Oregonian)

Attorneys for The Oregonian/OregonLive on Friday asked a state judge for a temporary restraining order to keep Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer from deleting his government emails.

Palmer “systematically” destroys his official emails in a potentially criminal practice that should be stopped, the court filing says.

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RENTS IN SEATTLE $2K AND PORTLAND $1,764 ARE FASTEST GROWING IN NATION (Portland Oregonian)

A Seattle city councilmember has proposed severely curtailing the amount of cash new renters need to plunk down to move in, The Seattle Times reports.

The bold move is sure to hit on a hot-button issue for renters in the Emerald City  as well as up and down the West Coast, where rents have continued to rapidly climb in recent years.

Over the past year, Seattle, Portland and San Francisco have led the nation in greatest percentage growth.

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CAN A MEDICAL AND MENTAL HEALTH DATABASE SAVE LIVES? (Salem Statesman Journal)

It’s been three years since Judy Wooldridge lost her son.

Ben Wooldridge was diagnosed with schizophrenia at age 25. He was a smart, caring father of three and successful business owner, but he struggled with medicating his illness.

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LEAD TESTS IN SALEM, PORTLAND SCHOOLS MAY BE SKEWED (Salem Statesman Journal)

The contractor hired to test water for lead in the Salem-Keizer and Portland school districts is not following the procedure recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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NATIONAL GUARD SOLDIERS HEAD TO ROMANIA FOR TRAINING (Salem Statesman Journal)

More than 250 Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment, are scheduled to mobilize to Romania this week with the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team CBCT to participate in Saber Guardian 2016, a multinational military training exercise.

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SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF HELPS STUDENTS PURSUE WORK, COLLEGE (Salem Statesman Journal)

In art class, Cristian Flores likes to draw cars. No, correct that. He likes to draw one kind of car in particular, the Batmobile.

Flores, 18, is a student at the Oregon School for the Deaf. He is both deaf and legally blind, and, like many his age, is still exploring what he wants to do with his life.

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GUN ACTIVISTS DISAGREE WITH GOV. BROWN’S GUN SAFETY AGENDA (Salem Statesman Journal)

More than 100 gun activists and locals gathered Saturday on the steps of the Oregon Capitol to protest Gov. Kate Brown’s positions on gun safety.

Armed with AK-47 semi-automatic rifles and conceal carry handguns, many said they considered the governor’s recent gun-related executive order and proposed gun safety plan to be a violation of Second Amendment rights to keep and bear arms.

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BLACK BEAR SIGHTED IN VENETA FRONT YARD (Eugene Register-Guard)

A resident on Huston Road was startled Friday morning when she looked outside her Veneta home and saw something she had never seen before wandering through her front yard  a black bear that appeared to be fully grown.

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STATE BOARD PUNISHES UO COUNSELING CENTER DIRECTOR FOR RELEASING STUDENTS RECORDS (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Shelly Kerr gave therapy records of victim of alleged sexual assault to UO legal offices without students consent-

The state psychology regulatory board voted Friday to punish Shelly Kerr, director of the University of Oregon counseling center, for giving a students therapy records to university lawyers without the students consent.

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LANE COUNTY HOUSING MARKET HITS UNCHARTED TERRITORY AS LOW SUPPLY PUSHES PRICES TO ALL-TIME HIGHS (Eugene Register-Guard)

After searching the super-spendy Seattle and Portland markets for a home in which to raise their two children, East Coast transplants Tessa and Orion Matthews this month settled instead on a house in the south Eugene hills, after Orion sold his interest in several software development companies in New York and Washington, D.C.

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OREGON BOTTLE DEPOSIT TO RISE TO 10 CENTS STARTING SPRING 2017 (Portland Tribune)

The refund Oregonians will get from returning used soda cans and water bottles is about to go up.

This week the Oregon Liquor Control Commission announced that it was doubling the redemption value of the Oregon Bottle Bill.

Starting in April, 2017, the redemption rate for bottles and cans will increase to 10 cents per container.

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UNEMPLOYMENT IN OREGON INCREASES IN JUNE (Portland Tribune)

Statewide unemployment increased to 4.8 percent in June from 4.5 percent in May, according to data released by the State of Oregon Employment Department.

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SCAPPOOSE TRAFFIC COULD BE STATE’S WORST BY 2035 (Portland Tribune)

-Three- to five-hour traffic congestion spurts possible on Highway 30, project manager says-

A transportation system plan for Scappoose proposes roughly $50 million in projects over the next 20 years to accommodate a surge in traffic and jobs.

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NW HOUSING MARKET STILL HOT HOT HOT (Portland Tribune)

The national housing market rocketed to the fastest, most competitive its been since 2009, with Denver, Seattle and Portland leading the way, according to Seattles online real estate brokerage Redfin.

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GRANTS WOULD BENEFIT PORTLAND TRAIN MOVEMENTS, AUTO EXPORTS (Portland Tribune)

I-405 overcrossing also on list pending before state commission.

Train movements through Portland will be eased and auto exports from Portland will be boosted by millions in pending state grants earmarked for transportation projects other than highways.

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EDITORIAL: EARN TAX-EXEMPT STATUS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon law has a fairly broad property tax exemption for nonprofits. But theres been a push in the Legislature and from the League of Oregon Cities to change that.

Its worth exploring as long as the Legislature doesn’t rush in and disrupt important charitable organizations without careful analysis.

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NEW MONEY AVAILABLE FOR MORTGAGE HELP (Bend Bulletin)

-Funding may help homeowners in Crook County –

A fresh infusion of money from the U.S. Treasury has breathed new life into two programs that helped Oregonians avoid foreclosure or get up-to-date on their mortgages in the wake of the Great Recession.

One of the programs began taking applications last week while the other is expected to start in September.

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MARINES SHARPEN SKILLS WHILE SPRUCING UP DESCHUTES FOREST SITES (Bend Bulletin)

The U.S. Forest Service has long complained of inadequate budgets, staffing and resources for national forests.

This month in Oregon, a couple of national forests got a little military intervention for some of those needs.

About 50 members of a U.S. Marine Corps Forces Reserve Engineer Services Company, part of Combat Logistics Battalion 23, came from Springfield earlier this month to camp out in the Deschutes National Forest and complete maintenance projects as part of their annual training.

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DATA SHOWS POWER OF HOSPITAL MONOPOLIES (Bend Bulletin)

-Hospitals with no competition negotiate higher payments from health plans-

For decades the prices hospitals negotiated with private insurance plans were treated as tightly guarded industry secrets. But the emergence of state-run databases on hospital payments is now shining light on the wide variation in prices and what factors might influence those amounts.

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PASSED SMARTER BALANCED? COLLEGES SAY SKIP PLACEMENT TESTS (Bend Bulletin)

-Deal with community colleges, public universities starts this fall-

Students entering Central Oregon Community College this fall can use high school test scores to prove they are ready for college-level courses, part of a larger effort to better gauge which students need remedial courses and which do not.

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EDITORIAL: BILL AIMED AT OIL TRAINS MIGHT HELP — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The last thing railroad companies, oil companies and Oregonians want for a line of oil cars is a rail derailment. It could threaten lives. It could damage the environment. It will cost money.

Three members of Oregon’s congressional delegation  Reps. Peter DeFazio, Greg Walden and Earl Blumenauer  have introduced a bill to try to better protect communities. We dont know if its the right answer, but its better than other suggestions, such as banning oil shipped by rail.

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OUTDOOR SCHOOL INITIATIVE QUALIFIES FOR OREGON BALLOT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregonians will vote this fall on whether to fully fund an outdoor education program for the states fifth and sixth graders. An initiative that would do that qualified for the Oregon ballot Friday.

Outdoor school is kind of like summer camp during the school year.

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ENTHUSIASTS, POLICYMAKERS WEIGH HOW TO JUICE ELECTRIC CAR SALES (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

California, Oregon and Washington state have lofty goals for increasing the number of non-polluting vehicles on the road. To achieve those goals, you and your neighbors will need to buy electric cars at a higher rate that were seeing now.

Hundreds of electric car enthusiasts and policymakers recently gathered in Portland this week to weigh how to spur consumer demand.

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STATE ACCEPTING ART GLASS COMMENTS FOR ONE MORE WEEK (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality will accept comments for one more week on permanent rules for the states colored art glass industry.

Two major players and three small companies are located in Portland. The two larger companies air emissions have been under scrutiny since large concentrations of heavy metals were found in moss near their operations.

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OREGON TIMBER HARVEST SLIPS FOR 2ND CONSECUTIVE YEAR (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon’s timber harvest has declined for the second year in a row.

The Oregon Department of Forestry said Monday the 3.79 billion board feet harvested in 2015 represents an 8 percent decline from the year before.

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THE REST OF THE STORY OF A COUNTY’S THREAT TO FARMLAND — GUEST OPINION (Capital Press)

As a long-time subscriber, I say kudos to the Capital Press for publishing Eric Mortensons article on farmland development in Clackamas County Conservation district fights farmland development, July 8.

One county within Metro Portland, Ore., is a small part of the Capital Press publishing coverage, but this a story that merits consideration. Eric captured the essence of the matter: A local Soil & Water Conservation District is asking, What is going on? And their concern is loss of irreplaceable farmland.

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WYDEN: OBAMA ADMINISTRATION WELL AWARE OF LOCAL OPPOSITION TO NATIONAL MONUMENT (Capital Press)

The Obama administration is well aware of the strong local opposition to a proposed national monument in Malheur County, U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden told Eastern Oregon residents on July 21.

Malheur County residents who asked Wyden during an annual town hall meeting whether he supports the proposed national monument said they didn’t receive a definite answer.

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DIALYSIS UNIT AT TRCI SAVES TAXPAYERS MONEY (East Oregonian)

The city of Umatilla’s only dialysis center is different than most such operations in America.

The life-saving machines, locked behind heavy metal doors and fences topped with razor wire, run under the watchful eye of a correctional officer. The patients who sit quietly in the chairs  all men  come in wearing standard-issue T-shirts and blue jeans marked with the Department of Corrections logo.

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WILDFIRE THREATENS HOMES IN GILLIAM COUNTY (East Oregonian)

A wind-driven wildfire continues to burn in rural Gilliam County as firefighters from across Eastern Oregon race to get it under control.

The Scott Canyon Fire erupted Thursday afternoon along the banks of the John Day River and spread quickly toward the small unincorporated community of Mikkalo, located halfway between Arlington and Condon. Local volunteers worked through the night to protect farms and homes, though 30 mph wind gusts made for difficult conditions again on Friday.

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EOCI REOPENS VISITING HOURS FOLLOWING FIGHT (East Oregonian)

Following a fight inside the walls of Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution Thursday, the facility remains on partial lockdown.

Although the west side of the prison is still on lockdown, EOCI spokeswoman Jackie Peck said visiting hours will reopen at 8 a.m. Saturday.

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MORE LIQUOR STORES COMING TO MID-VALLEY (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Citing an expanding customer base, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission announced Friday it hopes to add about 10 new liquor stores in Linn, Benton and Lane counties.

Looking at the data, the state of Oregon has had a lot of population increases, said Christie Scott, a spokeswoman for the commission.  We just haven’t kept up with adding liquor outlets to match population growth.

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AS $40M IN FUNDING LOOMS FOR OREGON, FEDS CLOSE IN ON WAVE ENERGY SITE — BLOG (Oregon Business Journal)

The federal government moved closer to selecting where to build a long-planned wave energy test center  the facility that Oregon wave energy backers see as vital to the future of the industry in the state.

The U.S. Department of Energy on Thursday said it would soon issue a funding opportunity announcement that would offer up to $40 million in federal funding for the test center.

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STATE VOTES TO DOUBLE BOTTLE REDEMPTION RATE TO 10 CENTS (Oregon Business Journal)

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission on Friday voted to double the value of redeemable beverage containers from 5 cents per bottle to 10 cents. The new rate takes effect April 1, 2017.

The ruling comes at the direction of House Bill 3145, which requires the OLCC to increase the value if redemption rates dip below 80 percent for two straight years. Data from the OLCC shows redemption rates dropped to 68.26 percent in 2014 and 64.45 percent in 2015.

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REPRIMAND, FINE FOR UO PSYCHOLOGIST OVER RECORD RELEASE (KOIN)

-The head of the counseling office was fined $2,500-

A state licensing board has imposed a fine of $2,500 for the head of the University of Oregon’s counseling office for allegedly releasing a students counseling records to the university’s lawyers without the students permission.

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OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS REMINDED TO PREVENT WILDFIRE (mycentraloregon.com)

Summer is finally heating up. And while this is great news for outdoor enthusiasts, fire officials want to remind everyone that the summer heat could lead to careless wildfires.

Preventing wildfires and wildfire safety is everyone’s responsibility, said Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. I encourage citizens to join their neighbors in reducing the wildfire risk to their communities.

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THE RACIST HISTORY OF PORTLAND, THE WHITEST CITY IN AMERICA (The Atlantic)

-Its known as a modern-day hub of progressivism, but its past is one of exclusion.-

Victor Pierce has worked on the assembly line of a Daimler Trucks North America plant here since 1994. But he says that in recent years hes experienced things that seem straight out of another time.

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PROTECT WOLVES OR HUNT THEM? WESTERN STATES ARE IN THE CROSSHAIRS (Stateline)

Sheep rancher Dave Dashiell got to his feet and wiped the blood from his hands. A newborn lamb he had just delivered from a struggling ewe took one breath, then another. He laid the lamb down gently in front of its mother. I hope he lives, Dashiell said.

In extreme northeastern Washington state, the hope is not only that the lamb will avoid sickness and injury so its mother will raise it, but that an increasing number of gray wolves wont make it their prey.

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July 25, 2016 OSL eClips

* Oregon ranks 10th in the nation for the percentage of women in its Legislature
* Pipe bomb removed from Wallowa Lake
* The Atlantic magazine dubs Portland ‘the Whitest City in America’
* Exit Interview: Roy Saigo says he’s leaving Southern Oregon on right path
* Warm Springs Reservation fire grows to 1,000 acres in a few hours
* Crews make progress on fire near the John Day River
* Willamette National Cemetery added to historic register
* Will Oregon face a $1.4 billion deficit? It depends.
* Gun activists disagree with Gov. Brown’s gun safety agenda
* Oregon House Speaker to give address at DNC
* History, heritage and civil discourse — Opinion
* Shifting Geers in Oregon
* What is Bottle Bill’s aim? — Opinion
* Measure 98 key to high school students’ future — Guest Opinion
* New money available for mortgage help
* NW Fire Season Slow So Far, But That Could Change In August
* Lead Tests In Portland, Salem Schools May Be Skewed
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OREGON RANKS 10TH IN THE NATION FOR THE PERCENTAGE OF WOMEN IN ITS LEGISLATURE (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon has the 10th highest percentage of women in its Legislature, with 31.1 percent of the 90 seats held by women, according to a new analysis by The Associated Press.

Washington did even better, coming in fifth among the 50 states, with women holding 34 percent of its legislative seats. The states with the highest female representation in their legislatures are Colorado with 42 percent and Vermont at 41.1 percent, The Associated Press found.

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PIPE BOMB REMOVED FROM WALLOWA LAKE (Portland Oregonian)

Friday afternoon law enforcement agents from an array of agencies gathered to remove a pipe bomb that was discovered in the water near a public beach, reports the Wallowa County Chieftain.

According to Wallowa County Sheriff Steve Rogers, “about two weeks ago” off-duty Search and Rescue members found what they believed to be a possibly explosive device during a recreational dive on at the north end of the lake.

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THE ATLANTIC MAGAZINE DUBS PORTLAND ‘THE WHITEST CITY IN AMERICA’ (Portland Oregonian)

The Atlantic magazine on Friday published a stinging profile of Portland on its website, dubbing it “the Whitest City in America.”

The 3,500-word piece says Portland  “known for its progressivism” — has earned that title among the nation’s big cities because of the 72.2 percent of residents who are white, and 6.3 percent who are African American.

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EXIT INTERVIEW: ROY SAIGO SAYS HE’S LEAVING SOUTHERN OREGON ON RIGHT PATH (Portland Oregonian)

Roy Saigo is retiring for real this time.

The 75-year-old came out of retirement in 2014 to be Southern Oregon University’s interim president. Oregon’s now-defunct State Board of Higher Education tabbed Saigo, a former university president and chancellor in Minnesota and Alabama, to step in at the Ashland-based university.

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WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION FIRE GROWS TO 1,000 ACRES IN A FEW HOURS (Portland Oregonian)

A fire that began Sunday afternoon on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation grew to roughly 1,000 acres in a few hours as it consumed grass and juniper trees, said William Wilson of the Federal Bureau of Indian Affairs Sunday evening.

The blaze began near Rattlesnake Spring along the Warm Springs River about six miles southeast of the Kah-Nee-Tah Resort Lodge in Warm Springs.

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CREWS MAKE PROGRESS ON FIRE NEAR THE JOHN DAY RIVER (Portland Oregonian)

The Scott Canyon fire northwest of Condon is 55 percent contained, according to an update Sunday from Central Oregon Fire Information.

The fire, which began Thursday, July 21, is burning on 33,587 acres of Bureau of Land Management and Gilliam County land. It is 9 miles outside of Condon and has come to within 200 feet of Highway 206. Fire crews have made progress of the fire, using dozers, air resources and burn-outs, among other things. The fire continues to burn light grassy fuel in the canyons of the John Day River.

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WILLAMETTE NATIONAL CEMETERY ADDED TO HISTORIC REGISTER (Portland Oregonian)

The Willamette National Cemetery in Portland has been added to the National Register of Historic Places.

The 1950 cemetery is about 10 miles southeast of Portland in Clackamas and Multnomah counties. It was the first national cemetery in the northwest U.S.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department says the 307-acre cemetery offers scenic views of four mountains, the city of Portland and the Columbia and Willamette rivers.

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WILL OREGON FACE A $1.4 BILLION DEFICIT? IT DEPENDS. (Salem Statesman Journal)

State agencies submitting budget requests for the next biennium are facing the challenge of planning for both growth and cutbacks, according to George Naughton, Oregon’s chief financial officer and acting chief operating officer.

He said the state may face a $1.4 billion discretionary spending deficit in the next biennium  give or take $500 million. Officials have said that whether cuts occur depends in part on if voters approve a new corporate tax.

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GUN ACTIVISTS DISAGREE WITH GOV. BROWN’S GUN SAFETY AGENDA (Salem Statesman Journal)

More than 100 gun activists and locals gathered Saturday on the steps of the Oregon Capitol to protest Gov. Kate Brown’s positions on gun safety.

Armed with AK-47 semi-automatic rifles and conceal carry handguns, many said they considered the governor’s recent gun-related executive order and proposed gun safety plan to be a violation of Second Amendment rights to keep and bear arms.

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OREGON HOUSE SPEAKER TO GIVE ADDRESS AT DNC (Salem Statesman Journal)

Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek, D-Portland, will give an address Monday at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Kotek’s speech will focus on the progressive policies of Oregon and what that means for the nation and the next president, said Lindsey O’Brien, communications director for Kotek.

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HISTORY, HERITAGE AND CIVIL DISCOURSE — OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

In stark contrast to the noise level of the Republican National Convention’s final night, a rapt audience of Salem-area residents gathered in the Dye House of the Willamette Heritage Center Thursday evening to contemplate how our state’s political history informs modern-day Oregon.

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SHIFTING GEERS IN OREGON (Salem Statesman Journal)

It all started in  the early 1600’s  when two orphaned boys, Thomas and George Geer, were sent by their uncle to America, arriving via ship in Boston. Four centuries later, descendants of the Geer boys are congregating this weekend at the GeerCrest farmstead in the rural Waldo Hills, located between Silverton and Sublimity, for the triennial national Geer family reunion, hosted by the non-profit GeerCrest Farm & Historical Society.

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WHAT IS BOTTLE BILL’S AIM? — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon earned distinction as a pioneer in public policy, and triggered nearly a half-century of self-congratulation, by approving the Bottle Bill in 1971. The bill requires a 5-cent deposit on beer and soda pop containers, to be refunded when the bottles and cans are returned to retailers. But the deposit is slated to increase to a dime next year. The state ought to make certain that the 10-cent deposit, and the deposit-and-return system generally, is serving both its purposes.

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MEASURE 98 KEY TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ FUTURE — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

In November, Oregonians will get to vote on a proposal that promises to make our education system better in ways you may not know about.

Measure 98 would provide all Oregon high schools the resources they need to ensure that all students who want hands-on education can get it. For many young people, hands-on learning opens doors to learning real-life skills and discovering careers that are satisfying and well-paid.

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NEW MONEY AVAILABLE FOR MORTGAGE HELP (Bend Bulletin)

A fresh infusion of money from the U.S. Treasury has breathed new life into two programs that helped Oregonians avoid foreclosure or get up-to-date on their mortgages in the wake of the Great Recession.

One of the programs began taking applications last week while the other is expected to start in September.

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NW FIRE SEASON SLOW SO FAR, BUT THAT COULD CHANGE IN AUGUST (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

This year’s fire season has had a slow start.  The winter’s thicker snowpack and cooler temperatures this summer have helped keep large fires at bay, said Carol Connolly with the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center.

“Part of the difference is the weather,” Connolly explained. “We haven’t had the hot dry conditions that we’ve experienced the last few years. We have not had the lightning activity.”

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LEAD TESTS IN PORTLAND, SALEM SCHOOLS MAY BE SKEWED (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The contractor hired to test water for lead in the Salem-Keizer and Portland school districts is not following the procedure recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

That could skew results, EPA officials said Friday.

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newspapers” http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

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July 22, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* State orders Bullseye Glass to clean its smokestacks in hopes of curbing toxic pollution
* First half of 2016 points to another deadly year for motorcyclists
* Oregon, Waze ink agreement to share traffic data
* Section of U.S. Highway 20 will close for two months
* State police forensic scientist faces federal charges, accused of stealing drug evidence
* Salem company fined $75,710 for illegal waste discharge
* Major highway to Central Oregon will close Aug. 2
* Oregon prison on lockdown after fight, warning shot
* ODOT partners with Waze app to help drivers avoid traffic
* Top earners in state government
* Role of private funds rises — Opinion
* Auxiliary lane on I-5 planned to relieve congestion
* OSP forensic scientist charged, accused of stealing drugs
* Grant money headed to new Bend bus stops
* Highway through Cascade Mountains to close in August
* Renaissance turns around fortunes of Oregon’s popular nut
* State of Oregon owes counties — Opinion
* The rest of the story of a county’s threat to farmland — Guest Opinion
* Warning shot fired at EOCI to stop inmate brawl
* Final EIS released for major forest project
* Our View: Water Commission credibility in question — Opinion
* DMV office moving to Medford Center
* PenAir gets warm reception in Klamath Falls
* Archaeologist strives to put new sites on history list
* Nurse surrenders license after violating probation
* County looks at potential evacuation routes during disasters
* Worried about lead? Here are some options
* Editorial: Email ruling is a victory for openness — Opinion
* Editorial: Let’s talk about scaling back vacation — Opinion
* Oregon gets funding from CDC to fight Zika
* Utah, Oregon, Delaware lead U.S. job growth

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STATE ORDERS BULLSEYE GLASS TO CLEAN ITS SMOKESTACKS IN HOPES OF CURBING TOXIC POLLUTION (Portland Oregonian)

Bullseye Glass must thoroughly clean its smokestacks because state officials suspect it is one of two possible sources of cancer-causing hexavalent chromium in Southeast Portland’s air, the Department of Environmental Quality announced July 21.

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FIRST HALF OF 2016 POINTS TO ANOTHER DEADLY YEAR FOR MOTORCYCLISTS (Portland Oregonian)

This year could join 2015 as one of the deadliest in recent memory for Oregon motorcyclists if current trends continue.

Thirty-one motorcyclists died in Oregon wrecks in 2016 through July 7, on par with the same period last year. By the end of 2015, 60 had died on Oregon roads in the worst year for the state’s motorcyclists in decades.

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OREGON, WAZE INK AGREEMENT TO SHARE TRAFFIC DATA (Portland Oregonian)

The Oregon transportation department and the crowd-sourced navigation app Waze have inked an agreement to share real-time traffic data.

The state has displayed user-submitted data from Waze, such as reported crashes and traffic jams, on its online TripCheck map for about a month. The Oregon Department of Transportation is also sending data from its dispatch centers to Waze, which the Google subsidiary could add to its software.

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SECTION OF U.S. HIGHWAY 20 WILL CLOSE FOR TWO MONTHS (Portland Oregonian)

Driving to central Oregon is about to get a little bit harder.

On Aug. 2, a section of U.S. Highway 20  which runs across central Oregon  will close for six to eight weeks to reset a bridge threatened by an active landslide.

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STATE POLICE FORENSIC SCIENTIST FACES FEDERAL CHARGES, ACCUSED OF STEALING DRUG EVIDENCE (Portland Oregonian)

Nika Elise Larsen, who has worked as a forensic scientist for the Oregon state crime lab, is now facing federal criminal allegations, accused of obtaining controlled substances through fraud and deception.

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SALEM COMPANY FINED $75,710 FOR ILLEGAL WASTE DISCHARGE (Salem Statesman Journal)

State environmental regulators have fined a Salem company $75,710 for discharging industrial waste into Rickreall Creek.

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MAJOR HIGHWAY TO CENTRAL OREGON WILL CLOSE AUG. 2 (Salem Statesman Journal)

A major highway through the Cascade Mountains will be closed for six to eight weeks, limiting the number of roads people can travel from the Willamette Valley to Central Oregon and back.

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OREGON PRISON ON LOCKDOWN AFTER FIGHT, WARNING SHOT (Salem Statesman Journal)

An eastern Oregon prison is on full lockdown and 47 inmates are in special housing following a fight in the recreation yard, during which a staff member fired a warning shot, officials said.

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ODOT PARTNERS WITH WAZE APP TO HELP DRIVERS AVOID TRAFFIC (Salem Statesman Journal)

In an announcement made Thursday, the Oregon Department of Transportation said it will help drivers avoid traffic by partnering with Waze, a crowdsourcing app that allows anonymous users to report traffic and weather information.

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TOP EARNERS IN STATE GOVERNMENT (Salem Statesman Journal)

Please contact the State Library for access to this premium story from the Statesman Journal via email library.help@state.or.us or phone 503-378-8800.

The top state government earners aren’t agency directors or elected officials. They’re physicians, psychiatrists and dentists at the State Hospital and Oregon prisons.

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ROLE OF PRIVATE FUNDS RISES — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

When the University of Oregon announced a $2 billion fund-raising goal in 2014, the target seemed far from reach. It looks closer now that the university has passed the halfway mark. All who understand higher educations central role in the states economic and social success will welcome the evidence of an upward trajectory  and should also contemplate what would be possible if the UO could be as bullish about public support as it is about increasing private donations.

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AUXILIARY LANE ON I-5 PLANNED TO RELIEVE CONGESTION (Portland Tribune)

Two Metro-area highway projects designed to ease the movement of trucks and traffic have been added to the Oregon Transportation Commissions four-year statewide plan.

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OSP FORENSIC SCIENTIST CHARGED, ACCUSED OF STEALING DRUGS (Bend Bulletin)

-Nika Larsen worked in Bend lab-

An Oregon State Police forensic scientist who worked in Bend was charged Thursday with two federal crimes alleging she stole pills submitted to OSP crime labs as evidence, federal court records show.

Nika Larsen was charged with two counts of obtaining a controlled substance by misrepresentation, fraud and deception on Thursday. One count alleges she obtained drugs in Umatilla County and the other alleges she obtained drugs in Deschutes County.

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GRANT MONEY HEADED TO NEW BEND BUS STOPS (Bend Bulletin)

-Cascades East Transit plans to construct 56 new bus stops and replace buses-

Cascades East Transit plans to create 56 new bus stops in Bend starting next week after receiving state grant money that will also be used to purchase new buses in Jefferson and Crook counties.

The Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, which manages the transit system, received $340,000 in state special transportation funding earlier this year. The program is overseen by the Oregon Department of Transportation.

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HIGHWAY THROUGH CASCADE MOUNTAINS TO CLOSE IN AUGUST (Bend Bulletin)

A section of U.S. Highway 20 through the Cascade Mountains and Willamette National Forest will be closed for six to eight weeks starting Aug. 2 for landslide-damage repairs to the Sheep Creek Bridge, according to the Oregon Department of Transportation.

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RENAISSANCE TURNS AROUND FORTUNES OF OREGON’S POPULAR NUT (Capital Press)

Nurseryman Rich Birkemeier cant keep up with the demand for hazelnut trees.

The owner of Birkemeier Nursery supplies farmers with young hazelnut trees, but the demand has been so great that his 300-acre hazelnut farm and nursery is sold out for 2016 and has already sold out of some varieties for 2017. Birkemeier has been forced to start a waiting list for new growers who want to plant the popular nut tree.

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STATE OF OREGON OWES COUNTIES — OPINION (Capital Press)

Across the West, rural counties, school districts and local governments that once depended on natural resources such as timber have been slowly sinking into a sea of red ink.

The problem: State and federal land managers have unilaterally changed the rules of how natural resources are managed. The result has been less economic activity such as logging, leading to ever-tighter local budgets. Those local governments and school districts once shared the revenue from timber cut on public lands. Now they receive only a small fraction of what they previously received.

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THE REST OF THE STORY OF A COUNTY’S THREAT TO FARMLAND — GUEST OPINION (Capital Press)

As a long-time subscriber, I say kudos to the Capital Press for publishing Eric Mortensons article on farmland development in Clackamas County Conservation district fights farmland development, July 8.

One county within Metro Portland, Ore., is a small part of the Capital Press publishing coverage, but this a story that merits consideration. Eric captured the essence of the matter: A local Soil & Water Conservation District is asking, What is going on? And their concern is loss of irreplaceable farmland.

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WARNING SHOT FIRED AT EOCI TO STOP INMATE BRAWL (East Oregonian)

Correctional officers at EOCI fired a warning shot Thursday after dozens of inmates brawled in the west recreation yard.

No injuries were reported.

According to a press release from the Oregon Department of Corrections, a number of inmates engaged in a series of fights about 2:30 p.m. in a yard at Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution in Pendleton.

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FINAL EIS RELEASED FOR MAJOR FOREST PROJECT (East Oregonian)

The Wallowa-Whitman National Forest is in the home stretch of permitting an ambitious project designed to make 98,000 acres of land healthier and more resilient to wildfire, part of a broader strategy to accelerate the pace and scale of forest restoration in Eastern Oregon and Washington.

The Lower Joseph Creek Restoration Project calls for 17,240 acres of timber harvest on the Wallowa Valley Ranger District north of Enterprise.

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OUR VIEW: WATER COMMISSION CREDIBILITY IN QUESTION — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

The continuing saga of the Medford Water Commission’s handling of lead contamination is less about public health than about public disclosure.The potential harm to water customers from ingesting lead is certainly a concern, but so far, there is no evidence that anyone’s health has been affected. The commission’s credibility, on the other hand, is on life support.

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DMV OFFICE MOVING TO MEDFORD CENTER (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Office will be closed week of July 25 during move-

The Oregon Department of Motor Vehicles’ Medford office is returning to the Medford Center, which it left 15 years ago.

Lance Westland and other local DMV employees waited for years to move to a new building before finally moving from Medford Center to Progress Square in 2001.

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PENAIR GETS WARM RECEPTION IN KLAMATH FALLS (Herald and News)

-Commerical air service to return Oct. 5-

About 300 people streamed into Crater Lake-Klamath Falls Regional Airport Thursday to welcome PenAir and the return of commercial airline service to the city.

PenAir, an Anchorage, Alaska-based airline, will begin two flights a day between Klamath Falls and Portland on Oct. 5.

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ARCHAEOLOGIST STRIVES TO PUT NEW SITES ON HISTORY LIST (The World)

-Gold Beach area filled with history of war-

In 1856, Miner’s Fort north of Gold Beach housed over 100 people for 30 days as they were attacked by Native Americans during the Rogue River Indian Wars. Mark Tveskov, professor of anthropology at Southern Oregon University, has done extensive research on the war, that desperate moment of history, and he and his students are excavating sites from that period with the goal of adding them to the National Register of Historic Places.

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NURSE SURRENDERS LICENSE AFTER VIOLATING PROBATION (Daily Astorian)

Registered nurse Jamie D. Grijalva, of Astoria, voluntarily surrendered her license last month for violating the terms and conditions of her probation, according to the Oregon State Board of Nursing.

Grijalva was placed on probation in November 2012 after she was reported to the state board for diverting eight hydrocodone from the workplace in October 2011, and supplying improper documentation.

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COUNTY LOOKS AT POTENTIAL EVACUATION ROUTES DURING DISASTERS (Daily Astorian)

Seldom used back roads outside Astoria and Seaside could offer a lifeline in a Cascadia earthquake.

Clatsop County Public Works is exploring ways to create alternate and evacuation routes and have identified several possibilities, including some that are currently gated off on private timberland.

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WORRIED ABOUT LEAD? HERE ARE SOME OPTIONS (Albany Democrat Herald)

Worried about the potential for lead in your own drinking water after reading accounts of elevated levels found in local schools?

If you live in a newer home or have replaced your fixtures recently, you probably don’t have to be. But if you’re concerned, Oregon has options for testing.

First, mid-valley cities want to stress, municipal water is considered safe. State law requires a battery of tests, including ones for lead contamination, and water reports with test results are made public annually.

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EDITORIAL: EMAIL RULING IS A VICTORY FOR OPENNESS — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

A recent ruling from a federal appeals court could be viewed as a rare legal victory for former Gov. John Kitzhaber.

But the ruling also had a very clear message to public officials: Even if you’re using a private email account to handle government business, emails regarding public business are public documents.

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EDITORIAL: LET’S TALK ABOUT SCALING BACK VACATION — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

An interesting story last Sunday in the Democrat-Herald examined the phenomenon that educators have termed the “summer slide”  the natural tendency for students to lose academic ground during the long, warm weeks of summer vacation.

School districts around the mid-valley have started programs intended to help students keep an educational mindset during the summer months, and those are showing some signs of success.

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OREGON GETS FUNDING FROM CDC TO FIGHT ZIKA (Oregon Business Journal)

Oregon was awarded $632,654 from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to fight the Zika virus

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UTAH, OREGON, DELAWARE LEAD U.S. JOB GROWTH (MarketWatch)

Utah, Oregon, and Delaware have the country’s fastest-growing job markets, according to government data released Friday.

For the year through June, nonfarm employment rose by 3.2% in Utah and Oregon, and 3.1% in Delaware, the Labor Department reported.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on July 22, 2016 OSL eClips

July 21, 2016 OSL eClips

* Portland school board plans speedy search for interim superintendent
* Oregon elections director resigns three months before November election
* Lead testing starts in Salem-Keizer schools
* Lawmakers tour potential transportation upgrade projects in Eugene area
* New regulations wont prevent bomb trains — Guest Opinion
* State elections director resigns suddenly with little explanation
* Oracle: State improperly concealed whistleblower’s bombshell account of Cover Oregon debacle
* Metro projects big population growth in suburban counties
* Report: Systemic failures led to inaction over lead in school water
* Recruiting a better ending for women in the trades
* Shootings across U.S. trigger racial tension in Portland
* State arts panel ends funding to Bend museum
* Medicaid may cover contraceptives right after delivery
* Wyden visits Bend for update on wildfires
* Tests show safe water at Redmond schools
* Oregon’s Elections Director Abruptly Resigns
* Thu 8 AM Oregon Pitches Pot Avoidance To Teens
* Oregon farmer wins zoning dispute
* Interior bill lays groundwork for addressing Western issues
* Group clones California giant trees to combat climate change
* State fair seeks creative submissions
* Forrester: Building homes in Pendleton could bring jobs — Opinion
* State nursing board penalizes two Medford women
* Our View: End the ban on gun violence research — Opinion
* Guest Opinion: Patridge should serve both city and OLCC — Guest Opinion
* Four more lead pigtails found in Medford
* Oregon Promise looks like good bet — Opinion
* Raising minimum wage won’t do much to improve your life — Guest Opinion
* Coast’s economic engines will be topic of August summit
* New plant species identified on mountain near Arch Cape
* Editorial: LaMear bears witness to a public health epidemic — Opinion
* Column: Oil trains from hell — Guest Opinion
* CASA list is shrinking, but children still in need
* Lead found at two Albany schools
* Health care advisory measure headed to Ashland voters
* Our View: Sending a message — Opinion
* DEQ hearing to consider new Lakeview landfill
* MOSIER Act demands derailment investigations
* ODFW confirms wolf attack on calf in Beeler Ridge area
* ODA bans 14 horticultural products, urges growers to halt use
* State prepares to launch retirement savings plan
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PORTLAND SCHOOL BOARD PLANS SPEEDY SEARCH FOR INTERIM SUPERINTENDENT (Portland Oregonian)

Portland school board members are scrambling to find an interim superintendent during a time of mounting district scrutiny.

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OREGON ELECTIONS DIRECTOR RESIGNS THREE MONTHS BEFORE NOVEMBER ELECTION (Portland Oregonian)

The director of Oregon’s Elections Division resigned on Tuesday, with just three months until the November general election.

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LEAD TESTING STARTS IN SALEM-KEIZER SCHOOLS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Testing of taps in all 88 Salem-Keizer School District buildings started last week and will continue through mid-August.

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LAWMAKERS TOUR POTENTIAL TRANSPORTATION UPGRADE PROJECTS IN EUGENE AREA (Eugene Register-Guard)

Twelve key state lawmakers visited Eugene and Springfield on Wednesday as part of a summer tour to build support for a new attempt to pass a transportation funding package in 2017.

Lawmakers rode on Lane Transit District buses through Eugene and Springfield, looking at problem areas and potential projects, before an evening public hearing at the University of Oregon.

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NEW REGULATIONS WONT PREVENT BOMB TRAINS — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The governments latest response to derailments of bomb trains carrying volatile Bakken crude oil and ethanol may help limit impacts in the aftermath of an accident, but do nothing to prevent the next fiery derailment. In announcing new regulations focused on ensuring that first responders and train operators are more prepared, it is what U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx did not say that speaks volumes.

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STATE ELECTIONS DIRECTOR RESIGNS SUDDENLY WITH LITTLE EXPLANATION (Portland Tribune)

Three months before the November general election, Oregon Elections Division Director Jim Williams suddenly resigned Tuesday citing personal reasons.

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ORACLE: STATE IMPROPERLY CONCEALED WHISTLEBLOWER’S BOMBSHELL ACCOUNT OF COVER OREGON DEBACLE (Portland Tribune)

On the eve of a key hearing Oracle is asking a judge to throw out the states billion-dollar fraud lawsuit over the Cover Oregon website debacle. The company accuses the state of playing hide-the ball to dishonestly conceal Oregon’s top witness.

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METRO PROJECTS BIG POPULATION GROWTH IN SUBURBAN COUNTIES (Portland Tribune)

By now, nearly everyone in Portland has heard the city’s population will skyrocket over the next 20 years. The Comprehensive Plan update recently approved by the City Council predicts that around 260,000 more people will be living in Portland by 2035, pushing the total to 880,000 or so. That’s why there are so many apartments under construction.

But new population projections being finalized by Metro, the elected regional government, shows that even more people will move into the rest of the tri-county area in coming years

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REPORT: SYSTEMIC FAILURES LED TO INACTION OVER LEAD IN SCHOOL WATER (Portland Tribune)

The largest school district in Oregon didn’t have a plan for testing for lead in its water, remediating its effects, nor communicating results externally or internally, despite knowing about the problem for at least the last 15 years.

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RECRUITING A BETTER ENDING FOR WOMEN IN THE TRADES (Portland Tribune)

-Changing hearts critical to ending sexism, abuse-

During the past month, the Tribune has explored discrimination and abuse against Oregon women attempting to make careers as line workers. Today, the Tribune spotlights electricians, a construction trade where gains for equality have been made.

Heres what Donna Hammond did when she was trying to break the color and gender barriers by apprenticing to become an electrician in the late-1970s.

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SHOOTINGS ACROSS U.S. TRIGGER RACIAL TENSION IN PORTLAND (Portland Tribune)

Portland protester calls for violence against cops. A West Linn cop posts online that a possible Black Lives Matter protest at Pioneer Courthouse Square may be target practice.

Tensions are high and the rhetoric is hot in the Portland area in the wake of shooting deaths of African-Americans and police officers in the last two weeks. Local activists and leaders are advising people to stay calm.

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STATE ARTS PANEL ENDS FUNDING TO BEND MUSEUM (Bend Bulletin)

-Commission says art not at core of High Desert Museum-

The Oregon Arts Commission has decided to no longer make funding available from two grants to the High Desert Museum and several other organizations.

After reviewing the criteria for eligibility for the Operating Support and Arts Learning grants last fall, the commission notified the museum via email in March that it did not meet the criteria and would not be eligible for funding from the two grants following the end of the fiscal year on June 30.

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MEDICAID MAY COVER CONTRACEPTIVES RIGHT AFTER DELIVERY (Bend Bulletin)

-Giving birth followed by receiving birth control?-

After delivering a 17-year-old girls second baby, certified nurse midwife Olivia Kroening-Roche walked the patient  who she said suffered physically, socially and economically from being a teenage parent  to a nearby clinic so she could receive a birth control implant.

In an email to Oregon Medicaid officials, Kroening-Roche wrote that the girl had not received a highly effective form of contraceptive following her first delivery, and she wanted to make sure she did this time.

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WYDEN VISITS BEND FOR UPDATE ON WILDFIRES (Bend Bulletin)

-Senator says he wants to change funding for fighting wildfires-

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., stopped in Bend on Wednesday to hear an update on the fire season and to urge an end to fire-borrowing, a practice that redirects federal agency funds to fight wildfires.

Fire officials from the region told Wyden that this winters larger snowpack melted off quickly. Fires started earlier in the season, and current conditions at lower elevations are dry.

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TESTS SHOW SAFE WATER AT REDMOND SCHOOLS (Bend Bulletin)

Recent tests of drinking water at Redmond School District facilities showed no elevated lead levels, the district announced this week.

The district tested seven of its schools that were all built in or before 1986: M.A. Lynch Elementary, John Tuck Elementary, Obsidian Middle

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OREGON’S ELECTIONS DIRECTOR ABRUPTLY RESIGNS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The head of Oregon’s Elections Division abruptly stepped down this week, just three months before voting begins in this falls election.

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THU 8 AM – OREGON PITCHES POT AVOIDANCE TO TEENS (Jefferson Public Radio)

One of the major concerns about marijuana becoming legal for personal use in Oregon was the possibility of younger people getting a hold of the drug.

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OREGON FARMER WINS ZONING DISPUTE (Capital Press)

Straw-compressing facilities can be built on Oregon farmland without a county conditional use permit, according to the Oregon Court of Appeals.

The appellate court has rejected arguments that compressing bales of straw for easier shipment to overseas markets is a form of processing that’s disallowed within farm zones without a permit.

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INTERIOR BILL LAYS GROUNDWORK FOR ADDRESSING WESTERN ISSUES (Capital Press)

Agricultural leaders are lauding passage of the House Interior and Environment Appropriations bill for Fiscal Year 2017, which they say fully funds wildfire suppression and assistance to rural counties heavy in federal lands while addressing recent examples of what they describe as government overreach.

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GROUP CLONES CALIFORNIA GIANT TREES TO COMBAT CLIMATE CHANGE (Capital Press)

At the foot of a giant sequoia in California’s Sierra Nevada, two arborists stepped into harnesses then inched up ropes more than 20 stories into the dizzying canopy of a tree that survived thousands of years, enduring drought, wildfire and disease.

There, the arborists clipped off tips of young branches to be hand-delivered across the country, cloned in a lab and eventually planted in a forest in some other part of the world.

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STATE FAIR SEEKS CREATIVE SUBMISSIONS (East Oregonian)

Oregonians have an opportunity to showcase their talents in the Oregon State Fair.

The Creative Living Competitions feature everything from cake design, photography and flower arrangements to Legos, fine art and woodworking. A long-standing tradition, it highlights the creativity of children and adults from across the state.

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FORRESTER: BUILDING HOMES IN PENDLETON COULD BRING JOBS — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Completion of an up-to-date study of Pendleton housing is good news. Although housing construction has been on the upswing, many of us in town have been worrying about considerable numbers of people who work in Pendleton but cant find housing here. Many have long commutes and others have settled elsewhere.

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STATE NURSING BOARD PENALIZES TWO MEDFORD WOMEN (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Oregon State Board of Nursing took final disciplinary action against 36 nurses or nursing assistants in the state during its July 13 board meeting. Two Jackson County women were among those disciplined.

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OUR VIEW: END THE BAN ON GUN VIOLENCE RESEARCH — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown last week issued an executive order intended to strengthen existing state gun laws, and called on the Legislature to enact three new laws next session aimed at reducing gun violence. Gun rights groups say the measures won’t work; gun control supporters say they will. Here’s the truth: Nobody knows.

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GUEST OPINION: PATRIDGE SHOULD SERVE BOTH CITY AND OLCC — GUEST OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

The city of Medford receives nearly $1 million with almost $3 million pouring into the Rogue Valley annually from liquor taxes. The OLCC generates over $1 billion per biennium and is Oregons third largest revenue source. Having a voice in maximizing Oregon Liquor Control Commission revenue is important. In addition to producing revenue, ensuring reasonable policies governing our wineries, breweries and distilleries as well as agriculture and hospitality industries is critical.

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FOUR MORE LEAD PIGTAILS FOUND IN MEDFORD (Medford Mail Tribune)

The Medford Water Commission unearthed another four lead pigtail pipes Wednesday, bringing to 13 the number found over the past year.

Lead pigtails, which were once used to connect service lines from the water meter to the main line in the street, were found on Laurel, King and 11th streets Wednesday by a Water Commission crew.

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OREGON PROMISE LOOKS LIKE GOOD BET — OPINION (Herald and News)

Oregon needs more college graduates to meet the needs of the economy, and produce the benefits a good economy brings.

That was the reason former Gov. John Kitzhaber pushed the 40-40-20 goal in which by 2025, 40 percent of Oregon’s adults would have at least a bachelors degree, 40 percent have an associates or equivalent degree and the remaining 20 percent have at least a high school diploma.

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RAISING MINIMUM WAGE WON’T DO MUCH TO IMPROVE YOUR LIFE — GUEST OPINION (Herald and News)

Raising the minimum wage doesn’t matter.

I can hear the screams now. What do you mean it doesn’t matter? Fifteen dollars an hour is way better than seven. Sure it is, but the conversation needs to be about a living wage and frankly, $15 an hour is not a living wage.

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COAST’S ECONOMIC ENGINES WILL BE TOPIC OF AUGUST SUMMIT (The World)

Leaders from across the state are convening the Oregon Coast Economic Summit to discuss education, job creation, natural resources and economic development on the Oregon Coast.

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NEW PLANT SPECIES IDENTIFIED ON MOUNTAIN NEAR ARCH CAPE (Daily Astorian)

Onion Peak  similar in habitat to Saddle Mountain  is home to many rare plants, since some species specialize in high elevations near the coast, North Coast Land Conservancy Stewardship Director Melissa Reich said.

Three new plant species were identified this month on Onion Peak, the third-tallest point in Clatsop County at 3,057 feet.

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EDITORIAL: LAMEAR BEARS WITNESS TO A PUBLIC HEALTH EPIDEMIC — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

The measures the mayor backs are common sense

One of the startling revelations of 2016 is Democrats finding their voice on gun control. In defiance of the National Rifle Association and other gun pressure groups, Oregon U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley have spoken out on the need to adopt measures that many of us deem are sensible  banning the sale of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, for instance. Gov. Kate Browns recent support for such measures was equally startling. She did something her predecessor John Kitzhaber, an emergency room physician, would not.

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COLUMN: OIL TRAINS FROM HELL — GUEST OPINION (Daily Astorian)

The whole idea  of fracking North Dakota and shipping flammable crude oil by rail through the Columbia River Gorge  is not just a violation of nature. Its also a threat to people who live near the tracks.

These trains are explosive. A recent fiery wreck of a Union Pacific oil train in the gorge just missed destroying the river town of Mosier. The gorge is a national scenic area and windsurfer heaven. Its almost never not windy.

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CASA LIST IS SHRINKING, BUT CHILDREN STILL IN NEED (Albany Democrat Herald)

One boy who was waiting to be placed in foster care spent five weeks in an area hotel because there were no open beds at residential care facilities or foster parents available, Hilary Harrison, executive director of Linn County CASA told county commissioners Roger Nyquist and Will Tucker Tuesday morning.

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LEAD FOUND AT TWO ALBANY SCHOOLS (Albany Democrat Herald)

Two Albany elementary schools have tested positive so far for elevated levels of lead in their water fixtures.

Doug Pigman, director of facilities, reported Tuesday afternoon that initial results from Periwinkle and Waverly elementary schools show lead values that exceed the action level.

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HEALTH CARE ADVISORY MEASURE HEADED TO ASHLAND VOTERS (Ashland Daily Tidings)

-Council OKs putting request that state legislators reform health care system on ballot-

The third time proved to be the charm for residents representing Health Care for All Oregon at Tuesdays Ashland City Council Meeting.

A brigade of several dozen sporting red Health Care for All Oregon T-shirts had approached two times before asking the council to certify their spot on the November ballot so Ashland residents could vote on a proposal asking the 2017 legislature to follow the results of research indicating what would be in the interest of health care options for Oregon residents, doctors and medical providers.

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OUR VIEW: SENDING A MESSAGE — OPINION (Ashland Daily Tidings)

A proposed resolution to the Legislature approved for the November ballot by the Ashland City Council won’t change anything by itself, but it will send a message to lawmakers if city voters approve it.

The measure, backed by local members of Health Care for All Oregon, calls on the Legislature to follow the results of a study on health care funding that lawmakers authorized in 2015. Essentially, the 2015 bill directed the Oregon Health Authority to determine the best way for the state to pay for universal health care.

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DEQ HEARING TO CONSIDER NEW LAKEVIEW LANDFILL (Lake County Examiner)

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality DEQ will hold a public information meeting on Wednesday, July 27 at the Lake County Courthouse to consider a solid waste permit application by Lake County for a new solid waste disposal site.

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MOSIER ACT DEMANDS DERAILMENT INVESTIGATIONS (Hood River News)

Oregon Senators Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden introduced a bill last Wednesday that would compel federal regulators to investigate every major oil train derailment.

The bill came in response to the June 3 fiery derailment in Mosier.

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ODFW CONFIRMS WOLF ATTACK ON CALF IN BEELER RIDGE AREA (Wallowa.com)

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife officials on Tuesday confirmed a wolf attack on a calf on public land in the Beeler Ridge area east of Joseph. Although the calf suffered numerous bites and lacerations, it survived the attack. This attack followed closely upon the heels of a confirmed wolf kill in the Kuhn Ridge area on June 26.

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ODA BANS 14 HORTICULTURAL PRODUCTS, URGES GROWERS TO HALT USE (KTVZ Bend)

The Oregon Department of Agriculture said Wednesday it has issued 12 notices of statewide detainment and stop sale and removal orders for horticultural products that contain pesticide active ingredients not listed on the label.

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STATE PREPARES TO LAUNCH RETIREMENT SAVINGS PLAN (KTVZ Bend)

-Will offer Roth IRAs for workers whose employers lack plans-

The voices of employers statewide are influencing the design of the landmark Oregon Retirement Savings Plan, which will provide potentially 1 million workers with the opportunity to save for more secure futures, officials said Wednesday.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on July 21, 2016 OSL eClips

July 20, 2016 OSL eClips

* Oregon unemployment rate climbs to 4.8 percent
* Oregon Youth Authority in ‘desperate need’ of foster homes for young offenders
* High levels of dioxins found in Salem’s Willamette Slough
* Cyclists stage ‘die-in’ on ODOT steps in Salem
* Ranchers have held up their end of wolf bargain — Guest Opinion
* Washington County eyes odor control for pot grows
* State continues job growth as June unemployment rate rises to 4.8 percent
* Environmentalists shut out of Oregon forest litigation
* OHA advises pregnant women to avoid Olympics
* Editorial: Our Oregon’s double standard — Opinion
* House Budget Bill Would Block Owyhee Monument
* Mosier Groundwater Contaminated After Oil Train Derailment
* Time runs out for Oregon timber ballot initiatives
* Port of Morrow to expand land application for wastewater
* Our view: Independent crash investigations will keep railroads safe — Opinion
* Wheat’s weather woes
* Program gives slight boost to state funds
* City: Water standards are unachievable
* House OK’s prohibiting monument
* Thumbs up, thumbs down — Opinion
* Since You Asked: I-5 interchange work at Phoenix nears the end
* Wyden pushes for study of gun violence
* Grading Browns gun speech — Opinion
* Personal preparedness will be key in big earthquake event
* Lower Joseph Creek plan closer to final
* Recent lightning sparks fires across the Blue Mountains
* OTEC completes annual safety training
* Lower Joseph Creek project clears major hurdle
* Oregon Employment Update, June 2016– Blog
* Columbia River sockeye salmon return is fifth largest since 1938
* OHA to Release 2017-2019 Budget at Months End
* Can Changing How You Think About Pain Lessen What You Feel?

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OREGON UNEMPLOYMENT RATE CLIMBS TO 4.8 PERCENT (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s jobless rate edged up last month to 4.8 percent, compared to 4.5 percent the prior month, according to data out early Tuesday. It’s the first increase in Oregon’s unemployment rate since May 2015.

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OREGON YOUTH AUTHORITY IN ‘DESPERATE NEED’ OF FOSTER HOMES FOR YOUNG OFFENDERS (Portland Oregonian)

Earlier this month, the Oregon Youth Authority posted Craigslist ads in three cities. The agency tasked with housing young criminal offenders said it was in “desperate need” of foster homes for three young transgender prisoners about to get out.

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HIGH LEVELS OF DIOXINS FOUND IN SALEM’S WILLAMETTE SLOUGH (Salem Statesman Journal)

State environmental regulators have found high levels of dioxins in sediment in the Willamette Slough in Salem, and warn that eating fish caught in the area could be unsafe.

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CYCLISTS STAGE ‘DIE-IN’ ON ODOT STEPS IN SALEM (Salem Statesman Journal)

On Saturday, a group of 12 bicyclists and one skateboarder traveled 60 miles from Portland to Salem, all to way to the steps of the Oregon Department of Transportation building, where they held a rally and pretended to die.

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RANCHERS HAVE HELD UP THEIR END OF WOLF BARGAIN — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon’s ranchers want to set the record straight on wolves.

The Oregon Cattlemens Association and the Oregon Farm Bureau Federation opposed wolf reintroduction from the beginning, knowing the toll it would take on our livestock producers. Nevertheless, the ranching community worked with environmental groups and state regulators and agreed to the conditions of the Oregon Wolf Conservation & Management Plan in 2005. This cooperation came at a significant expense to producers who expended resources to reduce the risk of attack on their animals.

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WASHINGTON COUNTY EYES ODOR CONTROL FOR POT GROWS (Portland Tribune)

-Board sets Aug. 2 for next hearing on new planning rules. –

Washington County commissioners say they may want to add a requirement for odor control as they consider new regulations for commercial growing and other operations connected with marijuana for recreational use.

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STATE CONTINUES JOB GROWTH AS JUNE UNEMPLOYMENT RATE RISES TO 4.8 PERCENT (Portland Tribune)

Oregon’s unemployment rate crept up to 4.8 percent in June as the state added 3,000 jobs last month.

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ENVIRONMENTALISTS SHUT OUT OF OREGON FOREST LITIGATION (Portland Tribune)

Environmental and fishing groups will be shut out from high-stakes litigation over Oregon’s forest management policies, according to a judges order.

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OHA ADVISES PREGNANT WOMEN TO AVOID OLYMPICS (Bend Bulletin)

The Oregon Health Authority issued a statement Tuesday warning pregnant women not to travel to Rio de Janeiro for the Olympic Games in August or the Paralympic Games in September due to the risk of becoming infected with the Zika virus.

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EDITORIAL: OUR OREGON’S DOUBLE STANDARD — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

A debate over Measure 97, the stealth sales tax formerly known as IP 28, has fallen apart before it began.

The debate was scheduled for July 28 at a City Club of Portland event sponsored by The Standard Insurance Co. Our Oregon, the union-funded advocacy group thats a major champion of the measure, has pulled out. Its reason? The Standard opposes Measure 97.

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HOUSE BUDGET BILL WOULD BLOCK OWYHEE MONUMENT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

The latest Congressional budget bill for the U.S. Department of the Interior includes a provision to block President Obama from designating an Owyhee National Monument in Southeast Oregon.

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MOSIER GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATED AFTER OIL TRAIN DERAILMENT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

When a Union Pacific oil train derailed and burst into fire in Mosier, Oregon, in June, the initial damage was in plain view, as dark smoke billowed into the sky.

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TIME RUNS OUT FOR OREGON TIMBER BALLOT INITIATIVES (Capital Press)

Three ballot initiatives that would have restricted clear-cutting and aerial spraying in Oregon have failed to qualify for the November general election.

One of the petitions, which would have imposed new limits on aerial pesticide applications, was able to obtain the Oregon Supreme Courts approval for its ballot title language.

However, that didnt leave enough time for supporters to collect about 88,000 valid signatures by the July 8 deadline.

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PORT OF MORROW TO EXPAND LAND APPLICATION FOR WASTEWATER (East Oregonian)

The Port of Morrow is expanding its capacity to recycle industrial wastewater for local farmers to irrigate their crops.

As the port continues to grow, General Manager Gary Neal said there has been a sharp increase in the amount of wastewater generated by food processors and data centers at the East Beach Industrial Park.

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OUR VIEW: INDEPENDENT CRASH INVESTIGATIONS WILL KEEP RAILROADS SAFE — OPINION (East Oregonian)

There was a time in America when railroads were a sovereign power  close to being a fourth branch of government.

In the 19th century, thanks to their enormous land grants and economic clout, they had the power to make some communities boom or bust. They held plenty of sway in Washington, D.C., too.

Even today, railroads pull plenty of might down their tracks, and can wield similar power within the industries and economies that rely on them.

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WHEAT’S WEATHER WOES (Argus Observer)

-Harvest halts, resumes after recent rainfall-

This years wheat harvest got off to a good start. Then the rain came, and harvest came to a stop for a few days.

It ground everything to a halt, Oregon State University Extension agent Bill Buhrig said of the rain that hit in mid-July.

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PROGRAM GIVES SLIGHT BOOST TO STATE FUNDS (Argus Observer)

Having a year under their belt, Oregon Department of Transportation officials are pleased with the progress of the pilot statewide road usage charge program.

The pilot program was started July 1, 2015, with volunteers being charges for the number of miles they drive instead of the fuel tax charged at the gas pump.

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CITY: WATER STANDARDS ARE UNACHIEVABLE (Argus Observer)

New state water quality standards are unachievable, city officials say, and Ontario is looking to a consulting firm to negotiate with Oregons Department of Environmental Quality.

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HOUSE OK’S PROHIBITING MONUMENT (Argus Observer) \

U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Oregon, has joined other lawmakers in adding a section to the Interior Departments budget to prevent a national monument declaration in Malheur County.

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THUMBS UP, THUMBS DOWN — OPINION (Argus Observer)

Thumbs down: to the Oregon Government Ethics Commission for doing a poor job with the investigation into Ms. Barnetts bonus raise. The mayor, Ron Verini, did in fact illegally sign a document giving Ms. Barnett a salary increase without prior authorization from the city council. Did the commission get the rest of the facts incorrect as well? When will there be total transparency with the city of Ontario government entities? The community deserves transparency and honesty.

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SINCE YOU ASKED: I-5 INTERCHANGE WORK AT PHOENIX NEARS THE END (Medford Mail Tribune)

Q: When is the northbound exit to Phoenix from Interstate 5 going to open?

A: Kathy, your question is very timely, but you’re going to have to hurry to put together your celebration. That’s because the northbound exit from Interstate 5 at Phoenix is supposed to open today, according to Gary Leaming, spokesman for the Oregon Department of Transportation.

Leaming says the exit should be open by midday today, which means work is “effectively finished” on the interchange itself.

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WYDEN PUSHES FOR STUDY OF GUN VIOLENCE (Medford Mail Tribune)

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Oregon, wants the Centers for Disease Control to be able to study gun violence, and he’s gathering data and information from around the state, including Southern Oregon, to make his case.

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GRADING BROWNS GUN SPEECH — OPINION (Baker City Herald)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown made a major speech Friday about guns and violence, and we liked some of the things the governor had to say.

Others, not so much.

We appreciate that Brown, in making her pitch for changes to gun control laws, cited a couple of examples that everyone, regardless of their stance on the issue, agrees represent failures.

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PERSONAL PREPAREDNESS WILL BE KEY IN BIG EARTHQUAKE EVENT (LaGrande Observer)

-Cascadia earthquake projected to hit Pacific Northwest-

The massive earthquake and the ensuing tsunami that hit Japan in 2011 killed thousands and caused damage that took years to repair. Geologists say a similar event is likely along the Northwest Coast, and emergency managers urge residents to prepare.

The earthquake would be the biggest natural disaster the nation has ever seen, according to a June 4 story by The Associated Press.

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LOWER JOSEPH CREEK PLAN CLOSER TO FINAL (LaGrande Observer)

There are many ideas about how to restore Wallowa Countys watersheds on public lands. A draft report released by the Forest Service today seeks to find a balance among a broad spectrum of forest users.

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RECENT LIGHTNING SPARKS FIRES ACROSS THE BLUE MOUNTAINS (LaGrande Observer)

Recent lightning activity across the Blue Mountains has sparked several new fires, according to a release from Blue Mountain Fire Information Center.

Both lookouts and aerial reconnaissance have reported a total of eight new lightning caused fires thus far across the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest and the Northeast Oregon Department of Forestry protection areas, the release said.

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OTEC COMPLETES ANNUAL SAFETY TRAINING (LaGrande Observer)

-Linemen are required to pass training to keep employment-

Recently, Oregon Trail Electric Cooperatives line crews buckled on their fall-restraint equipment belts, dug into utility poles and began their annual pole top rescue exercises.

As an OSHA-mandated safety training requirement, the course is designed to evaluate linemen on their ability to properly rescue an injured and/or stranded coworker, according to a press release from OTEC.

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LOWER JOSEPH CREEK PROJECT CLEARS MAJOR HURDLE (Wallowa.com)

Lower Joseph Creek may soon hear the sounds of chain saws and other tools of forest and grassland enhancement.

The USFS last week released a Final Environmental Impact Statement and a pair of draft decisions for the Lower Joseph Creek Restoration Project.

The restoration project will encompass nearly 100,000 acres just north of Enterprise. It is intended to increase forest resiliency, reduce fire and insect destruction of the forest, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat.

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OREGON EMPLOYMENT UPDATE, JUNE 2016— BLOG (Oregon Office of Economic Analysis)

This morning the Oregon Employment Department released the initial estimates for June 2016 in terms of jobs and the unemployment rate. Overall the data continue to bring good news, even as the unemployment rate ticked up a bit. The reason being is the state continues to add jobs and the labor force is growing. As shown below, our offices measures we use to gauge labor market slack continue to improve  certainly over the past year.

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COLUMBIA RIVER SOCKEYE SALMON RETURN IS FIFTH LARGEST SINCE 1938 (Seattle Times)

Here is the latest Columbia River sockeye data by state Fish and Wildlife:

The 333,997 sockeye counted at Bonneville Dam is the 5th highest through July 14th since at least 1938 updated count was 336,398 through Sunday, July 17.  The record are the 580,500 fish counted through July 14, 2014.

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OHA TO RELEASE 2017-2019 BUDGET AT MONTHS END (The Lund Report)

Proposed incentive programs for caregivers may offer more benefits to help deal with the workforce shortage in rural Oregon and for underserved populations in urban areas.

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CAN CHANGING HOW YOU THINK ABOUT PAIN LESSEN WHAT YOU FEEL? (The Lund Report)

Oregon has the fourth-highest rate of prescription pain killer abuse in the nation, so the state is implementing new guidelines that will require doctors to give lower doses and shorter prescriptions.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on July 20, 2016 OSL eClips

July 19, 2016 OSL eClips

State Library eClips

* Carole Smith stepping down immediately as Portland superintendent in wake of lead controversy
* University of Oregon passes $1 billion fundraising mark, has $1 billion to go
* UO settles lawsuit with 2 former health center whistleblowers for $425,000
* Lead in Portland school water: Investigation reveals ineptitude, dishonesty behind the flubs
* Adult obesity rates up 185 percent over last 50 years
* Think tank: Corporate tax measure would increase prices
* Fire season begins Thursday in Northwest Oregon
* Timing is right for pot tax — Opinion
* Industry’s forest health promise a hollow one — Guest Opinion
* Struggles over management, not lead, pushed Smith to retire early from Portland Public Schools
* Editorial: University leaders should open up their meetings — Opinion
* Fish face less stress this summer statewide
* State: All CO-OP members should find new policies
* Editorial: Legislature should stop the fake emergencies — Opinion
* Oregonian Turns To Heroin For Pain Relief After Opioid Prescription Cut
* Inmate At Oregon State Penitentiary Dies At Local Hospital
* Oregon Insurer Shuts Down
* U.S. House passes bill that prevents a Malheur County national monument
* Environmentalists shut out of Oregon forest litigation
* No lead detected in Morrow County schools
* Umatilla County will have fewer health insurance choices, higher premiums in 2017
* Pendleton floats boat launch idea
* Chinook salmon fishing season to close on Wallowa River
* Steelhead management area bill moves forward
* Our View: Oil train roulette in the Columbia Gorge — Opinion
* Our View: Another police levy try in Josephine County — Opinion
* Legacy of Asbestos
* Students find new ways to fund college
* Oregon dives into solving a statewide problem
* EPA Superfund gives North Ridge cleanup much-needed boost — Opinion
* Councilor explains position on wastewater project — Guest Opinion
* We’re the government … trust us — Opinion
* Animal versus animal as elk, dogs clash
* Editorial: Treaty rights without fish are meaningless — Opinion
* Editorial: Can we trust Union Pacific? — Opinion
* Editorial: Few excuses not to vote — Opinion
* Court rules no interveners in county vs. state lawsuit
* Editorial draft: The acid test for proposals on gun control — Opinion
* Editorial: Forest suit gets its first day in court — Opinion
* Editorial: University group should work in the open — Opinion
* Editorial: Vermont law opens new front in GMO fight — Opinion
* State officials tour forests with BLM, timber companies
* Classification committee members to review Tillamook County forestlands for wildlife protection
* How Many Countries Could You Fit Inside Oregon?

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CAROLE SMITH STEPPING DOWN IMMEDIATELY AS PORTLAND SUPERINTENDENT IN WAKE OF LEAD CONTROVERSY (Portland Oregonian)

Portland Superintendent Carole Smith announced Monday she is stepping down “now” in the wake of the lead controversy in Oregon’s largest school district.

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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON PASSES $1 BILLION FUNDRAISING MARK, HAS $1 BILLION TO GO (Portland Oregonian)

The University of Oregon is more than halfway to its goal of raising $2 billion to help pay for scholarships, new faculty positions, expanded research and athletic programs and construction projects on campus.

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UO SETTLES LAWSUIT WITH 2 FORMER HEALTH CENTER WHISTLEBLOWERS FOR $425,000 (Portland Oregonian)

Two former University of Oregon Counseling & Testing Center employees, who blew the whistle on a superior they said accessed an alleged rape victim’s health records without her consent, settled a lawsuit with the school Sunday.

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LEAD IN PORTLAND SCHOOL WATER: INVESTIGATION REVEALS INEPTITUDE, DISHONESTY BEHIND THE FLUBS (Portland Oregonian)

Portland Public Schools officials gave parents false assurances about the safety of their children’s drinking water for years while neglecting to properly test and track exposure, according to a local law firm’s investigation.

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ADULT OBESITY RATES UP 185 PERCENT OVER LAST 50 YEARS (Portland Oregonian)

The obesity rate has skyrocketed by more than 185 percent among American adults over the last 50 years, the Centers for Disease Control said Monday, and rates of extreme obesity among children have tripled during the same time period.

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THINK TANK: CORPORATE TAX MEASURE WOULD INCREASE PRICES (Salem Statesman Journal)

The corporate tax measure on the Oregon ballot this November would increase prices statewide, according to the Tax Foundation, a Washington, D.C. think tank.

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FIRE SEASON BEGINS THURSDAY IN NORTHWEST OREGON (Salem Statesman Journal)

Due to increasing fire danger, fire season will begin Thursday in the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Northwest district.

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TIMING IS RIGHT FOR POT TAX — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The Oregon Legislature opened a window of opportunity for local governments interested in skimming part of the take from the states fast-emerging recreational marijuana industry. Cities and counties can ask their voters to impose a 3 percent sales tax on recreational pot  and even if the taxes are approved, the net tax paid by marijuana consumers will go down a year from now. Then the window will close, and any new local taxes will add to the price of pot. The time for Lane County, the city of Eugene and other municipalities to act is now.

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INDUSTRY’S FOREST HEALTH PROMISE A HOLLOW ONE — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

A July 10 Register-Guard guest viewpoint, Forest health a priority for forest industry, begs the question: What is industry’s vision of forest health?

The forest industry uses forest health as a front to vindicate increased logging in our federal forests. It tells us our lush heritage forests, still filled with old trees, are sick and need more logging to become healthy again. How, one wonders, did the worlds greatest and richest temperate forests persist for eons in Oregon without the timber industry here to log them into health?

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STRUGGLES OVER MANAGEMENT, NOT LEAD, PUSHED SMITH TO RETIRE EARLY FROM PORTLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS (Portland Tribune)

Portland Public Schools  on track for a huge school construction bond measure, a major reconfiguration of its schools and, potentially, a windfall of new tax dollars  will have to navigate all of that without a familiar face at the helm.

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EDITORIAL: UNIVERSITY LEADERS SHOULD OPEN UP THEIR MEETINGS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The presidents of Oregon’s seven public universities  Portland State, Oregon State and University of Oregon, plus four smaller schools in Ashland, Klamath Falls, La Grande and Monmouth  are meeting together regularly behind closed doors.

That may, or may not, be legal.

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FISH FACE LESS STRESS THIS SUMMER STATEWIDE (Bend Bulletin)

-Central Oregon preparing for fish strandings that come in fall-

Last year around this time, extremely high temperatures caused problems for fish in waterways across the state.

In Central Oregon, fish kills occurred near the mouth of the Deschutes River and the Middle Fork of the John Day River, where bacteria thrived in the warmer water temperatures.

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STATE: ALL CO-OP MEMBERS SHOULD FIND NEW POLICIES (Bend Bulletin)

-Doomed carrier has 620 members in Central Oregon-

State regulators announced Monday that Oregon’s remaining health insurance carriers have agreed to take on Oregon’s Health CO-OP members and honor the contributions individual policyholders have made to their policies.

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EDITORIAL: LEGISLATURE SHOULD STOP THE FAKE EMERGENCIES — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

It was disheartening to learn Oregon lawmakers will go to Salem next January and, unless they’re willing to discipline themselves, spend the 2017 legislative session passing fake emergency legislation.

The effort to stop the practice of routinely tacking emergency clauses onto decidedly nonemergency legislation failed to gather enough signatures for the November ballot, the secretary of states office said recently.

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OREGONIAN TURNS TO HEROIN FOR PAIN RELIEF AFTER OPIOID PRESCRIPTION CUT (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

John is a carpenter, OPB is only using his first name for reasons that’ll become clear in this story.

John grew up in southern Oregon and for 20 years had a successful business installing kitchens. Then, in 2005, he was in a car crash. I mean, fractured my neck, fractured my back. I had to have my right shoulder replaced, he said.

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INMATE AT OREGON STATE PENITENTIARY DIES AT LOCAL HOSPITAL (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

An inmate at the Oregon State Penitentiary has died at a local hospital, but officials are not yet releasing any details.

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OREGON INSURER SHUTS DOWN (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon’s Health CO-OP will shut down at the end of this month and 20,000 Oregonians will have to find new health insurance plans.

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U.S. HOUSE PASSES BILL THAT PREVENTS A MALHEUR COUNTY NATIONAL MONUMENT (Capital Press)

An Interior Department funding bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives includes a provision that blocks a proposed national monument in Malheur County, Ore., that is strongly opposed by local ranchers and farmers.

The bill passed 231-196 July 14 and is headed to the Senate.

It includes a proposal by Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., that prevents funds from being used to create a national monument in Malheur County.

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ENVIRONMENTALISTS SHUT OUT OF OREGON FOREST LITIGATION (East Oregonian)

Environmental and fishing groups will be shut out from high-stakes litigation over Oregon’s forest management policies, according to a judges order.

Linn County Circuit Court Judge Daniel Murphy has denied a request by several non-profit organizations to intervene in the lawsuit, which seeks $1.4 billion from Oregon on behalf of multiple counties.

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NO LEAD DETECTED IN MORROW COUNTY SCHOOLS (East Oregonian)

The Morrow County School District has announced the results of lead testing in the districts drinking water. The testing occurred in June and indicated all sources of drinking water either had no lead detected or levels below the EPA limit of .020 milligrams per liter.

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UMATILLA COUNTY WILL HAVE FEWER HEALTH INSURANCE CHOICES, HIGHER PREMIUMS IN 2017 (East Oregonian)

Umatilla County citizens will have fewer health insurance carriers to choose from in 2017, and premiums will increase.

Four of the seven companies that offered individual coverage to Umatilla County citizens this year announced they are pulling out of the county next year, citing insufficient payments by the federal government to cover losses from high-risk customers.

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PENDLETON FLOATS BOAT LAUNCH IDEA (East Oregonian)

The Pendleton Development Commission is looking into a grant that could bring a boat launch to the Umatilla River.

Robb Corbett, Pendleton’s city manager and the executive director of the commission, said the launch could provide river access to swimmers, tubers, kayaks and small fishing boats.

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CHINOOK SALMON FISHING SEASON TO CLOSE ON WALLOWA RIVER (East Oregonian)

Chinook salmon fishing season will close Sunday, July 24 on the Wallowa River.

Jeff Yanke, district fish biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife in Enterprise, said water temperatures are beginning to rise in the river, which can have an impact on salmon and limit catch rates. Angler participation has also been very low for the fishery, Yanke said.

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STEELHEAD MANAGEMENT AREA BILL MOVES FORWARD (Medford Mail Tribune)

-Bill headed for debate in the U.S. Senate bears name of Umpqua conservationist Frank Moore-

A campaign to protect nearly 100,000 acres of the North Umpqua River Basin for wild steelhead and name it after one of the fish’s most ardent and iconic defenders is gathering traction in Congress.

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OUR VIEW: OIL TRAIN ROULETTE IN THE COLUMBIA GORGE — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

It was unsettling to learn that replacing puncture-prone oil tank cars used to haul explosive crude on the nation’s rail lines could take 15 years under current regulations. The refusal of federal safety officials to investigate last month’s fiery derailment in the Columbia Gorge is more alarming, coupled with the finding that regular track inspections failed to spot the faulty bolts that caused the crash.

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OUR VIEW: ANOTHER POLICE LEVY TRY IN JOSEPHINE COUNTY — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

Josephine County residents concerned about increasing lawlessness and decreasing police protection are hoping those trends will convince voters to approve a property tax levy to beef up sheriff’s patrols and restore jail capacity and juvenile detention. Residents of other counties, including this one, will be watching closely, because they are helping to pay for Oregon State Police troopers to pick up the slack.

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LEGACY OF ASBESTOS (Herald and News)

-North Ridge Superfund site-

It was a dream come true.

Almost.

When Arizona residents Richard and Susan Gibson married in April 1999, the two lived in separate homes. As a celebration of a new chapter in their lives, each sold their home and the newlywed couple honeymooned in Klamath Falls, shopping for property.

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STUDENTS FIND NEW WAYS TO FUND COLLEGE (Herald and News)

-Oregon Promise picking up steam-

Many students are now applying for the Oregon Promise  a program that makes the first two years of Oregon community college free  decreasing the number of applicants for Klamaths Advanced Diploma Program.

Both the Klamath County School District and the Klamath Falls City Schools District have had a drop in the number of students attending Klamath Community College through the ADP for the fall, 2016.

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OREGON DIVES INTO SOLVING A STATEWIDE PROBLEM (Herald and News)

Oregon has one of the highest rates of chronic absenteeism in the country, with one in five students routinely missing 10 percent of the school days. In a 180-day school year, that means missing 18 days, or nearly three weeks of school.

With these stark numbers in mind, the Oregon Chief Education Office dove into this topic, producing the 88-page Chronic Absenteeism Report.

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EPA SUPERFUND GIVES NORTH RIDGE CLEANUP MUCH-NEEDED BOOST — OPINION (Herald and News)

North Ridge Estates history has played a prominent role in Klamath Falls and we should be thankful its current chapter is finally drawing to a close.

Located at the top of Old Fort Road overlooking much of Klamath Falls, the areas past is woven into the history of Oregon Institute of Technology, which  two name changes ago  occupied the site before moving to its present site. At that time, the schools curriculum was built around such classes as watch repair and gun-smithing and aimed at veterans returning from World War II.

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COUNCILOR EXPLAINS POSITION ON WASTEWATER PROJECT — GUEST OPINION (The World)

The sky is not falling.

The World editorial staff has called upon four Coos Bay City Councilors to explain ourselves regarding a decision to request a law firm that specializing in waste water handling, to develop a proposal for private, best available technology and halt the citys expensive and antiquated plans for waste water treatment.

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WE’RE THE GOVERNMENT … TRUST US — OPINION (The World)

The saga of Coos Bays Wastewatergate got sinister this week.

In the process of our reporting, we thought it made perfect sense to ask the city for a copy of the contract or the written agreement for services from the San Francisco law firm Farella Braun and Martell. We also asked what the law firms hourly rate would be.

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ANIMAL VERSUS ANIMAL AS ELK, DOGS CLASH (Daily Astorian)

A pet whippet was trampled and killed by a herd of deer at the Reserve at Gearhart this month. In another incident reported to Gearhart Police, an elk kicked a dog and broke the dogs legs. A Little Beach resident said he saw a herd menace kayakers this month when they approached too close to the shore.

They will sometimes get aggressive, Wildlife Communications Coordinator Michelle Dennehy of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said. It can happen anytime. The advice for pets and people is to try to keep away.

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EDITORIAL: TREATY RIGHTS WITHOUT FISH ARE MEANINGLESS — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Fifty percent of nothing is nothing.

The fishing rights guaranteed to Indians by treaties and court decisions are meaningless if there are few fish to catch. These treaty tribes are entitled to half the salmon. But 50 percent of nothing is nothing. Tribal negotiators are increasingly insisting that there be actual flesh attached to the bare bones of treaty rights.

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EDITORIAL: CAN WE TRUST UNION PACIFIC? — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

Wyden and Merkley stand up to the railroads

There was a time in America when railroads were a sovereign power  close to being a fourth branch of government. Through their enormous land grants and economic clout, they made and broke communities in the 19th century, and they held sway in Washington, D.C.

Even today railroads have the power to hold communities and regions hostage.

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EDITORIAL: FEW EXCUSES NOT TO VOTE — OPINION (Daily Astorian)

One more attempt to make Oregon’s innovation universal

Oregon has led the way in eliminating cumbersome and overly restrictive processes for getting citizens registered to vote. Versions of the states automatic voter registration system ought to be extended nationwide.

U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley and U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer have introduced legislation to compel states to move to vote by mail.

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COURT RULES NO INTERVENERS IN COUNTY VS. STATE LAWSUIT (Albany Democrat Herald)

A group of environmental and wildlife advocacy groups will not be allowed to intervene in the $1.4 billion breach of contract lawsuit brought by Linn County against the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Linn County Circuit Court Judge Daniel Murphy issued his ruling Monday, a week after a 3-hour motions hearing.

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EDITORIAL DRAFT: THE ACID TEST FOR PROPOSALS ON GUN CONTROL — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Gov. Kate Brown last week ensured that gun control would be a contentious issue again next year in the 2017 Legislature, as she unveiled three legislative priorities and an executive order meant to tighten existing Oregon law.

We don’t have much issue with at least some parts of her executive order, but our sense is that her legislative priorities again will find some tough sledding when the Legislature convenes  and we’re not convinced that any of those ideas will do anything to make Oregon residents safer, which seems to us to be the acid test for any such proposal.

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EDITORIAL: FOREST SUIT GETS ITS FIRST DAY IN COURT — OPINION (Albany Democrat Herald)

Linn County’s $1.4 billion lawsuit over how the state of Oregon has managed forest trust lands got its first day in court this week, and a couple of themes started to come into focus.

First: This first day of court, in which Judge Daniel Murphy heard a barrage of motions from all sides, will be followed by many more days in courtrooms, and in different courtrooms throughout Oregon.

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EDITORIAL: UNIVERSITY GROUP SHOULD WORK IN THE OPEN — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

The presidents of Oregon’s public universities have created a new organization, complete with an executive director, in part to ensure that the state’s institutions of higher learning present a united front at the Legislature.

The organization, aptly dubbed the Oregon Public Universities Council of Presidents, last week announced its hiring of an executive director: Dana Richardson, deputy director of the state’s Higher Education Coordinating Commission and a former legislative director for Senate President Peter Courtney.

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EDITORIAL: VERMONT LAW OPENS NEW FRONT IN GMO FIGHT — OPINION (Corvallis Gazette-Times)

Do you remember the fight we had in Oregon over a ballot measure that would require that genetically modified foods carry a label to that effect? How about the fight in Benton County over an ordinance to ban genetically modified organisms?

Both measures were defeated by voters but not without a considerable battle.

The fight over GMO’s isn’t going away, though. As evidence, look to Vermont, which this month became the first state to require labels on genetically modified foods.

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STATE OFFICIALS TOUR FORESTS WITH BLM, TIMBER COMPANIES (Douglas County News-Review)

A handful of state lawmakers found out Thursday why its a logging practice  and not forestry itself  that gets called clear-cut.

Clear-cutting, pesticide sprays and the role of public land management were among many contentious forestry topics discussed at length during a guided tour of more than 40 people through the forests around Camas Valley.

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CLASSIFICATION COMMITTEE MEMBERS TO REVIEW TILLAMOOK COUNTY FORESTLANDS FOR WILDLIFE PROTECTION (Tillamook County Pioneer)

The Forestland Classification Committee for Tillamook County will hold its first meeting on Friday, July 29 in Tillamook to kick off a review of lands within the county to determine which should be classified as forestlands.

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HOW MANY COUNTRIES COULD YOU FIT INSIDE OREGON? (Willamette Week)

Turns out there are a lot more than you’d think.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on July 19, 2016 OSL eClips

July 18, 2016 eClips Weekend Edition

State Library eClips
* Proposals to limit emergency clauses and access to voter data fail to qualify for the November ballot
* Gov. Brown renews push for bills to curb gun violence
* How much would you make if you lived somewhere else in Oregon?
* Marijuana labs prepping for regulation and oversight; no lab licenses issued yet
* Summer steelhead season shines in the Portland metro area
* Oregon DEQ’s public-records run-around — Opinion
* It’s tougher to be a high-information voter in a low-transparency state — Opinion
* What Oregonians should know about the Zika virus — Guest Opinion
* Former Kitzhaber communications director files civil rights lawsuit over firing
* Pot: Edibles market has consequences for pets
* Act now to make fair, constitutional PERS reforms — Guest Opinion
* Oregon rail officials look to push high-speed passenger rail service into distant future
* State fire marshal says spontaneous combustion was cause of spectacular hay fire in Junction City
* Siuslaw forestry practices offer great example for Tongass — Guest Opinion
* Brown unveils plan to reduce gun violence
* Voter privacy, emergency clause initiatives fail to make ballot
* Brown unveils plan to reduce gun violence
* Toxic algae advisory lifted
* CO-OP announcement coming Monday
* Bend pot businesses wait for licenses
* Editorial: Court was right to quash Kitzhaber subpoena — Opinion
* Gov. Brown Announces Plan To Curb Gun Violence
* Fierce Predators Could Be Northwest’s Most Effective Fruit Protectors
* Providence Notifies 5,400 Oregon Patients Of Records Breach
* Gov. Brown Announces Plan To Curb Gun Violence
* Voter privacy, emergency clause initiatives fail to make ballot
* Our view: Rein in loose dogs — Opinion
* Other views: Gun safety is our responsibility — Guest Opinion
* Workers repaint ‘no live fish’ warnings along Rogue
* Petitioners urge county to reopen road to Golden and Silver Falls
* Fictional character appears to donate to sheriffs legal expense fund
* END GUN VIOLENCE: Gov. Brown issues plan
* Algae health alert lifted for Lake Billy Chinook

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PROPOSALS TO LIMIT EMERGENCY CLAUSES AND ACCESS TO VOTER DATA FAIL TO QUALIFY FOR THE NOVEMBER BALLOT (Portland Oregonian)

Supporters of a proposal to limit Oregon lawmakers’ use of emergency clauses failed to turn in enough signatures for the measure to qualify for the November ballot, the Secretary of State’s office announced on Friday.
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GOV. BROWN RENEWS PUSH FOR BILLS TO CURB GUN VIOLENCE (Portland Oregonian)

New gun-control legislation, after falling short during the 2016 legislative session, is again emerging as a controversial topic as lawmakers gear up for 2017 session.
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HOW MUCH WOULD YOU MAKE IF YOU LIVED SOMEWHERE ELSE IN OREGON? (Portland Oregonian)

If you live in the Portland metropolitan area, your salary is sure to be different than someone doing the same job in other parts of Oregon. Based on last year’s Department of Labor statistics, we broke down just how much your location impacts your paycheck.
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MARIJUANA LABS PREPPING FOR REGULATION AND OVERSIGHT; NO LAB LICENSES ISSUED YET (Portland Oregonian)

Starting Oct. 1, new products headed to marijuana dispensary shelves will have to undergo a battery of tests that assess potency and look for biological contaminants such as E. coli, residual solvents from the extraction process used to make oil, and dozens of pesticides.
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SUMMER STEELHEAD SEASON SHINES IN THE PORTLAND METRO AREA (Portland Oregonian)

A close friend’s name showed up on my caller ID late one recent afternoon.

“I’m standing over at least 100 salmon,” he said excitedly.
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OREGON DEQ’S PUBLIC-RECORDS RUN-AROUND — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

We trust that most people who read our editorials can understand common acronyms without extra hand-holding. What Oregonian doesn’t know, after all, that FBI stands for Federal Bureau of Investigation and OLCC for Oregon Liquor Control Commission?
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IT’S TOUGHER TO BE A HIGH-INFORMATION VOTER IN A LOW-TRANSPARENCY STATE — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Buckets of ink have been spilled over the years bemoaning the influence of low-information voters, who participate in the political process without being quite as informed as they should be. Such concern is certainly justified. But casting the blame entirely upon voters ignores the role government institutions and officials play in keeping them in the dark.
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WHAT OREGONIANS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE ZIKA VIRUS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

You’ve probably seen a lot of headlines about the Zika virus, but you may have some confusion about if and how Zika will affect you.
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FORMER KITZHABER COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR FILES CIVIL RIGHTS LAWSUIT OVER FIRING (Portland Oregonian)

A past communications director for former Gov. John Kitzhaber has filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against him, his fiance Cylvia Hayes, his chief of staff and a state investigator.
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POT: EDIBLES MARKET HAS CONSEQUENCES FOR PETS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Every month, a handful of comatose and semicomatose dogs are rushed into the VCA Salem Animal Hospital, their eyes stupor-like and their legs splayed. Sometimes they dribble urine and begin to vomit, as veterinarians keep a close eye on their reactions. In some cases, the animals inhale the vomit, contract pneumonia and die.
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ACT NOW TO MAKE FAIR, CONSTITUTIONAL PERS REFORMS — GUEST OPINION (Salem Statesman Journal)

In April, Gov. Kate Brown said there isn’t a path forward for addressing the looming Public Employee Retirement System crisis. A July 12 Statesman Journal article quotes the governors spokesperson as again brushing aside PERS reform, saying the state is severely limited in PERS reform options.
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OREGON RAIL OFFICIALS LOOK TO PUSH HIGH-SPEED PASSENGER RAIL SERVICE INTO DISTANT FUTURE (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Tentative plan would keep passenger trains on Union Pacific Railroad tracks-

The Oregon Department of Transportation spent four years and $10 million mulling where the Willamette Valley passenger rail line of the future should go and is about to decide that it should stay put, on the Union Pacific Railroad tracks, where the long-standing intermingling of passenger and freight service guarantees sluggish passenger service.
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STATE FIRE MARSHAL SAYS SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION WAS CAUSE OF SPECTACULAR HAY FIRE IN JUNCTION CITY (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Fire units leave premises, but smoldering likely to continue for several days-

The Oregon Fire Marshal has ruled that the fire that burned a $1.5 million hay harvest early Friday evening was caused by spontaneous combustion, Junction City Fire Capt. Jason Peterson said Sunday.
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SIUSLAW FORESTRY PRACTICES OFFER GREAT EXAMPLE FOR TONGASS — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The recent release of the U.S. Forest Services old growth logging plans for Alaskas Tongass National Forest stalls urgent climate change protections and relies on old school forestry.
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BROWN UNVEILS PLAN TO REDUCE GUN VIOLENCE (Portland Tribune)

Gov. Kate Brown has unveiled a multi-pronged plan for decreasing gun violence in the state.

The plan, Oregonians United to End Gun Violence, involves state legislation to close loopholes on existing gun control measures and executive orders to keep better records on gun transactions and gun-related deaths.
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VOTER PRIVACY, EMERGENCY CLAUSE INITIATIVES FAIL TO MAKE BALLOT (Portland Tribune)

Two initiative petitions one requiring written consent to release voter information and another to restrict the use of emergency clauses in legislation have failed to qualify for the November general election ballot.
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BROWN UNVEILS PLAN TO REDUCE GUN VIOLENCE (Portland Tribune)

Gov. Kate Brown has unveiled a multi-pronged plan for decreasing gun violence in the state.

The plan, Oregonians United to End Gun Violence, involves state legislation to close loopholes on existing gun control measures and executive orders to keep better records on gun transactions and gun-related deaths.
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TOXIC ALGAE ADVISORY LIFTED (Bend Bulletin)

The state has lifted a health warning for the Metolius and Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook because the level of blue-green algae toxins has decreased.

Water monitoring found the levels of toxins now fall below guidelines for human exposure, the Oregon Health Authority said in a news release Friday.
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CO-OP ANNOUNCEMENT COMING MONDAY (Bend Bulletin)

Oregon’s Department of Consumer and Business Services will release information pertinent to Oregon’s Health CO-OP individual health insurance policyholders on Monday, a spokesman for the department said Friday.

State regulators announced last week they were taking action to shutter the embattled company at the end of this month after learning it owed about $900,000 to a federal risk adjustment program.

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BEND POT BUSINESSES WAIT FOR LICENSES (Bend Bulletin)

-OLCC says its building regulatory structure for the long haul-

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission had issued 132 licenses to recreational marijuana businesses as of Thursday, none, so far, in Bend.

The agency is working its way down the list and expects a relatively straightforward process once it starts processing applications from indoor growers and established medical marijuana dispensary owners, an OLCC spokesman said.

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EDITORIAL: COURT WAS RIGHT TO QUASH KITZHABER SUBPOENA — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit issued an opinion this week that was a victory of sorts for former Gov. John Kitzhaber. The opinion quashed a subpoena for his emails in personal accounts that were saved by the state.
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GOV. BROWN ANNOUNCES PLAN TO CURB GUN VIOLENCE (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced an executive order Friday, ordering Oregon State Police to maintain a database of firearms transactions for five years after the sale. She also ordered state police to notify local law enforcement agencies if a person who is prohibited from buying a gun tries to do so.

Gun violence is terrorizing America, tearing apart the very fabric of our communities and our families, Brown said.
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FIERCE PREDATORS COULD BE NORTHWEST’S MOST EFFECTIVE FRUIT PROTECTORS (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Over orchards and vineyards across the Northwest, European starlings are eating fruit to the tune of hundreds of thousands of dollars per year. And when the traditional methods of keeping the birds away like scarecrows, pyrotechnics and netting don’t work, its time to call Falcon Force.

Its a company run by Vah Alaverdian that offers raptors for hire. Alaverdian has been a lifelong falconer and started doing abatement work professionally in 2009.

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PROVIDENCE NOTIFIES 5,400 OREGON PATIENTS OF RECORDS BREACH (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Providence Health & Services in Oregon is notifying about 5,400 current and former patients that a former employee may have improperly accessed their patient records.
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GOV. BROWN ANNOUNCES PLAN TO CURB GUN VIOLENCE (Jefferson Public Radio)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced an executive order Friday, ordering Oregon State Police to maintain a database of firearms transactions for five years after the sale. She also ordered state police to notify local law enforcement agencies if a person who is prohibited from buying a gun tries to do so.
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VOTER PRIVACY, EMERGENCY CLAUSE INITIATIVES FAIL TO MAKE BALLOT (East Oregonian)

Two initiative petitions one requiring written consent to release voter information and another to restrict the use of emergency clauses in legislation have failed to qualify for the November general election ballot.

The campaign for Initiative Petition 49, No More Fake Emergencies Act, failed to submit enough signatures to reach the 117,578 threshold for a constitutional change to the law. The act would have required a two-thirds majority vote in the Legislature to declare an emergency when it passes a bill.

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OUR VIEW: REIN IN LOOSE DOGS — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Eastern Oregon has a problem with domesticated animals on the loose. They pose a danger to residents and tie up emergency personnel who have better things to do.

Just last month, a Hermiston woman was attacked by two dogs near the Diagonal Road walking trail, outside of city limits in the jurisdiction of Umatilla County. The dogs left her with wounds on her hands and shoulder that required more than 20 stitches.

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OTHER VIEWS: GUN SAFETY IS OUR RESPONSIBILITY — GUEST OPINION (East Oregonian)

We are Oregonians. We are life-long gun owners, hunters and military veterans. Recently we came together around a common belief that there are sensible ways to reduce gun violence and protect the rights of law-abiding gun owners. We grew up using guns for hunting, personal protection, recreation and as part of our military service. And like many Oregonians, we have been wounded by the blast of gun violence in our families and communities.
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WORKERS REPAINT ‘NO LIVE FISH’ WARNINGS ALONG ROGUE (Medford Mail Tribune)

A group of young people are busy all week repainting messages on Rogue River boat ramps that aim to keep invasive fish from Oregon’s waterways.

“No live fish in, no live fish out” is being repainted 19 times, mostly on the Rogue River from Chinook Park above Grants Pass to Grave Creek 30 miles downstream.
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PETITIONERS URGE COUNTY TO REOPEN ROAD TO GOLDEN AND SILVER FALLS (The World)

People longing to visit Golden and Silver Falls State Natural Area are frustrated that the county road to the falls has been closed for more than two years.
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FICTIONAL CHARACTER APPEARS TO DONATE TO SHERIFFS LEGAL EXPENSE FUND (Blue Mountain Eagle)

The legal expense trust fund for Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer, who is being investigated by the Oregon Department of Justice, received more than $20,000 in donations between April and June, including one that appears to be from a fictional character with a false address.
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END GUN VIOLENCE: GOV. BROWN ISSUES PLAN (St. Helens Chronicle)

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has announced “Oregonians United to End Gun Violence,” a plan to address gun safety in Oregon and across the country.
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ALGAE HEALTH ALERT LIFTED FOR LAKE BILLY CHINOOK (KTVZ Bend)

-Lower levels confirmed; pet caution still advised-

The Oregon Health Authority said Friday it has lifted the health advisory issued July 1 and extended July 8 for the Metolius and Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook 12 miles west of Madras in Jefferson County.
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State Library eClips Blog & Disclaimer: http://library.state.or.us/blogs/eClips/wordpress

For State Library Patron access to Statesman Journal Articles & other Oregon
newspapers: http://bit.ly/1IjlkDj

To subscribe/unsubscribe visit: http://library.state.or.us/services/awareness/eclips

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